hig.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 24 of 24
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Björklund, Erika
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Education.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Djupsjöbacka, Mats
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Discourses about electricians in vocational education2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Students in vocational education to become electricians have an increased risk of developing musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) once in the workforce compared to most other blue collar professions (Toomingas et al., 2014). This increased risk comes from having to work in awkward body positions, with heavy and sometimes poorly adapted tools and with time constraints. Many end up with chronic disabilities, forcing them to change careers or to go on sickness pension. Besides the significant and damaging consequences for the individual concerned, losing electricians from the workforce is a significant loss for the building industry in which electricians these days are scarce, and for society that not only loses tax-incomes but also possibly need to pay sickness pension for these people during quite a few years. It is therefore important to find ways to prevent MSDs and to promote good ergonomics in the building industry in general and among electricians specifically. Electricians’ knowledge and habits regarding MSDs are first formed and shaped in school, during vocational education to become an electrician. Drawing on the ideas of bio-power and governmentality, as introduced and developed by Foucault (1988, 1990, 2003) and developed by Rose (1999; Rabinow and Rose, 2006), discourses govern how it is possible to think and act. From this standpoint, then, talk and discourses are not perceived as innocent or ‘mere’ talk (Hall, 2001) but as governing the production, regulation and representation of both bodies and subjects through the acquisition of specific dispositions, tastes and abilities (Foucault, 1988; Rose, 1999). Thus, discourses drawn on in school about electricians and the profession govern how it is possible to think and act about oneself and others in relation to both ergonomics and MSD and, by extension, have material effects on electricians’ health. This means that, to foster healthy ergonomics one needs to consider how electricians and the profession are conceived and thought about in school, i.e. how electricians and the profession are discursively conceived. The purpose of this paper is thus to explore discursive constructions of electricians and the profession as these are expressed in discussions about MSDs in the vocational education and school context. Methods used are four focus group interviews: two with students, one with teachers and one with school management at one senior high school program for electricians. In the focus group interviews the participants were asked to discuss ideas about causes and reasons to why electricians develop MSDs, consequences and effects of MSDs and ideas about what could be done to prevent MSDs. The interviews were then transcribed and discursively analyzed with questions in mind about how each group conceived of electricians and the profession.

  • 2.
    Björklund, Erika
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Education.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Djupsjöbacka, Mats
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Discursive constructions of electricians in discussions about musculoskeletal disorders among professionals in the field2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electricians have an increased risk of developing musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) compared to most other blue collar professions. Many end up with chronic disabilities, forcing them to change careers or to go on sickness pension. Besides negative consequences for the individuals concerned, MSDs also have a detrimental impact on the workforce (reduced number of professionals) and on society (financial costs). It is therefore important to find ways to prevent MSDs and to promote good ergonomic behavior. Electricians’ knowledge and habits regarding MSDs are first formed and shaped in school, during vocational education to become an electrician. In the course of this time the students have periods of internship during which they interact with professionals within the field. Drawing on the ideas of bio-power and governmentality, as introduced and developed by Foucault and developed further by Rose, discourses govern how it is possible to think and act. From this standpoint, then, talk and discourses are not perceived as innocent or ‘mere’ talk but as producing and regulating subjects through their acquisition of specific dispositions, tastes and abilities. Thus, discourses drawn on about electricians and the profession during the students’ internship will govern how it is possible for the students to think and act about themselves and others in relation to both ergonomic behavior and MSDs and, by extension, will have material effects on electricians’ health. This means that, to foster healthy ergonomic behavior one needs to consider how electricians are thought of within the field, i.e. how electricians and the profession are discursively conceived. The purpose of this paper is thus to explore discursive constructions of electricians and the profession as these were expressed in discussions about MSDs among professionals in the field.  Two semi-structured focus group interviews and one individual interview with professionals in the field were conducted. The participants were asked to discuss ideas about i) causes as to why electricians develop MSDs, ii) consequences and effects of MSDs, and iii) ideas about what could be done to prevent MSDs. The interviews were transcribed and the material is currently being discursively analyzed with questions in mind about how the participants conceived of electricians and the profession. Results will be presented at the conference, but preliminary analyses suggests that predominant discourses are concerned with the masculinity of electricians as well as with their time pressured work situation, both contributing to casualness towards ergonomic behavior.

  • 3.
    Djupsjöbacka, Mats
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Björklund, Erika
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Education.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Utveckling av arbetsmiljöutbildning på yrkesgymnasium för förebyggande av belastningsbesvär och främjandet av ett hållbart arbetsliv för installationselektriker: En förberedande fallstudie2018In: FALF KONFERENS 2018. Arbetet - problem eller potential för en hållbar livsmiljö? Gävle 10-12 juni 2018: Program och Abstracts / [ed] Per Lindberg, Gävle: Gävle University Press , 2018, p. 92-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund och syfte

    Många yrkesprogram på gymnasiet utbildar för yrken där vi vet att anställda ofta drabbas av belastningsrelaterad ohälsa. Exempelvis visar data från Arbetsmiljöverket att 9–12% av alla installationselektriker och elmontörer rapporterar besvär orsakade av påfrestande arbetsställningar och att de rapporterar en ettårsprevalens på 6–10% för besvär i nacke, axlar, arm och rygg till följd av arbetet som varit så svåra att det påverkat arbetsförmågan. Forskning har även visat att elever på elteknikprogram löper särskilt hög risk att drabbas av arbetsskada relativt andra utbildningar. Redan under utbildningen bör åtgärder sättas in för att minska dessa risker.

    En genomgång av litteraturen visar dock att det finns tydliga brister i hur yrkesprogram förbereder eleverna för ett kommande arbetsliv vad gäller arbetsmiljökunskap och att orsakerna till dessa brister troligen finns inom undervisningens innehåll och utformning, lärares kompetens och samverkan med yrkeslivet under utbildningen. Vidare kan elever-nas attityder till arbetsmiljöundervisning utgöra ett hinder. Sammantaget förefaller hin-dren för en bra arbetsmiljöutbildning på yrkesprogram inom gymnasiet vara komplexa och multifaktoriella.

