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  • 1.
    Blomqvist, Sven
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Sports science.
    Ervasti, Per-Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Sports science.
    Elcadi, Guilherme H.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Sports science.
    Evaluating physical workload by position during match in elite bandy2018In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, ISSN 1064-8011, E-ISSN 1533-4287, Vol. 32, no 9, p. 2616-2622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To improve current understandings of physical Workload (WL) in elite Bandy, ten bandy players were monitored for heart rate (HR) during thirteen matches over one championship season. Participants were divided into five subgroups according to playing position - libero, defender, halves, midfielder and forward. HR measurements were analyzed with two different methods to compute physical WL - (i) percentage of total time spent in different HR zones (HRres) and (ii) WL based on the Edwards method. Also determined was the time spent at HR levels above the lactate threshold (LT). A one-way ANOVA was used for analysis. For WL according to the Edwards method, significant differences (p=0.05) were shown between groups with defenders presenting the highest scores and forwards and liberos the lowest. A significant difference (p=0.05) was found between liberos and halves and the other positions as to how much time they spent in zone 70-80% of HRres. In 91-100% of HRres there was a distinct difference between defenders and the other positions and also forwards differed significantly from liberos, defenders and halves (p=0.05). The libero spent only one percent of the time over the LT, whereas the midfielder spent about 27% of the time over the LT. Overall, defenders showed the greatest WL during a match and liberos the lowest. The practical implications of these findings can help coaches and trainers design training methods specific to each position as well as individualized training sessions for each player in elite bandy.

  • 2.
    Crenshaw, Albert
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Elcadi, Guilherme
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Reproducibility and gender comparisons of oxygenation, blood flow and oxygen consumption for the forearm2010In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 384-385Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Crenshaw, Albert G
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Elcadi, Guilherme H
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Forearm oxygen delivery, consumption and blood flow before and after fatigue in subjectsexperiencing work related muscle pain and healthy controls2010In: Proceedings of the Premus 2010 conference (Seventh International Conference on Prevention of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders), Angers, France, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Crenshaw, Albert G
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Elcadi, Guilherme H
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hellström, Fredrik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Reliability of near infrared spectroscopy for measuring forearm and shoulder oxygenation in healthy males and females2012In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 112, p. 2703-2715Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study determined the day-to-day reliability of NIRS-derived oxygenation responses (ΔStO 2%) for isometric contractions and for cuff occlusion. Twenty-four subjects (12 males and 12 females) were tested on two days (4-6 days interval). Variables generated were: (i) ΔStO 2% for isometric contractions (10%, 30%, 50% and 70% MVC) for descending trapezius (TD) and extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscles; (ii) slope changes in total haemoglobin (HbTslope) and deoxyhaemoglobin (HHbslope) for the ECR using upper arm venous (VO, 50 mmHg) and arterial occlusion (AO, 250 mmHg); (iii) recovery slopes (Rslope) for oxygen saturation (StO2) following isometric contractions and AO. For each variable an intraclass correlation (ICC) was calculated to assess the ability to differentiate between subjects, and limits of agreement (LOA) were computed to assess day-to-day consistency of the measurement. ICCs for ΔStO2% were lowest at 10% MVC for both ECR (0.58) and TD (0.55), and highest at 30% MVC for ECR (0.95) and at 70% MVC for TD (0.79). For both muscles, LOA for ΔStO 2% was lowest at 10% and highest at 50% and 70% MVC. ICC for HbTslope was 0.17. For HHbslope ICC was higher for AO (0.83) than for VO (0.73), and LOA was lower for AO. For the ECR Rslope ICCs ranged 0.88–0.90 for contraction, but was lower for AO (0.33); LOA was lowest at 70% MVC. For trapezius Rslope ICCs ranged 0.63–0.73 and LOA was lowest at 30% MVC. For this study establishing reliability data for the ECR and TD, and including variables commonly reported, are expected to have meaning for future NIRS studies of work-related upper-extremity pain as well as for other NIRS research and clinical applications.

