hig.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 97
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Aboul-Ata, Aboul-Ata E.
    et al.
    Vitti, Antonella
    Nuzzaci, Maria
    El-Attar, Ahmad K.
    Piazzolla, Giuseppina
    Tortorella, Cosimo
    Harandi, Ali M.
    Olson, Olof
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Piazzolla, Pasquale
    Plant-Based Vaccines: Novel and Low-Cost Possible Route for Mediterranean Innovative Vaccination Strategies2014In: Advances in Virus Research / [ed] Maramorosch, K; Murphy, F A, Elsevier, 2014, Vol. 89, p. 1-37Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A plant bioreactor has enormous capability as a system that supports many biological activities, that is, production of plant bodies, virus-like particles (VLPs), and vaccines. Foreign gene expression is an efficient mechanism for getting protein vaccines against different human viral and nonviral diseases. Plants make it easy to deal with safe, inexpensive, and provide trouble-free storage. The broad spectrum of safe gene promoters is being used to avoid risk assessments. Engineered virus-based vectors have no side effect. The process can be manipulated as follows: (a) retrieve and select gene encoding, use an antigenic protein from GenBank and/or from a viral-genome sequence, (b) design and construct hybrid-virus vectors (viral vector with a gene of interest) eventually flanked by plant-specific genetic regulatory elements for constitutive expression for obtaining chimeric virus, (c) gene transformation and/or transfection, for transient expression, into a plant host model, that is, tobacco, to get protocols processed positively, and then moving into edible host plants, (d) confirmation of protein expression by bioassay, PCR-associated tests (RT-PCR), Northern and Western blotting analysis, and serological assay (ELISA), (e) expression for adjuvant recombinant protein seeking better antigenicity, (f) extraction and purification of expressed protein for identification and dosing, (g) antigenicity capability evaluated using parental or oral delivery in animal models (mice and/or rabbit immunization), and (h) growing of construct-treated edible crops in protective green houses. Some successful cases of heterologous gene-expressed protein, as edible vaccine, are being discussed, that is, hepatitis C virus (HCV). R9 mimotope, also named hypervariable region 1 (HVR1), was derived from the HVR1 of HCV. It was used as a potential neutralizing epitope of HCV. The mimotope was expressed using cucumber mosaic virus coat protein (CP), alfalfa mosaic virus CP P3/RNA3, and tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) CP tobacco mild green mosaic virus (TMGMV) CP as expression vectors into tobacco plants. Expressed recombinant protein has not only been confirmed as a therapeutic but also as a diagnostic tool. Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2), HSV-2 gD, and HSV-2 VP16 subunits were transfected into tobacco plants, using TMV CP TMGMV CP expression vectors.

  • 2. Aboul-Ata, E
    et al.
    Aboul-Ata, Ahmad
    El Attar, K
    Soliman, Ahmad M
    Rezk, Adel A
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Università degli studi di Molise (Unimol).
    Mazyad, Hamed M
    Harandi, Ali
    Olsson, Olof
    Gene expression and gene suppression mechanisms for human and plant virus-infection control in Egypt: HCV, HSV-2, PVX-Eg2 and TYLCV2009In: BIOSPECTRUM 2009, International symposium on, Second Green Revolution: Priorities, Programs, Social and Ethical Issues, 2009, p. 12-13Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3. Aloisio, I
    et al.
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Università degli studi di Molise (Unimol), Italy.
    De Felice, D. V. A
    Tremonte, P
    Castoria, R
    A biochemical approach to elucidate the pathway of patulin degradation by a biocontrol yeast2008In: Journal of plant pathology, ISSN 1125-4653, E-ISSN 2239-7264, Vol. 90, no S2, p. 317-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Alsanius, Beatrix
    et al.
    VKM; SLU.
    Magnusson, Christer
    VKM; NIBIO.
    Nicolaisen, Mogens
    VKM; Aarhus University.
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Science, Biology. VKM.
    Wendell, Micael
    VKM.
    Krokene, Paal
    VKM; NINBIO.
    Stenberg, Johan
    VKM; SLU.
    Thomsen, Iben M
    VKM; University of Copenhagen.
    Rafoss, Trond
    VKM; University of Agder.
    Assessment of treatment methods and validation criteria for composting and biogas facilities in relation to plant health risks and the risk of spreading alien organisms: Scientific Opinion of the Panel on Plant Health of the Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food and Environment2021Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Amein, T
    et al.
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Göteborg University.
    Olsson, C H B
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Göteborg University.
    Wikstrom, M
    Findus R & D AB, Bjuv, Sweden.
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Göteborg University.
    First report in Sweden of downy mildew on parsley caused by Plasmopara petroselini2006In: Plant Disease, ISSN 0191-2917, E-ISSN 1943-7692, Vol. 90, no 1, p. 111-111Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Amein, Tahsein
    et al.
    Dept Cell & Mol Biol, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Univ Studi Molise, Dipartimento Sci Anim Vegetali & Ambiente, Italy .
    Wikström, Mariann
    Jordbruksverket Växtskyddscentralen Alnarp, Sweden .
    Koch, Eckhard
    JKI, Inst Biol Control, Darmstadt, Germany .
    Schmitt, Annegret
    JKI, Inst Biol Control, Darmstadt, Germany .
    Stephan, Dietrich
    JKI, Inst Biol Control, Darmstadt, Germany .
    Jahn, Marga
    JKI, Inst Strategies & Technol Assessment Plant Protec, Kleinmachnow, Germany .
    Tinivella, Federico
    Univ Turin, Italy .
    Gullino, M. Lodovica
    Univ Turin, Italy .
    Forsberg, Gustaf
    Seedgard AB, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Werner, Sigrid
    Hild Samen GmbH, Marbach Am Neckar, Germany.
    van der Wolf, Jan
    Plant Res Int, Netherlands.
    Groot, Steven Pc
    Plant Res Int, Netherlands.
    Evaluation of non-chemical seed treatment methods for control of Alternaria brassicicola on cabbage seeds2011In: Journal of Plant Diseases and Protection, ISSN 1861-3829, E-ISSN 1861-3837, Vol. 118, no 6, p. 214-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the lack of foliar fungicide use, the organic production of Brassica seeds free of Alternaria spp. is difficult. Therefore, effective seed treatments certified for use in organic farming are needed to eradicate or at least effectively reduce the seed-borne inoculum. We here report results of greenhouse and field experiments in which non-chemical seed treatments were tested for control of A. brassicicola on cabbage seeds naturally infested with the pathogen. In greenhouse experiments, significant improvements were obtained by seed treatment with some commercialised and experimental microbial biocontrol agents, an emulsion of thyme oil in water (0.1%) and by the tested physical seed treatments methods (i.e. hot water, aerated steam and electron seed treatment). Resistance inducers tended to increase the percentage of healthy plants, but the effects were statistically not significant. Generally the combination of physical treatments with the effective agents did not result in improved performance. Positive effects on crop establishment and yield by the same treatments were also observed in field tests. Overall the results indicate that several options for non-chemical control of A. brassicicola on Brassica seeds exist that are comparable in efficacy to the chemical standard Aatiram (active ingredient thiram) used in this study.

