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  • 1.
    Kalinnikova, Liya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Education.
    Different roads to the same target: inclusion through exclusion?2019In: Conference book, 2019, article id 249858Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two studies were undertaken in former Soviet republics: Ukraine and Moldova. The first study in 2012-2015 was investigating how families with impaired children experience their lives in societies with transition economies, meeting conditions of poverty. As a result of this study, crucial factors, constituting poverty in these families were analysed and identified as a multi-dimensional issue ‘for understanding the holistic picture of disaster and hardship leading families with ChildrenwithDisabilities (ChDis) to poverty'(4). The research study has shown that special education as an area of social exclusion and segregation of ChDis and their families, rooted in the principle of socialist humanism and ‘DefectologicalEducationalModel (DEM)' (2), played a significant role in the reproduction of poverty in these families. Historical dominance of social exclusion through DEM segregation for disabled learners in the Soviet ideological context, currently is recognised as ‘unrealized utopia' (2). Inclusive movement is met as a meaningful challenge in education, generating resistance from families. The second study started in 2019, investigating inclusion in the same countries, adding Sweden as EU country (1, 3). All the data will be analysed corresponding to contextual circumstances, contributing to further illumination of the research question - if social inclusion in life could be reached through segregation in school?

    References:

    • Berhanu G. (2014). Special education today in Sweden. Special Education International Perspectives: Practice Across the Glob. Advances in Special Education.V.28:209-241.
    • Kalinnikova L., Trygged S. (2014). Retrospect on Care and Denial of Children with Disabilities in Russia. Scandinavian journal on disability research. V.16(3):229-248.
    • Rosenqvist, J. (1986). Psychisch geschädigte Personen und ihre Arbeitsmöglichkeiten in der DDR, in der Bundesrepublik und in Schweden. Eine komparative Studie. Didakometrie und Soziometrie (Malmö, Schweden: Lehrerhochschule), Nr29.
    • Kalinnikova Magnusson, L. (2016). Scientific Report Project title: «Human resources in poverty and disability: family perspective (Moldova and Ukraine)»: Popular description of the project. http://hig.diva-portal.org/smash/record.jsf?pid=diva2%3A931679&dswid=7622
  • 2.
    Kalinnikova, Liya
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Trygged, Sven
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work. Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för socialt arbete.
    A retrospective on care and denial of children with disabilities in Russia2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 229-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In tsarist Russia, disability care was little developed, yet showed certain similarities with other European countries. Disabled children received support through charities and private philanthropy. The October revolution of 1917 proclaimed a better future for all the country's citizens. Issues: How did the disability policy discussion change after the Russian revolution? Who took care of the so-called feeble-minded? What did this care consist of? Methodology: Study of political and scientific documentation of the period from the end of the 1800s to 1936, along with reflections on the ongoing situation found in the diaries of the head of one child institution, Ekaterina Gracheva. Outcomes: 'Educable' children received schooling, while 'non-educable' children were placed in separate institutions. This marginalisation was reinforced by the focus on the productive worker. Soviet Russia developed defectology as a science and increased the use of institutional solutions. 

  • 3.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Education.
    AAC: ethical contexts and ethical dilemmas2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [ru]

    В статье анализируются профессиональные этические контексты и этические делеммы, возникающие как результат противоречий между этими контекстами и этическими принципами. Показано, что этический контекст ААС может быть понят как процесс развития двух противоположных тенденций: междисциплинарной интеграции этических кодексов и профессиональной этической специализации. Эти две тенденции нормируют отношения между специалистами различных профессий и ААС пользователем. Центральной ценностью этих отношений выступает «очеловеченная» коммуникация: понимающая, взаимная, эмпатийная, разделенная и др., развитие и формирование которой сопровождается возникновением целого ряда этических дилемм. В статье также анализируется подход к пониманию этических дилеммы в уникальном профессиональном опыте «встречи» с «со-бытием».