    Innan åtgärder sätts in för att utveckla undervisningen finns därför stort behov av att kartlägga de komplexa orsakssambanden bakom brister inom utbildningen och utifrån det utforma förbättringsåtgärder.

    I vår studie avser vi att svara på forskningsfrågan: Hur anser olika intressenter att olika faktorer inom såväl utbildningen som framtida yrkeskontext interagerar och bidrar till uppkomsten av belastningsbesvär hos installationselektriker?

    Metod och resultat

    Studien har en fallstudiedesign där fokusgrupper och problemträdsanalys används. Pro-blemträdsanalys är en metod för att kartlägga komplexa orsakssamband och att klargöra grundläggande orsaker. Analysen kan därmed säkra att aktiviteter och insatser inte väljs och påbörjas utan att man först har kartlagt kärnproblemets ofta komplexa orsaker grundligt.

    Som underlag till problemträdsanalysen kommer fokusgruppsintervjuer att genomföras där personer från samma kategori intressenter separat samtalar om kärnproblemet. Vi kommer genomföra intervjuer separat med elever, lärare, skolledning och representanter från arbetslivet. Problemträdsanalysen genomförs sedan vid ett tillfälle där 2–3 personer från varje intressent; elever, lärare, skolledningen, representanter från arbetslivet och forskare från projektgruppen deltar. Inför sessionen kommer vi att delge deltagarna underlag baserat på resultaten från fokusgruppintervjuerna och vår litteratursökning så att de kan ta del avSession D:2Individuella presentationer: Fysiskt arbetsliv93vad andra intressegrupper/källor identifierat som möjliga orsaksfaktorer. Efter framtagande av problemträd kommer tänkbara lösningar att formuleras i samverkan med alla intressenter för att skapa ett lösningsträd, vilket kommer att utgöra grund för kommande utvecklingsarbete inom utbildningen.

    Datainsamling och analyser genomförs under våren 2018 och preliminära resultat kommer att presenteras på konferensen.

  • 4.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Wijk, Katarina
    Samhällsmedicin Gävleborg, Landstinget i Gävleborg.
    Företagsledares uppfattningar om arbetsmiljöprioritering och dess samband med framgång2012In: Makt, Myter och Motstridigheter: Utmaningar i dagens arbetsliv, Karlstad: Karlstad Universitet , 2012, p. 19-19Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The management and prioritization of the work environment is crucial to the achievement of any potential benefits resulting from a good work environment. Managers from successful, micro- or small-sized companies responded to a questionnaire in which they rated the prioritization of seven work environment areas and to what extent they perceived that a relationship exists between a good work environment and corporate success. The results showed that Communication & Interaction was perceived as the highest prioritized area and that the mangers perceived a relationship between a good work environment and corporate success.

  • 5.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Wijk, Katarina
    Samhällsmedicin Gävleborg, Landstinget i Gävleborg.
    Manager perceptions of work environment prioritization and its relation to success2012In: Proceedings NES2012: Ergonomics for sustainability and growth / [ed] Ann-Beth Antonsson, Göran M Hägg, Stockholm, Sweden: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Technology and Health, Division of Ergonomics , 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The management and prioritization of the work environment is crucial to the achievement of any potential benefits resulting from a good work environment. Managers from successful, micro- or small-sized companies responded to a questionnaire in which they rated the prioritization of seven work environment areas, ranked six company interests, and rated to what extent they perceived that a relationship exists between a good work environment and corporate success. The results showed that Communication & Interaction was perceived as the highest prioritized area, that Profitability was the highest ranked company interest, and that the mangers perceived a relationship between a good work environment and corporate success.

  • 6.
    Lindberg, Per
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Engström, Veronica
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science.
    Vingård, Eva
    Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Factors at work promoting mental health and wellbeing - a systematic litterature review2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    There is strong evidence that work itself, despite its risks, reduces the risk of depression and improves mental health (Waddell & Burton, 2006; van der Noordt, IJzelenberg, Droomers, & Proper, 2014). Mental health, like mental illness, is a vaguely defined concept. Mental health is a non-contextual concept which can be defined as absence of mental illness and with the opportunity to develop and flourish with high levels of emotional, psychological and social well-being (Keyes, 2005). The concept of wellbeing at work is inclusive. It relates to the physical environment, work-related risks, organization of work and tasks, relationships with colleagues, personal health and work ability and even family-related stress (Suomaa Leo, Yrjänheikki Erkki, Savolainen Heikki, & Hannu, 2011). It can also be seen as an important determinant of productivity at the individual, corporate and community levels (Schulte & Vainio, 2010).

    "Healthy factors" for mental health in the workplace are factors and circumstances at work that may have a preventive and/or promotional effect on mental health and wellbeing of the workers. These factors can serve as resources (buffers) against negative consequences of various risks at work, but they may also be factors that, by themselves, create positive health benefits for the individual and the workplace.

    The large numbers of work-related mental unhealthy in the western world (not the least in Sweden), call for actions in improving working conditions, but which are the important determinants of positive mental health and wellbeing at work to be influenced?  A review of indicators for healthy workplaces has recently been performed (Lindberg & Vingård, 2012), but we have not found any comprehensive review explicitly concerning positive mental health at work. Hence, the aim of this study was to review current knowledge concerning determinants for mental health and wellbeing at work.

    Method

    Two comprehensive literature searches were conducted in nine scientific databases, EBSCO (includes Academic Search Elite, Cinahl, PsycINFO och PsycARTICLES), Emerald, PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science, for relevant articles written in English, German or the Scandinavian languages. The first search, covering 2000-2014, was done for a Swedish government report (Lindberg & Karlsson, 2015). The second search, covering 2014 - June 2016, updated the previous data for the purpose of a scientific publication. Exclusion of articles was made stepwise by title, abstract and full text. The quality of included articles was assessed by acknowledged guidelines (STROBE Statement) and done separately by two researchers. The combined results are being analysed and will be presented in Montreal.