  • 7. Azarang, M
    et al.
    Collinge, D. B
    Gerhardson, B
    Johnsson, L
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    An integrated approach to simultaneously control insect pests, powdery mildew and seed borne fungal diseases in barley by bacterial seed treatment2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8. Beer, S. V
    et al.
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Wodzinski, R. S
    Zumoff, C. H
    Antibiotic production by Erwinia herbicola strain Eh318 and biological control of fire blight1993In: Phytopathology, ISSN 0031-949X, E-ISSN 1943-7684, Vol. 83, p. 1342-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9. Beers, S. V
    et al.
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Ophir, Y
    Zumoff, C. H
    Towards biological control of plant disease with antibiotic-producing strains of bacteria isolated from symptom-less plants1994In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 616-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Brady, S. F
    et al.
    Cornell University, Ithaca, New York.
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Department of Plant Pathology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York.
    Lee, J. C
    Cornell University, Ithaca, New York.
    Sutton, A. E
    Cornell University, Ithaca, New York.
    Zumoff, C. H
    Cornell University, Ithaca, New York.
    Wodzinski, R. S
    Ithaca Collage, Ithaca NY USA.
    Beer, S. V
    Cornell University, Ithaca, New York.
    Clardy, J
    Cornell University, Ithaca, New York.
    Pantocin B, an antibiotic from Erwinia herbicola discovered by heterologous expression of cloned genes1999In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 121, no 50, p. 11912-11913Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Bui, Tuyet T. A.
    et al.
    Laboratory of Fruit Breeding and Biotechnology, Department of Biosystems, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Science, Biology.
    Falk, Anders B.
    Valthornsvagen, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Vanwalleghem, Tanja
    Department of Mycology, Proefcentrum Fruitteelt vzw, Sint-Truiden, Belgium.
    Van Hemelrijck, Wendy
    Department of Mycology, Proefcentrum Fruitteelt vzw, Sint-Truiden, Belgium.
    Hertog, Maarten L.A.T.M.
    Division of MeBioS, Department of Biosystems, Faculty of Bioscience Engineer-ing, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Keulemans, Johan
    Laboratory of Fruit Breeding and Biotechnology, Department of Biosystems, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Davey, Mark W.
    Laboratory of Fruit Breeding and Biotechnology, Department of Biosystems, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Botrytis cinerea differentially induces postharvest antioxidant responses in 'Braeburn' and 'Golden Delicious' apple fruit2019In: Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, ISSN 0022-5142, E-ISSN 1097-0010, Vol. 99, no 13, p. 5662-5670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The fruit of two apple cultivars - 'Braeburn', which is susceptible to inoculation with Botrytis cinerea, and the less susceptible cv. 'Golden Delicious' - were investigated with respect to their response to inoculation with B. cinerea. Successful infection by B. cinerea leads to an oxidative burst and perturbation of plant redox homeostasis. To investigate the interaction between apple fruit and B. cinerea, antioxidant metabolism in fruit samples from sun-exposed and shaded sides of different tissue types was measured over time.

    RESULTS: The sun-exposed tissue of 'Braeburn' had higher initial levels of total vitamin C in the peel and phenolic compounds in the flesh than 'Golden Delicious', despite its greater susceptibility to gray mold. A substantial antioxidant response was recorded in diseased 'Braeburn' fruit 14 days after inoculation, which involved an elevated superoxide dismutase activity and ascorbate peroxidase activity, a progressive oxidation of total vitamin C, and a decrease in peroxidase activity and phenolic content. Disease development was slower on the sun-exposed sides than on the shaded sides.

    CONCLUSION: The two cultivars appeared to utilize different strategies to defend themselves against B. cinerea. 'Golden Delicious' almost entirely escaped infection. Preharvest exposure of apple fruit to high light / temperature stress appears to prepare them to better resist subsequent postharvest attack and disease. 

  • 12. Castoria, R
    et al.
    De Felice, D. V
    D'Alonges, S
    Ianiri, G
    Heitman, J
    Idnurm, A
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Università degli studi di Molise (Unimol), Italy.
    A genetic approach to elucidate the pathway of patulin degradation by a biocontrol yeast2008In: Journal of plant pathology, ISSN 1125-4653, E-ISSN 2239-7264, Vol. 90, no S2, p. 319-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13. Castoria, R
    et al.
    Ianiri, C
    Pinedo-Rivilla, D. V
    de Felice, R. M
    Durán Patrón, F
    Maffrei, A
    Idnurm, S. A
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Università degli studi di Molise (Unimol), Italy.
    Different aspects of the prevention of patulin accumulation by a biocontrol yeast2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Castoria, Raffaello
    et al.
    Univ Molise, Campobasso, Italy .
    Mannina, Luisa
    Univ Molise, Campobasso, Italy .
    Duran-Patron, Rosa
    Univ Cadiz, Spain .
    Maffei, Francesca
    Univ Bologna, Italy .
    Sobolev, Anatoly P.
    CNR, Rome, Italy .
    De Felice, Dario V.
    Univ Molise, Campobasso, Italy .
    Pinedo-Rivilla, Cristina
    Univ Cadiz, Spain .
    Ritieni, Alberto
    Univ Naples Federico 2, Portici, Italy .
    Ferracane, Rosalia
    Univ Naples Federico 2, Portici, Italy .
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Univ Molise, Campobasso, Italy .
    Conversion of the Mycotoxin Patulin to the Less Toxic Desoxypatulinic Acid by the Biocontrol Yeast Rhodosporidium kratochvilovae Strain LS112011In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, ISSN 0021-8561, E-ISSN 1520-5118, Vol. 59, no 21, p. 11571-11578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The infection of stored apples by the fungus Penicillium e., pansum Causes the contamination of fruits and fruit-derived products with the mycotoxin patulin, which is a major issue in food safety Fungal attack can be prevented by beneficial microorganisms, so-called biocontrol agents Previous time-course thin layer chromatography analyses showed that the aerobic incubation of patulin with the biocontrol yeast Rhodosporidium kratochvilovae strain LS11 leads to the disappearance of the mycotoxin spot and the parallel emergence of two new spots, one of which disappears over time In this work, we analyzed the biodegradation of patulin effected by LS11 through HPLC The more stable of the two compounds was purified and characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance as desoxypatulinic acid, whose formation was also quantitated in patulin degradation experiments After R. kratochvilovae LS11 had been incubated m the presence of (13)C-labeled patulin, label was traced to desoxypatulinic acid, thus proving that this compound derives from the metabolization of patulin by the yeast Desoxypatulinic acid was much less toxic than patulin to human lymphocytes and, in contrast to patulin, did not react in vitro with the thiol-bearing tripeptide glutathione The lower toxicity of desoxypatulinic acid is proposed to be a consequence of the hydrolysis of the lactone ring and the loss of functional, groups that react with thiol groups The formation of desoxypatulinic acid from patulin represents a novel biodegradation pathway that is also a detoxification process

  • 15.
    Castoria, Raffaello
    et al.
    Università degli studi del Molise.
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    University of Gothenburg and Università degli studi del Molise.
    Host responses to biological control agents2010In: Post-harvest pathology / [ed] D. Prusky & M.L. Gullino, Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2010, p. 171-181Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Castoria, Raffaello
    et al.
    Università degli studi di Molise (Unimol).
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Università degli studi di Molise (Unimol), Italy.
    Droby, Samir
    Biological Control of Mycotoxigenic Fungi in Fruits2008In: Mycotoxins in Fruits and Vegetables / [ed] R. Barkai-Golan and N. Paster, Elsevier, 2008, p. 311-333Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mycotoxins are toxic metabolites produced by fungi. The ability to produce mycotoxins is found in some fungal pathogens of plants and molding agents of food and feed, and has a noteworthy repercussion on the quality and safety of food products. Mycotoxin contaminations present one of the most insidious challenges to meet in food safety. Their importance is evident in the constant attention paid to them internationally, because of their harmful impact on animal and human health as well as on the economy. The most prevalent toxigenic fungi on fresh fruits belong to the genera Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Alternaria, which pose serious mycotoxicological risks essentially in postharvest and processed food products. The use of microbial antagonists for the control of postharvest pathogens, including mycotoxigenic fungi, is briefly explained in this chapter taking into account the commercial potential and perspectives of the practical application of these biological control agents and their mechanisms of action.