  • 4.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Education.
    AAC: ethics of unique communicative context2015In: Sotsial'no Psihologichni Problemi Tiflopedagogiki [Social-Psychological Problems of Typhlopedagogy], Institute of Special education at National Pedagogica University named after M. Dragomanov, Vol. 12, no 21, p. 92-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: Development of AAC theory and practice has contributed to a powerful change of professional consciousness among AAC experts, bringing new requests and requirements to more complex issues among which ethics has been lifted up and mainstreamed. The aim of the present research is to enter the analysis of the core issues of fundamental professional ethical codes in the light of alternative and augmentative communication; to bring contribution into the “normative” integrated interdisciplinary fundamental ethical principles from the perspective of “meeting with unique AAC-user context”. The research methodology is built upon the study of scientific sources, systematized by international electronic data bases and includes an interdisciplinary approach to its collection. Phenomenology is the basic research methodology to analyzed data. A case study of the family context, where deaf parents are upbringing blind child, is taken as a representative part for the discussion. The primary determinant for the intervention strategy was defined as family-centered, based on conceptual principles of Enabling and Empowering Families and Effective help-giving in the early intervention program. Badiou’s theory of ethics and its dimensions of ‘truth’ as a ‘truth’ of the Event were used for the interpretation of ethics of a unique AAC context and developing a minimal model of a ‘basic values’. It has been shown that each professional community forms its own unique structure of minimal values. The structure of the values forms a meaningful basis for mutual understanding between professionals, family members and professional community in a wider perspective. The success of the AAC implementation as a new discipline is dependent on how all together researchers, professionals and the AAC-users could act ethically developing common understandings, beliefs and values.

  • 5.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Education.
    AAC: meeting Event in life span longitude2017In: / [ed] Professor Doru VIad Popovici, PhD, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: Development of AAC theory and practice has contributed to a powerful change of professional consciousness among AAC experts, bringing new requests and requirements to more complex issues among which ethics has been lifted up and mainstreamed. The aim of the present research is to enter the analysis of the core issues of fundamental professional ethical codes in the light of alternative and augmentative communication; to bring contribution into the “normative” integrated interdisciplinary fundamental ethical principles from the perspective of “meeting with unique AAC-user context”. The research methodology is built upon the study of scientific sources, systematized by international electronic data bases and includes an interdisciplinary approach to its collection. Phenomenology and hermeneutics are the basic research methodology to collect and analyze data. A case study of the family context, where deaf parents are upbringing blind child, is taken as a representative part for the discussion. The primary determinant for the intervention strategy was defined as family-centered, based on conceptual principles of Enabling and Empowering Families and Effective help-giving in the early intervention program. Badiou’s theory of ethics and its dimensions of ‘truth’ as a ‘truth’ of the Event were used for the interpretation of ethics of a unique AAC context. The structure of the values forms a meaningful basis for mutual understanding between professionals, family members and professional community in a wider perspective. The success of the AAC implementation as a new discipline is dependent on how all together researchers, professionals and the AAC-users could act ethically developing common understandings, beliefs and values meeting Event in life span longitude.

  • 6.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Education.
    Challenges Arising From the "Red" and the "White" Special Education Legacy2017In: 15th Biennial International Association of Special Education (IASE) Conference: Addressing the Exceptional Needs of the Whole Child and Young Adult: Embracing the Future, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Soviet Russia and Apartheid South Africa implemented special education under conditions of strong state control. These regimes left a legacy of challenges to current governments in developing inclusive education. We explore these challenges by studying the "red" and the "white" legacy to better understand contextual influences on special and inclusive education.

  • 7.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Education.
    Costs of AAC: methodology of time, space, tools and values2017In: 11th ECER AAC Conference Program / [ed] Professor Doru VIad Popovici, PhD, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite AAC being many-faced/interdisciplinary scientifically and practically with its own about 40 years history, it is dominantly seen through the methodology of communication as a central phenomenon and, specifically, the development/implementation of “communicative instruments” for those who have special communicative needs.