    Search terms were: work OR workplace OR "healthy workplace" OR "healthy work" OR "healthy work* environment" OR "good work* environment" AND "depressive disorder" OR depression OR "behavioral symptoms" OR "anxiety disorders" OR "stress, psychological" OR "common mental disorders" OR "mental health" OR "sustainable mental health” OR "mental wellbeing" OR "mental well-being" OR "job wellbeing" OR "job well-being" OR "positive mental health" OR "good mental health" OR "positive mental wellbeing" OR "positive mental well-being" AND prevention OR promotion.

    Results

    According to preliminary analyses 5378 unique publications were found, of these 30 review-, cohort-, cross sectional-, and qualitative studies are included.

    In the included studies 25 individual or categories of related factors promoting positive mental health and wellbeing at work were identified. Below is a list of the twelve most frequently researched factors listed in order of descending frequency.

    • Style of  leadership
    • Empowerment; Autonomy; Control at work; Participation
    • Possibilities for own development
    • Positive work climate
    • Social  support from supervisor
    • Communication supervisor-employee
    • Clear goals
    • Appreciation from supervisors, colleagues, customers
    • Work time control; Enough time
    • Effort-reward balance
    • Intellectually stimulating
    • Job security

     As seen above the most frequently investigated factor was the impact of leadership on mental health. It was found that “good leadership”, i.e. fair, supportive and empowering, gave positive health changes and increased well-being, that increased quality of a staff-oriented leadership reduced sickness absence in the company and that transformational leadership increased psychological wellbeing and job satisfaction among workers.

    Conclusion

    Independent of study design leadership was the most scrutinized factor. Apart from possibly being a research trend (?), this may be interpreted as an understanding of both its explicit influence on the well-being of the employees, and its implicit influence by having the authority to facilitate communication, empowerment, control, support, respect, work content, feedback, etc.

    Practical implications

    Working conditions arise in the interaction between the individual and the organization, but creating working conditions that promote mental health cannot be put on the individual. It must be organized in the workplace for the employees in that special context, whereby the leadership seems to be paramount for the promotion of mental health and wellbeing at work.

  • 7.
    Lindberg, Per
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Engström, Veronica
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Vingård, Eva
    Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Factors at work promoting mental health and wellbeing at work – a systematic literature review2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    There is strong evidence that work itself, despite its risks, reduces the risk of depression and improves mental health (Waddell & Burton, 2006; van der Noordt, IJzelenberg, Droomers, & Proper, 2014). Mental health, like mental illness, is a vaguely defined concept. Mental health is a non-contextual concept, which can be defined as absence of mental illness and with the opportunity to develop and flourish with high levels of emotional, psychological and social well-being (Keyes, 2005). The concept of wellbeing at work is inclusive. It relates to the physical environment, work-related risks, organization of work and tasks, relationships with colleagues, personal health and work ability and even family-related stress (Suomaa, Yrjänheikki, Savolainen, & Jokiluoma, 2011). It can also be seen as an important determinant of productivity at the individual, corporate and community levels (Schulte & Vainio, 2010).

    "Healthy factors" for mental health in the workplace are factors and circumstances at work that may have a preventive and/or promotional effect on mental health and wellbeing of the workers. These factors can serve as resources (buffers) against negative consequences of various risks at work. They may also be factors that, by themselves, create positive health benefits for the individual and the workplace.

    The large numbers of work-related mental unhealthy in the western world (not the least in Sweden), call for actions in improving working conditions, but which are the important determinants of positive mental health and wellbeing at work to be influenced?  A review of indicators for healthy workplaces has recently been performed (Lindberg & Vingård, 2012), but we have not found any comprehensive review explicitly concerning mental health at work. Hence, the aim of this study was to review current knowledge concerning determinants for mental health and wellbeing at work.

    Method

    Two comprehensive literature searches were conducted in nine scientific databases, EBSCO (includes Academic Search Elite, Cinahl, PsycINFO och PsycARTICLES), Emerald, PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science, for relevant articles written in English, German or the Scandinavian languages. The first search, covering 2000-2014, was done for a Swedish government report. The second search, covering 2014- June 2016, updated the previous data for the purpose of a scientific publication. Exclusion of articles was made stepwise by title, abstract and full text. The quality of included articles was assessed by acknowledged guidelines (STROBE Statement) and done separately by two researchers. The combined results are being analysed and will be presented in Montreal.

    Search terms were: work OR workplace OR "healthy workplace" OR "healthy work" OR "healthy work* environment" OR "good work* environment" AND "depressive disorder" OR depression OR "behavioral symptoms" OR "anxiety disorders" OR "stress, psychological" OR "common mental disorders" OR "mental health" OR "sustainable mental health” OR "mental wellbeing" OR "mental well-being" OR "job wellbeing" OR "job well-being" OR "positive mental health" OR "good mental health" OR "positive mental wellbeing" OR "positive mental well-being" AND prevention OR promotion.

    Results

    5378 unique publications were found, of these 30 review-, cohort-, cross sectional-, and qualitative studies are included (preliminary data).

    We found 25 individual or “group of related factors” promoting positive mental health and wellbeing at work. Below is a list of the twelve most frequently investigated factors arranged in order of descending frequency.

    • Style of leadership
    • Empowerment; Autonomy; Control at work;      Participation
    • Possibilities for own development
    • Positive work climate
    • Social support from supervisor
    • Communication supervisor-employee
    • Clear goals
    • Appreciation from supervisors, colleagues,      customers
    • Work time control; Enough time
    • Effort-reward balance
    • Intellectually stimulating
    • Job security

    As seen above the most frequently investigated factor was the impact of leadership on mental health. It was found that “good leadership”, i.e. fair, supportive and empowering, gave positive health changes and increased well-being, that increased quality of a staff-oriented leadership reduced sickness absence in the company and that transformational leadership increased psychological wellbeing and job satisfaction among workers.

