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  • 1. Backlund Rambaree, Brita
    et al.
    Davies, P.
    Ponian, C.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    People in Micro Businesses & The Blue Bay Marine Park: An Analysis of Knowledge, Attitudes and Perceived Benefits2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Magnusson, Peter
    et al.
    Centre for Research and Development, Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden; Cardiology Research Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kihlström, Gabriella
    Centre for Research and Development, Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden.
    Wallhagen, Marita
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Life‐threatening peripartum cardiomyopathy — not expected when expecting2019In: Clinical Case Reports, E-ISSN 2050-0904, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 1127-1132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is challenging to diagnose as it mimics symptoms present in normal pregnancy. The clinical course and prognosis are various. In selected cases, a cardioverter implantable defibrillator with/without cardiac resynchronization therapy, mechanical ventricular assist device treatment, and transplantation is indicated.

  • 3.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Abductive Thematic Network Analysis (ATNA) using ATLAS-ti2018In: Innovative Research Methodologies in Management: Volume I: Philosophy, Measurement and Modelling / [ed] L. Moutinho & M. Sokele, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, 1, p. 61-86Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter introduces Abductive Thematic Network Analysis (ATNA) as a methodological approach for qualitative data analysis. It starts by providing a brief description on abductive theory of method and thematic analysis method. Then, it highlights how the two methods are combined to create ATNA. Using a qualitative data set, this chapter demonstrates the steps in undertaking ATNA with a computer-aided qualitative data analysis software—ATLAS-ti v.7.5. The chapter concludes that ATNA provides to researchers a much-needed pragmatic and logical way of reasoning, organising, and presenting qualitative data analysis.

  • 4. Rambaree, Komalsingh
    Analysing Photographic Evidence through Atlas-ti: An Innovative Approach to Qualitative Social Research2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    Department of Social Studies, Faculty of Social Studies and Humanities, University of Mauritius, Réduit.
    Bringing Rigour in Qualitative Social Research: The Use of a CAQDAS2007In: University of Mauritius Research Journal, ISSN 1694-0342, Vol. 13A, no 1, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Computer Aided Qualitative Data Analysis Software (CAQDAS) is becoming an essential tool for a number of social scientists. Particularly, CAQDAS allow for a more rapid and rigorous qualitative data analysis. Over the past few decades, a variety of software that falls under the CAQDAS umbrella has emerged in the market. In this context, this paper focuses on one of the software - Atlas-ti 5.0- to describe its use as a tool for enhancing rigour in qualitative social research. The paper describes why and how Atlas-ti 5.0 has been used for data analysis in an exemplar qualitative social research on the ecology of the Mauritian early adolescents’ Internet-mediated dating/romance. It also considers some critics related to the essentials of rigour in qualitative social research. Finally, it outlines the use of Atlas-ti 5.0 for bringing rigour in the exemplar research.

  • 6.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Sociology/Social work.
    Children and the Janus-faced Internet: Social Policy Implications for Mauritius as a Developing Country Case Study2010In: High-Tech Tots: Childhood in a Digital World / [ed] I, Berson and M. Berson, Charlotte, USA: Information Age Publishing , 2010, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Sociology/Social work.
    Community participation within integrated coastal zone management in Western Indian Ocean Countries: A factor analysis of perceived benefits and barriers2011In: Journal of Environmental Research and Development, ISSN 0973-6921, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 147-154Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Computer-aided deductive critical discourse analysis of a case study from Mauritius with ATLAS-ti 6.22015In: Research Methods: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications, Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2015, 1, Vol. 4-4, p. 1831-1853Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter considers computer-aided deductive critical discourse analysis with ATLAS-ti 6.2 using a case study on eco-social work research from Mauritius. Data for this case study were gathered in digital audio format from eight focus group discussions, three semi-structured interviews and various reports from secondary sources. For the analysis, a literature review using ATLAS-ti was first carried out, in order to develop a conceptual/theoretical framework related to eco-social work. Then, the gathered data were directly plugged into ATLAS-ti for a computer-aided deductive critical discourse analysis using the developed eco-social work conceptual/theoretical framework from the literature review. Using the case study as an example, this chapter (a) demonstrates the techniques, and (b) appraises the opportunities, limitations and challenges of computer-aided critical discourse analysis. 