  • 5.
    Elcadi, Guilherme
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Forsman, Mikael
    Public Health Sciences, Karolinska institute, Stockholm.
    Aasa, Ulrika
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University.
    Fahlström, Martin
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine, Umeå University.
    Crenshaw, Albert
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Shoulder and forearm oxygenation and myoelectric activityin patients with work-related muscle pain and healthy subjects2013In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 113, no 5, p. 1103-1115Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Elcadi, Guilherme
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Forsman, Mikael
    Karolinska institutet.
    Crenshaw, Albert
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Oxygenation and myoelectric activity in the forearm and shoulder muscles of males and females2010In: MEDICINE AND SCIENCE IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE, ISSN 0195-9131, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 384-384, article id 1745Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Elcadi, Guilherme
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Forsman, Mikael
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Public Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Crenshaw, Albert
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    The relationship between myoelectric activity and oxygenation during isometric contractions in the forearm and shoulder muscles of healthy males and females2010In: The XVIII Congress of the International Society of Electrophysiology and Kinesiology (ISEK), 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Elcadi, Guilherme
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Forsman, Mikael
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Aasa, Ulrika
    5 Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Fahlström, Martin
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation and Department of Clinical Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden .
    Crenshaw, Albert
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Oxygenation and hemodynamics do not underlie early muscle fatigue for patients with work-related muscle pain2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 4, p. e95582-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients suffering from work-related muscle pain (WRMP) fatigue earlier during exercise than healthy controls. Inadequate oxygen consumption and/or inadequate blood supply can influence the ability of the muscles to withstand fatigue. However, it remains unknown if oxygenation and hemodynamics are associated with early fatigue in muscles of WRMP patients. In the present study we applied near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) on the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) and trapezius (TD) muscles of patients with WRMP (n = 18) and healthy controls (n = 17). Our objective was to determine if there were group differences in endurance times for a low-level contraction of 15% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) – sustained for 12-13 min, and to see if these differences were associated with differences in muscle oxygenation and hemodynamics. At baseline, oxygen saturation (StO2%) was similar between groups for the ECR, but StO2% was significantly lower for TD for the WRMP patients (76%) compared to controls (85%) (P < 0.01). Also, baseline ECR blood flow was similar in the two groups. For both muscles there were a larger number of patients, compared to controls, that did not maintain the 15% MVC for the allotted time. Consequently, the endurance times were significantly shorter for the WRMP patients than controls (medians, ECR: 347 s vs. 582 s; TD: 430 s vs. 723 s respectively). Responses in StO2% during the contractions were not significantly different between groups for either muscle, i.e. no apparent difference in oxygen consumption. Overall, we interpret our findings to indicate that the early fatigue for our WRMP patients was not associated with muscle oxygenation and hemodynamics.

  • 9.
    Elcadi, Guilherme H
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Forsman, Mikael
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Public Health Sciences, Institute Karolinska, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Crenshaw, Albert G
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Gender differences in the forearm for the oxygenation and myoelectric activity relation, muscle blood flow and oxygen consumption2010In: Proceedings of the Premus 2010 conference, Angers, France, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Elcadi, Guilherme H
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. University of Umeå, Sweden .
    Forsman, Mikael
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Crenshaw, Albert G
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    The relationship between oxygenation and myoelectric activity in the forearm and shoulder muscles of males and females2011In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 111, no 4, p. 647-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to investigate the relationship between oxygen saturation (StO(2)%) measured with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and myoelectric activity (root mean square, RMS) for the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) and trapezius muscles. In addition, gender differences were examined for submaximal (10-70% MVC) and sustained (10% MVC for 5 min) isometric contractions. Thirteen males and 15 females participated. Changes in StO(2)% (∆StO(2)%) and RMS, expressed as percentages of maximum, were calculated for each submaximal contraction. A good correlation between ∆StO(2)% and RMS was seen for the ECR (r = -0.53) and a moderate correlation seen for the trapezius muscle (r = -0.44). The ANOVA showed a significant decrease in ECR-∆StO(2)% over force with females demonstrating a tendency for larger changes than males. ECR-RMS increased over force with no impact of gender. For the trapezius, ∆StO(2)% decreased over force but was not gender dependent. Trapezius-RMS increased over force with females demonstrating a tendency for greater change than males. For the sustained contraction, ECR-StO(2)% changed over time but was not gender dependent. ECR-RMS increased over time with females showing a greater response than males. Trapezius-StO(2)% changed over time and differed between genders, i.e., males increased while females decreased. RMS increased over time similarly for both genders. In conclusion, our data show that the ECR and trapezius aerobic demands during isometric contractions are negatively correlated to electromyography (EMG) RMS. The present study also suggests some gender specificity for forearm and shoulder myoelectric activity and oxygenation for submaximal and sustained contractions.