  • 17. Celan, M. A
    et al.
    Azarang, M
    Lyngs Jørgensen, H. J
    Collinge, D. B
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Università degli studi di Molise (Unimol), Italy.
    Characterization of bacterial strains as biological control agents of powdery mildew of barley2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18. De Curtis, F
    et al.
    Castoria, R
    Palmgren, L
    Ianiri, G
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Università degli studi di Molise (Unimol), Italy.
    Origin of plant-associated pink yeasts influences their biodiversity, biocontrol efficacy and ability to degrade patulin2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19. De Curtis, F
    et al.
    Castoria, R
    Palmgren, L
    Ianiri, G
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Università degli studi di Molise (Unimol), Italy.
    Origin of plant-associated pink yeasts influences their biodiversity, biocontrol efficacy and ability to degrade patulin2009In: Journal of plant pathology, ISSN 1125-4653, E-ISSN 2239-7264, Vol. 91, no S4, p. 58-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20. De Curtis, F
    et al.
    Palmgren, L
    Castoria, R
    De Cicco, V
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Università degli studi di Molise (Unimol), Italy.
    Plant-Associated Pink Yeasts: Isolation, characterization and screening for biocontrol ability2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21. De Curtis, F
    et al.
    Quici, R
    Ianiri, G
    Palmgren, L
    De Cicco, V
    Castoria, R
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Università degli studi di Molise (Unimol), Italy.
    The influence of yeast origin and identity on modes of biodegradation of patulin by basidiomycetous pink yeasts2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22. Falk, A. B
    et al.
    Gerhardson, B
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Università degli studi di Molise (Unimol), Italy.
    The role of an antifungal polyketide of a fluorescent pseudomonad in biological control2007In: 7th International Conference on Pseudomonas syringae pathovars and related pathogens, 2007, p. 17-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Falk, Anders B.
    et al.
    SLU.
    Lindström, Svante
    University of Gävle, Central University Administration.
    Mattsson, Magnus
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Energy system.
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Biology.
    Influence of some weather parameters on the susceptibility of apple fruit to postharvest grey mould attack2018In: Proceedings 2018, 2018, p. 124-127Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several cultural and weather factors during the season influence the susceptibility of apple fruit to post-harvest pathogens. In the present study, the effect of different weather parameters on postharvest susceptibility of apples of the cv. ‘Ingrid Marie’ to grey mould was investigated. In 2015, apple fruit were collected from orchards in Southern Sweden, where local weather stations monitored different parameters. After harvest, the fruit were tested for susceptibility to grey mould by artificially inoculating them with%FLQHUHD. Lesion development was monitored over a 10-day-period. Analysis of results for a few orchards showed that cold weather for over a month preceding harvest and a low total number of growth degree days gave apples that were more susceptible to grey mould. This study was carried out in conventional orchards, but the conclusions can be important also for organic production, since they deal with the general effect of sunshine, temperature and rain, factors that may strengthen fruit during cultivation, regardless of production type. Future studies may focus on organic production to investigate whether these effects are general and also apply to organic production.

  • 24. Gerhardson, Berndt
    et al.
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    SLU.
    Bacterial associations with plants: Beneficial, non N-fixing interactions2002In: Microorganisms in Plant Conservation and Biodiversity / [ed] K. Sivasithamparama, K. W. Dixon, R. L. Barrett, Springer , 2002, p. 79-103Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25. Hökeberg, M
    et al.
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    SLU.
    Svensson, L
    Lundgren, L. N
    Gerhardsson, B
    Mutants of Pseudomonas chlororaphis Defective in the Production of an Antifungal Metabolite Express Reduced Biocontrol Activity1998Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Ianiri, G.
    et al.
    Dipartimento di Agricoltura, Ambiente e Alimenti, Facoltà di Agraria, Università degli Studi del Molise, Campobasso, Italy;Division of Cell Biology and Biophysics, School of Biological Sciences, University of Missouri—Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri, USA.
    Idnurm, A.
    Division of Cell Biology and Biophysics, School of Biological Sciences, University of Missouri—Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri, USA.
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Dipartimento di Agricoltura, Ambiente e Alimenti, Facoltà di Agraria, Università degli Studi del Molise, Campobasso, Italy.
    Durán-Patrón, R.
    Departamento de Química Orgánica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cádiz, Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain.
    Mannina, L.
    Dipartimento di Chimica e Tecnologie del Farmaco, Sapienza Universita' di Roma, Rome, Italy;Istituto di Metodologie Chimiche, Laboratorio di Risonanza Magnetica Annalaura Segre, CNR, Monterotondo, Rome, Italy.
    Ferracane, R.
    Dipartimento di Scienza degli Alimenti, Università di Napoli Federico II, Parco Gussone, Portici, Italy.
    Ritieni, A.
    Dipartimento di Chimica Farmaceutica e Tossicologica, Università di Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy.
    Castoria, R.
    Dipartimento di Agricoltura, Ambiente e Alimenti, Facoltà di Agraria, Università degli Studi del Molise, Campobasso, Italy.
    Searching for genes responsible for patulin degradation in a biocontrol yeast provides insight into the basis for resistance to this mycotoxin2013In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 0099-2240, E-ISSN 1098-5336, Vol. 79, no 9, p. 3101-3115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patulin is a mycotoxin that contaminates pome fruits and derived products worldwide. Basidiomycete yeasts belonging to the subphylum Pucciniomycotina have been identified to have the ability to degrade this molecule efficiently and have been explored through different approaches to understand this degradation process. In this study, Sporobolomyces sp. strain IAM 13481 was found to be able to degrade patulin to form two different breakdown products, desoxypatulinic acid and (Z)-ascladiol. To gain insight into the genetic basis of tolerance and degradation of patulin, more than 3,000 transfer DNA (T-DNA) insertional mutants were generated in strain IAM 13481 and screened for the inability to degrade patulin using a bioassay based on the sensitivity of Escherichia coli to patulin. Thirteen mutants showing reduced growth in the presence of patulin were isolated and further characterized. Genes disrupted in patulin-sensitive mutants included homologs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae YCK2, PAC2, DAL5, and VPS8. The patulin-sensitive mutants also exhibited hypersensitivity to reactive oxygen species as well as genotoxic and cell wall-destabilizing agents, suggesting that the inactivated genes are essential for tolerating and overcoming the initial toxicity of patulin. These results support a model whereby patulin degradation occurs through a multistep process that includes an initial tolerance to patulin that utilizes processes common to other external stresses, followed by two separate pathways for degradation.