  • 9.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Computer-Aided Deductive Critical Discourse Analysis of a Case Study from Mauritius with ATLAS-ti 6.22014In: Innovative Methods and Technologies for Electronic Discourse Analysis / [ed] Hwee Ling Lim & Fay Sudweeks, Hershey PA, USA: IGI Global, 2014, 1, p. 346-368Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter considers computer-aided deductive critical discourse analysis with ATLAS-ti 6.2 using a case study on eco-social work research from Mauritius. Data for this case study were gathered in digital audio format from eight focus group discussions, three semi-structured interviews and various reports from secondary sources. For the analysis, a literature review using ATLAS-ti was first carried out, in order to develop a conceptual/theoretical framework related to eco-social work. Then, the gathered data were directly plugged into ATLAS-ti for a computer-aided deductive critical discourse analysis using the developed eco-social work conceptual/theoretical framework from the literature review. Using the case study as an example, this chapter (a) demonstrates the techniques, and (b) appraises the opportunities, limitations and challenges of computer-aided critical discourse analysis.

  • 10.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Eco-social work for poverty alleviation in coastal areas of Mauritius: from research to practice.2016Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Instrumentalism and Environmental Justice: People’s Cooperative Renewable Energy in Mauritius2017In: The Ecosocial Transition of Societies: The Contribution of Social Work and Social Policy / [ed] Aila-Leena Matthies and Kati Närhi, New York: Routledge, 2017, 1, p. 121-136Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social work is commonly known as an agent of social change for achieving social justice. In fact, social justice is one of the founding values of social work. Several researchers have conceptualized social justice from distributional, recognitional and associational dimensions, in order to allow for a broader understanding of freedom from oppression, exploitation, marginalization, powerlessness, cultural imperialism and violence (Young 1990, Fraser 1997, Gewirtz 2006). However, Morgaine (2014) argues that social justice as a concept remains valueless unless social workers have clear practical orientations towards its use for achieving emancipation/liberation of the marginalized, vulnerable individuals and groups from injustices and oppressive agencies, forces as well as structures.

  • 12.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology.
    Integrated Coastal Zone Management Training Demand & Supply Assessment in Mauritius2009Report (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Sociology/Social work.
    Internet and Early Adolescent Sexuality2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    University of Mauritius.
    Internet, Sexuality and Development: Putting Early Adolescents First2009In: International Journal of Environmental, Cultural, Economic and Social Sustainability, ISSN 1832-2077, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 105-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Like many other countries, Mauritius has experienced some major socioeconomic changes as a result of its advancement towards a technology-based society. Such socio-economic changes are indeed impacting on people’s life. Given that early adolescents represent an important section of the future generation, this study focuses on this specific population to look at issues related to the Internet, sexuality and development in Mauritius. Within this context, using Altas-ti 5.0 (a computer aided qualitative data analysis software) a thematic network analysis of 136 narratives and 8 focus group discussions of Mauritian early adolescents (10-14 years old) is carried out to answer the following research questions: How do Mauritian early adolescents access the Internet? What do they use the Internet for? How do they perceive the Internet? What is the nature of their sexual interactions over the Internet? Finally, the paper also considers some indications about future directions for public policy on the Internet, sexuality and development in Mauritius.

  • 15.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    University of Mauritius.
    Internet-Mediated Dating/Romance of Mauritian Early Adolescents: A Grounded Theory Analysis2008In: International Journal of Emerging Technologies and Society, ISSN 1863-0383, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 34-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focused on describing the ecology of Mauritian early adolescents’ Internet- mediated dating/romance. It used a grounded theory analysis of 136 narrative interviews and eight focus group discussions from Mauritian early adolescents (10-14 years old). The main findings were that (a) within a conservative society like Mauritius, cyberspace has become the new secret environment for early adolescents to experience, understand, learn and fantasise dating/romantic behaviour; (b) Internet-mediated dating/romantic patterns described by the early adolescents in Mauritius is somewhat similar to those patterns identified in face-to-face dating/romance within the western context; (c) contrary to some common beliefs, Mauritian early adolescents’ Internet-mediated dating/romance is not idealised by sexual activities, but rather by the approval of their parents for relationships, marriage and having children.