  • 11.
    Elcadi, Guilherme H.
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Sports science.
    Tsaklis, Panagiotis
    Alexander Technological Institute of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Blomqvist, Sven
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Sports science.
    Ervasti, Per-Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Sports science.
    W. Söderström, Mikael
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Sports science.
    Forsman, Mikael
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Richter, Hans
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    A Strong Correlation Between Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex And Vastus Lateralis Activity During Running To Fatigue2016In: Medicine and science in sports and exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 854-854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fatigue is a phenomenon of pronounced importance in sports. Recently, there is strong evidence of interplay between the prefrontal cortex and motor output during fatiguing contractions. The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPC) due to its large involvement in cognitive and motor activities is believed to be involved but this requires physiological clarification. AIM: We investigated the relationship between DLPC activity - responses in oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) and total hemoglobin (HbT) measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), and the vastus lateralis muscle (VL) activity - quantified as root-mean-square (RMS) of the EMG signal, during a fatigue protocol.

    METHODS: Four male runners (32±12 yrs) with probes for NIRS over the DLPC and EMG over the VL performed a track running test at a constant speed to fatigue (exhaustion). The running speed was individually determined as the average speed of a 1200-m time trial performed ~3 days prior to testing. For NIRS changes in μmole/L of HbO2 and HbT were computed. The VL EMG-RMS of the contraction of each step was normalized as a percent of a submaximal reference contraction (%RMS), thus removing the non-activity between steps. Data of 10s epochs at 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100% of time for each lap were averaged for analyses. Regression analyses performed with HbO2 and with HbT as dependent variables and %RMS as the independent variable.

    RESULTS: Over time there was an increase in HbO2 and HbT in the DLPC, and in VL-%RMS. Both HbO2 and HbT correlated strongly with EMG-RMS during running to fatigue (see figures below); p<0.001 for both.

    CONCLUSION: The strong relationship between DLPC and VL activities during running to fatigue suggests the involvement of the DLPC in the central processing of fatigue.

  • 12.
    Gold, Judith E.
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Lewis, Charlotte
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Elcadi, Guilherme H.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Trapezius oxygenation and hemodynamics during work : a field study using EMG and Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS)2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Relative blood volume (RBV) and muscle oxygenation (TSI) can be measured using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), but no studies have used NIRS with workers performing their job in the field. The study aims were (1) to assess day-to-day within-subjects dispersion in NIRS measurements during work, and (2) to determine whether trapezius RBV and TSI differed between office and industrial workers. Electromyography (EMG) measured trapezius muscle activity.

    Methods. Portable NIRS and EMG instruments were adhered to the trapezius of healthy female industrial (n = 8) and office (n = 10) workers for approximately four hours on two separate days. Mean and standard deviation (SD) RBV, TSI and 50th percentile EMG were calculated for both days separately. Participants were videotaped to demarcate work and rest periods, and to qualitatively assess ergonomic exposures. Two-way mixed effects models were constructed to examine outcomes, with occupation (office/industrial) and work/rest as fixed effects and subject as a random effect.

    Results. Industrial workers appeared to have more variable arm postures and handled heavier loads than office workers. The between-days variability of RBV and TSI indicated that NIRS performed well in an occupational setting. Median trapezius EMG showed an effect of occupation (p < 0.0001), and an interaction between occupation and work/rest (p < 0.0001). As expected, industrial workers had higher median EMG overall and during work, but office workers had a higher EMG during rest. Similar results for EMG SD were found. Mean RBV and RBV SD were greater in industrial workers. No effects on mean TSI were found. However, TSI SD was higher in industrial workers, while TSI SD was greater in office workers during rest.

    Discussion. NIRS had a satisfying reliability and showed face validity with respect to expected responses to occupational work. NIRS shows promise as a method for measuring hemodynamics in the field.

  • 13.
    Hilgert Elcadi, Guilherme
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Near infrared spectroscopy for assessing oxygenation and hemodynamics in the upper extremities of healthy subjects and patients with work-related muscle pain2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of work-related muscle pain (WRMP) is large in the general population in the industrialized world. Despite significant advances over recent years in some research areas, the mechanisms of why WRMP occurs and the pathophysiological mechanisms behind the disorders are still unclear. One suggested explanation is that WRMP is caused initially by a limitation of the local muscle circulation and oxidative metabolism. There is a lack of objective methods to gauge the development and diagnosis of WRMP.