  • 27.
    Ianiri, G.
    et al.
    Dipartimento di Agricoltura, Ambiente e Alimenti, Facoltà di Agraria, Università degli Studi del Molise, Campobasso, Italy, and Division of Cell Biology and Biophysics, School of Biological Sciences, University of Missouri-Kansas City, USA.
    Idnurm, A.
    Division of Cell Biology and Biophysics, School of Biological Sciences, University of Missouri-Kansas City, USA .
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology. Dipartimento di Agricoltura, Ambiente e Alimenti, Facoltà di Agraria, Università degli Studi del Molise, Campobasso, Italy.
    Durán-Patrón, R.
    Departamento de Química Orgánica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cádiz, Spain .
    Mannina, L.
    Dipartimento di Chimica e Tecnologie del Farmaco, Rome, Italy .
    Ferracane, R.
    Dipartimento di Scienza degli Alimenti, Università di Napoli “Federico II”, Italy .
    Ritieni, A.
    Dipartimento di Chimica Farmaceutica e Tossicologica, Università di Napoli “Federico II”, Italy .
    Castoria, R.
    Division of Cell Biology and Biophysics, School of Biological Sciences, University of Missouri-Kansas City, USA .
    Searching for Genes Responsible for Patulin Degradation in a Biocontrol Yeast Provides Insights into the Basis for Resistance to This Mycotoxin2013In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 0099-2240, E-ISSN 1098-5336, Vol. 79, no 9, p. 3101-3115Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Ianiri, Giuseppe
    et al.
    Univ Missouri, Kansas City, USA, and Univ Molise, Campobasso, Italy .
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Univ Missouri, Campobasso, Italy .
    Castoria, Raffaello
    Univ Molise, Campobasso, Italy .
    Idnurm, Alexander
    Univ Missouri, Kansas City, USA .
    Development of resources for the analysis of gene function in Pucciniomycotina red yeasts2011In: Fungal Genetics and Biology, ISSN 1087-1845, E-ISSN 1096-0937, Vol. 48, no 7, p. 685-695Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Pucciniomycotina is an important subphylum of basidiomycete fungi but with limited tools to analyze gene functions. Transformation protocols were established for a Sporobolomyces species (strain IAM 13481), the first Pucciniomycotina species with a completed draft genome sequence, to enable assessment of gene function through phenotypic characterization of mutant strains. Transformation markers were the URA3 and URA5 genes that enable selection and counter-selection based on uracil auxotrophy and resistance to 5-fluoroorotic acid. The wild type copies of these genes were cloned into plasmids that were used for transformation of Sporobolomyces sp. by both biolistic and Agrobacterium-mediated approaches. These resources have been deposited to be available from the Fungal Genetics Stock Center. To show that these techniques could be used to elucidate gene functions, the LEU1 gene was targeted for specific homologous replacement, and also demonstrating that this gene is required for the biosynthesis of leucine in basidiomycete fungi. T-DNA insertional mutants were isolated and further characterized, revealing insertions in genes that encode the homologs of Chs7, Erg3, Kre6, Kexl, Pik1, Sad 1, Ssu1 and Tlg1. Phenotypic analysis of these mutants reveals both conserved and divergent functions compared with other fungi. Some of these strains exhibit reduced resistance to detergents, the antifungal agent fluconazole or sodium sulfite, or lower recovery from heat stress. While there are current experimental limitations for Sporobolomyces sp. such as the lack of Mendelian genetics for conventional mating, these findings demonstrate the facile nature of at least one Pucciniomycotina species for genetic manipulation and the potential to develop these organisms into new models for understanding gene function and evolution in the fungi.

  • 29.
    Jin, M
    et al.
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, USA.
    Liu, L
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, USA.
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Department of Plant Pathology, Cornell University, Ithaca, USA, and SLU, Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet, Uppsala.
    Beer, S V
    Department of Plant Pathology, Cornell University, Ithaca, USA.
    Clardy, J
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, USA. .
    Structural and functional analysis of pantocin A: An antibiotic from Pantoea agglomerans discovered by heterologous expression of cloned genes2003In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 42, no 25, p. 2898-2901Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Jin, M
    et al.
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, USA.
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Department of Plant Pathology, Cornell University, Ithaca, USA, and SLU Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Uppsaka.
    Beer, S V
    Department of Plant Pathology, Cornell University, USA.
    Clardy, J
    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, USA.
    The biosynthetic gene cluster of pantocin A provides insights into biosynthesis and a tool for screening2003In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 42, no 25, p. 2902-2905Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Johansson, P M
    et al.
    SLU, Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet, Uppsala.
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Department of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden .
    Low-temperature isolation of disease-suppressive bacteria and characterization of a distinctive group of pseudomonads2003In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 0099-2240, E-ISSN 1098-5336, Vol. 69, no 11, p. 6464-6474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of environmental factors during isolation on the composition of potential biocontrol isolates is largely unknown. Bacterial isolates that efficiently suppressed wheat seedling blight caused by Fusarium culmortun were found by isolating psychrotrophic, root-associated bacteria and by screening them in a bioassay that mimicked field conditions. The impact of individual isolation factors on the disease-suppressive index (DSI) of almost 600 isolates was analyzed. The bacteria originated from 135 samples from 62 sites in Sweden and Switzerland. The isolation factors that increased the probability of finding isolates with high DSIs were sampling from arable land, Swiss origin of samples, and origination of isolates from plants belonging to the family Brassicaceae. The colony morphology of the isolates was characterized and compared to DSIs, which led to identification of a uniform morphological group containing 57 highly disease-suppressive isolates. Isolates in this group were identified as Pseudomonas sp.; they were fluorescent on King’s medium B and had characteristic crystalline structures in their colonies. These isolates were morphologically similar to seven strains that had previously been selected for suppression of barley net blotch caused by Drechslera teres. Members of this morphological group grow at 1.5degreesC and produce an antifungal polyketide (2,3-deepoxy-2,3-didehydrorhizoxin [DDR]). They have similar two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis protein profiles, phenotypic characteristics, and in vitro inhibition spectra of pathogens. In summary, in this paper we describe some isolation factors that are important for obtaining disease-suppressive bacteria in our system, and we describe a novel group of biocontrol pseudomonads.