    At the same time methodology of ACC has its cost dimension, which has its fundamental presence in each AAC case in the forms of time, space, individual tools and values. Special needs require support/help and demand for external resources. Environmental response, hopefully provided by a welfare system, becomes a natural and important substitutional societal effort for those with special needs (children and adults). The AAC-effort in its cost dimension has its multilevel structure, where macro-, mezo- and micro- levels are representing specific “life world contexts”, and are often leading families of AAC users to social and economic impoverishment. Such issues of support as service accessibility, quality, regularity, etc. are key aspects of this support and are costly for many societies internationally. AAC, as a communicative tool (low or high technology), comes with a price even though its form might be unclear.     

    All the ECER AAC networking countries have ratified main international documents regarding the rights of children and people with disabilities, professional ethics for establishing national platforms of values toward those who need extra societal resources for human being existence etc, stressing AAC needs. What solutions could be found to diminish the gap between the “declaration” and its “implementation”?   The presentation is aiming to focus on the discussion around this question.

  • 8.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Education. UCRS, Uppsala University, Sweden; Northern Arctic Federal University, Archangelsk, Russia.
    Critical factors of the poverty structure in families upbringing children with disabilities (pre-understanding situation in the Republic of Moldova and Ukraine)2015In: Banber - Bulletin of Yerevan University. Sociology, Economics, ISSN 1829-4545, Vol. 1, p. 42-57Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Education.
    Crucial factors of poverty in families with children with developmental disorders2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [fi]

    This study was designed to study the structure of the critical factors of poverty in families with children with developmental disorders and the role of special education among them. The Ideology of the Soviet period legitimized "equality in poverty" through low but stable standard of living. The liberalization of government reforms after the collapse of the Soviet Union increased economic polarization in the new independent societies. Poverty for families with children with developmental disabilities has become an apparent reality. Based on the study of basic and advanced research and interdisciplinary approach to the analysis of scientific texts, we have identified three critical factors (CF) that structure poverty in these families: CF of financial distress; CF of social "exclusion" and institutional practices of special education; CF of "human resources" and "family capital". The nature of the CF is multi-dimensional. Multidimensionality of each of the factors is manifested in the fact that each of them includes a number of sub-factors that exist at several levels at the same time: macro- (governmentality), meso- (social cultural and special education) and micro- (family); the relationships between sub-factors are complicated and individualized in each family. All of these factors are critical for understanding the holistic picture of disaster and hardship leading families with children with developmental disabilities to poverty. Among all the three critical factors, the dominant role is played by a factor of macro-level: governmentality. Special education in Moldova and Ukraine is rooted in the Soviet "defectological educational model", which during long time was shaped scientifically and practically by the principle of socialist humanism, constructing a context of social exclusion in the form of "defectological square", it became a symbolic result of unrealized "utopia." However, inclusive processes in European education, caused by neoliberal reforms and lack of a new theoretical thinking have put new questions regarding the role and the place of special education in structuring and reproducing poverty. Research in the applied problem continues.

  • 10.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science.
    Developing research and education in the special education field2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Education.
    Differences as a source of development. Some lessons from Vygotsky for culturally diverse learning milieu2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Education.
    Experience of Inclusion in Higher Education in One of the Swedish Industrial Cities in the North (the University of Gävle)2019In: Promoting the Social Inclusion of Youth and Access to Labour Markets: Experiences in Finland, Sweden, and Russia / [ed] Riekkinen M., Kalinnikova Magnusson L., Miuller N., Varlamov G., Antipov A., Kirillova K., Prokopchik M., Gorokhova I., Åbo: Åbo Akademi University, Institute for Human Rights , 2019, 1, p. 16-26Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on understanding the Nordic, Bologna-based platform for inclusive higher education of students with SEN and the implementation of this platform according to the Swedish program of NAIS on national and local (University of Gävle) operational levels. The analysis of Bologna documents shows that expansion of inclusive processes in European HE represents a ‘social dimension in education’ and is essential to the implementation of the Bologna Declaration.