     

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a non-invasive technique that allows for determinations of oxygenation and blood flow. The purpose of this thesis was to evaluate NIRS (1) as a method for measuring muscle oxygenation and hemodynamics for the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) and trapezius descendens muscles (TD), and (2) to investigate whether variables measured by NIRS differed between patients diagnosed with WRMP and healthy subjects.

     

    Several variables of NIRS were produced and investigated. These included muscle oxygenation (StO2%), changes during contractions (∆StO2%) and StO2% recovery (Rslope), total hemoglobin (HbT) as an indication of blood volume and its changes during contractions (∆HbT). In addition, for the ECR, by applying an upper arm venous occlusion (VO) HbTslope increase as a surrogate of blood flow, and for both VO and arterial occlusion (AO) HHbslope increase (i.e. deoxyhemoglobin slope) as a surrogate of oxygen consumption were variables of interest.

     

    A first objective was to determine how StO2% and HbT responded to various contraction forces and how it related to muscle activation measured by electromyography (EMG). For both muscles isometric contractions of 10, 30, 50 and 70% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) were maintained for 20 s each by healthy males and females; additionally a 10% MVC contraction was sustained for 5 min. For the different contraction levels, predictable relationships were seen between ∆StO2% and force, and between ∆StO2% and EMG RMS amplitude. The general trend was a decrease in ∆StO2% with increasing force and increasing EMG. Females showed a tendency for a higher oxygen use (i.e., drop in StO2%) for the ECR over force levels than males and a higher RMS% MVC for the TD. For the 10% MVC contraction sustained for 5 min gender specific changes over time for HbT and RMS for the ECR, and for StO2% for the TD muscle were seen.

     

    A second objective was to determine the day-to-day reliability of NIRS variables for the ECR and TD muscles at group level (Pooled data) and at gender level (males and females). Measurements were performed on two occasions separated by 4-6 days and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and limits of agreement (LOA) were determined as reliability and reproducibility indicators, respectively. Variables tested were ∆StO2% during submaximal isometric contractions of 10, 30, 50 and 70% MVC and StO2% recovery (Rslope) after contractions and after AO. For the ECR, HbTslope as an indication of blood flow (using VO) and HHbslope as a surrogate of oxygen consumption for both VO and AO were computed. For ∆StO2% for the ECR the highest ICC was at 30% MVC for both the pooled data and at gender level. For the TD ICCs were comparably high for 30, 50, 70 % MVC (for both muscles the ∆StO2% at 10% MVC showed the lowest ICC). Further, females showed a higher ICC than males for contraction levels of 50 and 70% MVC. For both muscles, LOA for ∆StO2% was lowest at 10% and highest at 50 and 70% MVC. For the ECR Rslope ICCs were high for all contraction levels, but was lower for AO; LOA was lowest at 70% MVC. For the TD, Rslope ICCs were also high for all contraction levels and LOA was lowest at 30 % MVC. ICC for HbTslope was the lowest of all variables tested. For HHbslope ICC was higher for AO than for VO, and LOA was lower for AO.

     

    A third objective was to determine if there were differences between healthy subjects and patients diagnosed with WRMP in ∆StO2% and ∆HbT responses during varying submaximal contractions (10, 30, 50 and 70% MVC), and StO2% recovery (Rslope) immediately after contractions and AO. Additional variables tested in the ECR at rest were HHbslope to indicate oxygen consumption (using AO) and HbTslope as an indication of blood flow. There were no differences between groups in ∆StO2% and ∆HbT variables during the contractions or Rslope in the recovery after contractions or AO. Furthermore, HbTslope was not different between groups However, oxygen consumption for the ECR and StO2% for the TD at rest were significantly greater for healthy subjects compared to patients.

     

    A fourth objective was to determine if there were differences in StO2% and HbT between healthy subjects and WRMP patients during a 12 min sustained contraction of 15 % MVC. In addition, the protocol included a recovery period of 30 min. Prior to contraction, as well as during the recovery period, HbTslope as a surrogate of blood flow was determined for the ECR. Neither the ECR nor the TD exhibited significant differences between groups for StO2% and HbT during the contraction. For the TD patients showed a lower StO2% value at rest and throughout the contraction than healthy subjects. For the ECR HbT during the sustained contraction the general trend was an initial decrease with gradual increase throughout the contraction for both groups. For HbTslope no differences were seen between patients and healthy subjects before the sustained contraction and during the recovery period for both muscles.