  • 32.
    Koch, Eckhard
    et al.
    JKI, Inst Biol Control, Darmstadt, Germany .
    Schmitt, Annegret
    JKI, Inst Biol Control, Darmstadt, Germany .
    Stephan, Dietrich
    JKI, Inst Biol Control, Darmstadt, Germany .
    Kromphardt, Carola
    JKI, Inst Strategies & Technol Assessment Plant Protec, Germany .
    Jahn, Marga
    JKI, Inst Strategies & Technol Assessment Plant Protec, Germany .
    Krauthausen, Hermann-Josef
    DLR Rheinpfalz, Agr Serv Ctr, Neustadt, Germany .
    Forsberg, Gustaf
    Seedgard AB, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Werner, Sigrid
    Hild Samen GmbH, Marbach, Germany .
    Amein, Tahsein
    Dept Cellular & Mol Biol, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Dept Plant & Environm Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden ; Univ Molise, Fac Agr, Dipartimento Sci Anim Vegetali & Ambiente, Campobasso, Italy .
    Tinivella, Federico
    Univ Torino, Ctr Competence Innovat Agroenvironm Sector, Grugliasco, Italy .
    Gullino, Maria L.
    Univ Torino, Ctr Competence Innovat Agroenvironm Sector, Grugliasco, Italy .
    Roberts, Steven J.
    Plant Hlth Solut, Warwick, England .
    van der Wolf, Jan
    Plant Res Int, Wageningen, Netherlands .
    Groot, Steven P. C.
    Plant Res Int, Wageningen, Netherlands .
    Evaluation of non-chemical seed treatment methods for the control of Alternaria dauci and A. radicina on carrot seeds2010In: European journal of plant pathology, ISSN 0929-1873, E-ISSN 1573-8469, Vol. 127, no 1, p. 99-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study was initiated to evaluate the efficacy of physical methods (hot water, aerated steam, electron treatment) and agents of natural origin (resistance inducers, plant derived products, micro-organisms) as seed treatments of carrots for control of Alternaria dauci and A. radicina. Control of both Alternaria species by seed treatment with the resistance inducers was generally poor. Results were also not satisfactory with most of the formulated commercial micro-organism preparations. Based on the average of five field trials, one of these, BA 2552 (Pseudomonas chlororaphis), provided a low but significant increase in plant stand. Among the experimental micro-organisms, the best results were obtained with Pseudomonas sp. strain MF 416 and Clonostachys rosea strain IK726. A similar level of efficacy was provided by seed treatment with an emulsion (1%) of thyme oil in water. Good and consistent control was generally achieved with the physical methods aerated steam, hot water and electron treatment. Aerated steam treatment was, apart from the thiram-containing chemical standard, the best single treatment, and its performance may at least partially be due to extensive pre-testing, resulting in dosages optimally adapted to the respective seed lot. In some of the experiments the effect of the hot water treatment, which was tested at a fixed, not specifically adapted dosage, was significantly improved when combined with a Pseudomonas sp. MF 416 or C. rosea IK726 treatment. The results are discussed in relation to the outcome of experiments in which the same seed treatment methods and agents were tested in other seed-borne vegetable pathosystems.

  • 33.
    Krokene, Paal
    et al.
    Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research; Norwegian University of Life Sciences.
    Hatteland, Bjørn Arild
    Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research; University of Bergen.
    Magnusson, Christer
    Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research; Norwegian University of Life Sciences.
    Flø, Daniel
    VKM.
    Thomsen, Iben M.
    University of Copenhagen.
    Stenberg, Johan A.
    SLU.
    Brurberg, May Bente
    Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research; Norwegian University of Life Sciences.
    Wendell, Micael
    VKM.
    Nicolaisen, Mogens
    Aarhus university.
    Rossmann, Simeon
    Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research.
    Talgø, Venche
    Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research.
    Wright, Sandra A. I. (Contributor)
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Science, Biology.
    Rafoss, Trond (Contributor)
    VKM; University of Agder.
    Pest risk categorization – New plant health regulations for Norway: Scientific Opinion of the Panel on Plant Health of the Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food and Environment2021Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an ongoing effort to renew Norwegian regulations related to plants and measures against plant pests, the Norwegian Food Safety Authority asked The Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food and Environment (VKM) which of the currently regulated pests that should still be regulated (either as a quarantine pest (QP) or a regulated non-quarantine pest (RNQP) for Norway), and whether there are any species that should be deregulated. Following such a risk categorization process the Norwegian Food Safety Authority will determine if pest risk assessments (PRA’s) should be performed for quarantine pests. International trade regulations define quarantine pests (QPs) as pests of potential economic importance to an area that are not yet present, or are present but not widely distributed and are subject to official control. A regulated non-quarantine pest (RNQP) is a pest whose presence in plants for planting affects the intended use of those plants with an economically unacceptable impact and which is therefore subject to official control within the territory of the importing contracting party and regulated in international trade. In this report VKM presents an overview of the pest categorisation of some of the pests regulated in the current Norwegian regulation and concludes on whether each pest should be regulated as a potential QP, RNQP or none of these categories for Norway. The pest categorisation process – the process of determining whether a pest has or has not the characteristics of a QP or RNQP – has been done using the FinnPRIO model. The FinnPRIO model is a pest risk ranking tool that uses a hypervolume approach carry out quick, semiquantitative expert assessments and that allows a high number of pest risk categorizations to be done cost-effectively and in a short period of time. In total 33 pests were assessed as per request from the Norwegian Food Safety Authority. Of those 33 pests VKM suggests that the vast majority – 32 pests – are kept as a QPs for Norway. However, one pest, the cherry leafroll nepovirus (EPPO code CLRV00), fulfils the requirements for being a RNQP since it is most likely present in Norway already. Furthermore, one organism, the flatworm Arthurdendyus triangulates (ARDDTR), is suggested to not be regulated as QP or RNQP. This pest does not fulfil the requirements for being a QP since it would probably not cause direct damage to plants if it established in Norway. Also, it does not fulfill the requirements for being a regulated non-quarantine pest(RNQP) since its potential presence in plants for planting does not directly affect the intended use of those plants with an economically unacceptable impact.

  • 34.
    Nielsen, Anders
    et al.
    VKM; Norwegian Institute for Bioeconomy Research.
    Stenberg, Johan A.
    VKM; SLU.
    Wendell, Micael
    VKM.
    Krokene, Paal (Contributor)
    VKM; Norwegian Institute for Bioeconomy Research.
    Magnusson, Christer (Contributor)
    VKM; Norwegian Institute for Bioeconomy Research.
    Nicolaisen, Mogens (Contributor)
    VKM; Aarhus university.
    Thomsen, Iben M. (Contributor)
    VKM; University of Copenhagen.
    Wright, Sandra A. I. (Contributor)
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Science, Biology. VKM.
    Rafoss, Trond (Contributor)
    VKM; University of Agder.
    Risk assessment of the biological control product Limonica with the organism Amblydromalus limonicus: Scientific Opinion of the Panel on Plant Health of the Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food and Environment2020Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The product Limonica, with the predatory mite Amblydromalus limonicus as the active organism, is sought to be used as a biological control agent in Norway. Limonica is intended for use against western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentallis), other thrips (e.g. Thripstabaci), spider mites and white flies (e.g. Trialeurodes, Aleyrodes and Bemisia spp.) in protected horticultural crops such as cucumber, sweet pepper, strawberry and ornamentals. The product is not recommended for greenhouse-grown tomatoes. 

  • 35.
    Oksinska, M. P.
    et al.
    Department of Agricultural Microbiology, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Wroclaw, Poland.
    Pietr, S. J.
    Department of Agricultural Microbiology, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Wroclaw, Poland.
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Resistance to oxidation products of caffeic acid is important for efficient colonization of wheat seedlings by Pseudomonas proteolytica strain PSR1142013In: Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment. Applied Soil Ecology, ISSN 0929-1393, E-ISSN 1873-0272, Vol. 66, p. 71-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interrelationships between plants and rhizosphere bacteria are strongly dependent on the quality and quantity of root exudates. The ability to colonize roots is crucial for pseudomonads to function as biological control agents of root- and soil-borne pathogenic microbes. The multiplication of rhizosphere bacteria is restricted in the presence of simple phenolic compounds, which are components of the resistance mechanisms of plants to pathogens. Caffeic acid is a phenolic compound, which is commonly found in wheat tissues. It is prone to oxidation into o-quinones, which are toxic to microorganisms. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the ability of microorganisms to resist caffeic acid and its oxidation products could play a role in the early colonization of wheat seedlings. Among the fluorescent pseudomonads that we have studied, strain PSR114 is one of the most efficient colonizers of wheat seedlings during the first 48h after seed germination, and it is particularly resistant to products resulting from the spontaneous oxidation of caffeic acid. This strain was isolated from the rhizosphere of oilseed rape and identified as being closely related to Pseudomonas proteolytica through the analysis of 16S rRNA and rpoB gene sequences. At pH 7.0, this strain grew intensively in the presence of 1.50mgmL-1 of caffeic acid. Its multiplication was partially reduced in the presence of oxidized caffeic acid at concentrations above 0.21mgmL-1, and completely inhibited at concentrations above 0.38mgmL-1. A Tn5 transposon mutant of PSR114 had lower level of resistance to the oxidation products of caffeic acid, as well as reduced capacity to colonize wheat seedlings when compared to the wild type strain. This work demonstrates that resistance to oxidation products of caffeic acid can be important for successful bacterial colonization of wheat seedlings.

  • 36.
    Oksinska, Malgorzata P.
    et al.
    Wroclaw Univ Environm & Life Sci, Dept Agr Microbiol, Wroclaw, Poland .
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Univ Molise, Dept Anim Plant & Environm Sci, Campobasso, Italy .
    Pietr, Stanislaw J.
    Wroclaw Univ Environm & Life Sci, Dept Agr Microbiol, Wroclaw, Poland .
    Colonization of wheat seedlings (Triticum aestivum L.) by strains of Pseudomonas spp. with respect to their nutrient utilization profiles2011In: European journal of soil biology, ISSN 1164-5563, E-ISSN 1778-3615, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 364-373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nutrients that leach out from roots constitute a major source of food for root-colonizing bacteria. The role of specific nutrients in this interaction is unclear. The aim of the present study was to examine whether colonization ability could be attributed to specific nutrient utilization profiles. Twenty fluorescent pseudomonads were tested for colonization ability of 48-h-old wheat seedlings. Analyses of RFLPs of amplified 165 rRNA gene and of BIOLOG GN2 data demonstrated that colonization ability did not associate with any particular RFLP or metabolic group. The best colonizers PPS96, PSR2, PSR21, good colonizer PSR6 and four of ineffective colonizers were identified through 16S sequence analysis as Pseudomonas reactans. The best and good colonizers distinguished themselves from the less efficient colonizers by specifically utilizing: p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, bromosuccinic acid, benzoic acid, methyl pyruvate. N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, D-trehalose and adonitol. However, there was no specific sole nutrient utilization profile that predicted excellent root colonization ability of wheat, since the best colonizers did not have identical profiles. This work indicates that strains of P. reactans are present in the rhizosphere of oil seed rape and wheat and that some of them are effective colonizers of wheat roots.

  • 37. Olsson, C .H. B
    et al.
    Bui, T. T. A
    Falk, A. B
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Università degli studi di Molise (Unimol); Göteborgs universitet.
    Bladmögel hotar persiljeodlingen2008In: Viola, Potatis och Grönsaker, Vol. 11, p. 18-20Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 38. Olsson, C. H. B
    et al.
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Nguyen, T. H
    Dang, V. T. T
    Ramstedt, M
    Phytophthora species on citrus in Vietnam – potential for spread to forest plants2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Pinedo, Cristina
    et al.
    Departamento de Química Orgánica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cádiz, Campus Universitario Río San Pedro, Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain.
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Biology.
    Collado, Isidro G.
    Departamento de Química Orgánica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cádiz, Campus Universitario Río San Pedro, Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain.
    Goss, Rebecca J. M.
    School of Chemistry, Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, University of St Andrews, Fife, Scotland.
    Castoria, Raffaello
    Dipartimento Agricoltura, Ambiente, Alimenti, Università degli Studi del Molise, Campobasso, Italy.
    Hrelia, Patrizia
    Dipartimento di Farmacia e Biotecnologie, Alma Mater Studiorum-Università di Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
    Maffei, Francesca
    Dipartimento di Scienze per la Qualità della Vita, Alma Mater Studiorum-Università di Bologna, Campus Rimini, Rimini, Italy.
    Durán-Patrón, Rosa
    Departamento de Química Orgánica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cádiz, Campus Universitario Río San Pedro, Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain.
    Isotopic Labeling Studies Reveal the Patulin Detoxification Pathway by the Biocontrol Yeast Rhodotorula kratochvilovae LS112018In: Journal of Natural Products, ISSN 0163-3864, E-ISSN 1520-6025, Vol. 81, no 12, p. 2692-2699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patulin (1) is a mycotoxin contaminant in fruit and vegetable products worldwide. Biocontrol agents, such as the yeast Rhodotorula kratochvilovae strain LS11, can reduce patulin (1) contamination in food. R. kratochvilovae LS11 converts patulin (1) into desoxypatulinic acid (DPA) (5), which is less cytotoxic than the mycotoxin (1) to in vitro human lymphocytes. In the present study, we report our investigations into the pathway of degradation of patulin (1) to DPA (5) by R. kratochvilovae. Isotopic labeling experiments revealed that 5 derives from patulin (1) through the hydrolysis of the γ-lactone ring and subsequent enzymatic modifications. The ability of patulin (1) and DPA (5) to cause genetic damage was also investigated by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay on in vitro human lymphocytes. Patulin (1) was demonstrated to cause much higher chromosomal damage than DPA (5).