    Inclusion of students with SEN has approximately a 50-year history, and the foundation of the University of Gävle is the result of the diversification of Swedish HE in the 1960–70s. A systematic special education support service for students with SEN in Sweden has developed during the last two decades. During this period, educational support for students’ service of the University of Gävle has become an integral part of the well-functioning network among several Swedish national actors: special education services of HEIs, UHR, SPSM27 and Stockholm University. Remaining autonomous in carrying out their functions, coordinators of the educational support service at the University of Gävle cooperate with other Swedish universities and develop their high-quality professionalism.

    Examining the theoretical foundation engendered conceptual approaches to understanding inclusion in HEIs from both individual and institutional perspectives. Responding to the expansion and belief in the fundamental value of inclusion for European HE, the Swedish Council for Higher Education (UHR) initiated the development of a new program for standardizing different aspects of the inclusion of students with SEN in HEIs, creating NAIS and started its cross-country university functional network implementation in 2017, linking it with 32 HEIs all over Sweden. Introduction to this study data, collected by the NAIS program, is of great interest for the further development of university and societal knowledge about the inclusion of young people with special educational needs in HEIs. The questions discussed and formulated in this paper reveal that understanding inclusion in HE requires further investigation.

  • 13.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science.
    Legacy of special education in Russia2016In: Intensive Municipal Partnerships between Russia and Sweden: Panel IV Human welfare and the Role of Local Government in Inclusion of Persons with Functional Variations in Work and in Study, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science.
    “One step ahead and two steps back”: meeting special education and inclusive challenges in the context of poverty (case study in the context of Republic of Moldova)2016In: Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, ISSN 1471-3802, E-ISSN 1471-3802, Vol. 16, no Suppl. 1, p. 786-788, article id JRS312179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last 20 years Moldavian and Ukrainian societies have been developing inclusive infrastructures, being under complicated transformative changes. There are two main tendencies of the current situation for children with disabilities. The first one is that the inherited system of internat special schools is rapidly changing its functions, expanding, due to work with children from marginal families. In this case economic polarization forms a specific family strategy to protect their children from family economic problems, “intentionally putting” their children in these special school internats. The second strategy is directed towards deinstitutionalization of the system of special school internats, the development of inclusive infrastructure and involvement the non-profit organizations etc. The article is discussing these tendencies, through a case study approach.

  • 15. Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    Ongoing trends in special education2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Education.
    Power influence in disability: gender aspect: Ideas from Sweden as applied on present situation in Russia2017In: : , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Education. UCRS, Uppsala University, Uppsala ; Center of Excellence “Choices of Modernisation”, University of Helsinki, Helsinkii, Finland.
    Presentation of the idea to contribute to the project, based on the case of Archangelsk region (Russia)2016In: : , 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science.
    Response of parents to inclusive education in societies of economical polarisation [Отношение родителей к инклюзивному образованию в изменяющихся обществах/Otnoshenie roditelei k inkluzivnomu obrazovaniu v izmenyzushihsya obshestvah]2017In: Journal of Psychology. Special Pedagogy. Social Work (PSPSW), ISSN 1857-0224, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 31-40, article id CZU 37.018.1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The research is focused on two main tendencies. The first one- reforms of the system of special education and a process of decreasing of special schools; the implementation of the concept of inclusive education and the problem of accessibility of special educational resources. The second tendency is discussing the situation of the attitudes to inclusive education by parents of children with developmental disability in conditions of extreme poverty. The research methodology is based on case study approach and it is a phenomenological study.

  • 19.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Education.
    Scientific Report   Project title: «Human resources in poverty and disability: family perspective (Moldova and Ukraine)»: Popular description of the project2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The project was investigating how families with impaired children experience their lives in societies with transition economies, meeting conditions of poverty [2012-2014, Moldova, Ukraine].