    NIRS is deemed a suitable technique for assessing physiological measurements of the upper extremity, including for day-to-day testing.

    NIRS was not able to distinguish between the patients with WRMP and controls. A concern in the thesis is the characteristics of the patient group in being equally active in recreational sports, actively working, and similar in muscle strength as controls. Thus, applying NIRS for studying a more severe patient group could yield different results.

  • 14.
    Kotsa, K.
    et al.
    Diabetes Center, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, 1st Department of Internal Medicine, AHEPA University Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Elcadi, Guilherme H.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Sports science.
    Grammatiki, M.
    Diabetes Center, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, 1st Department of Internal Medicine, AHEPA University Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Xergia, S.
    Division of Physiotherapy, European University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus.
    Catrina, S. B.
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery (MMK), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tsaklis, P.
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery (MMK), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Physiotherapy, Alexander TEI, Thessaloniki, Greece .
    Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activity towards fatigue of type 2 diabetes patients with macro-angiopathy and peripheral neuropathy (pilot study)2017In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 60, p. S446-S447Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Richter, Hans
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Crenshaw, Albert G.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Domkin, Dmitry
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Elcadi, Guilherme H.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Near infrared spectroscopy as a useful research tool to measure prefrontal cortex activity during visually demanding near work2016In: IIE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors, ISSN 2157-7323, Vol. 4, no 2-3, p. 164-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Unlike the usual skeletal muscles, ciliary muscles responsible for focusing the crystalline eye lens and extraocular muscles responsible for convergence eye movements appear resistant to fatigue. Purpose: The dual goals of this article are to briefly outline the current evidence that suggests that probing into blood flow and hemodynamic prefrontal brain activity with Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) could advance progress in visual ergonomic research, and to provide pilot data exemplifying the proposed approach. Methods: The vision task consisted of sustained focusing on a contrast-varying black and white Gabor grating. Four participants with a median age of 46 (IQR 44 – 50) fixated the grating from a distance of 65 cm. Three counterbalanced 10-min tasks required central fixation and accommodation/convergence on the grating target through: (i) 0.0 diopter (D) lenses, (ii) −1.5 D lenses, and (iii) −3.5yD lenses while maintaining maximal focus. Non-invasive measurements of local oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) were quantified with a one-channel Near Infrared Spectrometer, NIRS. The NIRS probe was placed on the prefrontal cortex in the vicinity of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex or Brodmann area 46 (DLPFC, BA 46). Accommodation response and contrast threshold was measured in parallel. Results: General estimating equation analyses showed that baseline subtracted DLPFC blood flow (ΔHbO2) increased significantly over time in all three lens conditions. The effect of time may be caused by a continuous increase in mental effort to compensate for progressively more mental fatigue induced by increased visual attention. The increase of DLPFC ΔHbO2 was also larger in magnitude in participants with larger amplitudes accommodation response (i.e., in participants who minimized deterioration in visual performance). Conclusion: The results from this study indicate that oxyhemoglobin changes recorded over DLPFC with NIRS can be used to assay the degree to which the visual system is strained during demanding near work.

  • 16.
    Richter, Hans
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Domkin, Dmitry
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Elcadi, Guilherme H.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Sports science.
    Anderson, H. W.
    Skogforsk, the forestry research institute of Sweden, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Högberg, Hans
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Englund, Martin
    Skogforsk, the forestry research institute of Sweden, Uppsala, Sweden.
    A comparison of mental and visual loads resulting from semi-automated and conventional forest harvesting: An experimental machine simulation study2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is concerned with a new method for partly automating forestry harvesting work. Work-related injuries and constant demands for a higher productivity are two of the many arguments for why forestry work must be improved. Forestry work places great mental demands on the driver because they must continuously evaluate and act on relevant parts in a heavy visual information flow. Against this background the purpose of the present study was to extend the knowledge of functional linkages between visual and mental fatigue, performance, and prefrontal cortex activity, during semi-automated and conventional forestry harvesting work. Eleven healthy participants, range 21–51 years old, with a minimum of 1-year work experience, carried out the task of loading logs along a standardized path in a machine simulator during two counterbalanced 45-min periods: (i) conventional forest harvesting, and; (ii) semi-automated forest harvesting. Equal emphasizes was put on accuracy and speed. During manual forest harvesting the driver controlled the crane arm, used to load logs into the load space of the forest vehicle (“forwarder”), by manually operating the joysticks and so guide the crane to the location of the log and then back to the load space. During semi-automatic forest harvesting the driver moved the crane with the press of a button to a pre-programmed location near the log and then, after another button press, to a pre-programmed location within the load space. The following joystick usage parameters were considered for the statistical analysis: Sequential work cycle number, work phase (1-loading in basket, 2-movement to log, 3-picking up log, 4-movement to load space), number of simultaneously used controls across samples of one phase, number of direction changes of joystick movements per phase. Mental load was assessed by quantification of oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO2) concentration changes over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) via non-invasive functional near infrared spectrometry (fFNIRS: PortaLite mini, Artinis Medical Systems, Zetten, the Netherlands). The frequency and duration of horizontal amplitudes of eye/head/neck angles was assessed continuously with 8 SmartEye cameras and used as a measure of visual load. NASA-TLX and Borg CRS was used to assess perceived mental and physical fatigue. Linear Mixed Model will be used to test and to analyze the effect of the duration of work, joystick usage, work type (manual or semi-automated) and perceived mental and physical effort on the outcome of oxygenated hemoglobin concentration. This study contributes with new knowledge of the consequences of the current increase in automation. The 4th industrial revolution can have tremendous implications on how we perceive and organize work in the future, but little is still known about the impact on human body and brain.