  • 16.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Sociology/Social work.
    Social Work and Sustainable Development : Local Voices from 'Maurice Ile Durable'2012In: Joint World Conference on Social Work and Social Development: Abstract book, 2012, p. 274-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The island of Mauritius is a well-known tourist destination. It has a land surface area of 1,860 square kilometers with a coastline of 177 kilometers, and a total human population of about 1.2 million. Within the context of sustainable development initiatives, the current government launched a project called ‘Maurice Ile Durable’ in 2008. Within this particular context, social workers are often being called upon to work on sustainable social development programmes, such as community empowerment for Integrated Coastal Zone Management (IZCM). Social work has a long tradition of using theoretical perspectives for analysing social problems as well as guiding decision-making for interventions and practice. The aim of the paper is to present an analysis of the voices gathered from the local ICZM stakeholders, using a critical eco-social work perspective, in order to identify important sectors for eco-social work interventions. This paper is based on qualitative data collected from 2009 to 2011 for three different ICZM research projects. The data set consist of 8 focus group discussions with influential local inhabitants from 8 key coastal villages, and 24 semi-structured face-to-face interviews with leaders of national non-governmental and governmental organisations involved in ICZM programmes in Mauritius. Atlas-ti 6.2, a computer aided qualitative data analysis software, has been utilised to carry out a critical discourse analysis of the gathered data. From the analysis of the gathered voices, the discussion on findings is focused on three key sectors for critical eco-social work within ICZM programmes in Mauritius. These keys sectors are; access to coastal resources, redistribution of national benefits from the tourism industry, and community empowerment through the ‘National Empowerment Programme’. The conclusion of the paper is based on the implications for anti-oppressive and emancipatory social work practice within the promotion of sustainable social development in Mauritius.

  • 17.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Social Work and Sustainable Development: Local Voices from Mauritius2013In: Australian Social Work, ISSN 0312-407X, E-ISSN 1447-0748, Vol. 66, no 2, p. 261-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable development is much more than an ecological and economic concern; it requires social workers to analyse and understand its impact on the broader social and cultural aspects of human life. Mauritius has been branded as ‘Maurice Ile Durable’ (Sustainable Mauritius) by its current government. Within this context, Mauritian social workers are often called upon to engage in sustainable development programs through community empowerment and development activities. This article uses the eco-critical social work theoretical approach to analyse a subset of qualitative data generated by a larger study conducted in 2008 and 2011, which included focus groups and semistructured interviews. Based on the findings of this research, the article focuses on discourses related to concepts such as control, power, and exploitation. It considers three areas as influential to eco-critical social work in Mauritius: antioppressive practice, promotion of social justice, and critical thinking by exploring related concepts such as control, power, and exploitation. The author concludes that within the context of sustainable development more attention should be paid to promoting social justice through tackling the marginalisation and oppression of certain sections of its population.

  • 18.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Sociology/Social work.
    Social Work in Rural Communities: A Case study of Empowerment Interventions for the Eradication of Absolute Poverty in Southeast Rural Coastal Villages of Mauritius2011In: Social Work in Rural Communities / [ed] L. Ginsberg, Virginia, USA: Council of Social Work Education , 2011, 5, p. 39-67Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology.
    Stakeholders analysis for Integrated Coastal Zone Management in Mauritius2008Report (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Stray Dogs and Social Work in Mauritius: An Analysis of Some Concerns and Challenges2014In: Animals in social work: why and how they matter / [ed] Thomas Ryan, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014, p. 182-198Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    The Ecology of Early Adolescents’ Internet Mediated Sexual Interactions2014In: Encyclopedia of Information Science and Technology / [ed] Mehdi Khosrow-Pour, Hershey, PA, USA: IGI Global, 2014, 3, p. 6781-6790Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early adolescents (11-14 years old) are normally considered to be no longer children, but not yet adults (World Health Organisation, 2003). Early adolescence is usually characterised as a period when sexual, physical, emotional, and psychological changes, begin to happen. LeCroy (2004) opines that early adolescence is a period of multiple, rapid, and profound changes and transitions. During early adolescence puberty increases body awareness, and may initiate the sex drive.

    Historically, the academic focus on early adolescence as a critical and vital period emerged from a belief that during this particular phase young people are still innocent and with a potential which required cultivation, protection and guidance (Holloway & Valentine, 2003). In addition, there is also a common conviction among the general public that this particular nature of early adolescence must be controlled by responsible members of society; as young people at these ages are more likely to get involved in unconventional beliefs, behaviours and practices mainly coming through the persuasive influences of the media (Troen, 1985; Williams & Frith, 1993; Coleman & Hendry, 1999; Heins, 2001). It has often been argued that media1 represent some of the most under-recognized and most potent influences on adolescent’s development in modern society (Mastronardi, 2003; Strasburger, 2004; Lwin & Malik, 2012; Spurr, Berry & Walker, 2013; Vandenbosch, L. & Eggermont, 2013). In some cases, it has even been found that media have stronger influence on the early adolescents than family and other social relationships (Johnston, 2000).

    In contemporary society early adolescents are in many ways the defining users of Internet (Subrahmanyam & Smahel, 2011; Rambaree, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010). It is also being argued that Internet, through its interactive multi-media interface, has created a new pattern and form of interaction that requires more involvement of early adolescents (Subrahmanyam & Smahel, 2011; Lwin & Malik, 2012; Vandenbosch, L. & Eggermont, 2013). Given the high frequency at which adolescents are using Internet-based technology, it is not surprising that that such interactions may not always be positive (Zweig, Dank, Yahner & Lachman, 2013). In fact, Internet and its relationship with early adolescents have been viewed from two different perspectives. The pessimistic view is that early adolescents become victims of the pervasive and powerful Internet; and, the optimistic view is that Internet contributes immensely towards empowering children and early adolescents and making them more creative and knowledgeable than ever before (United Nations, 2003).

  • 22.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    University of Mauritius, Réduit, Mauritius.
    The Ecology of Sexuality in a Mauritian Internet Chat Room (MICR): An Internet Mediated Research (IMR)2004Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mauritius is advancing, with a strong determination, towards a technology-based society. Consequently, young people are very much attracted by the new technologies, such as mobile phone, computer, and computer-based technologies. Recent data, for example the IT Household Survey - carried out by NCB (2000) - clearly show that adolescents are the age group that uses Internet the most, at home ; and e-mail/chat is the top of the list of purposes for using the Internet. It is also a well-known fact, that sexuality is a dominant theme over the Internet, and especially on the Chat Rooms . Personal observation, of the Mauritian Chat Rooms, has also revealed that sexuality is commonly expressed over the Internet. In this context, this research aims to explore how sexuality is being framed, communicated, deconstructed, and understood by the Mauritian chat users. The specific set research questions, for the qualitative study, are: (a) what types of sexuality related information are shared (b) how sexuality related information are framed, expressed, deconstructed and understood over the chat rooms, and (c) what are the implications of ‘sexuality on the Internet’ for the Mauritian policy-makers?

      This paper also presents an innovative approach to qualitative social research using modern technological tools. Particularly, Hewson et al. (2003) point out that IMR offers researchers the potential to reach a vast number of participants from unlimited distance cheaply and time-efficiently. Moreover, the data, collected from the chat rooms, are directly being plugged into Atlas-ti for the content / discourse analysis purpose, thereby saving time and money incurred in transcribing. It is also worth noting that ethical issues such as informed consent of all stakeholders, no access and sharing of pornography related materials, and several other principles of social research, for example, autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficience and veracity, are being seriously considered, in this particular study.

  • 23.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Sociology/Social work.
    The Internet Mediated Sex Consumptions of Mauritian Teenagers: Heroes And Victims2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    University of Mauritius.
    The Mauritian Employment Relation Act 2008 and Social Justice: A Critical Discourse Analysis2009In: South African Journal of Labour Relations, ISSN 0379-8410, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 1-22Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Three Methods of Qualitative Data Analysis Using ATLAS.ti: ‘A Posse Ad Esse’2013In: ATLAS.ti User Conference 2013: Fostering Dialog on Qualitative Methods / [ed] S. Friese and T. G. Ringmayr, Berlin: Universitätsverlag der TU Berlin, 2013, Vol. 1, p. 1-15Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article appraises the possibilities, limitations and challenges in undertaking three different methods of qualitative data analysis using ATLAS.ti. The discussion is based on three different research projects carried out from 2004 to 2012. In the first project, a grounded theory analysis of data collected in 2004 was carried out using an inductive approach to make a theoretical proposition on Mauritian early adolescents’ internet-mediated dating pattern. In the second project, an abductive thematic network analysis was carried out using qualitative data collected in 2006 from Kenya and Zambia on adolescent sexual and reproductive health. In the third project, a deductive critical discourse analysis was carried out using an eco-social work research from Mauritius, undertaken in 2012. This article concludes that ATLAS.ti presents numerous possibilities for researchers to carry out different methods of qualitative data analysis. However, there are certain limitations and challenges that need to be considered by the researchers when undertaking computer assisted qualitative data analysis.

  • 26.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Sociology/Social work.
    Why it is Difficult to Eradicate Chronic Poverty?: A Case Study from Mauritius2011In: Poverty alleviation strategies: experiences and new ideas: Proceedings, Ankara: General Directorate of Social Assistance and Solidarity , 2011, , p. 217-241p. 217-241Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27. Rambaree, Komalsingh
    Young Girls and Sexual Rights: A Reflection on the Current Mauritian Society2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Sociology/Social work.
    Young People and Cybersex in a Sexually Conservative Society: A Case Study from Mauritius2011In: Youth Culture and Net Culture: Online Social Practices / [ed] Elza Dunkels, Gun-Marie Franberg and Camilla Hallgren, Hershey, USA: IGI Global Publishing , 2011, 1, p. 171-189Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Ahmadi, Fereshteh
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Eco-social work for sustainable development: Implications for social work education, practice and research2017In: A good life for all: Essays on sustainability celebrating 60 years of making life better / [ed] Fagerström, Arne and Cunnigham, Gary M., Mjölby: Atremi AB , 2017, 1, p. 71-94Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the context of sustainable development, social workers have important roles to play towards the eco-social transformation of society. This chapter starts by justifying how social work and sustainable development are linked. Then, it defines eco-social work and considers implications for education, research and practice of social work. The chapter provides examples of how the social work unit at the University of Gävle contributes to sustainable development through its education, research and community engagement. The chapter concludes that sustainable development is an area  of legitimate focus for social workers, and sustainability is a core social mission of social work.

  • 30. Rambaree, Komalsingh
    et al.
    Auchoybur, N.
    Kistamah, A.
    Rajcomar, R.
    Sports Participation and Perceived Health: A study of undergraduate users and non-users of the University of Mauritius Gymnasium2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    et al.
    University of Mauritius, Réduit, Mauritius.
    Backlund Rambaree, Brita
    University of Mauritius, Réduit, Mauritius.
    Higher Education (HE) for Voluntary Social Workers (VSWs) in Mauritius: Beneficiaries´ Personal Motivation and their Perceived Contribution towards the National Millennium Development Goals (NMDGs)2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Berg, Maria
    Save the Children - Sweden.
    Thomson, Robert
    Policy Adviser, Swiss Government, Switzerland.
    A Framework for Youth Work with Refugees: Analysis Further To The Expert Seminar "Journeys To A New Life: Understanding The Role Of Youth Work In Integrating Young Refugees In Europe"2017In: "Journeys to a New Life": an expert seminar on the role of youth work in integration of young refugees in Europe, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Faxelid, Elisabeth
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Considering Abductive Thematic Network Analysis with ATLAS-ti 6.22013In: Advancing Research Methods with New Technologies / [ed] Natalie Sappleton, Hershey PA, USA: IGI Global, 2013, 1, p. 170-186Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social research carried out through the use of new media technologies can generate large volumes of qualitative data. A systematic and rigorous approach is therefore important in analysing large volumes of qualitative data. Computer-aided qualitative data analysis programmes—such as Atlas-ti 6.2—have managed to facilitate the process of data analysis, to some extent. However, researchers remain central in designing and deciding how the qualitative data gathered as evidence from the field are to be analysed, interpreted, and presented. Within this context, this chapter aims to consider Abductive Thematic Network Analysis (ATNA) with Atlas-ti 6.2 as a systematic way of carrying out qualitative data analysis. A data set from a study on Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health is used as an example for facilitating the explanation on the steps in carrying out, and for providing an illustration of the outcome of, ATNA. The objectives of this chapter are to make a brief presentation of abductive approach to social research, describe ATNA, and demonstrate the techniques for such an analysis using Atlas-ti 6.2. The chapter concludes that ATNA can be a useful systematic way to proceed with qualitative data analysis that can be facilitated by the use of Atlas-ti 6.2.

  • 34.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Sociology/Social work.
    Karlsson, Lis-Bodil
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Sociology/Social work.
    Teaching and Learning of Social Work through Autobiographic Literatures2012In: International Journal of Learning, ISSN 1447-9494, E-ISSN 1447-9540, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 17-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Like many other subjects and disciplines, the teaching and learning of social work is also based on the notion of engaging learners through different levels of Bloom’s (1956) taxonomy of learning - cognitive, affective and psycho-motor. From this theoretical perspective, teachers responsible for developing social work curricula usually look for different materials and methods for transferring social work knowledge and skills that touches the three essential domains of teaching and learning. Within this context, this paper considers the use of autobiographic literatures as a material and method for transferring social work knowledge and skills to learners through the three learning domains. Through a discourse analysis of students’ perceptions on making use of autobiographic literatures in a research methodology course, this paper answers two specific research questions: (a.) how social work learners relate to autobiographic literatures as a learning material and (b.) how autobiographic literatures could effectively be used within teaching and learning of social work. The analysis of the learners’ perspective from this study reveals that autobiographic literatures are interesting, informative and helpful materials for teaching and learning of both theories and practice of social work. However, teachers responsible for designing social work teaching curricula should ensure that methodologically the materials and methods engage the learners at different learning domains for the learning of both theories and practice of social work. The paper also supports the view that materials and methods in teaching and learning of social work should be rigorously evaluated with more focus given to the learners’ insights as part of a more participatory curriculum review.

  • 35.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Sociology/Social work.
    Karlsson, Lis-Bodil
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Sociology/Social work.
    Teaching and Learning of Social Work through Autobiographic Literatures2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Like many other subjects and disciplines, the teaching and learning of social work is also based on the notion of engaging learners through different levels of Bloom’s (1956) taxonomy of learning - cognitive, affective and psycho-motor. From this theoretical perspective, teachers responsible for developing social work curricula usually look for different materials and methods for transferring social work knowledge and skills that touches the three essential domains of teaching and learning. Within this context, this paper considers the use of autobiographic literatures as a material and method for transferring social work knowledge and skills to learners through the three learning domains. Through a discourse analysis of students’ perceptions on making use of autobiographic literatures in a research methodology course, this paper answers two specific research questions: (a.) how social work learners relate to autobiographic literatures as a learning material and (b.) how autobiographic literatures could effectively be used within teaching and learning of social work. The analysis of the learners’ perspective from this study reveals that autobiographic literatures are interesting, informative and helpful materials for teaching and learning of both theories and practice of social work. However, teachers responsible for designing social work teaching curricula should ensure that methodologically the materials and methods engage the learners at different learning domains for the learning of both theories and practice of social work. The paper also supports the view that materials and methods in teaching and learning of social work should be rigorously evaluated with more focus given to the learners’ insights as part of a more participatory curriculum review.

  • 36.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Knez, Igor
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Psychology.
    Effects of Ethnicity and Gender on Youth Health2016In: Cogent Social Sciences, E-ISSN 2331-1886, Vol. 2, no 1, article id 1186136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the effects of ethnicity and gender on the health of young people (14–25 years old) living in Mauritius. Combinations of female and male by four ethnic groups—“Creole”, “Hindu”, “Muslim” and “Mixed”—were used for multivariate analysis of variances. “Mixed” ethnic group consumed most to-bacco, alcohol and drugs compared to other ethnic groups. They were also the ones that mostly skipped breakfast and lunch and were found to eat most fast food. Moreover, “Mixed” ethnic group had heard most about HIV/AIDS programmes, but were least satisfied with such programmes and with public hospitals and health services. Females were shown to perceive more physical and mental health issues than did males; although males smoked more cigarettes and drunk more alcohol. However, females consumed more fast food and deep fries and rated public hospi-tals and sexual and reproductive health services as less good than did males. The findings call for further research on the health of young people living in Mauritius with respect to socio-economic variables in order to promote social justice in the Mauritian society. In addition, this article also emphasises on the need of having a new National Youth Policy for Mauritius, which is long overdue.

  • 37.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Knez, Igor
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Psychology.
    Young people’s identity & Facebook behaviour: the role of gender and ethnicity2017In: Cogent Social Sciences, E-ISSN 2331-1886, Vol. 1, no 35, article id 1359895Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to investigate the effects of gender and ethnicity on Facebook visit and identity among young people (14–25 years old) living in Mauritius. According to the results obtained, males were shown to visit more Facebook and had a stronger Facebook identity than did females. However, females compared to males considered themselves to be persons that are more similar online as offline, and their Facebook activity represented more who they were than it did for males. Hindu participants were shown to most infrequently visit Facebook. They were also the group with the weakest Facebook identity. Creole and Muslim groups were reported to have the strongest Facebook identity followed by the Mixed participants. This study concludes that both gender and ethnicity might have a sig-nificant impact on Facebook activity and identification among young people.

  • 38.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Sociology/Social work.
    Knez, Igor
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Psychology. University of Gävle.
    Auchoybur, Nashad
    University of Mauritius.
    Gender and Health in Higher Education: A Study of Undergraduates from University of Mauritius2012In: Jenda: A Journal of Culture and African Women Studies, ISSN 1530-5686, E-ISSN 1530-5686, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 25-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores health among men and women from the undergraduates at the University of Mauritius. A representative sample of 250 undergraduates was selected from the register of the University of Mauritius using stratified random sampling strategy to carry out Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVAs) which demonstrated significant differences between men and women from the study group. The study found that women reported more physical and mental health problems as compared to men. In addition, there were significant differences between men and women in terms of awareness about sexual health risks which were mainly related to promiscuity and the use of condoms. Moreover, there were significant differences between men and women in terms of consumption of alcohol and cigarettes, as well as participation in sports activities. Finally, it was found that more men reported about facing barriers such as money and location with regards to access to health care services. This paper therefore concludes that gender could explain most of the significant differences in terms of health among the undergraduates at the University of Mauritius.

  • 39.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Mousavi, Fariba
    Freelance Researcher, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ahmadi, Fereshteh
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Sports participation and drug use among young people in Mauritius2018In: International Journal of Adolescence and Youth, ISSN 0267-3843, E-ISSN 2164-4527, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 188-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between drug use and sports participation among young people (14–25 years old) living in Mauritius. Data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire from a stratified sample of young people residing in Mauritius. According to the results, the strongest predictor of reporting drug use was age, recording an odds ratio of 2.50 and showing a positive effect. Drug usage was a negative predictor, meaning that the more use of drug, the less sport activity. In addition, gender predicted the respondents’ sports activity. This article concludes that sports can protect young people in Mauritius from getting into drug use, and policy-makers should focus more attention in tackling the gender disparities in sports participation.

  • 40.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    et al.
    University of Mauritius.
    Nashad, Auchoybur
    Sports Participation and Use of Alcohol and Cigarettes Among the Undergraduates from The University of Mauritius2009In: University of Mauritius Research Journal, ISSN 1694-0342, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Rock, Letnie F.
    Department of Government, Sociology and Social Work, University of the West Indies, Cave Hill, Barbados.
    Green Social Work within Integrated Coastal Zone Management: Mauritius and Barbados2018In: The Routledge Handbook of Green Social Work / [ed] Lena Dominelli (with Bala Raju Nikku & Hok Bun Ku), London: Routledge, 2018, 1, p. 242-253Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the more critical ‘discontents’ of capitalism and global neoliberalism (Stiglitz, 2002) by highlighting the ecological damages, natural disasters and social problems that have resulted from its rapid growth with less and less government sanctions and political and social control to check its domination and impact. Neoliberalism relies almost exclusively on unfettered economic growth from extracting the Earth’s limited natural and non-renewable resources to fuel energy and manufacturing products for mass consumption while squirreling millions of dollars for a select few individuals and corporations in charge and/or owners of manufacturing sites and resource extraction projects (Giroux 2001, 2015; Klein, 2015). I do this to develop further the emerging green social work discourse by strengthening its political voice in addressing current environmental and socio-political impacts. I argue that social workers need to re-focus their practice on grassroots activism, alternative economic models and sustain criticism of capitalism to redress its massive industrial consumerism to protect human and non-human species and show a clear platform for action. Green social work has undertaken this challenge, but this is only the beginning.

  • 42.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Sjöberg, Stefan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Companion animals in health-promoting work-life2019In: Society and Animals, ISSN 1063-1119, E-ISSN 1568-5306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite a growing number of studies on human-animal interactions, empirical data focusing on companion animals within the context of health promoting work-life is still limited. This article presents the analysis and discussion based on the perceptions of 22 students and staff members from the University of Gävle in Sweden on the potential of companion animals for supportive functions in health promoting work-life, as well as on the possible challenges of having companion animals within the premises of the University. Based on the findings, this article discusses that companion animals can indeed play vital supportive functions in health promoting work-life, which are presented in the text as: forcing function, communication companion, and social skills. However, this article also highlights the socio-economic, legal, and organizational challenges that need to be carefully considered and worked-out for having companion animals at workplace, such as university.

  • 43.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Sjöberg, Stefan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Companion Animals in Occupational Social Work2016Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The ecosocial work perspective stresses on the importance of focusing on the holistic interconnectedness between humans and non-humans for enhancing the wellbeing of all. Within the field of occupational social work, the involvement of companion animals for enhancing the wellbeing and productivity of employees is gaining popularity. Within this context, a study was undertaken at the University of Gavle, in Sweden, with the aim to explore the potential benefits and challenges of companion animals in health promoting work-life. Using an abductive thematic network analysis of the gathered perspectives from four focus group discussions with students and staff members from the University of Gavle, this article presents answers to two main research questions: (a) why and how companion animals can be beneficial in certain areas of occupational social work practice; and (b) what are some of the possible ways of tackling challenges emanating from having companion animals at workplace. This article concludes that companion animals can be beneficial in certain areas of occupational social work practice; however, social workers need to consider and appropriately plan for ethical, legal and organizational implications involved in having such interventions.

  • 44.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Sjöberg, Stefan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Empowermentarbete i marginaliserade bostadsområden i Indien och Sverige2018In: Samhällsarbete: aktörer, arenor och perspektiv / [ed] Sjöberg, Stefan & Turunen, Päivi, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, 1, p. 343-362Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kapitlet belyser hur kollektiv empowerment tillämpas inom samhällsarbete i marginaliserade bostadsområden i Stockholm och Mumbai. Kollektiv empowerment innebär medvetandegörande om orsaker till social exkludering och marginalisering, uppbyggande av kollektiv identitet, samt social mobilisering av exkluderade grupper så att de kan bygga gemensamma maktresurser med syfte att förändra ojämlikhetsskapande sociala strukturer. I Sverige är det en mera individinriktad form av empowerment som kommit att bli dominerande, åtminstone inom professionellt socialt arbete. Den utmaning som diskuteras i detta kapitel handlar om hur kollektiv empowerment och social mobilisering kan främjas i Sverige vad gäller socialt arbete i allmänhet och samhällsarbete i synnerhet. Enligt författarna har socialarbetare och forskare i socialt arbete viktiga lärdomar att dra från hur man arbetar i Mumbai, men även från den egna historien av folkrörelsernas mobiliseringsarbete.

  • 45.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Sjöberg, Stefan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Turunen, Päivi
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Ecosocial change and community resilience: the case of “Bönan” in glocal transition2019In: Journal of Community Practice, ISSN 1070-5422, E-ISSN 1543-3706Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article was to identify and discuss ecosocial changes and community resilience mechanisms in a coastal fishing community of Sweden – Bönan. Data were collected through eight semi-structured interviews and field observations. An abductive thematic analysis was used to analyze data and background literature. The findings showed that Bönan has been exposed to a combination of ecosocial changes that have transformed the community, and therefore required community resilience interventions. This article concludes that social workers need to take an active part in ecosocial work for enhancing community resilience.

  • 46.
    Sjöberg, Stefan
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Jojo, Bipin
    School of Social Work, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai, India.
    Collective empowerment: a comparative study of community work in Mumbai and Stockholm2015In: International Journal of Social Welfare, ISSN 1369-6866, E-ISSN 1468-2397, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 364-375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mumbai and Stockholm are worlds apart in terms of public services, infrastructures and standard of living. However, both cities have known common problems of social exclusion and marginalisation related to neo-liberal globalisation. Social workers are facing similar challenges regarding collective empowerment as a strategy for community work. This comparative study explored how collective empowerment is undertaken by community workers. The research participants were 13 informants from community-work organisations in the two settings. Semi-structured interviews were used and were analysed with the help of Atlas-ti 6.2 (ATLAS.ti Scientific Software Development GmbH D-10623 Berlin Germany). Social work in Mumbai is in a context of extreme poverty and mainly within the informal sector, whereas in Stockholm most social work is done in relation to a public welfare model. In Stockholm, interventions are aimed towards strengthening social networks, without direct aim at social change. In Mumbai, community workers organise people for collective empowerment to strengthen marginalised groups and achieve social change.

  • 47.
    Sobhee, Sanjeev Kumar
    et al.
    University of Mauritius.
    Jankee, Chandun
    University of Mauritius.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Socio-Economic Study of the Fisher Community in Mauritius and Rodrigues2007Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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