  • 20.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Education.
    Segregation for inclusion?: Special education and child disability in the Soviet special education history2019In: Book of abstracts, 2019, article id 108Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Special education development internationally is lifting up several issues for better understanding the roots of inclusive education as a theory and a practice. Ratification and acceptance of international documents in different aspects of disability, forces countries to pay attention to national particularities for further implementation of inclusion in education. National special education systems have their unique socio-cultural patterns, developed out of research ideas and societal traditions. To understand inclusive education as a theory and a practice means to understand the socio-cultural nature of special education and the role of it as ‘a cultural mediator’ between children with disabilities and society. Formation of the soviet system of special education was reinforced by an extreme ideological belief in pedagogical methods of forming/correcting/re-upbringing future citizens, ideas of which were embedded in the fundamentals of defectology as an integrative science. Officially, defectology was never recognized as a science among social and humanitarian sciences in the national classifier of sciences, but played one of the key roles, studying ‘child disability’ and ‘special education’ for them. Presentation will be focused on some issues of ‘child disability’ and special education, which were central for soviet defectology, interpreting them by the history of ideas methodology

  • 21.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Education.
    Special education in different social context: search for new theoretical approaches2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The article is analyzing the problem of establishing new theoretical approaches to understanding the family role in up bringing and developing children with disabilities in the society of economic polarization, awakened by the collapse of the USSR and the following market transformation. It shows that economic and social order, established in the post-soviet countries, accelerated economic stratification and socio-cultural inequality, becoming a source of poverty in families with children with disabilities. Inequality of life chances, “double poverty”, reproduction of poverty risks are specific manifestations of economic differences in these families. Theories of human and family resources become powerful instruments of knowledge and understanding of changes taking place. The use of these theories in the areas traditional for these sciences, such as special pedagogy and psychology, significantly extends the analysis of the “new conditions” of family fostering, providing the way of “growing into civilization” for children with disabilities.

  • 22.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Education.
    Special Education: Traditions and Transitions (experience from neighboring non EU countries)2016In: Engineering, Education and Psychology, Conference Program Guide, Engineering Information Institute, 2016, p. 18-19Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Moldavian and Ukrainian societies are deconstructing traditional (inherited) welfare institutions, being under extremely complicated transformative challenges, struggling with economical burdens, polarization and poverty affection.  Deconstruction of the “old” system of special education towards inclusion is one challenge. A process of constituting “new” systems of education, making attempts to embed special education in mainstream education, is acknowledging deinstitutionalization as an inevitable stage of this process. When poverty affects this process, different types of resistance from families of children with disabilities appear. Historically and ideologically the Soviet system of special education was constructed based upon the earliest social projects where the state took full responsibility for children with special needs, satisfying their basic needs, accommodating them in special institutions. It means that families of children with disabilities were treated by the state as those who need permanent social-economical support. Critically reflecting upon the inherited system of special education it is evident that several generations of children grown out of becoming parents themselves, accepted this system as extra resources. In the current situation of market liberalization and economical polarization, these parents, protecting their children from family economic burdens are turning to the “old” system, resisting against a process of inclusion. They “intentionally put” their children in these special education institutions, because of the importance of the extra resources of special educational institutions for their children. These families are risking of reproducing a family poverty circle. The other negative effect of this process is a rather big number of special needs children who have not reached mainstream inclusive schools because of the lack of family resources (when special institutions get closed). My research is focusing on what ways could be worked out to overcome traditional assistance of special education (closed institutions) for children with special needs as a system which reproduces unfreedoms in poverty and disability.

    What transformative models of special education could be developed out of traditional forms?

    How to transform special education resources in mainstream education, keeping care of those children with special needs, whose families have stable economical burdens?

  • 23.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Education.
    Substitution of shortage services: Habilitation resources in low income families with hearing impaired children2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science. Uppsala universitet.
    Unfreedoms of poverty and disability: special education as a traditional assistance2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Moldavian and Ukrainian societies are deconstructing traditional (inherited) welfare institutions, being under extremely complicated transformative challenges, struggling with economical burdens, polarization and poverty affection.  Deconstruction of the “old” system of special education (SpE) towards inclusion is one challenge. A process of constituting “new” systems of education, making attempts to embed SpE in mainstream education, is acknowledging deinstitutionalization as an inevitable stage of this process. When poverty affects this process, different types of resistance from families of children with disabilities (FChD) appear. Historically and ideologically the Soviet system of SpE was constructed based upon the earliest social projects where the state took full responsibility for children with special needs (SNCh), satisfying their basic needs, accommodating them in special institutions (SpInst). It means that FChD were treated by the state as those who need permanent social-economical support. Critically reflecting upon the inherited system of SpE it is evident that several generations of children grown out of becoming parents themselves, accepted this system as extra resources. In the current situation of poverty, these parents, protecting their children from family economic burdens are turning to the “old” system “intentionally putting” their children in these SpInst reproducing a family poverty circle. A negative effect of this process is a rather big number of SNCh who have not reached mainstream inclusive schools because of the lack of family resources (when SpInst get closed). My research is focusing on what ways could be found to overcome traditional assistance of SpE for SNCh as a system which reproduces unfreedoms in poverty and disability. 

  • 25.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science.
    Vägen till eleven2017Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science.
    СОЦИАЛЬНАЯ ИНКЛЮЗИЯ ЧЕРЕЗ СЕГРЕГАЦИЮ? СПЕЦИАЛЬНОЕ ОБРАЗОВАНИЕ В МЕЖДУНАРОДНОМ ОБОЗРЕНИИ [Social Inclusion through segregation? International Perspective in special education]2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Education.
    Bodorin, Cornelia
    PSU named after I. Creange (Republic of Moldova).
    Habilitation resources in families with hearing impaired children: substitution and complementation of shortage services (Republic of Moldova)2017In: TILTAI, ISSN 1392-3137, Vol. 77, no 2, p. 11-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Habilitation of children with hearing impairment is becoming an integral part of the education system in Republic of Moldova, which remains one of the poorest countries in Europe. The research data presented in this article show that accessibility to education for children with disabilities is full of contradictions. The research focuses on the ongoing reform of special education and assesses the adaptation of democratic values in education from the perspective of habilitation. The families involved in this research were low income full families who had a school age children with hearing impairment, lived in an urban environment of the big city and experienced shortage of services for their children. The assumption was taken, that in search for solution these families tend to compensate for the lack of services by self-creating the resources of habilitation. Results of the qualitative research highlighted two problems: social and economic. The essence of these problems – management of social stigmatization through realization of habilitation resources as a mean to compensate and replenish the lack of services. Research data also revealed the necessity of further construction and conceptualisation of habilitation resources.

  • 28.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Education.
    Chiperi, Nadezhda
    State Pedagogical University named after I. Creangi.
    Parents with mental retardation and family resources: the narrative of social exclusion in the conditions of extreme poverty [the sample from Republic of Moldova]2014In: Scientific journal of the National Pedagogical Dragomanov University. Series 19: Special Education and Psychology, ISSN 2310-0893, no 26, p. 433-441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article is analyzing a problem of family resources in the family of single father with mental retardation upbringing two adolescents in the conditions of extreme poverty. Research methodology based on the model of the case study qualitative research within the phenomenological “life world” and hermeneutics approaches. The study has gotten whole description of the father’s “life world” and its structural and essential elements constituting it. It is shown that family “life world” is structured by experience of coping with the extreme poverty within the context of strong social exclusion, and is controlled by the father’s family story and has class socio-economic nature. Family resources such as: health, education, social context and economic conditions of the family and its members are characterized as being affected by different type of limitations and dependence on external “donor’s” sources. The discussion is lifting up the moral-ethical problem of special education and “universal” values and what role should they play in the process of structuring essential elements of ” the life world”  experience in such families.

  • 29.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Education.
    Magnusson, Magnus
    Stockholm University, department of special education.
    Conceptualizing literacy in AAC: some reflections2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Literacy is a concept which almost has taken over and included concepts like reading, writing and inter human social communication in general. However, it has only recently been integrated into the AAC-field of social work, special education and assistive technologies. This paper focusses on some key-questions regarding AAC and literacy, mentioning that the holistic approach of AAC in combination with a general linguistic theory as the one by Charles Peirce and, by that, creates more whole or holistic perspective for thinking and looking for answers on these questions. The social model created by Uri Bronfenbrenner is also very applicable. Even though a holistic approach demands openness on the behalf of the teacher or interventionist as well as of the user her/himself, it is important to remember the need for good methods and methodology, based upon good practical evidence.