  • 17.
    Richter, Hans
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Högskolan i Gävle.
    Domkin, Dmitry
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Elcadi, Guilherme H.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Andersson, H. W.
    Skogforsk, the forestry research institute of Sweden, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Högberg, Hans
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science.
    Englund, Martin
    Skogforsk, the forestry research institute of Sweden, Uppsala, Sweden.
    A Comparison of Mental and Visual Load Resulting from Semi-automated and Conventional Forest Forwarding: An Experimental Machine Simulation Study2019In: Proceedings of the 20th Congress of the International Ergonomics Association (IEA 2018): Volume X: Auditory and Vocal Ergonomics, Visual Ergonomics, Psychophysiology in Ergonomics, Ergonomics in Advanced Imaging / [ed] Bagnara S., Tartaglia R., Albolino S., Alexander T., Fujita Y., Cham, 2019, 827, Vol. X, p. 199-208Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present study was to extend the knowledge offunctional linkages between visual and mental load, performance, and prefrontalcortex (PFC) activity, during forestry forwarding work. Eleven healthy participants,range 21–51 years old, with a minimum of 1-year work experience,carried out the task of loading logs along a standardized path in a machinesimulator during two counterbalanced test conditions: (i) conventional cranecontrol, and; (ii) semi-automated crane control. Mental load was assessed byquantification of oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO2) concentration changes overthe right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) via non-invasive functional nearinfrared spectrometry (fNIRS). Visual, autonomic, and motoric control variableswere measured and analyzed in parallel along with the individual level of performance.Linear Mixed Models (LMM) analysis indicated more mental loadduring conventional crane work. Collectively, our data suggest that fNIRS is aviable tool which can be used in neuroergonomic research to evaluate physiologicalactivity levels in PFC.

  • 18.
    Richter, Hans
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Domkin, Dmitry
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Elcadi, Guilherme H.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Andersson, Helena
    Skogforsk, the forestry research institute of Sweden, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Högberg, Hans
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Forsman, Mikael
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Englund, Martin
    Skogforsk, the forestry research institute of Sweden, Uppsala, Sweden.
    A comparsion of mental and visual loads resulting from semi-automated and conventional forest harvesting: An experimental machine simulation study2018In: FALF Konferens 2018: Arbetet - problem eller potential för en hållbar livsmiljö?: Program och Abstracts / [ed] Per Lindberg, Gävle: Gävle Universtiy Press , 2018, p. 96-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is concerned with a new method for partly automating forestry harvesting work. Work-related injuries and constant demands for a higher productivity are two of the many arguments for why forestry work must be improved. Forestry work places great mental demands on the driver because they must continuously evaluate and act on relevant parts in a heavy visual information flow. Against this background the purpose of the present study was to extend the knowledge of functional linkages between visual and mental fatigue, performance, and prefrontal cortex activity, during semi-automated and conventional forestry harvesting work. Eleven healthy participants, range 21–51 years old, with a minimum of 1-year work experience, carried out the task of loading logs along a standardized path in a machine simulator during two counterbalanced 45-min periods: (i) conventional forest harvesting, and; (ii) semi-automated forest harvesting. Equal emphasizes was put on accuracy and speed. During manual forest harvesting the driver controlled the crane arm, used to load logs into the load space of the forest vehicle (“forwarder”), by manually operating the joysticks and so guide the crane to the location of the log and then back to the load space. During semi-automatic forest harvesting the driver moved the crane with the press of a button to a pre-programmed location near the log and then, after another button press, to a pre-programmed location within the load space. The following joystick usage parameters were considered for the statistical analysis: Sequential work cycle number, work phase (1-loading in basket, 2-movement to log, 3-picking up log, 4-movement to load space), number of simultaneously used controls across samples of one phase, number of direction changes of joystick movements per phase. Mental load was assessed by quantification of oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO2) concentration changes over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) via non-invasive functional near infrared spectrometry (fFNIRS: PortaLite mini, Artinis Medical Systems, Zetten, the Netherlands). The frequency and duration of horizontal amplitudes of eye/head/neck angles was assessed continuously with 8 SmartEye cameras and used as a measure of visual load. NASA-TLX and Borg CRS was used to assess perceived mental and physical fatigue. Linear Mixed Model will be used to test and to analyze the effect of the duration of work, joystick usage, work type (manual or semi-automated) and perceived mental and physical effort on the outcome of oxygenated hemoglobin concentration. This study contributes with new knowledge of the consequences of the current increase in automation. The 4th industrial revolution can have tremendous implications on how we perceive and organize work in the future, but little is still known about the impact on human body and brain.