  • 40. Pinedo-Rivilla, C
    et al.
    D´Apruzzo, P
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Università degli studi di Molise (Unimol), Italy.
    Collado, I. G
    Castoria, R
    Durán-Patrón, R
    Biodegradation pathway of the mycotoxin patulin by Rhodosporidium kratochvilovae2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41. Pinedo-Rivilla, C
    et al.
    D´Apruzzo, P
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Università degli studi di Molise (Unimol), Italy.
    Collado, R
    Castoria, R
    Durán-Patrón, R
    Detoxification pathway of the mycotoxin patulin to the less toxic desoxypatulinic acid by Rhodosporidium kratochvilovae2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Puglisi, Ivana
    et al.
    Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Catania, Catania, Italy; Dipartimento di Agraria, Università Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, Feo di Vito, Reggio Calabria, Italy.
    De Patrizio, Alessandro
    Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Catania, Catania, Italy.
    Schena, Leonardo
    Dipartimento di Agraria, Università Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, Feo di Vito, Reggio Calabria, Italy.
    Jung, Thomas
    Phytophthora Research Center Mendel University, Brno, Czech Republic; Phytophthora Research and Consultancy, Nußdorf, Germany .
    Evoli, Maria
    Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Catania, Catania, Italy.
    Pane, Antonella
    Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Catania, Catania, Italy.
    Van Hoa, Nguyen
    Southern Horticultural Research Institute, My Tho, Tien Giang, Vietnam.
    Van Tri, Mai
    Southern Horticultural Research Institute, My Tho, Tien Giang, Vietnam.
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Biology.
    Ramstedt, Mauritz
    Department of Forest Mycology and Plant Pathology, Swedish Agricultural University (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Olsson, Christer
    Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Faedda, Roberto
    Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Catania, Catania, Italy.
    Magnano di San Lio, Gaetano
    Dipartimento di Agraria, Università Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, Feo di Vito, Reggio Calabria, Italy.
    Cacciola, Santa Olga
    Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Catania, Catania, Italy.
    Two previously unknown Phytophthora species associated with brown rot of Pomelo (Citrus grandis) fruits in Vietnam2017In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 2, article id e0172085Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two distinct Phytophthora taxa were found to be associated with brown rot of pomelo (Citrus grandis), a new disease of this ancestral Citrus species, in the Vinh Long province, Mekong River Delta area, southern Vietnam. On the basis of morphological characters and using the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of the rDNA and the cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI) as barcode genes, one of the two taxa was provisionally named as Phytophthora sp. prodigiosa, being closely related to but distinct from P. insolita, a species in Phytophthora Clade 9, while the other one, was closely related to but distinct from the Clade 2 species P. meadii and was informally designated as Phytophthora sp. mekongensis. Isolates of P. sp. prodigiosa and P. sp. mekongensis were also obtained from necrotic fibrous roots of Volkamer lemon (C. volkameriana) rootstocks grafted with 'King' mandarin (Citrus nobilis) and from trees of pomelo, respectively, in other provinces of the Mekong River Delta, indicating a widespread occurrence of both Phytophthora species in this citrus-growing area. Koch's postulates were fulfilled via pathogenicity tests on fruits of various Citrus species, including pomelo, grapefruit (Citrus x paradisi), sweet orange (Citrus x sinensis) and bergamot (Citrus x bergamia) as well as on the rootstock of 2-year-old trees of pomelo and sweet orange on 'Carrizo' citrange (C. sinensis 'Washington Navel' x Poncirus trifoliata). This is the first report of a Phytophthora species from Clade 2 other than P. citricola and P. citrophthora as causal agent of fruit brown rot of Citrus worldwide and the first report of P. insolita complex in Vietnam. Results indicate that likely Vietnam is still an unexplored reservoir of Phytophthora diversity.

  • 43.
    Rambaree, Komalsingh
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Sundström, Agneta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Wang, Zhao
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science.
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Science, Biology.
    Qualitative stakeholder analysis for a Swedish regional biogas development: A thematic network approach2021In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 14, article id 8003Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The creation of pathways toward a societal transition to clean energy requires the engagement of multiple stakeholders with different and sometimes conflicting interests. In this connection, stakeholder analysis (SA) offers a technique for identifying, assessing and structuring different needs, interests and concerns related to different stakeholders within the context of sustainability. This article aims to present the findings from a qualitative stakeholder analysis (QSA) by using a thematic network approach (TNA), with the help of the ATLAS.ti software. It focuses on Project X, which was aimed at engaging multiple stakeholders and creating favorable conditions for small and medium-sized companies in a region situated in the central part of Sweden, with the potential to start biogas production. In this work, the findings and discussions of the QSA using TNA are structured by using the political, economic, social, technological, environmental and legal (PESTEL) themes of the model. The present study concludes that for the small-scale biogas industry to successfully develop an understanding of the possibilities of the biogas value chain, it is necessary to have analyzed the nature of the main themes by which various stakeholders relate to biogas production and envision their contribution to creating a sustainable society. Herein, we demonstrate that QSA by a TNA, combined with the application of a PESTEL model, are valuable analytical tools in sustainable project management. The lessons from Project X can be applied to other local biogas initiatives, as many identified threats and opportunities are shared by others. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 44. Ramstedt, M
    et al.
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Olsson, C. H. B
    Phytophthora sp. from coffee plantations in Vietnam - potential for host shifts and spread to forest plants2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Rönnander, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Science, Chemistry.
    Ljunggren, Joel
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Hedenström, Erik
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Biology.
    Biotransformation of vanillin into vanillyl alcohol by a novel strain of Cystobasidium laryngis isolated from decaying wood2018In: AMB Express, ISSN 2191-0855, E-ISSN 2191-0855, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vanillin is an aromatic aldehyde found as a component of lignocellulosic material, and in the cured pods of orchidaceae plants. Like other phenolic substances, vanillin has antimicrobial activity and can be extracted from lignin either by a thermo-chemical process or through microbial degradation. Vanillin, can serve as a model monomer in biodegradation studies of lignin. In the present study, a yeast isolated from decaying wood on the Faroe Islands, was identified as Cystobasidium laryngis strain FMYD002, based on internal transcribed spacer sequence analysis. It demonstrated the ability to convert vanillin to vanillyl alcohol, as detected by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography–quadrupole-time-of-flight. Structural analysis of vanillyl alcohol was carried out by using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry and 1H NMR spectroscopy, and further verified by synthesis. The reduction of vanillin to vanillyl alcohol has been documented for only a few species of fungi. However, to our knowledge, this biotransformation has not yet been reported for basidiomycetous yeast species, nor for any representative of the subphylum Pucciniomycotina. The biotransformation capability of the present strain might prove useful in the industrial utilisation of lignocellulosic residues.

  • 46.
    Rönnander, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Science, Chemistry.
    Ljunggren, Joel
    Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Science, Biology.
    Growth in Spent Sulphite Liquor and Biotransformation of Vanillin by Yeasts from Decaying Wood2019In: The 35th International Specialized Symposium on Yeasts, 21-25 October 2019, Antalya, Turkey: Proceedings book, 2019, p. 124-124Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a challenging ecological niche for microorganisms. Spent sulphite liquor (SSL), which derives from acid hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass, is an even greater challenge, due to the presence of toxic phenolic compounds, specific monosaccharides, lignosulphonates and inhibitors, such as HMF, furfural, formic acid and acetic acid. One of these inhibitors is vanillin, a lignin monomeric derivative. Could yeasts that originate from wood tolerate vanillin and grow in the presence of SSL? A basidiomycetous yeast, Cystobasidium laryngis strain FMYD002, grew in vanillin-supplemented media, and biotransformed vanillin into vanillyl alcohol. It is part of a collection of yeasts isolated from decaying wood on the Faroe Islands. The aim of the present study was to determine the vanillin biodegradation profiles and the ability to grow in the presence of SSL.

    These yeasts were identified by ITS1–5.8S–ITS2 and D1/D2 sequence homology. The relationship between wood-habitat and vanillin tolerance by cultivating the yeasts in the presence of 1 mM vanillin. The vanillin biodegradation profiles were determined by LC-MS, using the standards: vanillin, vanillyl alcohol and vanillic acid. The growth in different concentrations of SSL was evaluated.

    Strains of Cystobasidium laryngis, Cystofilobasidium infirmominiatum, Goffeauzyma gastrica, Goffeauzyma sp., Naganishia sp., Holtermanniella sp., Rhodotorula sp., Nadsonia starkeyi-henricii, Debaryomyces hansenii, Debaryomyces sp., Candida sake and Candida argentea were identified. Most strains were able to grow in vanillin-supplemented medium. The predominant biodegradation product was vanillyl alcohol followed by vanillic acid. Several other biodegradation products were detected. Most strains were able to grow in the presence in SSL. Species of Candida and Debaryomyces were most tolerant, whereas species of Nadsonia, Holtermanniella and Naganishia grew poorly.

    Many of the yeast species described herein are associated with wood or cold environments. Ability to grow in the presence of vanillin did not completely correlate with tolerance to SSL. However, the strains that grew at the highest concentration of SSL also grew well in the presence of vanillin, from which they rapidly producedl arge amounts of vanillyl alcohol, and many other biodegradation products. Conversely, the isolates with poor or no growth in vanillin had extremely low or no tolerance to SSL. Thus, high tolerance to vanillin appeared to be a prerequisite for growth in SSL-based medium. Different yeasts have tolerance to different inhibitors present in SSL. A comprehensive analysis of growth and biodegradation of vanillin produced five groups, containing specific yeast genera.

  • 47.
    Rönnander, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Science, Chemistry.
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Science, Biology.
    Growth of wood-inhabiting yeasts of the Faroe Islands in the presence of spent sulphite liquor2021In: Antonie van Leeuwenhoek. International Journal of General and Molecular Microbiology, ISSN 0003-6072, E-ISSN 1572-9699, Vol. 114, p. 649-666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the microbial community of decaying wood, yeasts are important for the recycling of nutrients. Nevertheless, information on their biodiversity in this niche in the Northern hemisphere is limited. Wood-colonising yeasts encounter identical and similar growth-inhibitory compounds as those in spent sulphite liquor (SSL), an energy-rich, acid hydrolysate and waste product from the paper industry, which may render them well-suited for cultivation in SSL. In the present study, yeasts were isolated from decaying wood on the Faroe Islands and identified based on sequence homology of the ITS and D1/D2 regions. Among the yeasts isolated, Candida argentea, Cystofilobasidium infirmominiatum, Naganishia albidosimilis, Naganishia onofrii, Holtermanniella takashimae and Goffeauzyma gastrica were new to decaying wood in cold and temperate climates. C. argentea and Rhodotorula are rarely-isolated species, with no previous documentation from cold and maritime climates. The isolates were further tested for growth in a medium with increasing concentrations of softwood SSL. Most grew in the presence of 10% SSL. Isolates of Debaryomyces sp., C. argentea and Rhodotorula sp. were the most tolerant. Representatives of Debaryomyces and Rhodotorula have previously been found in decaying wood. In contrast, the least tolerant isolates belonged to species that are rarely reported from decaying wood. The relative importance of individual inhibitors to yeast growth is discussed. To our knowledge, none of the present yeast species have previously been cultivated in SSL medium. Decaying wood can be a useful future source of yeasts for valorisation of various hydrolysates to industrial chemicals and biofuels.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
    Download (zip)
    Supplementary information
  • 48. Schmitt, A
    et al.
    Amein, T
    Tinivella, F
    van der Wolf, J
    Roberts, S
    Groot, S
    Gullino, M. L
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Koch, E
    Control of seed-borne pathogens on vegetables by microbial and other alternative seed treatments2004In: Proceedings of the First World Conference on Organic Seeds, Rome, Italy, July 5-7, 2004, 2004, p. 120-123Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Schmitt, A.
    et al.
    JKI, Inst Biol Control, Darmstadt, Germany .
    Koch, E.
    JKI, Inst Biol Control, Darmstadt, Germany .
    Stephan, D.
    JKI, Inst Biol Control, Darmstadt, Germany .
    Kromphardt, C.
    JKI, Inst Strategies & Technol Assessment Plant Protec, Kleinmachnow, Germany .
    Jahn, M.
    JKI, Inst Strategies & Technol Assessment Plant Protec, Kleinmachnow, Germany .
    Krauthausen, H. -J
    DLR Rheinpfalz, Agr Serv Ctr, Neustadt, Germany .
    Forsberg, G.
    Seedgard AB, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Werner, S.
    Hild Samen GmbH, Marbach, Germany .
    Amein, T.
    Dept Mol & Cellular Biol, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    Dept Plant & Environm Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden, and Univ Molise, Dipartimento Sci Anim Vegetali & Ambiente, Campobasso, Italy.
    Tinivella, F.
    Univ Turin, Ctr Competence Innovat Agroenvironm Sector AGROIN, Grugliasco, Italy .
    van der Wolf, J.
    Plant Res Int, Wageningen, Netherlands .
    Groot, S. P. C.
    Plant Res Int, Wageningen, Netherlands .
    Evaluation of non-chemical seed treatment methods for the control of Phoma valerianellae on lamb’s lettuce seeds2009In: Journal of Plant Diseases and Protection, ISSN 1861-3829, Vol. 116, no 5, p. 200-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to identify seed treatment methods for eradicating Phoma valerianellae from lamb’s lettuce seeds in organic vegetable production. Using seeds naturally infested with the pathogen, the effect of three physical methods (hot water, aerated steam, electron treatment) and different agents of natural origin (micro-organisms, plant derived products, resistance inducers) was tested on moist filter paper, in seed trays under controlled conditions and in the field. in an initial screening, none of the tested putative resistance inducers prevented infection by P. valerianellae, while two out of seven formulated micro-organism preparations and six out of 16 experimental microbial strains were effective. When selected agents and the three physical seed treatment methods were compared in blotter and seed tray tests, the physical methods were generally the most effective treatments, while the micro-organism treatments were clearly less efficacious. However, in field experiments with the same seed lots and the same treatments, a statistically significant increase in plant stand was not obtained with any of the treatments. Combinations of the three physical treatment methods with selected non-chemical agents did not perform better than the physical treatments alone. The most effective alternative seed treatments identified in the present study, aerated steam, hot water, electron treatment and thyme oil (0.1%), can be recommended for eradication of P. valerianellae from lamb’s lettuce seeds in organic farming. Because their efficacy was generally as high as that of the chemical fungicide Aatiram (active ingredient thiram), they are also potentially suited for use in conventional vegetable production.

  • 50.
    Stenberg, Johan A.
    et al.
    VKM; SLU.
    Flø, Daniel
    VKM.
    Kirkendall, Lawrence
    VKM; University of Bergen.
    Krokene, Paal
    VKM; Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research (NIBIO).
    Magnusson, Christer (Contributor)
    VKM; Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research (NIBIO).
    Nicolaisen, Mogens (Contributor)
    VKM; Aarhus university.
    Thomsen, Iben M. (Contributor)
    VKM; University of Copenhagen.
    Wright, Sandra A. I. (Contributor)
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Science, Biology. VKM.
    Rafoss, Trond (Contributor)
    VKM; Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research (NIBIO).
    Pest risk assessment of selected Epitrix species: Scientific Opinion of the Panel on Plant Health of the Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food and Environment2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Epitrix is a taxonomically complex genus, with 162 described species all over the world, and most likely many more undescribed species. Due to taxonomic difficulties identifying the species, there is considerable uncertainty regarding which species that feed on cultivated crops. At least 13 Epitrix species are known to damage the tubers of potato, which is the crop of concern in northern Europe. At least five of those Epitrix species (E. hirtipennis, E. fasciata, E.cucumeris, E. papa and E. pubescens) have established themselves outside their native range, spurring concerns that they may spread further and potentially cause damage in new areas where potato is cultivated. It is unknown how most of these species have moved from country to country, but there have been several interceptions of unknown Epitrix species in shipments of ware potatoes.

12 1 - 50 of 97
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf