hig.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 14 of 14
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Fransson, Göran
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Culture Studies, Religious Studies and Educational Sciences, Curriculum studies.
    Holmberg, Jörgen
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Culture Studies, Religious Studies and Educational Sciences, Curriculum studies.
    Developing digital literacy and digital competence in teacher education: Challenges, dilemmas and opportunities identified through self-study methodology2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teachers have an important role in helping pupils achieve the skills needed to become digitally literate and digitally competent in today’s society. Consequently teacher education must help becoming teachers develop these skills and how to teach them. However, previous research indicates a lack of confidence among many teacher educators to do so (Enochsson & Rizza, 2009).

    To acquire a deeper understanding of the challenges and opportunities teacher educators and student teachers might encounter when working with, and learning about, ICT as a tool for learning, the authors of this paper carried out a self-study research project (cf. Loughran, 2007; Zeichner, 2007) which focused on our own experiences when planning and teaching a 7,5 ECTS course in initial teacher training. The focus of the course was the pedagogical use of web 2.0-resourses to create learning objects for use in (pre-)schools.  The course could be characterized as innovative since its focus, content and form of distribution, teaching and examination goes far beyond what’s common in initial teacher training inSweden(Enochsson, 2010; Ericsson & Löndahl, 2008). Lectures, seminars and student co-operation were mainly web-based and students were encouraged to take a very high degree of responsibility for their own learning. Web-based resources specifically created for the course were offered to compensate for the scarceness of face-to-face meetings.

    The fact that we both have rather different experiences of the content and the technology used in this course, and of being a teacher educator and researcher, was used as a methodological postulate for the self study project. After every seminar, lecture or examination the two of us reflected together. Sometimes non-scheduled student contacts also actuated further reflections. These reflections were recorded digitally and notes were taken. In total five hours of recordings were made at eight times. In between these collaborative reflections, personal reflections were noted and sometimes taped.

    Some of the key-findings discussed in the paper are: Insights in challenges and opportunities for both teachers and students to integrate (a) content knowledge; (b) pedagogical knowledge; and (c) technological knowledge; into (d) a Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge, TPACK (see Mishra & Koehler 2006, 2008, cf. Ferdig, 2006).

    How our different skills and experiences gave us a better understanding of what might be difficult or unclear to students, thus making us able to give a better course and more valid student feedback. We also identified some of the mechanism that made us, as “expert” and/or “novice”, take certain things for granted (cf. Sandretto) which in turn might make us miss students’ proximal zone of development. When co-operating closely and complementing each other skills- and experience wise, this is less likely to happen. 

    Another insight was how our different proficiencies (i.e. our different understanding of technology, pedagogy and content) affected our assessment of the students’ multimodal presentations, what becomes focused, valued and assessed.

    Implications for teacher education, teacher educators’ professional development, student teachers, and for (pre)school are also discussed.

  • 2.
    Fransson, Göran
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Culture Studies, Religious Studies and Educational Sciences, Curriculum studies.
    Holmberg, Jörgen
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Culture Studies, Religious Studies and Educational Sciences, Curriculum studies.
    Understanding the theoretical framework of technological pedagogical content knowledge: A collaborative self-study to understand teaching practice and aspects of knowledge2012In: Studying Teacher Education: journal of self-study of teacher education practices, ISSN 1742-5964, E-ISSN 1742-5972, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 193-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a self-study research project that focused on our experiences when planning, teaching and evaluating a course in initial teacher training. The focus of the course was the pedagogical use of web 2.0 resources to support learning in the preschool/school context. The potential of the different digital tools was mainly explored by situated use in the design and teaching of the course. The focus, content, form of distribution, teaching and assessment of the course went beyond what is common in initial teacher training in Sweden. The analysis highlighted the challenges and opportunities that teacher educators and student teachers might encounter when working with, and learning about, ICT to support learning. Some of the findings discussed are related to the identified challenges and opportunities for both teachers and students to integrate content knowledge (CK), pedagogical knowledge (PK) and technological knowledge (TK) into a technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK). For teacher educators this is especially challenging, since they need to develop TPACK themselves and understand what this means for different categories of teachers. Taken-for-granted organizational and institutional assumptions of teaching, learning and assessment in teacher education were identified in the study.

  • 3.
    Fransson, Göran
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Curriculum studies.
    Holmberg, Jörgen
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Curriculum studies.
    Lindberg, J. Ola
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Anders D.
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Digitalise and capitalise? Teachers’ self-understanding in 21st-century teaching contexts2019In: Oxford Review of Education, ISSN 0305-4985, E-ISSN 1465-3915, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 102-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The digitalisation of educational contexts has changed the prac- tice of teaching and learning. In this, teachers have a key role in enacting digital technologies for this purpose and have different opportunities to do so. This article explores how digitalisation can affect teachers by focusing on: (a) how teachers manage to capi- talise on digitalisation; and (b) how digitalisation can affect and reconstruct their self-understanding. Two teacher colleagues of English as a foreign language (EFL) in the same teaching team are interviewed and observed. Drawing on the interplay between self-image, self-esteem, job motivation, and task perception, it is shown how the teachers’ self-understanding is played out and changes due to the call for digitalisation. Whereas one of the teachers has been able to capitalise on digitalisation in a way that has been beneficial both professionally and personally, the other has felt pressurised by it. A conclusion is that a limited or extended use of digital technologies should not be taken as an indicator of teaching quality.

  • 4.
    Holmberg, Jörgen
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Culture Studies, Religious Studies and Educational Sciences, Curriculum studies.
    Added Value? Preschool Teacher Students’ Views On And Examples Of The Added Value Of ICT As A Tool For Learning2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s digitalized society the potential of digital technologies and how to use these to support learning has increasingly become a focus of research. Since preschool children’s use of ICT is continuously increasing, more interest is also being paid to the question of how ICT can be used for pedagogical purposes in preschools, although research in this area is still limited (Sandvik, Smørdal & Østerud 2012). The use of ICT in preschools is itself a controversial matter. Earlier research has questioned whether young children should be subjected to ICT (Straker et al 2009; Kalas 2010). A growing number of studies, however, identify the potential of ICT as a tool for learning in preschools when the use of ICT is based on pedagogical principles and supports learning of an intended content (McCarrick & Li 2007; McKenney & Voogt 2009). In other words, if ICT is to be used to create a pedagogical added value in preschools, preschool teachers must develop an ability to integrate pedagogical knowledge, content knowledge and technological knowledge.

    The aim of this study is to examine what kind of added pedagogical value pre-service preschool teachers think educational technologies can bring to preschools and to analyze their oral, written and practical digital examples and presentations of such added value through the lenses of the theoretical framework of Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK).

    Mishra and Koehler (2008) has built on Shulman’s (1986) pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) to create a conceptual framework that also includes technological knowledge and the ability to successfully integrate this with their pedagogical knowledge and content knowledge. They label their conceptual framework Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK). The TPACK framework has proven useful as a tool for describing the type of knowledge required by teachers for successful technology integration (Voogt et al 2012).  A teacher that possesses TPACK knows how to successfully integrate ICT in their practice to create an added pedagogical value. Thus, looking for signs of TPACK means looking for signs of successful technology integration. Hence there are a number of studies that try to measure teachers’ or student teachers’ TPACK with the intention of identifying successful ICT integration (Angeli & Valanides 2009; Kramarski & Michalsky 2010). In this study the theoretical framework TPACK is used to analyze preschool teacher students’ oral presentations, written texts and digital examples of ICT use for added value in preschools.

    The following research questions have been formulated: - What types of arguments did the preschool teacher students present to support or questions the use of ICT to create added pedagogical value in preschools? - What types of examples were given of successful ICT use for added pedagogical value in preschools by the preschool teacher students in their written documentation? - To what extent do the preschool teacher students’ practical digital examples show signs of added pedagogical value by successful ICT integration (i.e. to what extent do the preschool teacher students’ digital examples show signs of TPACK or other subdomains in the TPACK framework)

  • 5.
    Holmberg, Jörgen
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science.
    Applying a conceptual design framework to study teachers'€™ use of educational technology2017In: Education and Information Technologies: Official Journal of the IFIP technical committee on Education, ISSN 1360-2357, E-ISSN 1573-7608, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 2333-2349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Theoretical outcomes of design-based research (DBR) are often presented in the form of local theory design principles. This article suggests a complementary theoretical construction in DBR, in the form of a design framework at a higher abstract level, to study and inform educational design with ICT in different situated contexts. Laurillard’s Conversational Framework (CF) is used as a conceptual lens to analyse how eight teachers use or envisage using technology to support learning in one-to-one environments. The findings demonstrate how the researcher uses the CF to discern different aspects of the teachers’ situated design practices. In the study, ICT is primarily used to support communication and the exchange of knowledge representations between the teachers and their students. Considerably fewer examples are found where ICT is used to support communication, collaborative creation and modelling between peers. However, the interview analyses reveal that the teachers’ intentions to apply ICT to support learning often include this second type of ICT use. Reasons for this discrepancy between the expressed intentions and de facto use of ICT include limitations in technical know-how and a perceived conflict between collaborative learning, existing school cultures and individual assessment. The findings suggest that in DBR, an analytical design framework could be an important tool for researchers and teachers when analysing and discussing educational uses of ICT. The CF provides a promising basis for a design framework, but should be expanded to include interactions with actors outside the classroom.

  • 6.
    Holmberg, Jörgen
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Curriculum studies. Institutionen för data- och systemvetenskap, Stockholms universitet, Stockholm.
    Designing for added pedagogical value: A design-based research study of teachers’ educational design with ICT2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In an increasingly digitized world teachers are expected to take on the role of educational designers and use ICT to design in ways that add pedagogical value to teaching and learning. This thesis adopts a design-based research (DBR) approach to: (a) explore and contribute to the educational design processes of teachers of English as a foreign language in their efforts to use ICT for added pedagogical value, (b) examine how ICT is used in educational designs to create/contribute to what the teachers and students describe as added value and (c) explore, problematize and refine DBR as a research approach.