  • 19.
    Richter, Hans
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Forsman, Mikael
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Elcadi, Guilherme H.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Sports science.
    Brautaset, R.
    School of Optometry, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Marsh, John E.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental psychology. School of Psychology, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom.
    Zetterberg, Camilla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Section of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Prefrontal cortex activity evoked by convergence load under conflicting stimulus-to-accommodation and stimulus-to-vergence eye-movements measured by NIRS: Prefrontal cortex oxygenation and visual fatigue2018In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5161, E-ISSN 1662-5161, Vol. 12, article id 298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To extend our knowledge of the functional linkages between visual fatigueand regional cerebral prefrontal cortex (PFC) oxygenation, we measured time related hemodynamic changes over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) duringconvergence load under conflicting stimulus-to-accommodation and stimulus-tovergence eye movements with and without concurrent mental load.

    Methods: Twenty healthy participants with a median age of 28 years (range:18–44 years) fixated upon a vertical bar presented separately to the left andright eyes, using polarized filters, during four counterbalanced 10-min periods:(i) no accommodation/vergence conflict (Control, Ctrl); (ii) added convergenceload and accommodation/vergence conflict (Conv); (iii) added cognitive load only(Cog) and; (iv) a combination of added cognitive and convergence load andaccommodation/vergence conflict (Cc). Viewing distance was 65 cm. Non-invasivemeasurements of hemodynamic activity over the dlPFC were quantified by functionalnear-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). During the two-convergence load conditions, thehorizontal disparity of the two bars varied dynamically from no disparity to a disparityset 20% below the individual threshold for diplopia. Cognitive load was induced by then-back-2 test which required the subject to memorize and recall the changing colorsof the horizontal bars and decide when a given color was the same as that occurring two colors previously. fNIRS data were averaged over 10-s windows centered at 0, 2,4, 6, 8, and 10 min of each task, subtracted from a 20-s baseline window immediatelypreceding the visual task, and then represented as changes in oxygenated hemoglobin(ΔHbO2); deoxygenated hemoglobin (ΔHHb) and total hemoglobin (ΔtHb).

    Results: Linear mixed model analyses showed that hemodynamic activity wassystematically influenced by time (p < 0.001). The group-averaged time-related levelof change across the viewing conditions did not differ when compared with one another(p > 0.05). Larger convergence eye-movement responses under conflicting stimulus-to accommodation,and stimulus-to-vergence over time, increased ΔHbO2 and ΔtHb onlyin condition Cc and after 8 min of task time (p < 0.10 for min-6 and min-8: p < 0.05 for min-10).

    Discussion: Collectively, our data suggest that HbO2, HHb, and tHb, recorded over the dlPFC with fNIRS, can be used to assay the degree to which supervisory oculomotorcontrol processes are activated during visually deficient near work.

  • 20.
    Sandberg, Camilla
    et al.
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå University.
    Crenshaw, Albert G.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Elcadi, Guilherme H.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Christensen, Christina
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Hlebowicz, Joanna
    Department of Cardiology, Lund University.
    Thilén, Ulf
    Department of Cardiology, Lund University.
    Johansson, Bengt
    Heart center and Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University.
    Impaired skeletal muscle endurance in adults with complex congenital heart disease is associated with local muscle oxygenation2018In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Sandberg, Camilla
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Crenshaw, Albert G.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Elcadi, Guilherme H.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Christersson, Christina
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hlebowicz, Joanna
    Department of Cardiology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Thilén, Ulf
    Department of Cardiology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Johansson, Bengt
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Impaired Skeletal Muscle Endurance in Adults With Complex Congenital Heart Disease is Associated With Local Muscle Oxygenation Kinetics2018In: Circulation: Abstracts From the American Heart Association's 2018 Scientific Sessions, 2018, Vol. 138, p. A15914-, article id Suppl. 1Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Adults with complex congenital heart disease show reduced aerobic exercise capacity and impaired skeletal muscle function compared to healthy peers. Peripheral muscle factors are presumed to be important contributors, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. Hypothesis: Muscle oxygenation is associated with reduced skeletal muscle endurance in adults with complex CHD. Methods: Sixty-four adults with complex congenital heart disease (mean age 36.9±14.8 years, females n=19) were recruited from centers specialized in congenital heart disease. Seventy-four age and gender matched healthy peers were recruited as controls. Muscle oxygen saturation was successfully determined on the anterior portion of the deltoid muscle using near-infrared spectroscopy for 57 patients and 71 controls. Measurements were made at baseline, during isotonic shoulder flexions (0-90°) to exhaustion and during 60 seconds of recovery. Results: The adults with complex CHD performed fewer shoulder flexions (38±15 vs. 69±40, p <0.001), had lower muscle oxygen saturation at rest (58±17% vs. 69±18%, p <0.001), a slower desaturation rate at exercise onset (-9.5±5.9%/sec vs. -15.1±6.5%/sec, p <0.001), and a slower resaturation rate post exercise (3.9±2.8%/sec vs. 5.4±3.6%/sec, p =0.008) compared to the controls. Conclusions: A distinct association was found between muscle oxygenation kinetics and early muscle fatigue for adults with complex CHD. Our findings may give insight to the underlying mechanisms for the reduced aerobic exercise capacity for these patients, and therefore provide implications for design of exercise training protocols in this population. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

  • 22.
    Sandberg, Camilla
    et al.
    Heart Center and Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Crenshaw, Albert G.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Elçadi, Guilherme H.
    Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Christersson, Christina
    Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hlebowicz, Joanna
    Department of Cardiology, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Thilén, Ulf
    Department of Cardiology, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Johansson, Bengt
    Heart Center and Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Slower Skeletal Muscle Oxygenation Kinetics in Adults With Complex Congenital Heart Disease2019In: Canadian Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0828-282X, E-ISSN 1916-7075Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Adults with complex congenital heart disease (CHD) show reduced aerobic exercise capacity and impaired skeletal muscle function compared with healthy peers. Peripheral muscle factors are presumed to be important contributors to the aerobic capacity, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate differences between adults with CHD and controls in muscle oxygenation kinetics at rest, and during and after exercise.

    Methods: Seventy-four patients with complex CHD (mean age 35.6 ± 14.3 years, female n = 22) were recruited. Seventy-four age- and sex-matched subjects were recruited as controls. Muscle oxygenation was successfully determined on the anterior portion of the deltoid muscle using near-infrared spectroscopy in 65 patients and 71 controls. Measurements were made at rest, during isotonic shoulder flexions (0-90°) to exhaustion, and during recovery.

    Results: The patients with CHD performed fewer shoulder flexions (40 ± 17 vs 69 ± 40; P &lt; 0.001), had lower muscle oxygen saturation (StO2) at rest (58 ± 18% vs 69 ± 18%; P &lt; 0.001), slower desaturation rate at exercise onset (−9.7 ± 5.9 vs −15.1 ± 6.5% StO2 × 3.5 s−1, P &lt;0.001), and slower resaturation rate post exercise (4.0 ± 2.7 vs 5.4 ± 3.6% StO2 × 3.5 s−1; P = 0.009) compared with the controls. Conclusions: In comparison with age- and sex-matched controls, adults with complex CHD had slower oxygenation kinetics. This altered skeletal muscle metabolism might contribute to the impaired skeletal muscle endurance capacity shown and thereby also to the reduced aerobic capacity in this population. 

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