    Conclusion

    Independent of study design leadership was the most investigated factor. Apart from possibly being a research trend, this can be interpreted as an insight into both its explicit influence on the well-being of the employees, and its implicit influence by having the authority to facilitate communication, empowerment, control, support, respect, work content, feedback, etc.

    Working conditions arise in the interaction between the individual and the organization, but creating working conditions that promote mental health cannot be put on the individual. It must be organized in the workplace for the employees in that special context, whereby the leadership seems to be paramount for the promotion of mental health and wellbeing at work.

  • 8.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    A description of the safety culture at a large steel manufacturing company2012In: Ergonomics for sustainability and growth: Nordic Ergonomics Society (NES), Saltsjöbaden, Sweden, 19-22 august 2012, Nordic Ergonomics Society, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: At the moment, in Sweden, there is a noticeable upswing of interest for workplace safety culture among companies. These are companies with dangerous work environments but that have already come a long way in improving their workplace safety and ergonomics standards by following the national legislations, using regular and systematic audits of the workplaces, and using modern equipment and technology for safety. This study was conducted in collaboration with a large steel manufacturing company in Sweden which employs about 1000 people. The company aims to improve the safety culture within the organization, not in order to get future payback in monetary terms, but actually to strive towards their company social responsibility (CSR) goal: that nobody should have to get injured on the job. The present study is an initial exploration of the company to provide the basic understanding of the work environment setting where the company implements change. Research is still needed to better understand different safety cultures.

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate what the safety culture and risk-taking is like at the company, according to employees. 

    Methods: The study had a qualitative and descriptive study design. Ten focus group interviews were conducted for data collection, consisting of about 6–8 employees each. The participants were employees from production. The interviews lasted 75 min and were digitally recorded and thereafter verbatim transcribed. Descriptive data was also collected from all participants by allowing them to fill out a short questionnaire. The participants were recruited from the company’s five main mills to get a representative sample, and it was randomized which shift teams that were asked to participate. Three discussion themes were used during the sessions: 1. What do you think of the safety at your workplace? 2. How is safety performed at your workplace? 3. What can become better with the safety at your workplace? During the interviews, emphasis was put on follow-up questions and asking the participants to explain more and to use own examples. The focus group sessions were conducted by a doctoral student, supported by an assistant taking additional notes.

    Results: The results are right now being analyzed, but will be presented at the conference as an oral presentation. One preliminary result is that an important incitement for the employees to risk their safety, for example by not using the appropriate tools, is to quickly get the production running again if a stop occurs.

  • 9.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Different ways of defining and measuring company size when studying its effects on OHS: A literature study2014In: 11th International Symposium on Human Factors in Organisational Design and Management, Nordic Ergonomics Society , 2014, p. 587-593Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective and method: Company size is a proxy for other variables affecting occupational health and safety (OHS) performance. The aim of this literature study was twofold: to give an overview on how it empirically has been shown that smaller and larger companies differ from one another in terms of OHS, and to present how earlier studies have defined company size when studying its mediating effects on OHS. A search strategy with search terms was used in the major databases, as well as inspecting the reference list of appropriate studies recovered. A total of 29 articles were included.

    Findings: Examining what empirically has been shown on company size differences in terms of OHS resulted in ten different themes. For example that the OHS standard improves as company size increases, that there is an inverse relationship between company size and injury frequency, and that the rate of absenteeism is lower in small companies. The examined studies were similar, in that they found differences attributed to company size. They differed, however, in the ways they defined company size as a variable in analysis. To define company size as number of employees was the most commonly used approach (27 out of 29 studies). One study used number of man-labor years as definition. One study used the contractors’ annual volume of business in dollars as definition. The scale of measure that was most commonly used as variable for measuring company size was ordinal scale data (23 out of 29 studies). Three studies used ratio scale data. Three studies did not specify scale of measurement.

    Conclusion: It is important to carefully consider what definition and scale of measure to use for the sake of studying the mediating effects of company size on OHS. Some of the less commonly used alternatives could be relevant.

  • 10.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    En beskrivning av säkerhetskulturen vid ett stort stålindustriföretag2012In: Makt, myter och motstridigheter - Utmaningar i dagens arbetsliv: Forum för arbetslivsforskning (FALF), Karlstad, 11-13 juni 2012, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Introduktion: Bland svenska företag finns det för tillfället ett ökat intresse för den egna arbetsplatsens säkerhetskultur. Dessa företag har farliga arbetsmiljöer men har också kommit långt med att förbättra arbetssäkerhet och ergonomisk standard genom att följa de nationella föreskrifterna och arbetsmiljölagen. Dessa företag tillämpar systematiskt arbetsmiljöarbete med skyddsronder och använder modern utrustning och teknologi för säkerhet. Föreliggande studie genomfördes i samarbete med ett stort svenskt stålindustriföretag med cirka 1000 anställda på den berörda orten. Företaget har som mål att förbättra säkerhetskulturen inom organisationen, inte för att få igen satsningen monetärt, utan för att sträva mot det företagsetiska målet: att ingen skall behöva bli skadad på arbetet. Föreliggande studie är en första utforskning av företaget i syfte att skapa grundläggande kunskap om den arbetsmiljökontext som företaget implementerar förändring i. Det behövs även ytterligare forskning för att bättre förstå olika säkerhetskulturer.  

    Forskningsfråga: Vad finns det för säkerhetskultur och risktagande på företaget, enligt de anställdas erfarenheter och uppfattningar?