    Literature studies and a collaborative self-study preceded the DBR to guide its focus and implementation. The DBR was carried out over a period of two years in four upper secondary schools in Sweden in which every student had access to their own computer. The research data consists of: (a) audio recorded design conversations, (b) enacted educational designs and design elements as parts of these, (c) reflective log entries written by the participating teachers, (d) focus group interviews with students and (e) the researcher’s field notes.

    Six different theoretical frameworks and models are used in combination in the accompanying articles to analyze the data and achieve the three research aims. The findings show how teachers’ pedagogical reasoning and TPACK development are interconnected and reciprocal aspects of the educational design process and how the externalization of, and reflection on, these aspects is necessary to develop the specific and practical TPACK needed to realize design intentions in situated contexts. A number of challenges and opportunities in the educational process have been identified.

    Moreover, the findings show how ICT was used to contribute added value in educational designs by facilitating: (a) more authentic and seamless learning experiences in external online contexts with both in-class and out-of-class actors irrespective of time and place, (b) an exchange of digital knowledge representations of understanding and practice between different actors, e.g. for the purposes of modelling, supporting cognitive apprenticeship, meta-cognitive self-regulation and formative assessment and (c) new and extended forms of, and opportunities for, collaborative creation and meaning-making.

    The current common focus in DBR on the development of prescriptive design principles is problematized in relation to the findings of the thesis, which illustrate the complex and situated nature of the educational design process. A theoretically and empirically informed design framework (DF) is developed and used as a conceptual tool to guide and analyze educational design processes and enactments. The findings illustrate how the use of the DF and the process of collaborative design reflection contributed to the analysis of the teachers’ design intentions and de facto design practices and to a DBR format that allowed the participants to use their respective competencies in the development of educational designs for added value. The thesis thereby serves as an example of how DBR can be methodically implemented to study and generate increased knowledge about teachers’ design intentions and design practices, develop research-based educational designs in line with teachers’ pedagogical intentions and support their development as educational designers.

  • 7.
    Holmberg, Jörgen
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science.
    Exploring theoretical development of Design Based Research: viewing design as reflective conversations with situations2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a world of rapid technological change, where learners are becoming increasingly accustomed to new ways of finding information and communicating with each other, teachers are having to face up to the challenges and opportunities involved in learning how to successfully use technology in their teaching practices. The ongoing digitization of society also has epistemological consequences. Nowadays learning is often viewed as constructive, self-regulated, situated and collaborative (de Corte 2010) – and teaching is increasingly referred to as designing for learning(cf. Laurillard 2012; Olofsson & Lindberg Eds., 2012). Considerable investments are made around the world to introduce technology into schools, with the expectation that teachers will put it to good use (cf. Lim et al 2013). However, in order to do this, teachers need to learn how to master and integrate a new knowledge domain, i.e. technological knowledge, into their existing practices, and understand the reciprocal interaction between technology, pedagogy and content knowledge (cf. Mishra & Koehler 2008). Teachers are thus having to face a number of challenges in an already complex profession, where a multitude of factors have to be constantly taken into consideration and situated problem-solving strategies designed . Studying and elaborating how technology can be integrated into practice to help teachers successfully design for learning thus becomes a priority for teachers and it has been argued that it would be of high priority for educational researchers as well (cf. Laurillard 2012; Schleicher 2011). However, existing research on the educational use of digital technologies has been criticized of lacking theoretical grounding, providing limited empirical evidence and using ineffective research methodologies, thus providing limited advice to practitioners and limited evidence of the effects of digital technologies in learning. (cf. Bebell et al., 2010; Orlando 2009). This correlates with the identification of a widening gap between educational research and educational practice that is not just limited to the use of digital technologies (cf. Berliner 2008; Dumont & Istance 2010). It is argued that ‘too much research on learning is disconnected from the realities of educational practice and policy making’, and that ‘too many schools do not exemplify the conclusions’ drawn by such research, thus resulting in a situation in which (scientific) theory and educational practice are less informed by each other (Dumont & Instance 2010, p. 21).

    Design based research (DBR) is increasingly being considered as one way of informing research on teachers design with educational technologies and simultaneously contributing in closing the research-practice gap described above. However, the dual goals of DBR, i.e. practical design of working educational interventions and theory building on working design models and principles, makes it a potentially powerful, but also a very ambitious and complex endevour (cf. Anderson & Shattuck 2012; McKenney & Reeves 2012). Given that the researcher in DBR is both designer, implementer and evaluator there is an obvious risks for a conflict of interest, biased perspectives, and that taken for granted assumptions don’t become critically scrutinized. Considering the complexity of assessing if, how and why learning occurs, the generalizability of interventions designed in situated contexts into generic design principles as a viable goal of DBR must also be problematized. Thus, the aim of this conceptual paper is to make a contribution to the theoretical development of the DBR-concept by problematizing certain key-concepts and goals of DBR. This is primarily done by contrasting Simon’s and Schön’s views of design and discussing the potential of using Schön’s view of design as a reflective conversation with the situation as an alternative perspective in DBR research 

