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  • 1.
    Flygare, Erik
    et al.
    School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden .
    Gill, Peter Edward
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för kultur-, religions- och utbildningsvetenskap, Pedagogik.
    Johansson, Björn
    School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden .
    Lessons From a Concurrent Evaluation of Eight Antibullying Programs Used in Sweden2013Inngår i: American Journal of Evaluation, ISSN 1098-2140, E-ISSN 1557-0878, Vol. 34, nr 2, s. 170-189Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden has a low prevalence of bullying and Swedish schools are legally obliged to have anti-bullying policies. Many commercial programs are available. A mixed methods, quasi-experimental, concurrent evaluation of 8 programs, chosen from a pool of 21 widely used anti-bullying programs, was planned. Preliminary data, based on 835 stakeholder interviews, both individual and group, revealed extensive program-contamination in "treatment" schools (n = 31), and extensive program use in nominally designated control/comparison schools (n = 8). An evolved evaluation strategy focused on arrays of program components, use of which was assessed through detailed qualitative data gathered from principals, teaching and non-teaching staff, anti-bullying teams, and pupils. Bullying victimization, Grades 4-9, in 39 schools, was assessed by questionnaire, administered in three waves. Responserates were 76.1% (with N = 10,919) at the first wave, 74.3% (of 10,660) at the second wave, and

    70.6% (of 10,523) at the final wave. Longitudinal aggregate and individual outcomes (3,487 pupils answered all three questionnaires) were assessed. Prevalence of victimization was 8.1% at first wave and (7.4% at last). Based on individual data, persistent victimization (bullied at both waves) was estimated at 1.5% with 4.7% experiencing a worsening situation (not bullied at the first wave but bullied at last) and 4.8% with an improved situation. Hierarchical cluster analysis was used to designate intervention types (shared arrays of strong, weak, or absent component use) and schools with similar approaches. A quasi-experimental, longitudinal design with individual data and an aggregate cross-sectional follow-up indicated differences in effective, ineffective, and iatrogenic components, component clusters (intervention types), and successful schools.

  • 2.
    Frånberg, Gun-Marie
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Gill, Peter
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och psykologi, Ämnesavdelningen för pedagogik.
    Vad är mobbning?2009Inngår i: På tal om mobbning - och det som görs: kunskapsöversikt, Stockholm: Skolverket , 2009, s. 17-40Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 3.
    Gill, Peter
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för kultur-, religions- och utbildningsvetenskap, Pedagogik.
    Elever som kränker och mobbar andra2013Inngår i: Kränkningar i skolan – analyser av problem och lösningar, Stockholm: Skolverket , 2013, 1, s. 112-133Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vad som särskiljer elever som kränker och mobbar andra undersöks och analyseras i kapitlet. Där berättas om olika roller i mobbningen och begreppen kulturell och strukturell mobbning beskrivs. Utifrån detta analyseras möjligheterna att motverka mobbning med fokus på de som utsätter andra.

  • 4.
    Gill, Peter
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och psykologi, Ämnesavdelningen för pedagogik.
    Ge mobbningsoffer upprättelse2009Inngår i: Grövre våld i skolan: vad man vet och vad man kan göra, Stockholm: Skolverket , 2009, s. 32-35Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 5.
    Gill, Peter
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för kultur-, religions- och utbildningsvetenskap, Pedagogik.
    Nyanser av våld, maktlekar och mobbning2011Inngår i: Angeläget om maktlekar: en antologi / [ed] Sannie Wedberg, Stockholm: ALMAeuropa , 2011, s. 41-58Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 6.
    Gill, Peter Edward
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap, Utbildningsvetenskap.
    A Case Study Of How An Irish Island School Contributes To Community Sustainability, Viability And Vitality2017Inngår i: Australian and International Journal of Rural Education, ISSN 1036-0026, Vol. 27, nr 2Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Island studies have rarely focused on the role of small schools on offshore islands. Island schools are often impacted by the decisions of national, regional and local educational authorities, particularly in today’s world where diseconomic and disbenefit arguments highlight the non-viability of small schools. Such schools are seen as unable to provide an adequate curriculum, socially disadvantageous and generally inefficient. This raises an important question: How does a small island school promote the participation and engagement of families and the community? This paper reports a bounded case to illustrate the characteristics intrinsic to a single small rural school as a communal hub on one of Ireland’s Atlantic islands. A narrative about the school in past and present times, along with vulnerability mapping, is used to explore the social dynamics of the island school within its community. The findings show how the modern diaspora is different from that of earlier generations. The case also illustrates the differences in vulnerabilities between a perceived attractive environment, supported by a viable school potentially driving in-migration, and communities where the absence of a primary school or the risk of its closure would diminish the attractiveness of an island as a place for young families.

  • 7.
    Gill, Peter Edward
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap, Pedagogik.
    Naiva förväntningar och kreativa lösningar kring "nätet" som examinationsverktyg2014Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 8.
    Gill, Peter Edward
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap, Pedagogik.
    Om elever som kränker eller mobbar andra : Om mobbning och kränkningar på nätet2014Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 9.
    Gill, Peter Edward
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och psykologi, Ämnesavdelningen för pedagogik.
    Våld och värdedidaktik i kamp- och kontaktidrotter2008Inngår i: Artikelsamling 2008, Farsta: SISU idrottsböcker , 2008Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 10.
    Gill, Peter Edward
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap, Utbildningsvetenskap.
    Kelly, Gráinne
    County Mayo, Ireland.
    Case-study of how an island school contributes to communal sustainability, viability and vitality2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Island studies, important in the history of science, have rarely focused on the role of small schools on offshore islands, not least because there is no agreed definition of a ‘small school’. Demographic trends and rationalization principles put increasing pressure on national, regional and local authorities to make consolidation choices about school size policies.  In these considerations, diseconomic and disbenefit arguments are made pertaining to the retention of small schools. In Norway and Sweden, due to the geographical dispersion of the population, policy makers have accepted that in maintaining communities in sparsely populated areas higher costs associated with maintaining education in rural and remote areas are inevitable and acceptable, while Iceland views schooling in rural areas as a national responsibility. There is little information available about pupil outcomes in small multi-grade classes in the Irish context. Small schools are frequently objected to as being non-viable, being unable to provide an adequate curriculum, being socially disadvantageous and by being generally inefficient. While smaller schools face economies of scale there is evidence that small size yields some achievement advantages. How does a small island school promote the participation and engagement of families and the community?  The present study examines the role played by the single primary school on one of Ireland’s offshore islands. While a process of “learning and leaving” is not an uncommon island experience, some studies have suggested that small rural schools can have integrative benefits for the local community helping to promote local vibrancy and community viability. In this descriptive case-study vulnerability mapping is used to expose threats to the island school. The dynamics of diaspora (dis)engagement and (dis)affection are examined through the curricula vitae of alumni. It is argued that the modern diaspora is uniquely different from the diaspora of earlier generations. The island school nurturing of local memories and histories is explored through the example of the schoolchildren’s annual Christmas concert. Demographic drivers such as birth rates and ageing population are examined. This island’s experience is as an example of the ‘new mosaic of rural regions’ in Europe, where communal sustainability, viability and vitality often hinges on the attractiveness of a particular living space. While perceived “attractive” environments may drive in-migration, the absence of a primary school would diminish the attractiveness of an island as a place for young families.  The symbolic capital of island life is examined. Headship, local management and multi-grade teaching challenges are explored.

  • 11.
    Gill, Peter Edward
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap, Pedagogik.
    Larsson, Paula
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap, Pedagogik.
    Incident-Level Analysis of 703 Retrospective Self-Reports of Ordinary Violence Recalled by 334 Swedes Aged 6 to 45 Years2015Inngår i: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, ISSN 0886-2605, E-ISSN 1552-6518, Vol. 30, nr 12, s. 2129-2150Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    There is wide variation in how exposure to violence is conceptualized. Perceptions of ordinary violence are linked to people's actual experiences, which may be direct, indirect, observed, or vicarious, and all through filters of gender, class, community, and culture. Event-recall interviews were conducted among a convenience sample of Swedish males (n = 132) and females (n = 202) aged 6 to 45 years. Respondents spontaneously recalled 703 events (averaging 2.3 events for males, 2.1 for females). For men, 93% of events were male(s)-on-male(s), 2% female-on-female, and 2% male(s)-on-female(s). For women, 42% of events were male(s)-on-male(s), 19% female(s)-on-female(s), 24% male(s)-on-females, and 10% female(s)-on-male(s). Interviewee's roles differed. Of males, 17% were aggressors, 40% victims, and 43% observers. Of females, 12% were aggressors, 30% victims, and 58% observers. For males, there was a significant increase in degree of seriousness of events from junior-, to high school, to college. For females, events became more serious as interviewees progressed from aggressor to victim to observer. For males, violent events between strangers were significantly more serious than all other combinations of acquaintanceship. Most recently recalled events were the most serious for males (no effect for females). Participation in sports was linked to seriousness of events recalled by females, events being described as more serious by females who participated in sports, this effect being stronger for those females who participated in contact/collision and self-defense sports. The significant correlation between trauma and seriousness is nearly twice as strong for females which might be taken as an indication of stronger moral pathos.

  • 12.
    Gill, Peter Edward
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap, Utbildningsvetenskap.
    Larsson, Paula
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap, Utbildningsvetenskap.
    Matton, Pelle
    Gävle kommun.
    Simonsson, Bo-Erik
    Gävle kommun.
    Levin, Eva
    Gävle kommun.
    Research to Practice: Rolling Implementation of Evidence-Based Anti-Bullying Strategies in a Swedish Municipality2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a dearth of research into the consequences of systematic reductions of prevalence of target behaviors, such as bullying, in school-based prevention science.  Reducing prevalence may also result in making bullying more difficult to uncover (Cunningham et al., 2015). Preventing bullying at school is a much researched field (Ttofi & Farrington, 2011).  In international comparisons, prevalence of bullying at school varies widely, with rates for Swedish schools regularly being lowest (e.g., among 66 countries, Due & Holstein, 2008).  Conditions influencing program efficacy are likely to vary as prevalence of target behavior is reducing.  School-wide prevention strategies, in schools with one or more victims in every class, present a very different challenge compared to schools where victims are found in every second of third class.  Recent longitudinal data from Sweden (Swedish Agency for Education, 2011; Hellstedt, Johansson & Gill, 2016 forthcoming) has revealed a cyclical replacement of victims, after successful intervention, showing that while rates at cross-sectional measurement intervals may remain the same (typically 6/7% in Swedish schools), up to 75% of victims at one time will self-report not being victimized at one-year follow-up (op.cit.).  Low rates of bullying in Sweden are the result intervention strategies based on a wide variety of ‘standard’ (International, Scandinavian & National) prevention programs, at least 21 according to Skolverket (2003).  A national evaluation revealed extensive program cross-contamination, proving the unviability of “gold standard” evaluation practices. “What works” conclusions were described in terms of program components.  When “promising” evidence for effective program components is produced, there is an inevitable momentum to package components into replicable “programs”.  We argue that this momentum may hamper response flexibility, particularly when program providers, in seeking to be “evidence based” may place more importance on implementation functions such as program fidelity and dosage rather than individual outcomes. We argue that considerations such as dosage and program fidelity are less relevant when anti-bullying initiatives are being adapted to variations in school contexts and climates (Gregory, Henry & Schoeny, 2007).  Component efficacy and effectiveness may also be masked by confidentiality requirements in program evaluations and outcome assessments that are based on follow-up, cross-sectional, cohort statistics.  What works in Sweden, for example, found by Frisén, Hasselblad & Holmqvist (2012), based on evidence from former victims, in descending order of importance: Support from school personnel; Transition to new school level; Change of coping strategies; Support from parents; Change of appearance or way of being; Change of school or class as a deliberate attempt to make the bullying stop; New friends; The bullies changed their attitude; No particular reason; and Support from peers, may not translate to other cultures, school systems and traditions.  With observed low prevalence, extensive program implementation, research evidence on effective components and extensive judicial obligations, it is likely, that in most Swedish municipalities, active anti-bullying programs may, theoretically, be located at the later phases of an implementation research continuum (Chalamandaris &  Piette, 2015, after Flay,1986, & Flay et al., 2005).  This, late stage program/component developemt, also has an impact on schools’ potential capacity to improve (Oterkiil & Ertesvåg, 2012).  Given these contexts, it is important to research the present state of evidence based anti-bullying strategies in Sweden.  Using best practice in program implementation evaluation a descriptive case study of scaled-up, school district-wide (Rhoades, Bumbarger & Moore 2012), research-to-action (Guhn et al., 2012) anti-bullying strategies in a Swedish municipality is presented. The goal is to investigate conditions, participants, hindrances, responses and outcomes at different stages of a rolling implementation process.  This Swedish example may be of value in other European school systems where prevalence is reducing toward Swedish levels.

  • 13.
    Gill, Peter Edward
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap, Pedagogik.
    Persson, Mariann
    Högskolan i Kristianstad.
    A shared responsibility model for the professional, interdisciplinary and scientific development of student teachers, practicum supervisors and teacher educators2014Inngår i: , 2014Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 14.
    Gill, Peter Edward
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och psykologi, Ämnesavdelningen för pedagogik.
    Persson, Mariann
    Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, University College Kristianstad, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    On using concept-maps to study school-children's understanding of leisure-time2008Inngår i: Leisure Studies, ISSN 0261-4367, E-ISSN 1466-4496, Vol. 27, nr 2, s. 213-220Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In striving to organise learning experiences it is important to understand how children perceive and relate to the learning environments they are presented and confronted with. It is important therefore to study how children perceive the notion of 'leisure' as an abstract concept. An example of how concept-mapping can be used to study children's conception of 'leisure-time' is presented. Forty-three Swedish 5th (n = 18) and 9th (n = 25) class children (average ages: 12 and 16) were presented with otherwise blank A4 pages with the root concept 'leisure-time' encircled and were asked to draw a spontaneous concept-map. For a sub-sample (quasi-experimental design) some additional concept-nodes, based on research findings (levels of location practice), were indicated in their maps. How maps may be analysed using numerical and content analysis, and ranges of hierarchical organisation of descriptive terms is described. About 1000 concepts (with repetitions) were inscribed. On the basis of one map per subject, numerical analysis was used to search for differences in width, depth and hierarchical structure (no age-group (school class) or gender differences were found). Content analysis was used to show how deep gender differences in conceptualisations could lie hidden behind statistical similarities. It is concluded that concept-maps may be used successfully to study abstract concepts such as of children's notions of leisure.

  • 15.
    Gill, Peter Edward
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap, Utbildningsvetenskap.
    Simonsson, Bo-Erik
    Utbildning Gävle, Gävle kommun.
    Matton, Pelle
    BIG, Brottsförebyggarna i Gävle, Utbildning Gävle.
    Consequences for prevention strategies of reduced prevalence of bullying at school-class and school level in a Swedish Municipality2017Inngår i: ECER 2017, 2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    A crucial feature of school classes, as intact social entities, is that members share certain values (Boehnke & Schiefer, 2016). Saarento, Garandeau and Salmivalli (2015), argue that the influence of classroom- and school-level factors on bullying involves demographic, structural, peer contextual and teacher-related dimensions. Swearer et al. (2014) use a theory of “homophily and bullying” to argue for a homophily hypothesis where within group similarity leads to bullies physically or relationally rejecting those who are different and withdrawing any social support for victims.  However, Saarento, Garandeau and Salmivalli’s conclusion (op.cit.) was that the contributions of demographic, school structural and school-class characteristics remain inconsistent.  On the other hand, recent Swedish research (Thornberg et al., 2015 & Thornberg et al., 2016), after controlling for factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, school-class size and gender composition, found that relational climate and experience of moral disengagement within school-classes was a significant predictor of between-class variation in victimisation.  Victimisation was less likely in classes characterised by supportive relational patterns and lower levels of moral disengagement in the classroom, a result confirmed by Grundherr (et al., 2016). The research reported here builds on a presentation at ECER 2016 (Gill, Larsson, Matton, Simonsson & Levin, 2016) that explored some consequences of systematic reductions of prevalence of bullying at school. It was argued that Swedish anti-bullying programs are being delivered at the later phases of an implementation research continuum (Chalamandaris &  Piette, 2015).   Uncovering new or persistent cases of bullying becomes more difficult as prevalence of bullying reduces (successful implementation). Being bullied at least 2 to 3 times a month between 2009–2015, among 200,000 children in 1500 Finnish schools (grades 1–9) decreased from 17.2% at baseline to 12.6% after six years of implementation of the KiVa program (Herkama & Salmivalli, 2016). Even though creating reliable measures of bullying prevalence is difficult (Vivolo-Kantor et al., 2014), Finnish prevalence is considerably higher than in Sweden, national average is about 7/8%, which in turn, is higher than the average in the municipality where this research has been carried out (4.9%, Spring 2016).  With prevalence rates at this level it is possible to envisage realistic “zero-vision” and “zero-tolerance” strategies. (For a critical review of zero-tolerance, see Borgwald & Theixos, 2013 and James & Freeze, 2006). Any goal of reducing a low prevalence of bullying in Sweden, even lower, is mediated by the discovery, from individual-level, longitudinal data, where successful cases of ceased victims are regularly replaced by new victims (Flygare, Gill & Johansson, 2013: Hellstedt, Johansson & Gill, 2016), revealing a cyclical replacement of victims. While up to 75% of victims at one time will self-report not being victimized at one-year follow-up, rates at cross-sectional measurement may remain the same (typically 7/8% in Swedish schools, op.cit.).  The Norwegian “Zero Program” (Strohmeier and Noam, 2012) is based on a “zero-vision” manifesto. Köhler (2006) in outlining health indicators for Swedish children argues that while some ideal zero-outcomes might not stand up as credible operational targets, using “zero vision” as a reference point may be reasonable in some cases. In the municipality that is the focus here, evidence is emerging that some schools and school classes are coming closer to a zero-vision reference point.  In a school with 200 children, in 8 or 9 classes, a point prevalence rate of 3% would indicate that at least two, possibly three classes in that school had no victims of bullying.  It is argued that this circumstance creates new challenges for prevention strategies.  Therefore, it is important to delve deeper into changes in “the picture of bullying”.  That is the goal of this research.

    Method

    Since the initiation of the rolling intervention (2011/12), where participation was voluntary, 6 schools have become 29 (including independent academy schools).  Since Autumn 2016, all 4th to 9th graders, in these schools, have participated in the municipality’s web-based “School Care Questionnaire”.  Included in this questionnaire is the instrument used by the National Agency for Education in estimating prevalence of bullying (see Flygare, Gill & Johansson, 2013, for details).  The questionnaire is delivered twice during the school year (October and April).  These measurements will allow for follow-up comparisons for 6000 children distributed between 300 school classes in 29 schools. Descriptive statistics will be used to establish realistic estimates of prevalence of bullying victimization. Rates for individuals categorised as “bullied” will be matched by a global index of “no involvement” (that is, no self-reported “incidents” of any kind, including events we refer to as “fun-like rough and tumble).

    Expected Outcomes

    Fluctuations in point prevalence estimates, at classroom level, will be revealed.  These will be examined with reference to indicated cases (school classes) where bullying is recurring (at follow-up) or is seen to be exceptionally high.  Statistical patterns will be tested against practitioners, responsible teachers, head-teachers, schools anti-bullying teams and municipal supervisor’s hands-on experiences of the school year in question (2016/17).

  • 16.
    Gill, Peter Edward
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och psykologi, Ämnesavdelningen för pedagogik.
    Stenlund, Max Allan
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och psykologi, Ämnesavdelningen för pedagogik.
    Dealing with a Schoolyard Bully: A Case Study2005Inngår i: Journal of School Violence, ISSN 1538-8220, E-ISSN 1538-8239, Vol. 4, nr 4, s. 47-62Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Most accounts of bullying and intervention programs against violence in school deal with aggregate prevalence estimates and outcome measures. Case studies are rare. Bullying occurs regularly within classrooms. Psychological aggression through teasing and harassment is more difficult to detect. Bullying and bullies are relatively persistent, victimhood less so. The aim of this study is to increase understanding of the mechanisms by which bullying persists and to identify some of the factors which may facilitate successful single-case interventions. A single-case, holistic design based on opportunistic (that is, non-professional) involvement is used. One of the authors was a participant observer throughout the period of the case and acted as an action-researcher in implementing the intervention strategy, including contacting and informing the 'facilitator.' The case arose opportunistically within a rural, close-knit community. The bullying occurred in a one-teacher school with one classroom and 28 children aged 5-13. How the nature and extent of the bullying was discovered is described. A facilitator agreed to act, did act by enlisting three of the bully's peers to “police” the bully, and followed up the outcome until it was clear that the bullying had ceased. The successful outcome was put down to the facilitator's perceived seriousness, the collective intervention by peers, the immediacy of the reaction, the legitimacy of the physical force used (restraint of a schoolyard bully by peers), continued peer threat of it and the obvious intentionality of the intervention. The most important outcome for the victim was an expression of justice having being done.

  • 17.
    Gill, Peter Edward
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och psykologi, Ämnesavdelningen för pedagogik.
    Wijk, Katarina
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och psykologi, Ämnesavdelningen för pedagogik.
    Case study of a healthy eating intervention for Swedish lorry drivers2004Inngår i: Health Education Research, ISSN 0268-1153, E-ISSN 1465-3648, Vol. 19, nr 3, s. 306-315Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 18.
    Gill, Peter
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för kultur-, religions- och utbildningsvetenskap, Pedagogik.
    Flygare, Erik
    Örebro universitet.
    Frånberg, Gun-Marie
    Umeå universitet.
    Johansson, Björn
    Örebro universitet.
    Lindberg, Odd
    Örebro universitet.
    Osbeck, Christina
    Karlstads universitet.
    Söderström, Åsa
    Karlstads universitet.
    Utvärdering av metoder mot mobbning2011Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 19.
    Gill, Peter
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap.
    Jonsson, CarolaHögskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap.
    Om väggar kunde tala: fem lärarutbildningskontexter i Sverige och Danmark2004Collection/Antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 20.
    Gill, Peter
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och psykologi, Ämnesavdelningen för pedagogik.
    Lindström, Anne-Lie
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och psykologi, Ämnesavdelningen för pedagogik.
    Mönster i mobbningsoffers berättelser2007Inngår i: Utstött: en bok om mobbning, Stockholm: Sveriges lärarförbund , 2007Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 21.
    Gill, Peter
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och psykologi, Ämnesavdelningen för pedagogik.
    Lindström, Anne-Lie
    Vart tredje mobbningsfall utförs av lärare mot elev2007Inngår i: Dagens Nyheter, nr 8 februariArtikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 22.
    Gill, Peter
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och psykologi, Ämnesavdelningen för pedagogik.
    Morberg, Åsa
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och psykologi, Ämnesavdelningen för didaktik.
    Öhlund, Lennart
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och psykologi.
    Lärare för små barn hamnar i skolans B-lag2002Inngår i: Lärarnas tidning, ISSN 1101-2633, Vol. 7, s. 39-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 23.
    Gill, Peter
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och psykologi, Ämnesavdelningen för pedagogik.
    Morberg, Åsa
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och psykologi, Ämnesavdelningen för didaktik.
    Öhlund, Lennart
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och psykologi.
    Återställ läraryrkets akademiska nivå2002Inngår i: Gefle Dagblad, ISSN 1103-9302, nr 20 aprilArtikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 24.
    Hellfeldt, Karin
    et al.
    School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Gill, Peter Edward
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för utbildningsvetenskap, Utbildningsvetenskap, Pedagogik.
    Johansson, Björn
    School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Longitudinal Analysis of Links Between Bullying Victimization and Psychosomatic Maladjustment in Swedish Schoolchildren2018Inngår i: Journal of School Violence, ISSN 1538-8220, E-ISSN 1538-8239, Vol. 17, nr 1, s. 86-98Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Cross-sectional studies of bullying mask variability in categories of and persistence of bullying victimization. Longitudinal, individual-level data offers a greater insight into schoolchildren’s psychosomatic maladjustment as a consequence of bullying. Swedish schoolchildren (n = 3,349), with unique identifiers, in 44 schools (4th–9th grade), answered a questionnaire at baseline and 1-year follow-up. Longitudinal trends for nonvictims (88%), ceased victims (4.7%), new victims (5.7%), and continuing victims (1.6%) revealed that new victims had the largest decrease in well-being; continuing victims had a smaller though not significant decrease; while ceased victims showed a small, (nonsignificant) increase in well-being over the measurement period. It was also discovered that children not bullied at baseline but bullied subsequently, differed, at baseline, from their never-bullied peers through lower levels of overall well-being. It is argued that this finding has implications for prevention strategies.

  • 25.
    Jerlinder, Kajsa
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och psykologi, Ämnesavdelningen för pedagogik.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro universitet.
    Gill, Peter
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och psykologi, Ämnesavdelningen för pedagogik.
    Normative approaches to justice in physical education for pupils with physical disabilities: dilemmas of recognition and redistribution2009Inngår i: Disability & Society, ISSN 0968-7599, E-ISSN 1360-0508, Vol. 24, nr 3, s. 331-342Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Seeking social justice in education for pupils with disabilities creates certain dilemmas. A ‘school for all’ means that educators are faced with a dilemma where the notion of ‘disability’ is perceived as ought not to matter, but where in actual fact it seems to matter very much! This article explores ways out of this general educational dilemma using the context of physical education (PE) for pupils with physical disabilities within the compulsory school as an example. Justice theories of resource distribution and cultural recognition affect educational outcomes, where demands are for justice and equity. Fraser’s (2000/2001) notion of ‘social status’, together with a pluralistic approach to identities where personal experiences are given a place, is used to suggest a solution to the dilemma. It is concluded that a redistribution of economic resources and social recognition is necessary if social justice within PE is to become a reality.

  • 26.
    Jerlinder, Kajsa
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för kultur-, religions- och utbildningsvetenskap, Pedagogik.
    Danermark, Berth
    Institutet för handikappvetenskap, Örebro Universitet.
    Gill, Peter
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för kultur-, religions- och utbildningsvetenskap, Pedagogik.
    Swedish Primary School Teachers' attitudes to inclusion: The case of PE and pupils with physical disabilities2010Inngår i: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 25, nr 1, s. 45-57Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 27.
    Jerlinder, Kajsa
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för kultur-, religions- och utbildningsvetenskap, Pedagogik.
    Gill, Peter
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för kultur-, religions- och utbildningsvetenskap, Pedagogik.
    Systematic Review and Analysis of General Physical Education Teachers' attitudes to inclusion.2012Inngår i: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 28.
    Larsson, Paula
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för kultur-, religions- och utbildningsvetenskap, Pedagogik.
    Gill, Peter
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för kultur-, religions- och utbildningsvetenskap, Pedagogik.
    Understanding how Swedish children, teenagers and adults define violence2010Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 29.
    Larsson, Paula
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för kultur-, religions- och utbildningsvetenskap, Pedagogik.
    Gill, Peter Edward
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för utbildning och ekonomi, Avdelningen för kultur-, religions- och utbildningsvetenskap, Pedagogik.
    Lay Definitions of Violence among Swedish Children, Teenagers, and Adults2013Inngår i: Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment & Trauma, ISSN 1092-6771, E-ISSN 1545-083X, Vol. 22, nr 3, s. 282-299Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Definitions of violence vary and are almost always operationalized by the researcher. Perceptions of violence often determine levels of tolerance of violence. Little research has focused on lay definitions. A total of 309 Swedes (78 children, 85 teenagers, 99 younger adults, and 47 adults (30+); 48% male) were interviewed using a specially developed interview protocol. Content analysis was used to assign definitional categories. A folk taxonomy emerged. Immediate physical violence accounted for 73% of all assigned categories. Hit was the word that occurred most frequently. If global physical violence was included, physical violence accounted for 89% of 780 assigned categories. Immediate non-physical violence accounted for 9% and vicarious violence (including media violence) accounted for 2%. Distributions of categories by respondents' gender, age, and participant role in incidents of violence showed the underlying definitions of violence to be extremely stable. The conclusion is that ordinary Swedes share a robust lay definition of violence as a behavior that is immediate, done in close quarters, and physical.

1 - 29 of 29
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