    Metod: Studien hade en kvalitativ och beskrivande studiedesign. Datainsamlingen bestod av tio fokusgruppintervjuer med cirka 6–8 anställda per grupp och deltagarna var anställda från produktionen. Intervjuerna hade en längd av 75 minuter och spelades in digitalt med en diktafon och transkriberades därefter ordagrant. Därutöver samlades bakgrundsdata in om deltagarna genom att de fyllde i ett kort frågeformulär. Deltagarna rekryterades från samtliga av företagets fem huvudavdelningar för att få ett representativt urval, och det slumpades fram vilka skiftlag som tillfrågades att delta. Tre diskussionsteman användes under intervjuerna: 1. Vad tycker ni om säkerheten här? 2. Hur gör ni med säkerheten här? 3. Vad kan bli bättre med säkerheten här? Under intervjuerna lades betoningen på följdfrågor där deltagarna ombads att utveckla sina svar och använda egna exempel. Fokusgruppintervjuerna leddes av en doktorand, och stöddes av en assistent som tog kompletterande anteckningar.

    Resultat: Datamaterialet analyseras just nu, men resultaten kommer att presenteras på konferensen. Ett preliminärt resultat är att ett viktigt incitament för anställda att riskera sin egen säkerhet, till exempel genom att inte använda de avsedda verktygen, är att snabbt få igång produktionen igen om ett stopp inträffar.

  • 11.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Socialmedicin..
    Förutsättningar och möjligheter för företag att prioritera och bedriva arbetsmiljö- och säkerhetsarbete2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Många företag saknar idag ett fungerande systematiskt arbetsmiljöarbete (SAM) som uppfyller lagens krav fullt ut. Istället tycks andra dagliga aktiviteter ha högre prioritet. Detta är en presentation av ett avhandlingsarbete, vars övergripande syfte var att undersöka förutsättningar och möjligheter för tillverkande företag att prioritera och arbeta med säkerheten och arbetsmiljön; med särskilt fokus på yrkesroller, företagsstorlek, säkerhetskultur och finansiella nyckeltal. Fyra delstudier (I–IV) ingår i denna avhandling, vilka är baserade på tre datainsamlingar. En enkät som mätte arbetsmiljöprioritering besvarades av 249 representanter vid 142 tillverkande företag (I & II). Fokusgruppintervjuer genomfördes med 66 arbetare på ett stort ståltillverkningsföretag, där deras erfarenheter och uppfattningar om säkerhet och risker i arbetet diskuterades (III). En enkät som mätte SAM, säkerhetskultur och arbetsmiljöprioritering besvarades av 280 representanter vid 197 tillverkande företag (IV). Information om företagens finansiella nyckeltal hämtades från ett kreditupplysningsföretag. De viktigaste resultaten från de fyra delstudierna kan bland annat sammanfattas med att lönsamheten uppfattades vara det mest prioriterade intresset vid företagen (I), och att avvägningar mellan produktivitet och säkerhet ansågs vara ett hinder för att kunna arbeta på ett säkert sätt (III). Chefer uppfattade generellt att arbetsmiljön prioriterades mer på företagen än vad skyddsombuden gjorde (I & IV). Uppfattningar om arbetsmiljöprioritering skiljde sig dock inte åt beroende på företagsstorlek (II & IV). Ansvaret för säkerheten på arbetet ansågs främst vila hos den enskilda individen, och risktagande betraktades komma ur en kombination av individuella faktorer och yttre omständigheter i arbetsmiljön (III). Att vara ett större företag, ha positiv säkerhetskultur och hög kreditvärdighet visade sig ha samband med att också ha ett bättre utvecklat SAM (IV). På motsvarande sätt, att vara ett mindre företag, ha negativ säkerhetskultur och låg kreditvärdighet befanns ha samband med att också ha ett sämre utvecklat SAM.

  • 12.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Socialmedicin.
    Prerequisites and Possibilities for Manufacturing Companies to Prioritize and Manage Occupational Health and Safety2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Legislation demands that health and safety of humans at work must be secured. Today, far from every company has a functioning systematic management of occupational health and safety (OHS) in place to fulfill its legal obligations. Instead, other day-to-day tasks appear to have greater priority.

    The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate prerequisites and possibilities for manufacturing companies to prioritize and manage OHS, with focus on professional roles, company size, safety culture, and financial performance.

    Four papers (I–IV) are included in this thesis, based on three data collections. A questionnaire measuring the priority accorded to work environment was completed by 249 representatives of 142 manufacturing companies (I & II). Focus group interviews were conducted with 66 workers at a large steel-manufacturing company, discussing their experiences and perceptions of safety and risks at work (III). A questionnaire measuring OHS management practices, safety culture, and priority given to work environment was completed by 280 representatives of 197 manufacturing companies (IV). Information regarding the companies’ financial performance was retrieved from a credit bureau database.

    The main findings of the four papers demonstrated that profitability was considered as the most prioritized interest in the companies (I), and that trade-offs between productivity and safety is an obstacle to working safely (III). Managers generally perceived their companies to prioritize work environment factors more than the safety delegates did (I & IV). Perceptions of work environment priority did, however, not differ depending on company size (II & IV). Responsibility for safety was perceived to rest on the individual to the largest extent, and risk-taking was believed to originate from a combination of individual factors and external circumstances in the work environment (III). Larger company size, positive safety culture, and low risk in creditworthiness were found to be associated with better OHS management practices in companies (IV). Correspondingly, smaller company size, negative safety culture, and high risk in creditworthiness were found to be associated with worse OHS management practices.

    In summary, structural, social, and financial aspects seem to be important in companies’ possibilities for prioritizing and managing OHS. Recommendations for industry and future research are discussed.