    Method

    As hinted above a methodological approach has been to problematize certain key-concepts and goals used and expressed in previous DBR-research. For example, since teaching is increasingly being referred to as designing for learning, our understanding of the word design becomes important. Two influential thinkers in the field of design are Simon and Schön (Schön 1983, 1987, 1992; Simon 1969/1996, 1973). The works of Simon and his ‘paradigm of rational problem solving’ (cf. Dorst 2006) still heavily influence the fields of design methodology and are evident in design approaches for teaching and learning today (cf. Dorst 2006; Mor & Winters 2007). However, the current critique of educational research hinted at above in many ways echoes the critique that Schön directed against what he referred to as ‘the model of Technical Rationality’ and its consequences for research on design practice some 20-30 years ago. For this paper a review of earlier research on DBR and the main foci and presented outcomes us such research has been made. Moreover, a literature review of the research of Simon and Schön has been conducted and their views of design has been contrasted to account for two different ways of thinking about the process of design and research on this process. Schön’s concept of design as a reflective conversation with the situation has then been critically examined along with its usefulness as a conceptual tool in DBR on teachers design with educational technologies.

    Expected Outcomes

    The paper argues that the rich affordances of digital technologies and teachers’ and students’ situated designs with such technologies in complex and changing educational contexts make viewing design as rational problem-solving problematic. Instead, it is suggested that adopting Schön’s view of design as a reflective conversation with the situation in DBR-approaches has the potential of informing both research on the use of digital educational technologies and teachers’ situated use of such technologies. The paper presents suggestions as to how Schön’s ideas for research on teachers’ situated practices could contribute to theory development in DBR. Finally, some of the possibilities and challenges of the reflective design-based research approach suggested in this paper are discussed. Arguably such an approach could have the potential of increasing knowledge about principles and methods used by teachers to guide their framing, reflection-in-action and knowing-in-action. An increased knowledge of such framing principles, or principles for reflection-in-action, could be useful in teachers’ reflective conversations in different unique situations, thus increasing the potential for generalizability in DBR research. The formulation of such principles could also form the basis of a meta-language for talking about design. The DBR format would ensure that teachers and researchers are involved in the development of such a meta-language, thus making it understandable and potentially useful for both parties. However, it should be noted that despite the suggested possibilities of reflective DBR, a research approach as the one suggested in this paper must also be regarded as extremely challenging. In addition to the inherent challenges in DBR described in the paper, the challenges of trying to study and elaborate understanding of teachers’ knowing-in-action and reflection-in-action also need to be taken into consideration. Due to their tacit and esoteric nature, this would be no easy task.

    References

    Anderson, T., & Shattuck, J. (2012). Design-Based Research A Decade of Progress in Education Research? Educational Researcher, 41(1), 16–25. Bebell, D., O’Dwyer, L.M., Russell, M. & Hoffman, T. (2010) Concerns, considerations and new ideas for data collection and research in educational technology studies. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 43(1), 29-52 Berliner, D.C. (2008) Research policy and practice: The great disconnect. In Lapan, S.D., & Quartaroli, M.T. (Eds.) Research essentials: An introduction to designs and practices (pp.295-325). Hoboken, NJ: Jossey-Bass. de Corte, E. (2010). Historical developments in the understanding of learning. In Dumont, H., Istance, D., & Benavides, F. (Eds.) The nature of learning: Using research to inspire practice (pp. 35-67). OECD Publishing Dorst, K. (2006) Design Problems and Design Paradoxes. Design Issues, 22(3), 4-17. Dumont, H., & Istance, D. (2010) Analysing and designing learning environments for the 21st century. In Dumont, H., Istance, D., & Benavides, F. (Eds.) The nature of learning: Using research to inspire practice (pp. 19-34). OECD Publishing Laurillard, D. (2012) Teaching as a Design Science: Building Pedagogical Patterns for Learning and Technology. London: RoutledgeFalmer Lim, C.-P., Zhao, Y., Tondeur, J., Chai, C.-S., & Tsai, C.-C. (2013). Bridging the Gap: Technology Trends and Use of Technology in Schools. Educational Technology & Society, 16 (2), 59–68. McKenney, S. & Reeves, T. C. (2012) Conducting Educational Design Research. London: Routledge Mishra, P. & Koehler, M. (2008). Introducing technological pedagogical content knowledge. Paper presented at the meeting of the American Educational Research Association, New York. Mor, Y. & Winters, N. (2007) Design approaches in technology-enhanced learning. Interactive Learning Environments, 15(1), 61-75. Olofsson, A., & Lindberg, J. (Eds.) (2012). Informed Design of Educational Technologies in Higher Education: Enhanced Learning and Teaching. Hershey, Pennsylvania: IGI Global. Orlando, J. (2009). Understanding changes in teachers’ ICT practices: A longitudinal perspective. Technology, Pedagogy and Education, 18(1), 33–44. Schön, D. (1983) The reflective practitioner: How professionals think in action. New York: Basic Books. Schön, D. (1987) Educating the reflective practitioner: Towards a new design for teaching in the professions. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Schön, D. (1992) The theory of inquiry: Dewey’s legacy to education. Curriculum inquiry 22(2), 119–139. Schleicher, A. (2011) Building a High-Quality Teaching Profession: Lessons from around the World, OECD Publishing. Simon, H. A. (1969/1996). The sciences of the artificial (3rd ed). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Simon, H. A. (1973) The Structure of Ill-structured Problems. Artificial Intelligence 4, 181–201.

  • 8.
    Holmberg, Jörgen
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Curriculum studies.
    Field-testing a conceptual design framework to study teachers’ intentions with and use of educational technology2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, design framework is suggested as a conceptual construct in DBR to analyze and inform teachers’ design thinking and practical interventions in different educational contexts. In the study, Laurillard’s Conversational Framework is proposed as a potential basis for such a design framework and used as a conceptual lens with which to analyze how teachers use or envision using technology to support learning in one-to-one environments. The findings are presented in relation to a) the use of the Conversational Framework as a conceptual research tool and a potential design framework and b) the participating teachers’ visions for and practical use of technology to support students’ learning.

  • 9.
    Holmberg, Jörgen
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Curriculum studies. Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för data- och systemvetenskap.
    Identifying the added pedagogical value in teachers’ educational designs with digital technologiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This research is part of a longitudinal design-based research (DBR) project in which the researcher collaborates with eight teachers of English as a foreign language. The objective of this study is to analyse the pedagogical use of ICT and the value this adds in educational designs that are described by teachers and students as having successfully supported learning during the DBR project.

    A design framework is used as a conceptual tool to support the creation, evaluation and elaboration of research-based and context relevant educational designs. Nvivo software is used for the thematic coding and analysis of multiple data sources.

    The findings show that the use of ICT added pedagogical value by enabling collaborative practices with peers and external actors in authentic contexts and empowered students as designers of their own meaning-making practices by affording and stimulating communication and reflection for learning in relation to knowledge representations of the teachers’, peers’, external actors’ and students’ own conceptual organisation and practice capabilities.

    Moreover, the findings illustrate how the use of ICT for added pedagogical value depended on the teachers’ willingness and abilities to reframe and develop their pedagogical reasoning and practices in relation to: the content to be taught, the students in question, possible pedagogical strategies and the available technologies. 

    The article provides evidence-based examples of how technology can be used to add pedagogical value and shows that it is how teachers and students use the existing technology to support teaching and learning that determines whether value is added or not.

  • 10.
    Holmberg, Jörgen
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Curriculum studies. Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Studying the process of educational design: revisiting Schön and making a case for reflective design-based research on teachers' 'conversations with situations'2014In: Technology, Pedagogy and Education, ISSN 1475-939X, E-ISSN 1747-5139, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 293-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This conceptual paper discusses Donald A. Schön’s views on design and how itcould inform design-based research (DBR) on teachers’ use of technology ineducation. It argues that the rich affordances of digital technologies and teachers’and students’ situated designs with such technologies in complex and changingeducational contexts make viewing design as rational problem-solving problematic.Instead, it is suggested that adopting Schön’s view of design as a reflectiveconversation with the situation in DBR approaches has the potential of informingboth research on the use of digital educational technologies and teachers’ situateduse of such technologies. The paper then presents suggestions as to howSchön’s ideas for research on teachers’ situated practices could contribute to theorydevelopment in DBR. Finally, some of the possibilities and challenges of thereflective DBR approach suggested in this paper are discussed.

  • 11.
    Holmberg, Jörgen
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Culture Studies, Religious Studies and Educational Sciences, Curriculum studies.
    Brenner, Mats
    University of Gävle, Library.
    Hallen, Maivor
    University of Gävle, Library. University Library of Gävle.
    Planning and implementing in-service ICT-training to support development of higher education teachers’ technological pedagogical content knowledge2013In: The Joy of Learning - Enhancing Learning Experience Improving Learning Quality: 2013 Annual EDEN Conference, Oslo, Norway, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Theoretical underpinnings in the planning of the in-service training

    The rapid technological development and the growth of online learning, present new challenges for higher education teachers and institutions. Web 2.0 tools create new opportunities for teachers and students to communicate, collaborate and contribute by different modalities. The need for teachers to harness this potential in order to be able to respond to the changing needs and expectations of their students make in-service training of higher education online teachers a priority. What is often overlooked in in-service initiatives however, is that teachers have varying degrees of technological competence and pedagogical competence. They also teach different kinds of content to students with different pre-existing knowledge, etc.  

    This poster presents the implementation and outcomes of two simultaneous in-service training initiatives at the University of Gävle, Sweden. The initiatives were aimed at developing online teachers’ ability to successfully integrate ICT in their teaching. When planning this initiative we deliberately wanted to avoid techno centrism and a narrow focus on standards or competencies. Instead we were inspired by Mishra & Koehler’s theoretical framework TPACK (Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge) which recognises that developing the ability to successfully integrate ICT as a tool for learning means understanding the reciprocal relationship between technological knowledge, pedagogical knowledge and content knowledge (Mishra & Koehler 1986; 1987). Mishra & Koehler has built on Shulman’s (1986) pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) to create a conceptual framework that also includes technological knowledge and the ability to successfully integrate this with their pedagogical knowledge and content knowledge. In other words, a teacher that possesses TPACK knows how to successfully integrate ICT in their practice to create an added pedagogical value.

  • 12.
    Holmberg, Jörgen
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Curriculum studies.
    Fransson, Göran
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Curriculum studies.
    Fors, Uno
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för data och systemvetenskap.
    Teachers’ pedagogical reasoning and reframing of practice in digital contexts2018In: The international journal of information and learning technology, ISSN 2056-4880, E-ISSN 2056-4899, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 130-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this study is to advance the understanding of teachers’ reframing of practice in digital contexts by analysing teachers’ pedagogical reasoning processes as they explore ways of using ICT to create added pedagogical value.

    Design/methodology/approach

    A design based-research (DBR) approach is employed, in which the on-site researcher collaborates with eight teachers of English as a foreign language in four Swedish schools over a period of two years. Multiple data sources are included for thematic coding and analysis. The TPACK framework is used as a conceptual construct in the analysis.

    Findings

    The findings show that teachers’ pedagogical reasoning is a complex and multidimensional process and is closely integrated with teachers’ reframing of practice. Common characteristics in the teachers’ reframing of practice are identified. The results highlight the reciprocal relationship between developments in teachers’ pedagogical reasoning and TPACK development and the need for a distinction between general and specific, theoretical and practical TPACK.

    Research limitations/implications

    An increased focus on TPACK research on teachers’ pedagogical reasoning is required. DBR is a relevant approach for this.

    Practical implications

    The pedagogical uses of ICT identified as adding value could benefit teachers in other contexts.

    Originality/value

    Rich data from multiple design contexts is collected and analysed over time through DBR. The paper contributes new knowledge about the process of pedagogical reasoning and its relation to teachers’ reframing of practice. The paper also contributes to TPACK theory development.

  • 13.
    Holmberg, Jörgen
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Curriculum studies.
    Fransson, Göran
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Curriculum studies.
    Fors, Uno
    Stockholms universitet, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV).
    Teachers’ reframing of practice during a design-based research project2017In: The International Conferenceon Information Communication Technologies in Education (ICICTE 2017) Proceedings / [ed] Morris, L. & Tsolakidis, C., 2017, p. 378-388Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how eight teachers in one-to-one environments frame, reframe and develop different aspects of their practice during a two-year long study. The data consists of 23 hours of transcribed open-ended interviews, 35 reflective log entries written by the teachers, their educational designs and the researchers’ field notes. The results show: (a) how different dimensions of the teachers’ pedagogical reasoning are formulated, manifested and developed during the time of the study and (b) how different aspects of their technological, pedagogical and content knowledge are included in and developed through their pedagogical reasoning.

  • 14.
    Holmberg, Jörgen
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Curriculum studies.
    Masoumi, Davoud
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Curriculum studies.
    Elm, Annika
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Curriculum studies.
    Fransson, Göran
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Curriculum studies.
    Westelius, Claes
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Educational science, Curriculum studies.
    Björkman, Annica
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Stake-Nilsson, Kerstin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Toratti-Lindgren, Monique
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Teachers’ and students’ understanding and use of ICT for teaching and learning – Combining different perspectives and methodologies in research on technology-enhanced learning2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    More than half of the 14,000 students currently studying at the University of Gävle (HiG) are enrolled in courses that are totally or partly online based.  In 2015, a university-wide project on technology enhanced learning (TEL) (Steffens et al 2015) was initiated. The project focuses on course and programme development and is divided into four sub-projects, all of which contribute to the overall goals of project.

    AIMS of the project

    The aims of the project are to: (a) restructure teaching facilities and integrate digital technologies, (b) develop technology supported teaching methods, (c) integrate campus and distance education, (d) enhance teachers' and students' digital skills and (f) increase collaboration with relevant external actors.

    These aims are achieved through the work of four project groups.

    The digital environment group's (1) main focus is on digital tools for learning and the physical arrangement of learning spaces. The collaboration group's (2) main focus is on the maintenance and development of collaborative relationships and connections with communities in higher education for e-learning. The education and professional development group (3) focuses on issues such as professional development, learning design and the implementation of ICT in different courses and subjects. The research group (4) focuses on different issues connected to TEL.

    One of the main principles of the project is that the above areas are interlinked and interdependent and that the different experiences and skills of each group and its members contribute to a broader perspective of TEL.

    This poster focuses on the research conducted by the project's research group. Taking a multidisciplinary approach, the research focuses on issues and aspects of teaching and learning in higher education that contribute to multifaceted knowledge. The overall aim of the research is to generate knowledge about how conditions for teaching and learning change when the use of technology increases. The four research studies that are initiated are described below.

    Study 1: Lecturers’ and students’ agency in encounters with digital media in higher education

    This research study focus on issues related to lecturers’ digital teaching practices and students’ digital technological use in their everyday lives and for learning purposes.

    Digital practices are defined as the different contexts in which lecturers teach and students participate in digital media (such as learning management systems, forums, communities etc.). Previous research shows that students’ own digital practices are not always made use of in higher education (Buzzard et al., 2011; Kelm, 2011).

    A controversial issue in the Swedish higher education context is the discourse on students as customers. The perception of students as customers and “buyers” of ready-packaged content from lecturers is problematic. This view of what higher education stands for clashes with traditional academic views emphasizing critical thinking, reflection, self-directed learning, collaborative and individual learning etc.

    In this study, the concept of agency is important in that it reflects “the capacity of actors to critically shape their own responsiveness to problematic situations” (Emirbayer & Mische, 1998, p. 971). In the different perceptions of students’ and lecturers’ tasks and roles in teaching and learning, especially in TEL, all the actors have to display agency in order to manoeuvre in the educational and digital contexts. Notably, agency is not something that people have, but is something that people achieve (Biesta & Tedder, 2006).

    Aim

    The aim of the research project is to study: (a) students’ use of digital technology in their everyday practices and in relation to teaching situations and (b) how lecturers’ agency is played out in teaching and learning when trying to facilitate TEL.

    Methodology

    In spring 2017 an online survey involving up to 200 students will be conducted in order to generate knowledge about (a) students’ everyday experiences of digital practices and how these are utilized in higher education and (b) how higher education challenges and develops students’ digital skills and knowledge. In the same period, interviews with lecturers at the university will be conducted in order to generate knowledge about lecturers’ (c) everyday teaching practices with digital technologies and (d) the perceived challenges and development of teaching in relation to their use.

    Study 2: Teachers’ understanding and enactment of practice in online and blended educational contexts

    The knowledge that teachers need to develop is referred to as a ‘didaktik’ knowledge in the German/European tradition (cf. Kansanen 2009) and as pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) in the Anglo-Saxon literature (Shulman 1986; 1987). However, in what Castells (2011) describes as a network society, teachers are faced with new challenges and opportunities. Koehler et al (2014) argue that teachers’ development and integration of a new knowledge domain is not simply a matter of adding this “technology knowledge” to existing knowledge, but involves a reframing and reconceptualization of their existing professional practices and knowledge. They refer to this amalgam knowledge as technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK). The TPACK framework has been widely accepted as a useful theoretical construct. However, there is a need for research on the development and manifestation of TPACK in different disciplinary contexts (Koehler et al 2014).

    Aim

    The aim of this sub-project is to study: a) how teachers reframe and reconceptualize their practices and the kind of knowledge that is needed in online contexts b) how teachers practices are manifested when ICT is used to create (intended) added pedagogical values in educational designs c) the characteristics of educational designs regarded as adding pedagogical value

    Methodology

    Three higher education teachers of different courses and subjects in three different departments participate in the study. A design-based research approach is applied, where one of the participating researchers engages in so-called design conversations with the teachers. As is characteristic of DBR, this researcher does not only observe and interview, but also acts as a “co-designer” on the understanding that the teachers are the context experts and the final decision makers (McKenney & Reeves 2012; Plomp & Nieveen 2013).

    The data consists of recorded design conversations, educational designs and the artefacts used in the educational designs, the researcher’s/co-designer’s field notes and recorded “field-note conversations” between the researcher/co-designer and the other researcher.

    Expected outcomes

    The study is expected to contribute knowledge about how teachers’ knowledge and practices are understood and manifested in online and mixed higher educational contexts.

    Study 3: Researching and developing student nurses’ drug calculation skills in an explorative design comprising digital technologies

    This study is partly experimental in nature. It focuses on the challenges involved in student nurses’ development of accurate drug calculation skills. Challenges like this are not specific to nurse education at the University of Gävle, but appear to be universal (cf. Wright, 2009). However, it has also been claimed that written drug calculation tests do not accurately evaluate the skills involved in drug calculation, in that they are decontextualized from healthcare settings (Wright, 2005; 2012). It has also been claimed that this problem is more imaginary than factual, given that in practice nurses have been shown to handle drug calculation well (Wright, 2009).

    Aim

    The aims of this sub-project are to: (a) deepen the understanding of the challenges and mistakes that student nurses make in drug calculation exams, why they occur and how they might be prevented, (b) explore how the teaching and examination of drug calculation can be made more effective and contextualized and whether digital technologies can help in this.

    Methodology

    A multiple design method is employed using empirical data from written examinations, analyses of the set tasks and interviews with student nurses.

    Expected outcomes

    It is expected that the study will contribute knowledge about why (some) student nurses find it difficult to pass exams and that sufficient knowledge will be developed to facilitate the exploration of an experimental design for teaching and learning that includes digital technologies.

    Study 4: Situating ICT in teacher education programmes at the University of Gävle

    Integrating ICT as an integral part of teacher education programmes has been addressed as the most significant factor in determining the future level of ICT use in teaching and learning practices (Davis, 2010). According to the Swedish Higher Education Act, ICT should be embedded across entire educational practices in teacher education programmes (Government Bill, 2009/10:89). Numerous teacher educationprogrammes have made extensive efforts to prepare and empower teacher education students’ ICT competences so that ICT-based technologies are seamlessly woven into the teaching and learning process. Most schools try to enhance teachers’ digital competences by in-service education and expect newly qualified teachers to be adequately trained to use digital technologies in their educational practices. However, in reality it would seem that many newly qualified teachers do not have the necessary skills for this (see Chigona, 2015; Koehler, Mishra, Akcaoglu, & Rosenberg, 2013). 

    Aims

    This study focuses on understanding why a large number of the newly qualified teachers in teacher education institution remain underprepared to use digital technologies in their educational practices, despite an increased investment in the provision of digital technologies in these institutions.

     Methodology

    In order to explore how digital technologies are integrated into teacher education in higher education institutions, a sequential explanatory multiple sources design consisting of two distinct phases will be implemented (Creswell, 2012). In this design, a number of course syllabi in a programme will be analyzed. Interviews with key actors, including students, teacher educators and gatekeepers, will be conducted in order to contextualize and deepen the analysis of the syllabi.

    Expected outcomes

    The study is expected to deepen the understanding of how student teachers are pedagogically trained in ICT in teacher education institutions.

    Concluding remarks

    The four research studies in the project investigate how students and teachers understand and use educational ICT. This is done by using different methodologies and from different perspectives. It is expected that the research studies will contribute to the broader and more inclusive project perspective by their specific aims and generate knowledge that will contribute to the multifaceted field of TEL.

    References

    1. Biesta, G. & Tedder, M. (2006). How is agency possible? Towards an ecological understanding of agency-as-achievement. Working paper 5, Learning Lives: Learning, Identity and Agency in the Life Course, University of Exeter, England.
    2. Buzzard, C., Crittenden, V.L., Crittenden, W.F. & McCarty, P. (2011). The Use of Digital Technologies in the Classroom: A Teaching and Learning Perspective. Journal of Marketing Education. 33 (2), 131-139.
    3. Buzzard, C., Crittenden, V.L., Crittenden, W.F. & McCarty, P. (2011). The Use of Digital Technologies in the Classroom: A Teaching and Learning Perspective. Journal of Marketing Education. 33 (2), 131-139.
    4. Castells, M. (2011) The Rise of the Network Society: The Information Age: Economy, Society, and Culture, 2nd edn (Vol. 1). Malden, MA: John Wiley & Sons. 
    5. Chigona, A. (2015). Pedagogical shift in the twenty-first century: Preparing teachers to teach with new technologies. Africa Education Review, 12(3), 478-492. doi:10.1080/18146627.2015.1110912
    6. Davis, N. (2010). Technology in Preservice Teacher Education. In P. Editors-in-Chief:  Penelope, B. Eva, E. B. Barry McGawA2 - Editors-in-Chief:  Penelope Peterson, & M. Barry (Eds.), International Encyclopedia of Education (Third Edition) (pp. 217-221). Oxford: Elsevier.
    7. Emirbayer, M., & Mische, A. (1998). What is agency? American Journal of Sociology, 103(4), 962-1023.
    8. Kansanen, P. (2009). The curious affair of pedagogical content knowledge. Orbis Scholae, 3(2), 5-18.
    9. Kelm, R. (2011). Social Media. It’s what students do. Business Communication Quarterly. 74, (4), 505-520.
    10. Koehler, M. J., Mishra, P., Akcaoglu, M., & Rosenberg, J. (2013). The technological pedagogical content knowledge framework for teachers and teacher educators. In R. Thyagarajan (Ed.), ICT integrated teacher education: A resource book. New Delhi, India: CEMCA.
    11. Koehler, M. J., Mishra, P., Kereluik, K., Shin, T. S., & Graham, C. R. (2014). The technological pedagogical content knowledge framework. In J.M. Spector, M.D. Merrill, J. Elen, & M.J. Bishop (Eds.), Handbook of research on educational communications and technology (pp. 101-111). Springer New York.
    12. McKenney, S., & Reeves, T. C. (2012). Conducting educational design research. London: Routledge.  
    13. Plomp, T. & Nieveen, N. (Eds.). (2013) Educational Design Research: Introduction and Illustrative Cases.  Enschede, Netherlands; SLO Netherlands Institute for Curriculum Development.
    14. Regeringens proposition, (2009/10:89) Regeringens proposition 2009/10:89 om lärarutbildning m.m. [Government Bill, 2009/10:89 regarding teacher education etc.]  (Stockholm, Gotab) (in Swedish).
    15. Shulman, L. S. (1986). Those who understand: Knowledge growth in teaching. Educational Researcher, 15, 4–14.
    16. Shulman, L. S. (1987). Knowledge and teaching: Foundations of the new reform. Harvard Educational Review, 57, 1–22.  
    17. Steffens, K., Bannan, B., Dalgarno, B., Bartolomé, A. R., Esteve-González, V., & Cela-Ranilla, J. M. (2015). Recent Developments in Technology- Enhanced Learning: A Critical Assessment. RUSC. Universities and Knowledge Society Journal, 12(2). pp. 73-86.
    18. Wright, K. (2005). An exploration into the most effective way to teach drug calculation skills to nursing students. Nurse Education Today, 25, 430–436. 
    19. Wright, K. (2009). The assessment and development of drug calculation skills in nurse education – A critical debate. Nurse Education Today, 29, 544–548. Doi: 10.1016/j.nedt.2008.08.019 
    20. Wright, K. (2012). Editorial. Drug calculation skills – Are we running scared? Nurse Education Today, *. Doi: 10.1016/j.nedt.2011.06.001 
1 - 14 of 14
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf