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  • 1.
    Bakken, Anders Galaasen
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Eklund, Andreas
    Karolinska institutet.
    Warnqvist, Anna
    Karolinska institutet.
    O’Neill, Søren
    University Hospital of Southern Denmark.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Axén, Iben
    Karolinska institutet.
    Are changes in pain associated with changes in heart rate variability in patients treated for recurrent or persistent neck pain?2022Inngår i: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 23, nr 1, artikkel-id 895Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Persistent or recurrent neck pain is associated with perturbations in the autonomic nervous system balance, and nociceptive stimulation has been seen to influence this balance. However, very few prospective studies have addressed the extent to which changes in pain associate with changes in autonomic cardiac regulation. Therefore, we investigated if changes in pain vary with changes in heart rate variability in a cohort of patients treated for persistent or recurrent neck pain.

    Method

    This analysis is based on data from a randomized controlled trial in which participants were given home stretching exercises with or without spinal manipulative therapy for two weeks. As the effectiveness of the intervention (home stretching exercises and spinal manipulative therapy) was found to be equal to the control (home stretching exercises alone), all 127 participants were studied as one cohort in this analysis. During the intervention, pain levels were recorded using daily text messages, and heart rate variability was measured in the clinics three times over two weeks. Two approaches were used to classify patients based on changes in pain intensity: 1) Clinically important changes in pain were categorized as either "improved" or "not improved" and, 2) Pain development was measured using pain trajectories, constructed in a data driven approach. The association of pain categories and trajectories with changes in heart rate variability indices over time were then analysed using linear mixed models.

    Results

    Heart rate variability did not differ significantly between improved and not-improved patients, nor were there any associations with the different pain trajectories.

    Conclusions

    In conclusion, changes in pain after home stretching exercises with or without spinal manipulative therapy over two weeks were not significantly associated with changes in heart rate variability for patients with persistent or recurrent neck pain. Future studies should rely on more frequent measurements of HRV during longer treatment periods.

    Trial registrationThe trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, registration number: NCT03576846.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Bergsten, Eva L.
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Haapakangas, Annu
    Faculty of Health and Well-being, Turku University of Applied Sciences, Turku, Finland.
    Larsson, Johan
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Jahncke, Helena
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Effects of relocation to activity-based workplaces on perceived productivity: importance of change-oriented leadership2021Inngår i: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 93, s. 10-16, artikkel-id 103348Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Activity-based workplaces (ABWs) are becoming popular in Western countries and were implemented at four office sites of a large Swedish government agency. A fifth office was used as a control group. The study aim was to examine the effects of relocation to ABW on perceived productivity among employees and to determine if perceived change-oriented leadership behavior prior to relocation moderates potential effects. Data were collected three months prior to relocation, and three and 12 months after. 407 respondents were included in linear mixed regression models. Perceived productivity decreased significantly after relocation compared to the control group and these effects persisted 12 months after the relocation. However, the decrease in perceived productivity was significantly smaller among employees perceiving high change-oriented leadership before relocation. Our results point out the importance of a change-oriented leadership behavior during the implementation to avoid productivity loss among employees when implementing ABWs.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Bergsten, Eva L.
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Wijk, Katarina
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning. Centre for Research and Development, Region Gävleborg/Uppsala University .
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Implementation of Activity-Based Workplaces (ABW)—The Importance of Participation in Process Activities2022Inngår i: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, nr 21, artikkel-id 14338Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Relocation to new office solutions such as activity-based workplaces (ABW) has increased but satisfaction with the ABW among employees varies, and the importance of participation in the relocation process is unclear. This study aimed to examine the association between employees’ extent of participation in the implementation process activities and satisfaction with the relocation to ABW. Data were collected from 699 employees in a Swedish governmental agency 3-months prior to, 3-months and 9-months after relocation to the ABW. Questionnaires were used to assess participation in process activities and perceived satisfaction with knowledge about working in ABW, office rules, and information and support during the process. Participation in activities was significantly associated with higher overall satisfaction with knowledge, office rules, information and support, and effects were generally more pronounced as the number of attended activities increased. Satisfaction also increased among non-participants, although without reaching the same levels as participants. Our results show the importance to offer and facilitate a high participation in the relocation process activities to obtain satisfaction with a relocation to ABW.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Bergsten, Eva L.
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Wijk, Katarina
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Implementing Activity-based Workplaces (ABW) and the importance of participating in process activities2019Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 5.
    Bergsten, Eva L.
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Wijk, Katarina
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning. Centre for Research and Development, Region Gavleborg/Uppsala University; Uppsala University.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Relocation to activity-based workplaces (ABW) – importance of the implementation process2021Inngår i: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 18, artikkel-id 11456Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Activity-based workplaces (ABW) have been implemented in many organizations to offer office flexibility and decrease facility costs. Evaluations of the ABW implementation process are rare. The study aimed to examine the ABW relocation process of two offices in a Swedish governmental agency and to explore factors that influence the implementation process and satisfaction with it. Qualitative or quantitative data were collected on process variables (context, recruitment, reach, dose delivered, dose received, satisfaction), barriers and facilitators to the process were explored in focus group interviews, and immediate outcomes (perceived knowledge, understanding office rules, satisfying information and support) were measured by questionnaire before and after the relocation. The evaluation showed that recruitment was unsatisfactory and reach insufficient—and participation in activities was thus low for both offices. However, intended changes improved. Unclear aims of ABW, lack of manager support and, lack of communication were some of the reported barriers to participation, while a well-planned process, work groups, and program activities were facilitators. Thus, to increase satisfaction with the relocation, our results suggest that recruitment should be thoroughly planned, taking these factors into account to increase participation. This knowledge may be useful for planning and designing successful ABW relocations and evaluations.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Bergsten, Eva L.
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Wijk, Katarina
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning. Centre for Research and Development, Region Gävleborg/Uppsala University.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    The important process when relocating to activity-based workplaces2022Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 7.
    Bergsten, Eva L.
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Zetterberg, Camilla
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Bjärntoft, Sofie
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Edvinsson, Johanna
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Kjellberg, Anders
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Larsson, Johan
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Jahncke, Helena
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Schemalagt arbete - Hälsofrämjande återhämtningsmönster i schemalagda arbeten: Delområde Färjerederiet2017Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 8.
    Bergsten, Eva L.
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Zetterberg, Camilla
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Bjärntoft, Sofie
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Edvinsson, Johanna
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Kjellberg, Anders
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Larsson, Johan
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Jahncke, Helena
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Schemalagt arbete - Hälsofrämjande återhämtningsmönster i schemalagda arbeten: Delområde Förarprov2017Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 9.
    Bergsten, Eva L.
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Zetterberg, Camilla
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Bjärntoft, Sofie
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Edvinsson, Johanna
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Kjellberg, Anders
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Larsson, Johan
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Jahncke, Helena
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Schemalagt arbete - Hälsofrämjande återhämtningsmönster i schemalagda arbeten: Delområde Trafikledning2017Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 10.
    Bergsten, Eva L.
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Zetterberg, Camilla
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Bjärntoft, Sofie
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Edvinsson, Johanna
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Kjellberg, Anders
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Larsson, Johan
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Jahncke, Helena
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Schemalagt arbete: Hälsofrämjande återhämtningsmönster i schemalagda arbeten: Kartläggning hösten 20162017Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 11.
    Bjärntoft, Sofie
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Larsson, Johan
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Jahncke, Helena
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Flexible work: Occupational determinants of work-life balance2018Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Fulltekst (pdf)
    Publicerat abstract
  • 12.
    Bjärntoft, Sofie
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Larsson, Johan
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Jahncke, Helena
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Occupational and individual determinants of work-life balance among office workers with flexible work arrangements2020Inngår i: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, nr 4, artikkel-id 1418Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Flexible work arrangements permitting workers to work anytime and anywhere are increasingly common. This flexibility can introduce both challenges and opportunities for the organisation, as well as for worker work-life balance (WLB). This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the extent to which occupational factors (organizational, leadership and psychosocial) and individual work-related behaviours (over-commitment, overtime work and boundary management) are associated with WLB, and whether these associations are modified by the perceived level of flexibility at work (i.e., control over when, where, and how to do the work). In total, 2960 full-time office workers with flexible work arrangements at the Swedish Transport Administration participated. Associations were determined using linear regression analyses with adjustment for covariates. The strongest negative associations with WLB were found for over-commitment, quantitative job demands, expectations of availability, and overtime work. Strongest positive associations were found for boundary management, information about organizing work, social support, and relation-oriented leadership. Perceived flexibility was positively associated with WLB, and interacted with several of the examined factors, buffering their negative associations with WLB. Results suggest that WLB can be promoted by organizational initiatives focusing on minimizing excessive job demands, increasing psychosocial resources, supporting boundary management, and enhancing perceived flexibility.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 13.
    Bjärntoft, Sofie
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Zetterberg, Camilla
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Larsson, Johan
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning. Luleå University of Technology; LKAB, Gällivare.
    Edvinsson, Johanna
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Jahncke, Helena
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    A participatory approach to identify key areas for sustainable work environment and health in employees with flexible work arrangements2021Inngår i: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, nr 24, artikkel-id 13593Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Flexible work arrangements are common worldwide, but knowledge on how to achieve a sustainable work environment is sparse. The aim of this study was to use a participatory approach to identify concrete suggestions and key areas for improvement that were considered relevant, effective, and feasible for promoting good work environment and health at organizational, work group and individual level (O-G-I), among office employees with flexible work arrangements. Eight focus group interviews (including 45 employees) were conducted in a large Swedish government agency in 2017. By using a Tree diagram approach, employees made a total of 279 suggestions for improvements, which were sorted into O-G-I levels and mapped into 18 key areas. We found that 13 key areas addressed organizational level (e.g., improving leadership, policy, job demands, and work efficiency), two key areas addressed group level (create common rules of availability and activity-based working), and three key areas addressed individual level (e.g., individuals’ responsibility to clearly communicate their availability). The participatory process was effective in obtaining concrete suggestions and key areas in need of improvement, which may provide an action plan that can guide organizations in developing interventions to promote good work environment and health in flexible work. 

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 14.
    Bosch, Tim
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, CBF. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, CBF. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    De Looze, Michiel
    TNO Work & Employment.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, CBF. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Lyskov, Eugene
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, CBF. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Visser, Bart
    Faculty of Human Movement Sciences, VU Amsterdam.
    van Dieën, Jaap
    Faculty of Human Movement Sciences, VU Amsterdam.
    Fatigue, timing strategy and performance during prolonged repetitive work with interposed breaks2012Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 15.
    Bosch, Tim
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, CBF. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, CBF. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, CBF. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    De Looze, Michiel
    TNO, Work& Employment, the Netherlands.
    Lyskov, Eugene
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, CBF. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Visser, Bart
    Amsterdam School of Health Professions, the Netherlands.
    van Dieën, Jaap
    VU Amsterdam, Faculty of Human Movement Sciences, the Netherlands.
    Temporal strategy and performance during a fatiguing short-cycle repetitive task2012Inngår i: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 55, s. 863-873Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated temporal changes in movement strategy and performance during fatiguing short-cycle work. Eighteen participants performed six 7-minutes work blocks with repetitive reaching movements at 0.5 Hz, each followed by a 5.5-minute rest break for a total duration of one hour. Electromyography (EMG) was collected continuously from the upper trapezius muscle, the temporal movement strategy and timing errors were obtained on a cycle-to-cycle basis, and perceived fatigue was rated before and after each work block. Clear signs of fatigue according to subjective ratings and EMG manifestations developed within each work block, as well as during the entire hour. For most participants, timing errors gradually increased, as did the waiting time at the near target. Changes in temporal movement strategy were negatively correlated with changes in the level and variability of EMG, suggesting that an adaptive temporal strategy offset the development of unstable motor solutions in this fatiguing, short-cycle work

  • 16.
    Brulin, Emma
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet; Karolinska institutet.
    Bjärntoft, Sofie
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Bergström, Gunnar
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning. Karolinska institutet.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Gendered associations of flexible work arrangement and perceived flexibility with work–life interference: a cross-sectional mediation analysis on office workers in Sweden2023Inngår i: Social Indicators Research, ISSN 0303-8300, E-ISSN 1573-0921, Vol. 167, s. 571-588Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Flexible work arrangements (FWA) may be beneficial for increasing perceived flexibility (i.e. control over when, where and how to work) and reducing interference between work and private-life, but knowledge of gendered patterns of these relationships is sparse. Drawing on gender theory, the aim of this study was to conduct gender-differentiated analyses of the associations between FWA (non-regulated work or flex-time) and work–life interference using perceived flexibility as a mediator. Survey data were collected in 2016 from a sample of 2614 employees in the Swedish Transport Administration (response rate 67%). The sample included 39.6% women and 60.4% men, 71.7% had non-regulated work and 28.3% flex-time. Associations were determined using linear mixed models and mediation analysis. Results indicated a beneficial effect of non-regulated work (referencing flex-time) on work–life interference through an increase in perceived flexibility. The indirect effect of FWA was pronounced and statistically significant in the total sample, as well as in men and women. However, in men, non-regulated work was associated with a statistically significant increase in interference (competitive mediation). Gender did not interact significantly with work arrangement nor with perceived flexibility. In conclusion, the type of FWA can result in different perceptions of flexibility which in turn may affect experiences of work–life interference. Furthermore, it should be acknowledged that both FWAs and flexibility may be experienced differently for men and women regarding interference. Thus, employers seeking to reduce employee interference should consider gender norms and individual needs.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 17.
    Brusaca, Luiz Augusto
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Januario, Leticia
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Gupta, Nidhi
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen.
    Oliveira, Ana Beatriz
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Working at the office or from home during the COVID-19 pandemic: a cross-sectional study of temporal patterns of sitting and non-sitting among normal-weight and overweight Brazilian office workers2023Inngår i: Journal of Activity, Sedentary and Sleep Behaviors, ISSN 2731-4391, Vol. 2, artikkel-id 28Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This study documents and compares temporal patterns of physical behaviours, assessed using accelerometry, on working and non-working days among normal-weight (body mass index [BMI] <25 kg/m2) and overweight (BMI ≥25 kg/m2) office workers who were either working exclusively at the office (WAO) or exclusively from home (WFH) during the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Methods: In this cross-sectional study, behaviours were measured over 7 days using a thigh-worn accelerometer in 43 workers WAO (21 normal-weight and 22 overweight) and 73 workers WFH (33 normal-weight and 40 overweight). 24-hour behaviours were completely described in terms of sitting in short (≤5 min), moderate (>5 and ≤30 min) and long bouts (>30 min), non-sitting in short (≤5 min) and long bouts (>5 min), and time-in-bed. These behaviour compositions were transformed into five isometric log-ratios (ilr) coordinates according to compositional data analysis procedures. Differences between workplace (WAO vs. WFH) and BMI groups (normal-weight vs. overweight) were tested using ANCOVA with adjustment for age and gender.

    Results: Compared to workers WAO, workers WFH spent more time-in-bed relative to time awake during working days, more time sitting relative to non-sitting, less time in short bouts of sitting relative to moderate and long bouts, less time in moderate bouts of sitting relative to long bouts, and more time non-sitting in short bouts relative to long bouts. Effect sizes [ηp2] were between 0.05 and 0.21 and p-values between <0.001 and 0.04. Irrespective of workplace, overweight workers spent less time sitting in short relative to moderate and long bouts (ηp2=0.06, p=0.01) than normal-weight workers, while differences in the other ilr coordinates were insignificant. During non-working days, behaviours did not differ significantly by workplace, while overweight workers spent more time sitting relative to non-sitting (ηp2=0.10, p<0.001), less time sitting in short relative to moderate and long bouts (ηp2=0.13, p<0.001), and less time sitting in moderate relative to long bouts (ηp2=0.04, p=0.03) than normal-weight workers. We found no interactions between workplace and BMI.

    Conclusions: Our findings suggest that WFH and being overweight predispose to more time sitting and less temporal variation in behaviours, thus reinforcing that these workers could likely benefit from interventions to reduce prolonged sitting time and increase variation.

  • 18.
    Brusaca, Luiz Augusto
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos.
    Januario, Leticia
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Barbieri, Dechristian
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos.
    Oliveira, Rafael
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos.
    Heiden, Marina
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Oliveira, Ana Beatriz
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    24-hour compositions of physical (in)activity among office workers during the COVID-19 pandemic: a comparison between Brazil and Sweden2022Inngår i: Proceedings of the ICAMPAM2022 conference, 2022Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Sedentary behavior (SED) has generally increased during the COVID-19 pandemic in people working from home, and physical activity (PA) has therefore decreased. However, it is unclear whether the pandemic has affected office workers in different countries in the same way. We aimed to compare the 24-hour time-use compositions of physical behaviors between Brazilian and Swedish office workers at working and non-working days during the pandemic. Methods: Physical behaviors were monitored over 7 days using thigh-worn accelerometer in 73 Brazilian and 202 Swedish workers. Daily time-use compositions were exhaustively described in terms of SED in short (<30 min) and long (≥30 min) bouts, light PA (LPA), moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), and time-in-bed (TIB). Following a compositional data analysis, isometric log-ratios (ilr) were calculated to express the ratio of TIB to time spent awake, SED (short and long bouts) relative to LPA and MVPA, SED in short relative to long bouts, and LPA relative to MVPA. We examined differences between countries using MANOVA, followed by univariate post-hoc tests of pairwise differences. Results: Both groups spent most of their time SED and in bed. On working days, Brazilian workers spent 294 min in SED in short bouts, 477 min in SED in long bouts, 157 min in LPA, 50 min in MVPA and 461 min TIB; Swedes spent 274, 365, 257, 86 and 458 min, respectively. During non-working days, results were 279, 359, 237, 61 and 504 min among Brazilians and 263, 251, 305, 93 and 529 min among Swedes.  Brazilians and Swedes differed significantly in the set of ilrs as a whole during working (p < 0.001) and non-working days (p < 0.001) and in all pairwise comparisons, except for the ratio of TIB to time spent awake during non-working days. Conclusions: During the COVID-19 pandemic Brazilian and Swedish office workers behaved differently. Whether this relates to restrictions being different or to differences even before the pandemic is not clear.

  • 19.
    Brusaca, Luiz Augusto
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos.
    Januario, Leticia
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Barbieri, Dechristian
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos.
    Oliveira, Rafael
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos.
    Heiden, Marina
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Oliveira, Ana Beatriz
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Sedentary behaviour, physical activity, and sleep among office workers during the COVID-19 pandemic: a comparison of Brazil and Sweden2022Inngår i: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 22, artikkel-id 2196Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the physical behaviours of office workers worldwide, but studies comparing physical behaviours between countries with similar restrictions policies are rare. This study aimed to document and compare the 24-hour time-use compositions of physical behaviours among Brazilian and Swedish office workers on working and non-working days during the pandemic.

    Methods: Physical behaviours were monitored over 7 days using thigh-worn accelerometers in 73 Brazilian and 202 Swedish workers. Daily time-use compositions were exhaustively described in terms of sedentary behaviour (SED) in short (<30 min) and long (≥30 min) bouts, light physical activity (LPA), moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and time-in-bed. We examined differences between countries using MANOVA on data processed according to compositional data analysis. As Swedish workers had the possibility to do hybrid work, we conducted a set of sensitivity analyses including only data from days when Swedish workers worked from home.

    Results: During working days, Brazilian office workers spent more time SED in short (294 min) and long (478 min) bouts and less time in LPA (156 min) and MVPA (50 min) than Swedish workers (274, 367, 256 and 85 min, respectively). Time spent in bed was similar in both groups. Similar differences between Brazilians and Swedes were observed on non-working days, while workers were, in general, less sedentary, more active and spent more time-in-bed than during working days. The MANOVA showed that Brazilians and Swedes differed significantly in behaviours during working (p < 0.001, ηp2 = 0.36) and non-working days (p < 0.001, ηp2 = 0.20). Brazilian workers spent significantly more time in SED relative to being active, less time in short relative to long bouts in SED, and more time in LPA relative to MVPA, both during workdays and non-workdays. Sensitivity analyses only on data from days when participants worked from home showed similar results.

    Conclusions: During the COVID-19 pandemic Brazilian office workers were more sedentary and less active than Swedish workers, both during working and non-working days. Whether this relates to the perception or interpretation of restrictions being different or to differences present even before the pandemic is not clear, and we encourage further research to resolve this important issue.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 20.
    Brusaca, Luiz Augusto
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning. Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Gupta, Nidhi
    Det Nationale Forskningscenter for Arbejdsmiljö, Köpenhamn.
    Barbieri, Dechristian
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos.
    Oliveira, Ana Beatriz
    Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos.
    Temporal patterns of sitting and non-sitting in normal-weight and overweight Brazilian office workers working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic2022Inngår i: Proceedings of the ICAMPAM2022 conference, 2022Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study documented the temporal patterns of sitting, non-sitting and time-in-bed (TIB) of Brazilian office workers working from home during the pandemic; and also determined the extent to which these patterns differed between normal-weight (NWW) and overweight workers (OWW). Methods: Behaviors were monitored over 5 days using accelerometers in 33 NWW (BMI <25 kg/m2) and 40 OWW (BMI ≥25 kg/m2). Time-use compositions were described in terms of sitting, non-sitting and TIB. Temporal patterns of sitting/non-sitting were quantified according to Exposure Variation Analysis into short (≤5 min), moderate (>5 and ≤20) and long uninterrupted bouts (>20). Following a compositional data analysis, isometric log-ratios (ilr) were calculated; ilr1–TIB relative to time spent awake, ilr2–sitting (all bouts) relative to non-sitting (all bouts), ilr3–sitting in short relative to moderate and long bouts, ilr4–sitting in moderate relative to long bouts; ilr5 and ilr6 represent the same behavior contrasts as ilr3 and ilr4, but for non-sitting. We examined differences between groups using MANOVA, followed by univariate post-hoc tests of pairwise differences. Results: NWW spent more time sitting in short bouts (50 min) and less time in moderate and long bouts (154 and 552) than OWW (42, 155 and 585). For non-sitting, NWW spent more time in short and moderate bouts (71 and 96) and less time in long bouts (45) than OWW (60, 83 and 54). NWW had longer TIB (473) than OWW (461). NWW and OWW differed in the set of ilrs as a whole (p=0.05). The post-hoc tests showed that time spent sitting in short relative to longer bouts (ilr3) was smaller for OWW than for NWW (p=0.05). This indicates that OWW had less variation in sitting behaviors. Conclusions: OWW spent less time at work sitting in short uninterrupted bouts, relative to sitting for longer bouts, than NWW, while the relative time-use did not differ for other behaviors.

  • 21.
    Cillekens, Bart
    et al.
    Department of Public and Occupational Health, AmsterdamUMC , Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Ketels, Margo
    Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University , Gent, Belgium.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Gupta, Nidhi
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, National Research Centre for the Working Environment , Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Clays, Els
    Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University , Gent, Belgium.
    Maaike, Huysmans
    Department of Public and Occupational Health, AmsterdamUMC , Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Andreas, Holtermann
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, National Research Centre for the Working Environment , Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Coenen, Pieter
    Department of Public and Occupational Health, AmsterdamUMC , Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    O7-1 The association of occupational and leisure time physical activity with all-cause mortality. Using an individual participant dataset (N = 634,131)2022Inngår i: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 32, nr Suppl2Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Physical activity is a key determinant for health and considered as an important factor in the prevention of lifestyle related-diseases. All physical activity domains are generally considered to be health enhancing. However, accumulating evidence in recent years suggests that occupational physical activity may not have the same beneficial health effect as leisure time physical activity. Our aim was to assess the association of occupational and leisure time physical activity and all-cause mortality.

    Methods

    We obtained individual participant data from published and unpublished cohort studies and assessed their risk of bias. We harmonized the data, and used Cox survival regression models to assess the association between occupational and leisure time physical activity with all-cause mortality, in a two-stage individual participant data meta-analysis. Different models were performed to assess the impact of relevant confounders including behavioral, health-related and socio-economic factors. Results of the data were reported with hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI).ResultsData from 22 prospective cohort studies showed that male workers with high occupational physical activity had an increased risk of all-cause mortality in comparison with sedentary occupational physical activity (HR: 1.12, 95%CI: 1.03- 1.23). For female workers, no such association was found (HR: 1.01, 95%CI: 0.85-1.19). when comparing high with sedentary occupational physical activity.

    Increasing levels of leisure time physical activity were inversely and dose-dependently associated with a reduced risk of all-cause mortality. For example, high compared with sedentary leisure time physical activity was associated with reduced risks for males (HR: 0.53, 95%CI: 0.36-0.79) and for females (HR: 0.49, 95%CI: 0.31-0.79).

    All associations remained robust when adjusting for additional relevant confounders, leaving one study out analysis, and when assessing the role of bias and reverse causality.

    Conclusion

    We consistently found a reduced risk of all-cause mortality with increasing levels of leisure time physical activity, but not for occupational physical activity. These findings indicate that occupational activity may not be health-enhancing. These findings suggest that occupational physical activity may not be considered a suitable substitute to leisure time physical activity when striving for health enhancement.

  • 22.
    Cillekins, Bart
    et al.
    AmsterdamUMC, Netherlands.
    Ketels, Margo
    University of Ghent, Netherlands.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Gupta, Nidhi
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Denmark.
    Clays, Els
    University of Ghent, Netherlands.
    Maaike, Huysmans
    AmsterdamUMC, Netherlands.
    Holtermann, Andreas
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Denmark.
    Coenan, Pieter
    AmsterdamUMC, Netherlands.
    O5-6 The relation between domain-specific physical behavior and cardiorespiratory fitness: a compositional data analysis on the physical activity health paradox using accelerometer-assessed data2022Inngår i: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 32, nr s2Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    In contrast to leisure time physical activity (LTPA), occupational physical activity (OPA) does not have similar beneficial health effects. These differential health effects, also known as the physical activity health paradox, might be explained by dissimilar effects of LTPA and OPA on cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF). This study aims to investigate the association between device-worn measures of physical behaviors during both work and leisure time and CRF among workers with high level of OPA.

    Methods

    Our results are based on a sample of 309 workers employed within the service and production sector from the cross-sectional FEPA (Flemish Employees' Physical Activity) study. OPA and LTPA were measured using two Axivity AX3 accelerometers, worn on the back and right thigh for 2 to 4 consecutive working days. CRF levels were obtained by the Harvard step test. Compositional multiple linear regression analyses were used to analyze the relations, adjusted for age, sex, education, smoking, BMI, moderate-to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and physical work demands.

    Results

    During work time, more sedentary behavior (SB) was associated with higher CRF when compared relatively to time spent on other work behaviors, while more SB during leisure time was associated with lower CRF when compared to other leisure time behaviors. Reallocating more time to MVPA from the other behaviors within leisure time was positively associated with CRF, which was not the case for MVPA during work.

    Conclusion

    Our results emphasize the need for taking the domain-specific nature of physical activity into account to understand its relation to CRF. Guidelines usually do not differentiate between OPA and LTPA in their recommendation to participate in at least 150 min of physical activity per week, regardless of the OPA level. Workers already meeting this recommendations through OPA might therefore mistakenly think that they already meet the recommendations on physical activity and think they can spend their leisure time in a sedentary fashion. In reality, these types of workers might benefit from recommendations to take more sitting breaks during their work and to participate in leisure time MVPA to maintain or improve their CRF in order ‘to be fit for the job'.

  • 23.
    Clays, Els
    et al.
    Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Belgium.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Oakman, J.
    Department of Public Health, La Trobe University, Australia.
    Holtermann, Andreas
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Objectively measured occupational physical activities in blue collar jobs: do psychosocial resources matter?2017Inngår i: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 24, nr 2SArtikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Occupational physical activity (OPA), and particularly static postures and physically exerting activities, is known to impact worker health and to increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal problems, sickness absence and premature retirement. The exploration of structural preventive measures at the workplace against the adverse health effects of excessive OPA is needed. The psychosocial work environment is hypothesised to buffer the adverse effects of OPA, and as such psychosocial resources might directly influence the performance of OPA. However, this has not been previously investigated with detailed objective measurements. The aim of this study is to describe OPA within blue-collar workers, and to examine the role of psychosocial job resources in the performance of OPA.

    Methods: Results are based on a sample of 198 blue-collar workers from the NOMAD (New method for Objective Measurements of physical Activity in Daily living) study, recruited from seven workplaces in Denmark. The sample included 112 men (56.6%) and 86 women (43.4%); the mean age was 44.9 years (SD 9.9). Data were collected with two Actigraph devices placed on the thigh and trunk, during four consecutive days. The accelerometer data were processed and analysed using the Acti4 software, to determine working time spent standing, walking, on feet and in activity of moderate to vigorous intensity level (MVPA). The level of influence and social support at work were assessed by questionnaire, and measured with a four-item scale. Analysis of (co-)variance and (multiple) linear regression models were conducted. All analyses were stratified by gender predominance of occupation.

    Results: The different types of OPA significantly varied by particular job type. Within male predominant occupations, job type accounted for 50–70% of explained variance, depending on the type of OPA. Manufacturing workers showed the highest average proportions of working time standing (33%) and on feet (79%), while garbage collectors had the highest proportion of working time in MVPA (33%). Mobile plant operators and construction workers had the lowest average working time spent walking and in MVPA. Differences in OPA between job types in female predominant occupations were less pronounced, but healthcare workers and cleaners had higher average proportions of time spent walking and in MVPA compared to assembly workers. The addition of age and psychosocial resources to the models did not contribute to a larger explained variance in OPA and the relations with job type remained significant. Social support at work showed an independent positive relation with working on feet, and with standing in female predominant jobs only. Influence at work was not related to OPA.

    Conclusion: The positive relation of social support with working on feet and standing is likely to be explained by the nature of the work tasks, as jobs that require these activities probably comprise more close interactions and as such create more intensified levels of cooperation at the work floor. Overall, our hypothesis that psychosocial job resources would affect the performance of OPA within blue-collar workers was not confirmed. These findings suggest that the performance of OPA within blue-collarjobs – and particularly within male predominant occupations – is mostly affected by work organisational factors related to specific job type, and not by psychosocial job resources.

  • 24.
    Clays, Els
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Belgium.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Oakman, Jodi
    Department of Public Health, Centre for Ergonomics and Human Factors, La Trobe University, Australia.
    Holtermann, Andreas
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Objectively measured occupational physical activity in blue-collar workers: What is the role of job type, gender and psychosocial resources?2020Inngår i: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 82, artikkel-id 102948Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to describe occupational physical activity (OPA) and examine the role of psychosocial job resources among blue-collar workers. In a sample of 198 workers (57% male; mean age 44.9 (SD 9.9) year) from 7 companies in Denmark, two accelerometers (Actigraph) were placed on the thigh and trunk during 1-5 consecutive days, to determine working time spent standing, walking, on feet and in activity of moderate to vigorous intensity level (MVPA). The level of influence and social support at work were assessed by questionnaire. The exposure to OPA significantly varied by particular job type, especially in male predominant occupations. Overall, psychosocial job resources did not affect the exposure to OPA. These findings suggest that workplace interventions aiming to prevent adverse outcomes of OPA among blue-collars workers ought to focus on task redesign and target work organizational factors related to specific job type.

  • 25.
    Coenen, Pieter
    et al.
    School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Curtin University, Perth, Australia; Department of Public and Occupational Health, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Korshøj, Mette
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Hallman, David M.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Huysmans, Maaike A.
    Department of Public and Occupational Health, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    van der Beek, Allard J.
    Department of Public and Occupational Health, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Straker, Leon M
    School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    Holtermann, Andreas
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Differences in heart rate reserve of similar physical activities during work and in leisure time - A study among Danish blue-collar workers2018Inngår i: Physiology and Behavior, ISSN 0031-9384, E-ISSN 1873-507X, Vol. 185, s. 45-51Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies suggest that while leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) promotes general health, engaging in occupational physical activity (OPA) may have negative health consequences. It has been hypothesized that the different health effects from OPA and LTPA can be explained by differences in physical activity (PA) intensity in these two domains. To assess the intensity of OPA and LTPA, we aimed to study the percentage heart rate reserve (%HRR) during similar types of OPA and LTPA during workdays. Data from the NOMAD study on Danish blue-collar workers (n=124) with objective measurements of PA (using accelerometers) and heart rate (using heart rate monitors) for 4 workdays were analysed. Activities of sitting, standing, moving, walking, and stair climbing were identified and %HRR in each of these activities was determined for work and leisure. %HRR was significantly higher during OPA than LTPA. These differences were more pronounced in men than in women. Although not statistically significant in the fully adjusted model, we found indications that these differences were more pronounced in those with low compared to high fitness. To our knowledge, this is the first study with objective measurements showing that %HRR is higher during the same gross-body postural activities when performed at work compared to leisure-time during workdays. This elevated intensity may help explaining the negative health consequences of engagement in high levels of OPA. Future guidelines should distinguish OPA from LTPA, possibly by advising workers to remain active during their leisure time, in particular when they are highly active at work.

  • 26.
    Coenen, Pieter
    et al.
    Department of Public and Occupational Health, VU University Medical Center, The Netherlands.
    Korshøj, Mette
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    van der Beek, Allard
    Department of Public and Occupational Health, VU University Medical Center, The Netherlands.
    Straker, Leon
    School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Curtin.
    Holtermann, Andreas
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Differences in heart rate reserve during occupational and leisure time physical activity in Danish blue-collar workers2017Inngår i: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 24, nr 2S, s. 33-34Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Physical activity (PA) is considered to be an important factor in the prevention of various cardiovascular diseases. However, recent studies suggest that while leisure time PA promotes cardiovascular health, occupational PA might impair cardiovascular health. An explanation for this PA health paradox may be a difference in the intensity and associated physical demands between occupational and leisure time PA. Occupational PA often consists of low-intensity, long-lasting physically demanding tasks, such as repetitive work and prolonged static working postures, which are presumed to cause sustained elevated heart rate that may stress the cardiovascular system. Despite this notion, the differences in physiological responses between occupational and leisure time PA are not well understood. Therefore, we aimed: (a) to study the difference in intensity of occupational and leisure time PA (expressed in percentage heart rate reserve; % HRR); and b) to assess whether this potential difference varies by gender and cardiorespiratory fitness level.

    Methods: We used data from the NOMAD study, in which Danish blue-collar workers from seven different workplaces took part in a four-day protocol of objective measurements of PA (using hip and thigh-worn accelerometers) and heart rate (using an ambulatory heart rate monitor). During occupational and leisure time, activities of sitting, standing, moving, walking and stair climbing were identified, and %HRR in each of these activities was determined. Differences in %HRR between occupational and leisure time PA were tested using generalised estimating equations (expressed in regression coefficient – beta with 95% confidence interval (CI)) adjusted for personal, health,work and lifestyle confounders.

    Result: In 124 workers with data on PA and heart rate, %HRR was higher for occupational PA compared to leisure time PA (beta1.9, 95% CI2.4,1.4,P<0.001). Differences in %HRR between occupational and leisure time PA were more pronounced in men than in women, and in those with high cardiorespiratory fitness compared to those with low cardiorespiratory fitness.

    Conclusion: This study is the first to assess differences in %HRR between occupational and leisure time PA, using objectiv emeasurements in blue-collarworkers. Cardiovascular intensity was higher in occupational activities (possibly due to additional physical and/or mental workloads) compared to the same activities during leisure time. The increase in cardiovascular intensity at work maybe a contributing factor to the health paradox of occupational and leisure time PA, suggesting negative cardiovascular health consequences for engagement in occupational PA (see Figure 1).

  • 27.
    Coenen, Pieter
    et al.
    Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    van der Beek, Allard
    Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Correction of bias in self-reported sitting time among office workers – a study based on compositional data analysis2020Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 46, nr 1, s. 32-42Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Emerging evidence suggests that excessive sitting has negative health effects. However, this evidence largely relies on research using self-reported sitting time, which is known to be biased. To correct this bias, we aimed at developing a calibration model estimating "true" sitting from self-reported sitting.

    Methods: Occupational sitting time was estimated by self-reports (the International Physical Activity Questionnaire) and objective measurements (thigh-worn accelerometer) among 99 Swedish office workers at a governmental agency, at baseline and 3 and 12 months afterwards. Following compositional data analysis procedures, both sitting estimates were transformed into isometric log-ratios (ILR). This effectively addresses that times spent in various activities are inherently dependent and can be presented as values of only 0−100%. Linear regression was used to develop a simple calibration model estimating objectively measured "true" sitting ILR (dependent variable) from self-reported sitting ILR (independent variable). Additional self-reported variables were then added to construct a full calibration model. Performance of the models was assessed by root-mean-square (RMS) differences between estimated and objectively measured values. Models developed on baseline data were validated using the follow-up datasets.

    Results: Uncalibrated self-reported sitting ILR showed an RMS error of 0.767. Simple and full calibration models (incorporating body mass index, office type, and gender) reduced this error to 0.422 (55%) and 0.398 (52%), respectively. In the validations, model performance decreased to 57%/62% (simple models) and 57%/62% (full models) for the two follow-up data sets, respectively.

    Conclusions: Calibration adjusting for errors in self-reported sitting led to substantially more correct estimates of "true" sitting than uncalibrated self-reports. Validation indicated that model performance would change somewhat in new datasets and that full models perform no better than simple models, but calibration remained effective.

  • 28.
    Edvinsson, Johanna
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Bjärntoft, Sofie
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Jahncke, Helena
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hartig, Terry
    Institute for Housing and Urban Research, Uppsala University, 75105 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    A Work Time Control Tradeoff in Flexible Work: Competitive Pathways to Need for Recovery2023Inngår i: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 20, nr 1, artikkel-id 691Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Work time control may offer opportunities, but also implies risks for employee recovery, influenced by increased work-related ICT use and overtime work. However, this risk–opportunity tradeoff remains understudied. This study aimed to test two different models of associations between work time control, work-related ICT use, overtime work, and the need for recovery. These models were constructed based on data on office workers with flexible work arrangements. Cross-sectional data were obtained with questionnaires (n = 2582) from employees in a Swedish multi-site organization. Regression models treated the three determinants of the need for recovery either as independent, or as linked in a causal sequence. The test of independent determinants confirmed that more work time control was associated with less need for recovery, whereas more ICT use and overtime work were associated with a higher need for recovery. In a test of serial mediation, more work time control contributed to a greater need for recovery through more ICT use and then more overtime work. Work time control also had a competitive, indirect effect through a negative association with overtime work. Our results suggest that work time control is beneficial for employee recovery, but may for some be associated with more work-related ICT use after regular working hours, thus increasing recovery needs. Policies that support work time control can promote recovery, but employers must attend to the risk of excessive use of ICT outside of regular working hours.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    Edvinsson et al. 2023. A Work Time Control Tradeoff in Flexible Work_Competitive Pathways to Need for Recovery
  • 29.
    Elcadi, Guilherme H.
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning. Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Forsman, Mikael
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning. Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Aasa, Ulrika
    5 Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Fahlström, Martin
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation and Department of Clinical Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden .
    Crenshaw, Albert G.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Oxygenation and hemodynamics do not underlie early muscle fatigue for patients with work-related muscle pain2014Inngår i: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, nr 4, s. e95582-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients suffering from work-related muscle pain (WRMP) fatigue earlier during exercise than healthy controls. Inadequate oxygen consumption and/or inadequate blood supply can influence the ability of the muscles to withstand fatigue. However, it remains unknown if oxygenation and hemodynamics are associated with early fatigue in muscles of WRMP patients. In the present study we applied near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) on the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) and trapezius (TD) muscles of patients with WRMP (n = 18) and healthy controls (n = 17). Our objective was to determine if there were group differences in endurance times for a low-level contraction of 15% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) – sustained for 12-13 min, and to see if these differences were associated with differences in muscle oxygenation and hemodynamics. At baseline, oxygen saturation (StO2%) was similar between groups for the ECR, but StO2% was significantly lower for TD for the WRMP patients (76%) compared to controls (85%) (P < 0.01). Also, baseline ECR blood flow was similar in the two groups. For both muscles there were a larger number of patients, compared to controls, that did not maintain the 15% MVC for the allotted time. Consequently, the endurance times were significantly shorter for the WRMP patients than controls (medians, ECR: 347 s vs. 582 s; TD: 430 s vs. 723 s respectively). Responses in StO2% during the contractions were not significantly different between groups for either muscle, i.e. no apparent difference in oxygen consumption. Overall, we interpret our findings to indicate that the early fatigue for our WRMP patients was not associated with muscle oxygenation and hemodynamics.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 30.
    Fani, A
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Oral Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Tzemparilidis, N
    Department of Clinical Oral Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Utterström, K
    Department of Clinical Oral Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, CBF. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Wanman, A
    Department of Clinical Oral Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Eriksson, P O
    Department of Clinical Oral Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Lyskov, Eugene
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, CBF. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Physical activity and cardiovascular regulation during clinical work in female students with and without musculoskeletal pain. Method study. (Poster)2010Inngår i: Proceedings of the Premus 2010 conference (Seventh International Conference on Prevention of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders), 2010, s. 283-283Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 31.
    Galaasen Bakken, Anders
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Eklund, Andreas
    Karolinska institutet.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Axén, Iben
    Karolinska institutet.
    The effect of spinal manipulative therapy and home stretching exercises on heart rate variability in patients with persistent or recurrent neck pain: a randomized controlled trial2021Inngår i: Chiropractic and Manual Therapies, E-ISSN 2045-709X, Vol. 29, nr 1, artikkel-id 48Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Persistent or recurrent neck pain is, together with other chronic conditions, suggested to be associated with disturbances of the Autonomic Nervous System. Acute effects on the Autonomic Nervous System, commonly measured using Heart Rate Variability, have been observed with manual therapy. This study aimed to investigate the effect on Heart Rate Variability in (1) a combination of home stretching exercises and spinal manipulative therapy versus (2) home stretching exercises alone over 2 weeks in participants with persistent or recurrent neck pain.

    Methods

    A randomized controlled clinical trial was carried out in five multidisciplinary primary care clinics in Stockholm from January 2019 to April 2020. The study sample consisted of 131 participants with a history of persistent or recurrent neck. All participants performed home stretching exercises daily for 2 weeks and were scheduled for four treatments during this period, with the intervention group receiving spinal manipulative therapy in addition to the home exercises. Heart Rate Variability at rest was measured at baseline, after 1 week, and after 2 weeks, with RMSSD (Root mean square of successive RR interval differences) as the primary outcome. Both groups were blinded to the other group intervention. Thus, they were aware of the purpose of the trial but not the details of the “other” intervention. The researchers collecting data were blinded to treatment allocation, as was the statistician performing data analyses. The clinicians provided treatment for participants in both groups and could not be blinded. A linear mixed-effects model with continuous variables and person-specific random intercept was used to investigate the group-time interaction using an intention to treat analysis.

    Results

    Sixty-six participants were randomized to the intervention group and sixty-five to the control group. For RMSSD, a B coefficient of 0.4 (p value: 0.9) was found, indicating a non-significant difference in the regression slope for each time point with the control group as reference. No statistically significant differences were found between groups for any of the Heart Rate Variability indices.

    Conclusion

    Adding four treatments of spinal manipulation therapy to a 2-week program of daily stretching exercises gave no significant change in Heart Rate Variability.

    Trial Registration: The trial was registered 03/07/2018 at ClinicalTrials.gov, registration number: NCT03576846. (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31606042/)

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 32.
    Gilson, Nicholas
    et al.
    School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane.
    Coenen, Pieter
    Department of Public and Occupational Health, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, VU University Medical Centre (VUmc), Amsterdam.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Holtermann, Andreas
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Straker, Leon
    School of Allied Health and enAble Institute, Curtin University, Perth.
    Postpandemic hybrid work: opportunities and challenges for physical activity and public health2022Inngår i: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 56, nr 21, s. 1203-1204Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 33.
    Gold, Judith E
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hellström, Fredrik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Björklund, Martin
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning. Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umea University, Umeå Sweden.
    Crenshaw, Albert G.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Djupsjöbacka, Mats
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Heiden, Marina
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Piligian, George
    Department of Occupational Medicine, Epidemiology and Prevention, North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, Great Neck, NY, USA.
    Barbe, Mary F.
    Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Temple University Medical School, Philadelphia, PA, USA..
    Systematic review of biochemical biomarkers for neck and upper-extremity musculoskeletal disorders2016Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 42, nr 2, s. 103-124Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:  This study systematically summarizes biochemical biomarker research in non-traumatic musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs).  Two research questions guided the review:  1) Are there biochemical markers associated with neck and upper extremity MSDs? and, 2) Are there biochemical markers associated with the severity of neck and upper extremity MSDs? 

    Methods:  A literature search was conducted in PubMed and SCOPUS.  Eighty-seven studies met primary inclusion criteria.  Following a quality screen, data were extracted from 44 sufficient quality articles.

    Results:  Most of the 87 studies were cross-sectional and utilized convenience samples of patients as both cases and controls.  A response rate was explicitly stated in only 11 (13%) studies.  Less than half of the studies controlled for potential confounding through restriction or in the analysis.  Most sufficient quality studies were conducted in older populations (mean age in one or more analysis group > 50 yrs).

    In sufficient quality articles, 82% demonstrated at least one statistically significant association between the MSD(s) and biomarker(s) studied.  Evidence suggested that: a) the collagen repair marker TIMP-1 is decreased in fibroproliferative disorders, b) 5-HT (serotonin) is increased in trapezius myalgia, and c) triglycerides are increased in a variety of MSDs.  Only five studies showed an association between a biochemical marker and MSD severity.

    Conclusion: While some MSD biomarkers were identified, limitations in the articles examined included possible selection bias, confounding, spectrum effect (potentially heterogeneous biomarker associations in populations according to symptom severity or duration) and insufficient attention to co-morbid conditions. A list of recommendations for future studies is provided.

  • 34.
    Gold, Judith
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning. Gold Standard Research Consulting, Bryn Mawr, PA, USA.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hellström, Fredrik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Björklund, Martin
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning. Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Crenshaw, Albert G.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Barbe, Mary
    Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Temple University Medical School,.
    Ali, Sayed
    Department of Radiology, Temple University Medical School,.
    Systematic review of quantitative imaging biomarkers for neck and shoulder musculoskeletal disorders2017Inngår i: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 18, artikkel-id 395Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    This study systematically summarizes quantitative imaging biomarker research in non-traumatic neck and shoulder musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). There were two research questions: 1) Are there quantitative imaging biomarkers associated with the presence of neck and shoulder MSDs?, 2) Are there quantitative imaging biomarkers associated with the severity of neck and shoulder MSDs?

    Methods

    PubMed and SCOPUS were used for the literature search. One hundred and twenty-five studies met primary inclusion criteria. Data were extracted from 49 sufficient quality studies.

    Results

    Most of the 125 studies were cross-sectional and utilized convenience samples of patients as both cases and controls. Only half controlled for potential confounders via exclusion or in the analysis. Approximately one-third reported response rates. In sufficient quality articles, 82% demonstrated at least one statistically significant association between the MSD(s) and biomarker(s) studied. The literature synthesis suggested that neck muscle size may be decreased in neck pain, and trapezius myalgia and neck/shoulder pain may be associated with reduced vascularity in the trapezius and reduced trapezius oxygen saturation at rest and in response to upper extremity tasks. Reduced vascularity in the supraspinatus tendon may also be a feature in rotator cuff tears. Five of eight studies showed an association between a quantitative imaging marker and MSD severity.

    Conclusions

    Although research on quantitative imaging biomarkers is still in a nascent stage, some MSD biomarkers were identified. There are limitations in the articles examined, including possible selection bias and inattention to potentially confounding factors. Recommendations for future studies are provided.

  • 35.
    Gold, Judith
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hellström, Fredrik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Björklund, Martin
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Piligian, George
    Department of Occupational Medicine, Epidemiology and Prevention, North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, Great Neck, NY.
    Barbe, Mary F.
    Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Temple University Medical School, Philadelphia.
    Biochemical biomarkers for MSDs: systematic review results2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Although the potential for musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) biomarkers to detect subclinical disease and monitor MSD severity was discussed more than 20 years ago, only one review on biochemical biomarkers exclusive to humans has been published (Saxton 2000). The aim of this study was to systematically summarize biochemical biomarker research in neck and upper extremity MSDs that could appear in a work-related context. Two research questions guided the review: (1) Are there biochemical markers associated with neck and upper extremity MSDs? (2) Are there biochemical markers associated with the severity of neck and upper extremity MSDs?

    Methods: A literature search was conducted in PubMed and SCOPUS. 87 studies met primary inclusion criteria. Following a quality screen, data were extracted from 44 sufficient-quality articles.

    Results. Most of the 87 studies were cross-sectional and utilized convenience samples of patients as both cases and controls. A response rate was explicitly stated in only 11 (13%) studies. Less than half of the studies controlled for potential confounding through restriction or in the analysis. Most sufficient-quality studies were conducted in older populations (mean age in one or more analysis group > 50 yrs). In sufficient-quality articles, 82% demonstrated at least one statistically significant association between the MSD(s) and biomarker(s) studied. Evidence suggested that: (a) the collagen repair marker TIMP-1 is decreased in fibroproliferative disorders, (b) 5-HT (serotonin) is increased in trapezius myalgia, and (c) triglycerides are increased in a variety of MSDs. Only five studies showed an association between a biochemical marker and MSD severity.

    Discussion. While some MSD biomarkers were identified, limitations in the articles examined included possible selection bias, confounding, spectrum effect (potentially heterogeneous biomarker associations in populations according to symptom severity or duration) and insufficient attention to co-morbid conditions. A list of recommendations for future studies is provided.

  • 36.
    Gupta, Nidhi
    et al.
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Cillekens, Bart
    Department of Public and Occupational Health, AmsterdamUMC, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Ketels, Margo
    Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Gent, Belgium.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Clays, Els
    Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Gent, Belgium.
    Huysmans, Maaike
    Department of Public and Occupational Health, AmsterdamUMC, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Holtermann, Andreas
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Coenen, Pieter
    Department of Public and Occupational Health, AmsterdamUMC, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    P09-08 24-Hour Physical Behavior Balance for Better Health for All: “The Sweet-Spot Hypothesis”2022Inngår i: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 32, nr Suppl2Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    'Sit less-move more' has been a common advice to improve health of adults. Research indicates that this advice might be health enhancing among adults with sedentary occupations but not among adults with physically active occupations such as cleaners. This may be explained by the considerable differences in 24-h physical behaviors between adults in sedentary and physically active occupations. To provide a scientific approach and encourage research on 24-h physical behaviors and health for those in physically active occupations, we recently proposed the ‘Sweet-Spot Hypothesis'. The hypothesis postulated that the ‘Sweet-Spot' of 24-h physical behaviors for better health differs between adults, depending on their occupation.

    Methods

    To exemplify such hypothesis, we tested the cross-sectional association between 24-hour time composition of physical behaviors measured using thigh-based accelerometry and self-rated health among adults engaged in white-collar (n = 136), manufacturing (n = 481) and cleaning (n = 130) occupations.

    Results

    We found that the sweet spot of 24-h physical behaviors for better health was far from ‘sit less-move more' zone among adults with physically active occupations. Specifically, among white-collar workers, 24-h physical behavior distribution associated with the best 5% of self-rated health comprised about 30% of the day spent on sedentary behavior, 45% spent actively, and 25% spent on sleep. However, among cleaners, this distribution was about 50% spent sedentary, 15% spent actively, and 35% on sleep and in manufacturing sector, this distribution was about 35% spent sedentary, 35% spent actively, and 30% spent on sleep.

    Conclusion

    The advice ‘sit less-move more' may not bring adults in physically active occupations toward their ‘Sweet-Spot' of 24-h physical behaviors for better health. To promote health for all and reduce social gradient, we see a great need for empirically testing the ‘Sweet-Spot Hypothesis' with high-quality data and strong study design. We hope that the proposal of testing ‘Sweet-Spot Hypothesis' will encourage discussion, debates, and empirical research to expand our collective knowledge about the healthy ‘24-h physical behavior balance' for all.

    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 37.
    Gupta, Nidhi
    et al.
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Dumuid, Dorothea
    Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition and Activity (ARENA), School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
    Vij, Akshay
    Institute for Choice, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia.
    Lund Rasmussen, Charlotte
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark; Section of Social Medicine, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Birk Jørgensen, Marie
    Department of Forensic Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Holtermann, Andreas
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Movement behavior profiles and obesity: a latent profile analysis of 24-h time-use composition among Danish workers2020Inngår i: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497, Vol. 44, nr 2, s. 409-417Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/objectives

    An element of obesity prevention is increasing total physical activity energy expenditure. However, this approach does not incorporate the balance of various movement behaviors—physical activity, sedentary behaviors and sleep - across domains of the day. We aimed to identify time-use profiles over work and leisure, termed ‘movement behavior profiles’ and to investigate their association with obesity.

    Subjects/methods

    Eight-hundred-and-seven workers completed (a) thigh accelerometry and diaries to determine their 24-h composition of behaviors (sedentary and standing, light physical activity and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity at work and leisure, and time in bed) and (b) obesity measurements. Movement behavior profiles were determined using latent profile analyses of isometric log-ratios of the 24-h composition, and labeled according to animal movement behavior traits. Linear models were applied to determine the association between profiles and obesity.

    Results

    Four profiles were identified, labeled as “Chimpanzees” (n = 226), “Lions” (n = 179), “Ants” (n = 244), and “Koalas” (n = 158). “Chimpanzees” work time was evenly distributed between behaviors while their leisure time was predominantly active. Compared to Chimpanzees, “Lions” were more active at work and sedentary during leisure and spent more time in bed; “Ants” were more active at work and during leisure; “Koalas” were more sedentary at work and leisure and spent similar time in bed. With “Chimpanzees” as reference, “Lions” had least favorable obesity indicators: +2.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.6, 3.4) %body fat, +4.3 cm (1.4, 7.3) waist circumference and +1.0 (2.0, 0.0) Body Mass Index (BMI), followed by “Koalas” +2.0 (0.4, 3.7) %body fat, +3.1 cm (0.1, 6.0) waist circumference, and +0.8 (−0.30, 1.94) BMI. No significant differences were found between “Chimpanzees” and “Ants”.

    Conclusions

    Movement behavior profiles across work and leisure time-use compositions are associated with obesity. Achieving adequate balance between work and leisure movement behaviors should be further investigated as a potential obesity prevention strategy.

  • 38.
    Gupta, Nidhi
    et al.
    The National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Denmark.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Dumuid, Dorothea
    Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition and Activity (ARENA), School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.
    Vij, Akshay
    Institute for Choice, University of South Australia, North Sydney, Australia.
    Lund Rasmussen, Charlotte
    The National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Denmark.
    Birk Jørgensen, Marie
    The National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Denmark.
    Korshøj, Mette
    The National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Denmark.
    Holtermann, Andreas
    The National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Denmark.
    Physical-behavior profiles and aerobic capacity: A latent profile analysis of 24-hour time-use composition among Danish workers2019Inngår i: ICAMPAM 2019: Oral Abstracts, Maastricht: ICAMPAM , 2019, artikkel-id O.11.4Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Obtaining a balance between exercise and recovery is an established approach in Exercise Science to improve aerobic capacity. However, it is unknown how different 24-h time-use profiles depicting a balance between physical behaviors (i.e. physical activities, sedentary behavior and sleep) across main domains of the day are associated with aerobic capacity. We aimed to identify such 'physical-behavior (PB) profiles' and to investigate their association with aerobic capacity. Methods Workers (n=807) participated in thigh-accelerometry to determine 24-h time-use composition of physical activity, sedentary and standing during work and leisure, as well as time in bed. Åstrand submaximal cycle ergometer test was used to estimate aerobic capacity. The PB profiles were determined using latent profile analysis of isometric log-ratios representing the 24-hour composition. Linear models were applied to determine the cross-sectional association between physical-behavior profiles and aerobic capacity. Results Four PB profiles were identified that were labeled based on animal traits; Chimpanzees (n=226), Lions (n=179), Ants (n=244), and Koalas (n=158). Compared to Chimpanzees (at work, in mins; sedentary=197, standing=145, physical activity=117; and at leisure in mins; physical activity=114, standing=121, time in bed= 440); Lions were more active at work, sedentary at leisure and spent more time in bed; Ants had more physical activity at work and similar physical activity and time in bed at leisure; Koalas were more sedentary at work and leisure and spent more time in bed. Compared to Chimpanzees, Koalas had lower aerobic capacity (mlO2/kg/min): -3.7 (95%CI -6.0,-1.5), followed by Lions -3.6 (-5.5,-1.7) and Ants -1.8 (-3.7,- 0.1). Conclusions Physical-behavior profiles based on 24-h time-use composition are associated with aerobic capacity. Obtaining a balance between physical behaviors at work and leisure may be a promising approach for improving aerobic capacity.

  • 39.
    Gupta, Nidhi
    et al.
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Aadahl, Mette
    Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Glostrup Hospital, Denmark; Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Jørgensen, Marie Birk
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Holtermann, Andreas
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Are Temporal Patterns of Sitting Associated with Obesity among Blue-Collar Workers?: A Cross Sectional Study Using Accelerometers2016Inngår i: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 16, nr 1, artikkel-id 148Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Little is known about the association of objectively measured temporal patterns of sitting (i.e., how sitting is distributed across time) with obesity indicators. We aimed to investigate the extent to which temporal patterns of sitting (time spent in long, moderate and brief uninterrupted sitting periods) are associated with obesity indicators (body mass index (BMI), waist circumference and fat percentage), independently from moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and total sitting time among blue-collar workers.

    Methods

    Workers (n=205) wore Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometers on the thigh and trunk for 1-4 working days. The time-line of sitting on working days was computed using the validated Acti4 software. Total sitting time and time spent sitting in brief (≤5 mins), moderate (>5 and ≤30 mins), and long (>30mins) periods were determined for the whole day, and for leisure and work separately. Obesity indicators, i.e. BMI (kg/m2), waist circumference (cm) and fat percentage were objectively measured. Associations between duration of sitting periods and each obesity indicator were determined using linear regression analysis adjusted for several potential confounders including objectively measured MVPA and total sitting time.

    Results

    Sitting time in brief periods was negatively associated with obesity indicators for the whole day (BMI, P<0.01; fat percentage, P<0.01; waist circumference, P<0.01) and work (BMI, P<0.01; fat percentage, P<0.01; waist circumference, P<0.01), but not for leisure time. Sitting time in long periods was positively associated with obesity indicators for the whole day (waist circumference, P=0.05) and work (waist circumference, P=0.01; BMI, P=0.04), but not for leisure time. Sitting in moderate periods was not associated with obesity indicators for any domain.

    Conclusion

    Time spent in brief and long periods of sitting during the whole day and at work were inversely associated with obesity indicators when adjusting for MVPA and total sitting time, while sitting during leisure time did not show these associations. Thus, the temporal distribution of sitting seems to influence the relationship between sitting and obesity.

  • 40.
    Gupta, Nidhi
    et al.
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Korshøj, Mette
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Holtermann, Andreas
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Association between Body Mass Index and objectively measured sitting patterns at work and during leisure among blue-collar workers2015Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 41.
    Gupta, Nidhi
    et al.
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Heiden, Marina
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Birk Jørgensen, Marie
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Holtermann, Andreas
    1National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Gender differences in time spent sedentary and in physical activity during leisure: A comparison of data analyzed using a traditional approach and compositional data analysis2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 42.
    Gupta, Nidhi
    et al.
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Mateu-Figueras, Gloria
    Department of Computer Science, Applied Mathematics and Statistics, University of Girona.
    Heiden, Marina
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Birk Jørgensen, Marie
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen.
    Holtermann, Andreas
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen.
    A comparison of standard and compositional data analysis in studies addressing group differences in sedentary behavior and physical activity2018Inngår i: International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, E-ISSN 1479-5868, Vol. 15, nr 1, artikkel-id 53Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Data on time spent in physical activity, sedentary behavior and sleep during a day is compositional in nature, i.e. they add up to a constant value, typically 100% time. Compositional data have fundamentally different properties from unconstrained data in real space, and require other processing and analysis procedures, referred to as compositional data analysis (CoDA). Most physical activity and sedentary behavior studies, however, still apply analytical procedures adapted to data in real space, which can lead to misleading results. The present study describes a comparison of time spent sedentary and in physical activity between age groups and sexes, and investigates the extent to which results obtained by CoDA differ from those obtained using standard analytical procedures.

    Methods. Time spent sedentary, standing, and in physical activity (walking/running/stair climbing/cycling) during work and leisure was determined for 1-4 days among 677 blue-collar workers using accelerometry. Differences between sexes and age groups were tested using MANOVA, using both a standard approach and a CoDA approach based on isometric log-ratio transformed data.  

    Results. When determining differences between sexes in time used for different activities at work, the effect size using standard analysis (η2=0.045, p<0.001) was 15% smaller than that obtained with CoDA (η2=0.052, p<0.001), although both approaches suggested a statistically significant difference. When determining corresponding differences between age groups, CoDA resulted in a 60% larger, and significant, effect size (η2=0.012, p=0.02) than that obtained with the standard approach (η2=0.008, p=0.07). During leisure, results with standard (age; η2=0.007, p=0.09; sex; η2=0.052, p<0.001) and CoDA (age; η2=0.007, p=0.09; sex; η2=0.051, p<0.001) analyses were similar.

    Conclusion. Results and, hence, inferences concerning differences by age and sex in time spent sedentary and in physical activity at work differed between CoDA and standard analysis. We encourage researchers to use CoDA in similar studies, in order to adequately account for the compositional nature of data on physical activity and sedentary behavior

  • 43.
    Gupta, Nidhi
    et al.
    National Research Centre for Working Environment, Copenhagen Denmark.
    Storda Christiansen, Caroline
    National Research Centre for Working Environment, Copenhagen Denmark.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Korshøj, Mette
    National Research Centre for Working Environment, Copenhagen Denmark.
    Gomes Carneiro, Isabella
    National Research Centre for Working Environment, Copenhagen Denmark.
    Holtermann, Andreas
    National Research Centre for Working Environment, Copenhagen Denmark.
    Is Objectively Measured Sitting Time Associated with Low Back Pain?: A Cross-Sectional Investigation in the NOMAD study2015Inngår i: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, nr 3, artikkel-id e0121159Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Studies on the association between sitting time and low back pain (LBP) have found contrasting results. This may be due to the lack of objectively measured sitting time or because socioeconomic confounders were not considered in the analysis.

    Objectives: To investigate the association between objectively measured sitting time (daily total, and occupational and leisure-time periods) and LBP among blue-collar workers.

    Methods: Two-hundred-and-one blue-collar workers wore two accelerometers (GT3X+ Actigraph) for up to four consecutive working days to obtain objective measures of sitting time, estimated via Acti4 software. Workers reported their LBP intensity the past month on a scale from 0 (no pain) to 9 (worst imaginable pain) and were categorized into either low (≤5) or high (>5) LBP intensity groups. In the multivariate-adjusted binary logistic regression analysis, total sitting time, occupational and leisure-time sitting were both modeled as continuous (hours/day) and categorical variables (i.e. low, moderate and high sitting time).

    Results: The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed a significant positive association between total sitting time (hours) and high LBP intensity (odds ratio; OR=1.43, 95%CI=1.15-1.77, P=0.01). Similar results were obtained for leisure-time sitting (OR=1.45, 95%CI= 1.10-1.91, P=0.01), and a similar but non-significant trend was obtained for occupational sitting time (OR=1.34, 95%CI 0.99-1.82, P=0.06). In the analysis on categorized sitting time, high sitting time was positively associated with high LBP for total (OR=3.31, 95%CI= 1.18-9.28, P=0.03), leisure (OR=5.31, 95%CI= 1.57-17.90, P=0.01), and occupational (OR=3.26, 95%CI= 0.89-11.98, P=0.08) sitting time, referencing those with low sitting time.

    Conclusion: Sitting time is positively associated with LBP intensity among blue-collar workers. Future studies using a prospective design with objective measures of occupational sitting time are recommended.

  • 44.
    Haapakangas, Annu
    et al.
    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Bergsten, Eva L.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Office design and occupational health – has research been left behind?2023Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 49, nr 1, s. 1-4Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Fulltekst (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 45.
    Haapakangas, Annu
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning. Turku University of Applied Sciences, Turku, Finland.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Jahncke, Helena
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Self-rated productivity and employee well-being in activity-based offices: the role of environmental perceptions and workspace use2018Inngår i: Building and Environment, ISSN 0360-1323, E-ISSN 1873-684X, Vol. 145, s. 115-124Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Activity-based offices are increasingly popular. However, productivity and well-being in these work environments have been little researched. The aims of this study were to quantitatively determine perception and use of the activity-based office environment in relation to self-rated productivity and well-being at work, and to identify important predictors of these outcomes. Four activity-based offices in a large Swedish government agency were surveyed 12 months after implementation.Two hundred and thirty-nine respondents were included in the analyses. Linear regression models, adjusted for relevant covariates, were constructed separately for predictors measuring satisfaction with different aspect of the environment (physical environment, privacy, communication, personalization, personal storage, IT functions and cleaning) and office use (the number of daily workspace switches, different workspaces used and the time spent looking for a workspace). Satisfaction with the physical environment, privacy and communication had the strongest positive association with self-rated productivity and well-being at work. Increased workspace switching was associated with higher productivity, while an increase in self-reported time spent searching for a workspace was associated with lower productivity and well-being. However, predictors related to office use generally explained only a small proportion of variance in the two outcomes. The results suggest that office developers should focus particularly on privacy needs but also on communication, personalization, smooth workspace switching and minimization of work time spent looking for available workspaces.

  • 46.
    Haapakangas, Annu
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Jahncke, Helena
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    The effects of moving into an activity-based office on communication, social relations and work demands – A controlled intervention with repeated follow-up2019Inngår i: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 66, artikkel-id 101341Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    When organizations adopt activity-based workplaces (ABWs), improved interaction is a common goal. Yet, few controlled longitudinal studies have been conducted on the effects of ABWs on interaction, social relations and work demands. The aim of this natural intervention study was to investigate the effects of moving into an ABW on satisfaction with communication, on social relations (i.e., social support and social community) and on work demands (i.e., quantitative demands, emotional demands and work pace) 3 months and 12 months after the relocation. The study included four offices which relocated into an ABW and one control office that did not. Questionnaire data from 408 respondents were analyzed with linear mixed models. Satisfaction with communication and the sense of belonging to a community had decreased 3 and 12 months after the relocation. Work pace was not affected while small, mostly short-term, negative effects on social support, quantitative demands and emotional demands were only observed among employees who had moved to ABWs from private offices. Differences between office sites were also observed. The results suggest that, to avoid negative outcomes, organizations moving to ABWs should focus on solving difficulties in locating colleagues at the office and on supporting particularly workers from private offices in adopting activity-based working.

  • 47.
    Hagströmer, Maria
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Kwak, Lydia
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Grooten, Wim
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Bergman, Patrick
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    A holistic approach in measuring occupational physical activity: challenges and potentials2015Inngår i: / [ed] University of Limerick, 2015, s. 11-Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Considering that adults spend a considerable proportion of their day at work, employment is a key determinant for daily PA. However, specifics of how and under what circumstances occupational PA (OPA) influences total PA, including other PA domains (e.g. leisure time PA, transport), are unclear. Little is also known about OPA patterns in different occupational groups and how OPA patterns can be changed, among for example those who have mostly sedentary occupations. One important issue concerns if working in a standing position and the use of dynamic chairs has any effect on OPA levels, for instance among office workers. This despite the fact that ergonomists advocate sedentary workers to work in a standing position or use an “active sitting” approach using “dynamic” chairs. To be able to give recommendations regarding PA to employees with different OPA, more insight is needed on how to optimally measure OPA. To move the field forward, knowledge should be combined from different disciplines involved in measuring OPA. Therefore, we want to initiate an interdisciplinary discussion on appropriate measurements of OPA. The aim of the symposium is to present a holistic approach to measuring OPA by combining our expertise in the field of PA and health, measurement of PA using objective measures and self-reported measures, ergonomics, occupational health and public health science.

  • 48.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Autonom reglering, fysisk aktivitet och stress hos personer med långvarig smärta i nacke-skuldra2013Inngår i: Best Practice Smärta, Vol. 1, nr 5, s. 20-23Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 49.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning. Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap.
    Autonomic nervous system regulation in chronic neck-shoulder pain: Relations to physical activity and perceived stress2013Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Neck-shoulder pain (NSP) is a highly prevalent musculoskeletal disorder with unclear causes, and effective prevention and treatment require a further understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Aberrant autonomic nervous system (ANS) regulation is a hypothesized causal element in the development and maintenance of chronic muscle pain.

    The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate possible differences in ANS regulation between chronic NSP and healthy control (CON) groups using both laboratory assessment and ambulatory monitoring in daily life.

    Four papers are included in this thesis, based on data from three groups with chronic NSP. Autonomic responses to laboratory stressors were assessed using heart rate variability (HRV), blood pressure, trapezius muscle activity and blood flow measurements (Study І) in NSP and CON. Long-term ambulatory monitoring of HRV, physical activity and perceived symptoms were assessed in Studies ІІ and IV to investigate group differences in real-life conditions. Finally, the effects of a ten-week intervention (using individually adjusted HRV biofeedback) to reinstating ANS balance in subjects with chronic NSP were evaluated using self-reported symptoms and health ratings, as well as autonomic regulation testing (i.e., evaluating HRV at rest and in response to stress) (Study ІІІ).

    The main findings from the four studies demonstrated aberrant ANS regulation in the NSP group compared to CON, which was predominantly characterized by diminished parasympathetic cardiac activity during rest and sleep, and altered sympathetic reactivity to laboratory stressors (Studies І, ІІ and IV). Different patterns in physical activity were observed between the NSP and CON groups, with reduced physical activity during leisure time in the NSP group (Studies ІІ and IV). Physical activity was found to be positively associated with HRV. Positive effects of HRV-biofeedback were found on perceived health, including social function, vitality and bodily pain, and improved HRV (Study ІІІ).

    In conclusion, imbalanced ANS regulation was demonstrated among persons with chronic NSP at both the systemic and local levels. Diminished parasympathetic activity in NSP was modulated by lower levels of physical activity in leisure time. Interventions targeting ANS functions might benefit persons with chronic NSP.

  • 50.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Stillasittande i arbetslivet: Ett hot mot arbetshälsan?2020Inngår i: Kung. Skytteanska Samfundets årsbok / [ed] Roger Jacobsson, Umeå: Förlagshuset Nordens grafiska AB , 2020, s. 71-80Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
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