  • 13.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Presentation av ett avhandlingsprojekt: Implementering av säkerhetskultur på ett stålindustriföretag2011In: Det nya arbetslivet: Forum för arbetslivsforskning (FALF), Luleå, 15-17 juni 2011, 2011, p. 1-9Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Introduktion: Risk för arbetsskada och olycksfall är höga inom industrisektorn och metallarbetare hör till de yrkesgrupper som löper en högre risk för arbetsskador än genomsnittet, där risken är fyrdubbelt högre att drabbas än genomsnittet (AFA, 2006). Metallindustrin är en sektor som AFA försäkring bedömer vara i ett fortsatt behov av riktade och skadeförebyggande insatser mot verksamheten (AFA, 2006). I dagsläget är forskningsområdet om implementering av en hälsosammare och säkrare arbetsplats ett område i behov av att prioriteras (Källestål et al, 2004). Vi samarbetar med ett stålindustriföretag, vilket kommer att implementera en säkrare arbetsmiljö för sina anställda, genom olika riktade insatser: utbildning; filmvisning och diskussionsgrupper; affischering; användandet av förebilder och feedback m.m. i verksamheten, vilka samtliga avser att stärka säkerhetskulturen på företaget – och därigenom nå anställdas och chefers säkerhetsbeteende med huvudbudskapet: om att personligt risktagande inne på de relativt farliga arbetsavsnitten i verken aldrig förväntas, eller tolereras för den delen. Forskningsområdet kring säkerhetskultur och säkerhetsklimat beskrivs ingående i en aktuell litteraturöversikt (Törner, 2010). Företaget är en Europaledande koncern för tillverkning av specialstålprodukter, och har sammanlagt ca 1000 anställda på den ort vi samarbetar med. Preliminär forskningsdelstudie: Hur ser säkerhetskulturen ut på företaget? Datainsamlingsmetod: Fokusgruppintervjuer.

  • 14.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    What is safety culture and risk-taking like at a large steel manufacturing company?2012In: Work: Proceedings for the 18th Triennial International Ergonomics Association's (IEA) Congress, 2012, Vol. 41 suppl. 1, no Suppl. 1, p. 5831-5832Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Focus group interviews were conducted at a large steel manufacturing company with 1000 employees, in order to answer the research question: what is the safety culture and risk-taking like at the company, according to employees? Ten focus groups were used for data collection consisting of 6-8 employees each. The participants were operators from production. The interviews lasted 75 min and were digitally recorded and thereafter verbatim transcribed. Descriptive data was also collected from all participants by allowing them to fill out a short questionnaire. The results of this study will be presented at the conference as a poster presentation.

  • 15.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Wiitavaara, Birgitta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science.
    Högberg, Hans
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science.
    Westerling, Ragnar
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    A cross-sectional study of factors influencing occupational health and safety management practices in companies2017In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 95, p. 92-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Companies need to ensure a functioning occupational health and safety management (OHSM) system to protect human health and safety during work, but generally there are differences in how successful they are in this endeavor. Earlier research has indicated that factors like company size, safety culture, and different measures of financial performance may be related to the quality of OHSM practices in companies. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether these factors are associated with OHSM practices in companies. A postal questionnaire was used to collect data from a sample of Swedish manufacturing companies, and complementary data regarding the companies were retrieved from a credit bureau database. The statistical analysis was performed with ordinal regression analysis using generalized estimating equations. Different predictor variables were modeled with OHSM practices as the outcome variable, in order to calculate p-values and to estimate odds ratios. Company size, safety culture, and creditworthiness were found to be associated with better, as well as worse, OHSM practices in companies (depending on directionality). Practical implications for industry and future research are discussed.

  • 16.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Socialmedicin..
    Wiitavaara, Birgitta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Högberg, Hans
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science.
    Westerling, Ragnar
    Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    To measure OHS management practices in manufacturing companies2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Manufacturing companies are bound to manage many different processes in their day-to-day operations. A systematic management of occupational health and safety (OHS) factors is necessary in order to comply with OHS legislation. Work environmental risks should be assessed and controlled, and if not controlled immediately, an action plan should be established and followed up on later. A successful OHS management should reduce hazards in the workplace and protect worker health and safety. But how can we accurately measure how well companies actually comply with OHS legislation? Earlier measures exist, but they often assess the perceptions of the respondent rather than the circumstance of the company. The aim of this study was to develop and utilize a way to measure OHS management practices, by using a self-report-questionnaire distributed to companies.   

    Methods: A questionnaire was developed in several steps. OHS legislation and earlier studies were read in order to identify different relevant indicators for OHS management compliance. These indicators were then compiled, sorted, and narrowed down in order to produce a manageable and relevant list of 13 indicators. A criterion for relevant indicators was that they together should provide appropriate information on whether a company has come far, or not so far, in arranging a systematic OHS management. A yes–no question was formulated for each of the indicators. Three examples of indicators were: whether the company has written routines stating how the OHS management should be carried out or not, whether written risk assessments have been conducted during the last 12 months or not, and whether the company has routines in place for reporting incidents that occur (near-misses and accidents) or not. The indicators and questions were chosen and formulated in order to measure as much of an objective circumstance at the companies as possible. The rationale is that, either the companies have an arrangement for these indicators, or they do not. Questionnaires were sent to a sample of manufacturing companies (n=238) in central Sweden, for one manager and one safety delegate per company to answer.

    Results and discussion: Taken together, the 13 indicators formed an OHS management practices index. A yes-answer for each indicator was counted as 1 and no as 0, and the scores were summed together. Other measures were also collected for this study: companies’ safety culture, overall work environment priority, company profitability, and company size. The OHS management practices index will undergo psychometric testing for validity and reliability, such as test-retest and Cronbach’s alpha test statistic. The development process and usability of the OHS management practices measure will be presented in more detail at the conference. We believe that this novel measure of OHS management practices, as employed in this study, can be of interest for future research within the field of OHS. This approach provides a relatively straightforward way to measure companies’ OHS management practice using questionnaire items.

  • 17.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Wiitavaara, Birgitta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Winblad, Ulrika
    Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    Wijk, Katarina
    Samhällsmedicin, Landstinget Gävleborg. Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och utbildningsstudier, Uppsala universitet.
    Westerling, Ragnar
    Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    A description of reasons for risk-taking at a large steel manufacturing company2013In: Ergonomics for equality: Nordic Ergonomics Society (NES), Reykjavík, Iceland, 11-14 august 2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Risk-taking in an industrial work environment is a serious matter since it involves the risk for bodily injuries and in worst case death. The aim of this study was to investigate reasons for risk-taking at a large steel manufacturing company in Sweden which employs about 1000 people.

    Methods: Ten focus group interviews were conducted, each consisting of about 6–8 workers. The situation of safety at work was discussed in a semi-structured manner, letting the employees themselves explain the reasons behind risk-taking. The interviews were analyzed with qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Reasons for risk-taking were formed into the following six aspects: 1.Being new-at-work. 2.Being tired. 3.Being nonchalant to the safety risks. 4.Working on routine and being “blind-to-flaws”. 5.Too little staff to do the job. 6.To stress, hurry, and work faster in order to save time. Conclusion: One’s state-of-the-day and external work environment circumstances affects risk-taking.

  • 18.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Wiitavaara, Birgitta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Winblad, Ulrika
    Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    Wijk, Katarina
    Samhällsmedicin, Landstinget Gävleborg. Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och utbildningsstudier, Uppsala universitet.
    Westerling, Ragnar
    Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    En beskrivning av anledningar till risktagande vid ett stort stålindustriföretag2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Introduktion: Risktagande i en industriell arbetsmiljö är allvarligt eftersom det involverar risk för kroppsskada eller i värsta fall död. Syftet med föreliggande studie var att undersöka anledningar till risktagande, beskrivna av arbetare. Studien genomfördes i samarbete med ett stort svenskt stålindustriföretag med cirka 1000 anställda på den berörda orten.

    Metod: Studien hade en kvalitativ och beskrivande studiedesign. Datainsamlingen bestod av tio fokusgruppintervjuer med ca 6–8 arbetare per grupp och deltagarna var anställda i produktionen. Deltagarna rekryterades från samtliga av företagets fem huvudavdelningar för att få ett urval med maximal variation, och det slumpades fram vilka skiftlag som tillfrågades att delta. Intervjuerna hade en längd av 75 minuter och spelades in digitalt med en diktafon. Säkerhet på arbetet diskuterades på ett semi-strukturerat sätt, genom att låta arbetarna själva berätta och förklara anledningar till risktagande. Under intervjuerna lades betoningen på följdfrågor där deltagarna ombads att utveckla sina svar och använda egna exempel. Därutöver samlades bakgrundsdata in om deltagarna genom att de fyllde i ett kort frågeformulär. Intervjuerna transkriberades ordagrant och analyserades med kvalitativ innehållsanalys.

    Resultat: Anledningar till risktagande formades till följande sex aspekter: 1.Att vara ny på jobbet. 2.Att vara trött. 3.Att vara nonchalant inför riskerna. 4.Att arbeta på rutin och vara ”hemmablind”. 5.Att det finns för lite personal för att göra jobbet. 6.Att stressa, skynda sig och arbeta fortare för att spara tid. Ett incitament för anställda att riskera sin egen säkerhet kan till exempel vara att inte använda de avsedda verktygen för att snabbt få igång produktionen igen om ett stopp inträffar. Arbetarna upplevde att ledningen inte vill att produktionen ska gå långsamt, vilket dock användandet av rätt verktyg kan medföra. De upplevde också att ledningen inte vill att tillfälliga personalreduceringar skall påverka produktionstakten. Slutsats: Dels individens dagsform och dels yttre omständigheter i arbetsmiljön påverkar risktagandet.

  • 19.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Wiitavaara, Birgitta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Winblad, Ulrika
    Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    Wijk, Katarina
    Samhällsmedicin, Landstinget Gävleborg; Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och utbildningsstudier, Uppsala universitet.
    Westerling, Ragnar
    Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    Safety culture and reasons for risk-taking at a large steel-manufacturing company: Investigating the worker perspective2015In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 73, p. 126-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Workers in the steel-manufacturing industry face many safety risks due to the nature of the job. How well safety procedures and regulations are followed within an organization is considered to be influenced by the reigning culture of the organization. The aim of this study was to investigate and describe safety culture and risk-taking at a large steel-manufacturing company in Sweden by exploring workers’ experiences and perceptions of safety and risks. Ten focus group interviews were conducted with a total of 66 workers. In the interviews, the situation of safety at work was discussed in a semi-structured manner. The material was analyzed inductively using qualitative content analysis. The analysis resulted in a thorough description of safety culture and risk-taking at the company, based on the following five main categories: 1. Acceptance of risks, one simply has to accept the safety risks of the work environment, 2. Individual responsibility for safety, the responsibility for safe procedures rests to the largest extent on the individual, 3. Trade-off between productivity and safety, these are conflicting entities, wanting to produce as well as wanting to work safely, 4. Importance of communication, it is needed for safety actions to be effective, and 5. State-of-the-day and external conditions, an interplay between these factors affect risk-taking. In sociotechnical systems theory it is acknowledged that there are interactions between social and technical factors in organizations. The findings of this study are interpreted to be in line with a sociotechnical understanding of safety culture and risk-taking.

  • 20.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Wijk, Katarina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Do small- and medium-sized enterprises differ in their work environment priorities?2011In: Wellbeing and innovations through ergonomics: Nordic Ergonomics Society (NES), Oulu, Finland, 18-21 september 2011, Nordic Ergonomics Society , 2011, p. 1-6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Companies differ to what extent they attend to their work environments, despite that every employer is obliged to follow the national legislations on occupational, health and safety (OHS). Earlier evidence suggests that small and larger companies significantly differ in quality in how they handle their OHS activities. This study used questionnaire data from 106 small- and medium-sized companies. The findings were contrary to what could be expected, since no significant differences between company sizes were found. It is important to consider if it is factual or perceptual differences that’s being compared when examining companies’ work environment management.

  • 21.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Wijk, Katarina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Uppfattningar om prioritering av arbetsmiljön i små och medelstora tillverkande företag2010In: Arbetsliv i förändring: Forum för arbetslivsforskning (FALF), Malmö, 19-21 maj 2010, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Inom forskningen råder det konsensus om att det finns signifikanta skillnader mellan hur små företag och större sköter om arbetet med arbetshälsa och säkerhet (Champoux & Brun, 2003; Lin & Mills, 2001; Hinze, 1988; Wilson, 200; Holmes, 1999). Ålder och kön anses vara karaktäristika som påverkar attityder kring miljö och miljöarbete (McKevier & Gadenne, 2005). Denna studie undersöker små och medelstora företags uppfattningar om hur arbetsmiljön prioriteras, enligt vad tillfrågade på företagen anser. Hur lika/olika är små och medelstora företag vid jämförelse, och spelar åldersgrupper eller kön hos respondenterna in i hur företagens prioritering av arbetsmiljön uppfattas?

    Metod: Företag med 10-49 anställda definieras som små företag, och 50-249 anställda som medelstora företag. Samtliga företag i dessa storleksgrupper, i ett län i Mellansverige, sysslandes med tillverkning, tillfrågades att besvara en enkät med 42 frågor om arbetsmiljön, där graden av prioritering av arbetsmiljön uppskattades på en skala (VAS, visual analogue scale). Två representanter per företag tillfrågades, företagsledare och skyddsombud, svarsfrekvensen var 60%, med 184 små företag och 63 medelstora. Svaren analyserades med det icke-parametriska testet Kruskal-Wallis i grupper om företagsstorlek, respondenternas ålder samt kön.

    Preliminära resultat: Resultaten visade att uppfattningarna kring prioritering av arbetsmiljön var övervägande lika då företagsstorlek jämfördes, i 5 av 42 frågor skiljde sig små och medelstora företag åt (p-värde <0.05, kruskall-wallis). Beträffande uppfattningarna bland åldersgrupperna (<35, 36-50, 51<) skiljde sig den äldsta åldersgruppen mot de andra två, i 12 av 42 frågor (p-värde <0.05, kruskall-wallis). I vidare analyser visade det sig också att uppfattningarna i åldergrupperna 36-50 och 51< i små företag skiljde sig åt mot motsvarande åldersgrupper i medelstora företag, i 8 av 42 frågor för åldersgruppen 36-50 i små företag, och 12 av 42 frågor för åldersgruppen 51< i små företag (p-värde <0.05, kruskall-wallis). Inga skillnader i uppfattningar mellan könen påträffades.

    Sammantaget visar det sig att inom små företag skiljer det sig mellan åldersgrupper i uppfattningar om prioritering av arbetsmiljön, där de yngsta (>35) inte uppfattar någon fråga högre prioriterad än någon av de två äldre åldersgrupperna, de medelålders (36-50) uppfattar hög prioritering på några områden som kan sammanfattas med orden – samspel och kommunikation, och de äldsta (50<) uppfattar hög prioritering på några områden som kan sammanfattas med orden – rutiner, kommunikation och förebyggande.

  • 22.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Wijk, Katarina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Lindberg, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    A comparison of managers’ and safety delegates’ perceptions of work environment priorities in the manufacturing industry2012In: Human Factors and Ergonomics in Manufacturing, ISSN 1090-8471, E-ISSN 1520-6564, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 235-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the attention and priority accorded to factors of work environment within manufacturing companies, as perceived by managers and safety delegates at small- and medium-sized enterprises. Representatives from 142 Swedish manufacturing companies answered a 43-item questionnaire covering seven areas of the work environment and a priority-ranking question of company interests. Respondents (n = 249) rated the present situation and the situation one year earlier, using a visual analogue scale. The findings showed that both managers and safety delegates ranked profitability as the main company interest. Respondents rated the priorities of the work environment currently as higher than one year earlier (p = <0.05). Managers rated the priorities of the work environment higher than did the safety delegates (p = <0.05). We conclude that the two professional roles, managers and safety delegates, differ in their perceptions as of to which extent different work environment factors are being attended to.

  • 23.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Wijk, Katarina
    Samhällsmedicin, Landstinget Gävleborg; Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och utbildningsstudier, Uppsala universitet.
    Westergren, Karl-Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Perceptions of work environment priorities: Are there any differences by company size? — An ecological study2015In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 697-706Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Earlier studies suggest that the quality of handling occupational health and safety (OHS) activities differs between companies of different sizes. Company size is a proxy variable for other variables affecting OHS performance.

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate if there is an association between company size and perceptions of work environment prioritizations.

    METHODS: Data from 106 small- and medium-sized Swedish manufacturing companies was collected. One manager and one safety delegate at each company rated different aspects of their companies' work environment prioritizations with a 43-item questionnaire. Ratings were aggregated to a summary statistic for each company before analysis.

    RESULTS: No significant differences in perceptions of priority were found to be associated with company sizes. This is in contrast to earlier studies of objective differences. The respondents in small companies, however, showed significantly greater consensus in their ratings.

    CONCLUSIONS: Company size does not appear to be associated with perceptions of work environment prioritizations. Company size is an important proxy variable to study in order to understand what factors enable and obstruct safe and healthy workplaces. The work presented here should be viewed as an initial exploration to serve as direction for future academic work.

  • 24.
    Wijk, Katarina
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Lönsamhet i en god arbetsmiljö (poster)2009In: Arbetet i människors liv: Forum för arbetslivsforskning (FALF), Göteborg, 13-14 maj 2009, Göteborg, 2009Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Presentation av de övergripande frågeställningarna från delstudier i ett pågående tvärvetenskapligt forskningsprojekt vid Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning (CBF), Högskolan i Gävle. Inom projektet studeras bl.a. tillvägagångssätt för arbetsmiljöarbete, hur arbetsmiljön prioriteras samt arbetsmiljöarbete och lönsamhet/varumärke. Inom projektet har även Ergopriset tagits fram, för att årligen uppmärksamma ett företag som med ergonomiska principer strävat efter att förbättra lönsamheten.

    Utställare är forskningsledare fil dr Katarina Wijk och projektmedarbetare Hasse Nordlöf.

1 - 24 of 24
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf