hig.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 16 of 16
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Östberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    A multiple-case study of a family-oriented intervention practice in the early rehabilitation phase of persons with aphasia2013In: Aphasiology, ISSN 0268-7038, E-ISSN 1464-5041, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 201-226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Having a family member with aphasia severely affects the everyday life of the significant others, resulting in their need for support and information. Family-oriented intervention programmes typically consist of support, information, and skill training, such as communication partner training (CPT). However, because of time constraints and perceived lack of skills and routines, such programmes, especially CPT, are not common practice among speech-language pathologists (SLPs).

    Aims: To design and evaluate an early family-oriented intervention of persons with stroke-induced moderate to severe aphasia and their significant others in dyads. The intervention was designed to be flexible to meet the needs of each participant, to emotionally support the significant others and supply them with information needed, to include CPT that is easy to learn and conduct for SLPs, and to be able to provide CPT when the persons with aphasia still have access to SLP services.

    Methods & Procedures: An evaluative multiple-case study, involving three dyads, was conducted no more than 2 months after the onset of aphasia. The intervention consisted of six sessions: three sessions directed to the significant other (primarily support and information) and three to the dyad (primarily CPT). The intervention was evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively based on video recordings of conversations and self-assessment questionnaires.

    Outcomes & Results: The importance of emotional support as well as information about stroke/aphasia was clearly acknowledged, especially by the significant others. All significant others perceived increased knowledge and understanding of aphasia and related issues.

    Communicative skills (as manifested in the video recordings) showed improvements from pre- to post-intervention.

    Conclusions: The results corroborate the need for individualised and flexible family-oriented SLP services that are broad in content. Furthermore, the results support the early initiation of such services with recurrent contact. The usefulness of CPT this early in the rehabilitation process was indicated but is yet to be proved.

  • 2.
    Blom Johansson, Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Östberg, Per
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Communication changes and SLP services according to significant others of persons with aphasia2012In: Aphasiology, ISSN 0268-7038, E-ISSN 1464-5041, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 1005-1028Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Significant others are important to persons with aphasia. For several reasons they should be involved in speech-language pathology (SLP) services, including acquiring facilitating communicative strategies and receiving support. In order to further adapt SLP services there is a need to know the perceptions and views of the significant others. Little is known about how they perceive changes in communication as well as received SLP services and in what way they want to be involved in these services.

    Aims: The study aimed to investigate which communicative changes significant others of persons with aphasia had experienced after a stroke event and to what extent these changes were experienced. A further aim was to describe the significant others' experiences of SLP services and their motivation to participate in these services. Finally, the significant others' experiences were compared in terms of sex, age, type of relationship, time since stroke onset, and type and severity of aphasia.

    Methods & Procedures: An 80-item study-specific questionnaire was answered by 173 significant others of persons with aphasia living throughout Sweden (response rate 69%). Of these, 33% were male and 67% female. Mean age was 64.2 years (range 33–87 years) and 85.5% of the participants were a cohabiting partner to a person with aphasia.

    Outcomes & Results: A total of 64% of participants perceived their conversations as being less stimulating and enjoyable compared with conversations before stroke onset. Aphasia was considered a substantial or very substantial problem by 64%. The participants took on an increased communicative responsibility, and 70% had changed their communicative behaviour in order to facilitate conversations. A total of 75% (n = 130) had met with the SLP of the person with aphasia. Of those, 63% perceived their own support from SLP services to be adequate; 87% considered language ability training as the most important SLP service. Type and severity of aphasia were especially related to the communicative experiences of the participants and their motivation to be involved in SLP services.

    Conclusions: The substantial decrease from pre- to post-stroke regarding enjoyment and meaningfulness of conversations suggests the need to further improve SLP services in order to help the people in question communicate at an optimal level. We suggest that clinicians should put more emphasis on explaining the benefits and availability of different kinds of aphasia rehabilitation services, such as functional communication training and communication partner training in addition to language ability training.

  • 3.
    Borg, Tomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Larsson, Sune
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Questionnaire to assess treatment outcomes of acetabular fractures2012In: Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery, ISSN 1022-5536, E-ISSN 2309-4990, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 55-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To construct a questionnaire to assess outcomes in patients who underwent internal fixation for acetabular fractures.