  • 30.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Education.
    Magnusson, Magnus
    Literacy as a toll for socialization of AAC users2015In: Main Issues in Special Education : Scientific Methodical Journal, ISSN 1829-4294, Vol. 3, p. 265-275Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Education.
    Magnusson, Magnus
    Sovremennaya sotsialjnaya rabota i traditsionnoje spetsialjnoje obrazovanije: "obsheje sotsialjnoje". Rossiya i Severnije strani. [Contemporary social work and traditional special education: "common social". Russian and Nordic countries]2015In: Sotsialjnaya rabota XXI veka: globaljnije vizovi i regionaljnaya practika [Social work 21 century: global challeges and local practice]: Monography / [ed] Danilova, R., Troshina, T. & Malik, L., Archangelsk, Russia: Northern Arctic Federal University named after M.Lomonosov , 2015, 1, p. 55-64Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Education.
    Magnusson, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Department of special education.
    Социальная политика в отношении детской «дефективности» в военно-революционный период и первую декаду Советской власти (1914–1927 годы): [Social policy of child "defectivity" during the war-revolutionary period and the first decade of Soviet power establishment (1914-1927)]2015In: Vestnik SAFU. Serija Gumanitarnye i sotsialnye nauki, ISSN 2227-6564, Vol. 1, p. 157-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social policy in the field of child “defectivicy” during the war and the first years of Soviet power formation (1914-1920) was performed in conditions of the severe socio-political disaster. Multimilliondemographic losses of the future human resources in forms of bad health children, a high rate of child mortality, potentially not born children in the future decades etc. – are standing in the line with the other facts of the war-revolutionary circumstances of the historical period in focus. Analysis of the texts of the number of historical documents, which are relevant to the dominant political and scientific areas in this field, allowed to identify the essence of the social doctrine of the country of Soviets and its role in understanding the key actors of a new social policy in the field of “defective” childhood. The definition of child “defectivicy” got a rather wide interpretation. Among the traditional understanding of “defective/ sick child”, a new category of "defective” children has appeared – they were disadvantaged and homeless/street children and teens. Philanthropic and private forms of social care of “defective/sick” children, supported by the social policy of the Russian Empire, were nationalized. Instead those “new institutions” were established: the first prototypes of the soviet internat institutions (schools communes for morally-defective). Traditionally “defective/sick” and “new defective” children and teens were united in the “single army of morally-defective”. A new social doctrine of the country of Soviets, expressed by the principle of socialistic humanism, in practice (by different reasons), didn’t protect the right of the most socially vulnerable group of children to become full members of the new society. A scientific discourse of “care taking” appeared inside Curative pedagogy and Pedology. Defectology, took the place of scientific philanthropy and established the foundation of the scientific knowledge about “defective” children, becoming a crucial regulator of social political discussions of "care taking" about them during upcoming decades of the Soviet era.

  • 33.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Education.
    Magnusson, Magnus
    Northern (Arctic) Federal University named after M.V. Lomonosov, Archangel, Russia.
    Bal, Natalia
    State Pedagogical University named after M. Tank, Minsk, Belarus.
    Developing Inclusive Infrastructure by Bringing AAC Knowledge for Special Education in Adjoining Countries to EU2015In: Journal of the Comenius Association, ISSN 2033-4443, no 24, p. 21-24Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    AAC is an abbreviation for the concept Alternative and Augmentative Communication, a joint term for methods used to support and develop communication for individuals who are non-speaking or with severe communicative disabilities. From 2007 and onwards, universities in Sweden, Belarus, Russia and Ukraine have cooperated to develop strategies for integrating these methods into inclusive special education practice and education in each country. The report will present some results and ongoing activities. In Sweden AAC is well-known and methods are used in many inclusive settings. In Russia there are a number of habilitation settings where training in communicative AAC-methods are available and some national and international conferences have been administrated as well as reports published. In Ukraine, some activities are developed from one university in Kyiv and finally in Belarus, AAC is well integrated into the central curriculum on special education training of teachers and others in the country. The cooperation has been initiated from Sweden through projects financed by Swedish agencies and some support from international AAC agencies. The results show that developing new structures in the infrastructure takes time but that international cooperation between EU and adjoining countries support joint inclusive development.

  • 34.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Education.
    Walton, Elizabeth
    Wits school of education, Johanneburg University, South Africa.
    Challenges Arising From the Special Education Legacies in South Africa and Soviet Russia2017In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591XArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Kalinnikova-Magnusson, Liya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science.
    Ontologiya neprotivorechivosti sotsialnoi konstruksii spotsialnogo i inklusivnogo obrasovaniya [Ontology of self-consistency of social construction of special and inclusive learning]2018In: «ИНВАЛИДЫ – ИНВАЛИДНОСТЬ – ИНВАЛИДИЗАЦИЯ» / [ed] Saralieva Z. M., Nizhnii Novgorod: NISOTS , 2018, p. 387-391Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article is focussing on and discussing several central issues about relations between special and inclusive education, such as: what is known about inclusive education for children with disabilities?; cultural-historical experience of some countries and filiation of inclusive education ideas; millennium sustainable developmental goals and special education. Themes of ’ontological consistency’ of the nature of special and inclusive education and special education as a ‘cultural mediator’ between children with disabilities and society are presented.

  • 36.
    Kalinnikova-Magnusson, Liya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Education. Uppsala Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies (UCRS), Uppsala University, Sweden; Northern Arctic Federal University, Archangelsk, Russia.
    [Structure of poverty in families with children with developmental disabilities (pre-understanding situation in  the Republic of Moldova and Ukraine)]2015In: Pictures of poverty in societies under transformation / [ed] Liya Kalinnikova-Magnusson, Silvia Belibova, [Chisinau]: - , 2015, p. 28-56Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Kalinnikova-Magnusson, Liya
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Education. Uppsala Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies (UCRS), Uppsala University, Sweden; Northern Arctic Federal University, Archangelsk, Russia.
    Belibova, SilviaState Pedagogical University named after Ion Creanga, Chisinau, Moldova.
    Pictures of poverty in societies under transformation2015Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Ryskina, Victoria
    et al.
    Saint Petersburg Information Center “Family”, Russian Federation.
    Artamonova, Anna
    Caritas educational center for social service, Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation.
    Kalinnikova Magnusson, Liya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science.
    Magnusson, Magnus
    Northern Arctic Federal University named after M.Lomonosov, Arkhangelsk.
    von Tetzchner, Stephen
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Augmentative and Alternative Communication in Russia2016In: 17th Biennial Conference of International Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 8-13 August, 2016, Toronto, Canada: Bringing Us Together / [ed] Bronwyn Hemsley; Gregor Renner, 2016, p. 190-, article id 113Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) has a relatively short history in Russia. Especially communication possibilities for people who have low communication and cognitive skills have not been well known i Russia. Russian professionals and researchers are becoming more informed about AAC research and practice but the process of implementation is still moderate. One reason for the limited information about AAC in Russia is related to the fact that official ideology did not recognize alternative communication forms as a «normative» language. Another reason was the concern that use of AAC might have a negative effect on speech development. The implementation is geographically irregular and unsystematic but three international conferences in the European part of Russia have had a strong influence. The community of professionals using AAC has grown in the last years, as evidenced by the number of conference participants. There were more than 300 participants in each of the conferences. The discussions included issues of availability and acceptance of the alternative communicative means in society, their legalization in schools, procedure of assessment. New professional alliances have been established, and the possibility has been raised that Russian professionals may join in ISAAC international, not just as individual members, but as a Russian language AAC Chapter.

1 - 38 of 38
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