    METHODS: 27 female and 100 male consecutive patients (mean age, 50 years) who underwent internal fixation for acetabular fractures were included. Patients were asked to report their outcomes at months 6, 12, and 24 using a questionnaire. The initial questionnaire was constructed by an expert group. There were 11 closed questions, each came with 6 responses from ?no discomfort? to ?very severe discomfort?. Three open questions were added to cover topics that were not included. The content validity and relevance of the 11 closed questions was determined using factor analysis to determine the number of factors involved. Factorability of the correlation matrix was measured via the Bartlett test of sphericity and Kaiser-Meyer- Olkin (KMO) measure of sampling sufficiency. Factor loadings of <0.50 were considered acceptable for factor representation. Reliability in terms of internal consistency was expressed as Cronbach alpha coefficients. The responses to the 3 open questions were analysed and categorised by a single assessor.

    RESULTS: 120 (94%) of the patients completed at least one questionnaire, and 92 (72%) completed all 3 questionnaires during the follow-up period. Based on responses to the 6-month questionnaire, responses to the 11 closed questions were significantly intercorrelated (Spearman 0.17-0.80). After factor analysis and analysis of responses to open questions, the number of questions was reduced to 6 and included questions related to pain, walking, hip motion, leg numbness, sexual life, and operation scar. Reliability of the questionnaire was estimated to alpha=0.89. Criterion validity was adequate with a high correlation with the Short Form 36 (r=0.56-0.80).

    CONCLUSION: Patients treated with acetabular fractures can be adequately assessed using the 6-item questionnaire and one global question concerning impact on activities of daily living.

  • 4.
    Gardulf, Ann
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; The Japanese Red Cross Institute for Humanitarian Studies, Tokyo, Japan.
    Nilsson, Jan
    The Japanese Red Cross Institute for Humanitarian Studies, Tokyo, Japan; Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Florin, Jan
    Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Leksell, Janeth
    Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden; Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lepp, Margret
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Østfold University College, Halden, Norway.
    Lindholm, Christina
    Sophiahemmet University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nordström, Gun
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; Hedmark University College, Hedmark, Norway.
    Theander, Kersti
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; Hedmark University College, Hedmark, Norway.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Johansson, Eva
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) Scale: Self-reported competence among nursing students on the point of graduation2016In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 36, p. 165-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: International organisations, e.g. WHO, stress the importance of competent registered nurses (RN) for the safety and quality of healthcare systems. Low competence among RNs has been shown to increase the morbidity and mortality of inpatients.

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate self-reported competence among nursing students on the point of graduation (NSPGs), using the Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) Scale, and to relate the findings to background factors.

    METHODS AND PARTICIPANTS: The NPC Scale consists of 88 items within eight competence areas (CAs) and two overarching themes. Questions about socio-economic background and perceived overall quality of the degree programme were added. In total, 1086 NSPGs (mean age, 28.1 [20-56]years, 87.3% women) from 11 universities/university colleges participated.

    RESULTS: NSPGs reported significantly higher scores for Theme I "Patient-Related Nursing" than for Theme II "Organisation and Development of Nursing Care". Younger NSPGs (20-27years) reported significantly higher scores for the CAs "Medical and Technical Care" and "Documentation and Information Technology". Female NSPGs scored significantly higher for "Value-Based Nursing". Those who had taken the nursing care programme at upper secondary school before the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) programme scored significantly higher on "Nursing Care", "Medical and Technical Care", "Teaching/Learning and Support", "Legislation in Nursing and Safety Planning" and on Theme I. Working extra paid hours in healthcare alongside the BSN programme contributed to significantly higher self-reported scores for four CAs and both themes. Clinical courses within the BSN programme contributed to perceived competence to a significantly higher degree than theoretical courses (93.2% vs 87.5% of NSPGs).

    SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION: Mean scores reported by NSPGs were highest for the four CAs connected with patient-related nursing and lowest for CAs relating to organisation and development of nursing care. We conclude that the NPC Scale can be used to identify and measure aspects of self-reported competence among NSPGs.

  • 5.
    Hedström, Mariann
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Uppsala University, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ekman, Anna
    Uppsala University Hospital, Department of medication and patient safety.
    Gillespie, Ulrika
    Uppsala University Hospital, Department of medication and patient safety.
    Mörk, Christina
    Uppsala County Council, Pharmaceutical Committee.
    Hulter Åsberg, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Department of Neuroscience.
    Development of the PHASE-Proxy scale for rating drug-related signs and symptoms in severe cognitive impairment2018In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 53-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The need for assessment of possible drug-related signs and symptoms in older people with severe cognitive impairment has increased. In 2009, the PHASE-20 rating scale for identifying symptoms possibly related to medication was the first such scale to be found valid and reliable for use with elderly people. In this project, the aim was to develop and examine the psychometric properties and clinical utility of PHASE-Proxy, a similar scale for proxy use in assessing elderly people with cognitive impairment.

    METHODS: Three expert groups revised PHASE-20 into a preliminary proxy version, which was then tested for inter-rater reliability, internal consistency, and content validity. Its clinical usefulness was investigated by pharmacist-led medication reviews. Group interviews and a study-specific questionnaire with nursing home staff were used to investigate the feasibility of use.

    RESULTS: The PHASE-Proxy scale had satisfactory levels of inter-rater reliability (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient; rs = 0.8), and acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha coefficient; α = 0.73). The factor analysis resulted in a logical solution with seven factors, grouped into two dimensions: signs of emotional distress and signs of physical discomfort. The medication reviews, interviews, and questionnaires also found the proxy scale to be clinically useful, and feasible to use.

    CONCLUSION: The PHASE-Proxy scale appears to be a valid instrument that enables proxies to reliably assess nursing home residents who cannot participate in the assessment, to identify possible drug-related signs and symptoms. It also appears to be clinically useful and feasible for use in this population.

  • 6.
    Holmström, Inger K.
    et al.
    School of Health, Care, and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden; Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kaminsky, Elenor
    School of Health, Care, and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden; Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Höglund, Anna T.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nursing students' awareness of inequity in healthcare - An intersectional perspective.2017In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 48, p. 134-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The overall aim of the present study was to explore awareness of inequity in healthcare and the intersection between different structures of power among nursing students. Another aim was to delineate the knowledge and use of Swedish Healthcare Direct in this group.

    DESIGN: The study had a descriptive design with a quantitative approach.

    PARTICIPANTS: The sample consisted of 157 nursing students from three universities in central Sweden.

    METHODS: The students filled out a study specific questionnaire in class. The questionnaire consisted of short descriptions of twelve fictive persons who differed in gender, age, and ethnicity, with questions about their life situation. The mean was calculated for each assessed fictive person for every item. In the next step, the assessments were ranked from the lowest probability to the highest probability. A 'Good life-index' consisting of quality of life, power over own life, and experience of discrimination, was also calculated. Free text comments were analysed qualitatively.

    RESULTS: People with Swedish names were assessed to have the highest probability of having a good life. Among those with Swedish names, the oldest woman was assessed as having the lowest probability of a good life. All students had knowledge about Swedish Healthcare Direct, but more female students had used the service compared to male students.

    CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that the nursing students had awareness of how power and gender, ethnicity and age, are related. Based on the free text comments, the questions and the intersectional perspective seemed to evoke some irritation which points to their sensitive nature. Therefore, the questionnaire could be used as a tool to start a discussion of equity in healthcare and in interventions where the aim is to raise awareness of inequality and intersectionality.

  • 7.
    Höglund, Anna T.
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Holmström, Inger K.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; School of health, care and social welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Kaminsky, Elenor
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; School of health, care and social welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Impact of telephone nursing education program for equity in healthcare2016In: International Journal for Equity in Health, ISSN 1475-9276, E-ISSN 1475-9276, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The Swedish Healthcare Act prescribes that healthcare should be provided according to needs and with respect for each person's human dignity. The goal is equity in health for the whole population. In spite of this, studies have revealed that Swedish healthcare is not always provided equally. This has also been observed in telephone nursing. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate if and how an educational intervention can improve awareness of equity in healthcare among telephone nurses.

    METHODS: The study had a quasi-experimental design, with one intervention group and one control group. A base-line measurement was performed before an educational intervention and a follow-up measurement was made afterwards in both groups, using a study specific questionnaire in which fictive persons of different age, gender and ethnicity were assessed concerning, e.g., power over one's own life, quality of life and experience of discrimination. The educational intervention consisted of a web-based lecture, literature and a seminar, covering aspects of inequality in healthcare related to gender, age and ethnicity, and gender and intersectionality theories as explaining models for these conditions.

    RESULTS: The results showed few significant differences before and after the intervention in the intervention group. Also in the control group few significant differences were found in the second measurement, although no intervention was performed in that group. The reason might be that the instrument used was not sensitive enough to pick up an expected raised awareness of equity in healthcare, or that solely the act of filling out the questionnaire can create a sort of intervention effect. Fictive persons born in Sweden and of young age were assessed to have a higher Good life-index than the fictive persons born outside Europe and of higher age in all assessments.

    CONCLUSION: The results are an imperative that equity in healthcare still needs to be educated and discussed in different healthcare settings. The intervention and questionnaire were designed to fit telephone nurses, but could easily be adjusted to suit other professional groups, who need to increase their awareness of equity in healthcare.

  • 8.
    Höglund, Anna T.
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Holmström, Inger K.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden; School of health, care and social welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Lännerström, Linda
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kaminsky, Elenor
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    From denial to awareness: a conceptual model for obtaining equity in healthcare.2018In: International Journal for Equity in Health, ISSN 1475-9276, E-ISSN 1475-9276, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Although Swedish legislation prescribes equity in healthcare, studies have reported inequalities, both in face-to-face encounters and in telephone nursing. Research has suggested that telephone nursing has the capability to increase equity in healthcare, as it is open to all and not limited by long distances. However, this requires an increased awareness of equity in healthcare among telephone nurses. The aim of this study was to explore and describe perceptions of equity in healthcare among Swedish telephone nurses who had participated in an educational intervention on equity in health, including which of the power constructs gender, ethnicity and age they commented upon most frequently. Further, the aim was to develop a conceptual model for obtaining equity in healthcare, based on the results of the empirical investigation.

    METHOD: A qualitative method was used. Free text comments from questionnaires filled out by 133 telephone nurses before and after an educational intervention on equity in health, as well as individual interviews with five participants, were analyzed qualitatively. The number of comments related to inequity based on gender, ethnicity or age in the free text comments was counted descriptively.

    RESULTS: Gender was the factor commented upon the least and ethnicity the most. Four concepts were found through the qualitative analysis: Denial, Defense, Openness, and Awareness. Some informants denied inequity in healthcare in general, and in telephone nursing in particular. Others acknowledged it, but argued that they had workplace routines that protected against it. There were also examples of an openness to the fact that inequity existed and a willingness to learn and prevent it, as well as an already high awareness of inequity in healthcare.

    CONCLUSION: A conceptual model was developed in which the four concepts were divided into two qualitatively different blocks, with Denial and Defense on one side of a continuum and Openness and Awareness on the other. In order to reach equity in healthcare, action is also needed, and that concept was therefore added to the model. The result can be used as a starting point when developing educational interventions for healthcare personnel.

  • 9.
    Johansson, Monica Blom
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Communication difficulties and the use of communication strategies: from the perspective of individuals with aphasia2012In: International journal of language and communication disorders, ISSN 1368-2822, E-ISSN 1460-6984, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 144-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: To enhance communicative ability and thereby the possibility of increased participation of persons with aphasia, the use of communication strategies has been proposed. However, little is known about how persons with aphasia experience having conversations and how they perceive their own and their conversation partner's use of communication strategies.

    AIMS: To explore how people with aphasia experience having conversations, how they handle communication difficulties, and how they perceive their own and their communication partners' use of communication strategies. Methods &

    PROCEDURES: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with four women and seven men with chronic aphasia (n = 11). Interviews were video-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed by qualitative content analysis.

    OUTCOMES & RESULTS: Informants appreciated having conversations despite the fact that they perceived their aphasia as a serious hindrance. Different factors related to the informants, the conversation partners, the conversation itself and the physical environment were perceived to impact on conversations. The importance of the communication partners' knowledge and understanding of aphasia and their use of supporting conversation strategies were acknowledged by the informants. The informants' views on using communication aid devices or strategies varied considerably. Four themes that characterized the informants' narratives were: loss and frustration, fear and uncertainty, shared responsibility based on knowledge, and longing for the past or moving forward.

    CONCLUSIONS & IMPLICATIONS: The informants longed to regain their former language ability and role as an active participant in society. To enhance participation of persons with aphasia, it is suggested that communication partner training should be an important and integral part of aphasia rehabilitation. Important elements of such training are reflecting on communication behaviours, training in real-life situations, and acknowledging each individual's special needs and preferences. To deal with the consequences of aphasia, counselling and psychological support may be needed.

  • 10. Kaminski, Elenor
    et al.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Röing, Marta
    Holmström, Inger K.
    ‘If I didn’t trust Swedish Healthcare Direct, I would never call’ – views of making pediatric health calls2013In: Clinical Nursing Studies, ISSN 2324-7959, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 57-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of the presented research is parents’ expectations and experiences of calling Swedish Healthcare Direct (SHD)regarding pediatric health issues. Telenursing is a rapidly expanding service and SHD handles up to 2.4 million pediatrichealth calls yearly. Mothers make the majority of the calls and reportedly receive self-care advice more than fathers.Parents’ views are important for the development and safe use of telenursing health services. The study is qualitative, withan exploratory and descriptive design. Twenty-one interviews with parents were analysed using content analysis.According to the interviewees, the decision to contact SHD or not is influenced by their degree of worry or trust in theservice. Calls are carefully prepared, and who will call is often predetermined and affected by gender. Parents want to begiven a chance to speak first in their communication with telenurses. They want to be listened to carefully and to beaccorded respect, to have their needs fully explored and to have their concerns relieved. Most parents follow telenurses’recommendations, a few exclusively. Some primarily trust their own intuition. Learning is frequent, implying the publichealth potential of calls, not least for foreign-born callers. Exploring parents’ expectations provides insight into parents’worries, potential to increase parents’ learning and may develop their trust in telenurses’ recommendations. Telenurses’awareness of gender impact can further develop the telenursing health service in providing safe care on equal terms for avulnerable patient group, children.

  • 11. Kaminsky, Elenor
    et al.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Holmström, Inger K
    Larsson, Jan
    Fredriksson, Mio
    Goals of telephone nursing work - the managers' perspectives: a qualitative study on Swedish Healthcare Direct2014In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 14, p. 188-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Swedish Healthcare Direct (SHD) receives 6 million calls yearly and aims at increased public sense of security and healthcare efficiency. Little is known about what SHD managers perceive as the primary goals of telephone nursing (TN) work and how the organisation matches goals of health promotion and equitable healthcare, so important in Swedish healthcare legislation. The aim of the study was to explore and describe what the SHD managers perceive as the goals of TN work and how the managers view health promotion and implementation of equitable healthcare with gender as example at SHD.

    METHODS: The study was qualitative using an exploratory and descriptive design. All 23 managers employed at SHD were interviewed and data analysis used deductive directed content analysis.

    RESULTS: The findings reveal four themes describing the goals of TN work as recommended by the SHD managers. These are: 'create feelings of trust', 'achieve patient safety', 'assess, refer and give advice', and 'teach the caller'. Most of the managers stated that health promotion should not be included in the goals, whereas equitable healthcare was viewed as an important issue. Varying suggestions for implementing equitable healthcare were given.

    CONCLUSIONS: The interviewed managers mainly echoed the organisational goals of TN work. The managers' expressed goal of teaching lacked the caller learning components highlighted by telenurses in previous research. The fact that health promotion was not seen as important indicates a need for SHD to clarify its goals as the organisation is part of the Swedish healthcare system, where health promotion should always permeate work. Time used for health promotion and dialogues in a gender equitable manner at SHD is well invested as it will save time elsewhere in the health care system, thereby facing one of the challenges of European health systems.

  • 12.
    Lindberg, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University; Centre for Research and Development, Uppsala University/County Council of Gävleborg.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Skytt, Bernice
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University.
    MRSA-colonized persons’ and healthcare personnel's experiences of patient-professional interactions in and responsibilities for infection prevention in Sweden2014In: Journal of Infection and Public Health, ISSN 1876-0341, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 427-435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patient-professional interactions and adherence to infection control measures are central to the quality of care and patient safety in healthcare. Persons colonized with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) describe insufficient support and unprofessional behavior among healthcare personnel. Methods: A descriptive qualitative study was conducted to investigate managers', physicians', registered nurses' and MRSA-colonized persons' experiences of patient-professional interactions in relation to and responsibilities for infection prevention in the care of colonized patients. Five persons with MRSA colonization and 20 healthcare personnel employed within infection, hematology, nephrology or primary healthcare settings participated. The data were collected using open-ended semi-structured individual interviews with the MRSA-colonized persons and semi-structured focus group interviews with the healthcare personnel. Results: The participants perceived MRSA as an indefinable threat and described that the responsibility for infection prevention is important, but such adherence was a neglected and negotiable issue. The described actions that were acknowledged as unprofessional and inappropriate adherence to infection prevention resulted in stigmatized patients. Conclusion: Colonized persons' and healthcare personnel's understanding of MRSA determines whether the personnel's behavior is perceived as proper or improper. Individual responsibility for patient-professional interactions in relation to MRSA colonization and adherence to infection control measures should be more stringent.

  • 13.
    Nilsson, Annika
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Ragny
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    A comparative correlational study of coping strategies and quality of life in patients with chronic heart failure and the general Swedish population2017In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 157-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to compare coping strategies and quality of life (QoL) in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) with such strategies and QOL in persons from two general Swedish populations as well as to investigate relationships between personal characteristics and coping strategies. Methods:A cross-sectional, comparative and correlational design was used to examine data from three sources. The patient group (n=124), defined using ICD-10, was selected consecutively from two hospitals in central Sweden. The population group (n=515) consisted of persons drawn randomly from the Swedish population. Data were collected with questionnaires in 2011; regarding QoL, Swedish population reference data from 1994 were used. Results: Overall, women used more coping strategies than men did. Compared to the general population data from SF-36, patients with CHF rated lower QoL. In the regression models, perceived low ‘efficiency in managing psychological aspects of daily life’ increased use of coping. Other personal characteristics related to increased use of coping strategies were higher education, lower age and unsatisfactory economic situation. Conclusion: Differences between the patients and the general Swedish population showed an unclear pattern for coping and a clear pattern for QoL. To deal with the psychological consequences of daily life, men with CHF and persons in the general Swedish population seemed to use both problem- and emotion-focused coping. 

  • 14.
    Nilsson, Jan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; The Japanese Red Cross Institute for Humanitarian Studies, Tokyo, Japan.
    Johansson, Eva
    Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Florin, Jan
    Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Leksell, Janeth
    Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Lepp, Margret
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Østfold University College, Halden, Norway.
    Lindholm, Christina
    Sophiahemmet University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nordström, Gun
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; Hedmark University College, Elverum, Norway.
    Theander, Kersti
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; Hedmark University College, Elverum, Norway.
    Gardulf, Ann
    Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden; The Japanese Red Cross Institute for Humanitarian Studies, Tokyo, Japan .
    Disaster nursing: Self-reported competence of nursing students and registered nurses, with focus on their readiness to manage violence, serious events and disasters2016In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 17, p. 102-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The World Health Organization and the International Council of Nurses recognises the importance of nurses' involvement in disaster preparedness and response. The aim of this study was to describe and compare self-reported disaster nursing competence (DNC) among nursing students (NSs) and among registered nurses (RNs) with professional experience. Further to investigate possible associations between self-reported DNC and background factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted of 569 NSs and 227 RNs. All respondents completed the 88-item Nurse Professional Competence Scale, including three items assessing DNC. Significant differences were found among the NSs depending on which University/University College they had attended. RNs reported significantly higher overall DNC and better ability to handle situations involving violence, and to apply principles of disaster medicine during serious events. RNs working in emergency care reported significantly better DNC ability, compared with RNs working in other areas of healthcare. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that working night shift and working in emergency care were positively associated with high self-reported overall DNC. The results indicate that workplace experience of serious events increase the readiness of registered nurses to handle violence, to act in accordance with safety regulations, and to apply principles of disaster medicine during serious events. 

  • 15.
    Nilsson, Jan
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Johansson, Eva
    Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Egmar, Ann-Charlotte
    The Red Cross University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Florin, Jan
    Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Leksell, Janeth
    Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Lepp, Margret
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindholm, Christina
    Sophiahemmet University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nordström, Gun
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden, and Hedmark University College, Hedmark, Norway.
    Theander, Kersti
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden, and Hedmark University College, Hedmark, Norway.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Gardulf, Ann
    Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Development and validation of a new tool measuring nurses self-reported professional competence: the nurse professional competence (NPC) scale2014In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 574-580Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To develop and validate a new tool intended for measuring self-reported professional competence among both nurse students prior to graduation and among practicing nurses. The new tool is based on formal competence requirements from the Swedish Board of Health and Welfare, which in turn are based on WHO guidelines.

    DESIGN: A methodological study including construction of a new scale and evaluation of its psychometric properties.

    PARTICIPANTS AND SETTINGS: 1086 newly graduated nurse students from 11 universities/university colleges.

    RESULTS: The analyses resulted in a scale named the NPC (Nurse Professional Competence) Scale, consisting of 88 items and covering eight factors: "Nursing care", "Value-based nursing care", "Medical/technical care", "Teaching/learning and support", "Documentation and information technology", "Legislation in nursing and safety planning", "Leadership in and development of nursing care" and "Education and supervision of staff/students". All factors achieved Cronbach's alpha values greater than 0.70. A second-order exploratory analysis resulted in two main themes: "Patient-related nursing" and "Nursing care organisation and development". In addition, evidence of known-group validity for the NPC Scale was obtained.

    CONCLUSIONS: The NPC Scale, which is based on national and international professional competence requirements for nurses, was comprehensively tested and showed satisfactory psychometrical properties. It can e.g. be used to evaluate the outcomes of nursing education programmes, to assess nurses' professional competences in relation to the needs in healthcare organisations, and to tailor introduction programmes for newly employed nurses.

  • 16.
    Theander, Kersti
    et al.
    Faculty of Health, Science, and Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Wilde-Larsson, Bodil
    Faculty of Health, Science, and Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; Faculty of Public Health, Department of Nursing and Mental Health, Hedmark University College, Hedmark, Norway.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Florin, Jan
    School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Gardulf, Ann
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden; The Japan Red Cross Institute for Humanitarian Studies, Tokyo, Japan .
    Johansson, Eva
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden; The Japan Red Cross Institute for Humanitarian Studies, Tokyo, Japan .
    Lindholm, Christina
    Sophiahemmet University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nordström, Gun
    Faculty of Health, Science, and Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; Faculty of Public Health, Department of Nursing and Mental Health, Hedmark University College, Hedmark, Norway.
    Nilsson, Jan
    Faculty of Health, Science, and Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; The Japan Red Cross Institute for Humanitarian Studies, Tokyo, Japan.
    Adjusting to future demands in healthcare: curriculum changes and nursing students' self-reported professional competence2016In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 37, p. 178-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Nursing competence is of significant importance for patient care. Newly graduated nursing students rate their competence as high. However, the impact of different designs of nursing curricula on nursing students' self-reported nursing competence areas is seldom reported.

    OBJECTIVES: To compare newly graduated nursing students' self-reported professional competence before and after the implementation of a new nursing curriculum. The study had a descriptive comparative design. Nursing students, who graduated in 2011, having studied according to an older curriculum, were compared with those who graduated in 2014, after a new nursing curriculum with more focus on person-centered nursing had been implemented.

    SETTING: A higher education nursing program at a Swedish university.

    PARTICIPANTS: In total, 119 (2011 n=69, 2014 n=50) nursing students responded.

    METHODS: Nursing students' self-reported professional competencies were assessed with the Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) scale.

    RESULTS: There were no significant differences between the two groups of nursing students, who graduated in 2011 and 2014, respectively, with regard to age, sex, education, or work experience. Both groups rated their competencies as very high. Competence in value-based nursing was perceived to be significantly higher after the change in curriculum. The lowest competence, both in 2011 and 2014, was reported in education and supervision of staff and students.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that newly graduated nursing students - both those following the old curriculum and the first batch of students following the new one - perceive that their professional competence is high. Competence in value-based nursing, measured with the NPC scale, was reported higher after the implementation of a new curriculum, reflecting curriculum changes with more focus on person-centered nursing.

1 - 16 of 16
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf