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  • 1.
    Beckley, Amber L.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Kardell, Johan
    Stockholms universitet.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Criminology. Stockholms universitet.
    Immigration and crime in Sweden2015In: Routledge handbook on crime and international migration / [ed] Sharon Pickering and Julie Ham, Abingdon: Routledge, 2015, p. 41-54Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Criminology. Department of Criminology, University of Stockholm, Kriminologiska Institutionen, Stockholm, Sweden.
    A Criminological Perspective on Recruitment of Men and Women to Daesh2018In: International Annals of Criminology, ISSN 0003-4452, Vol. 56, no 1-2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Criminological research usually directs its focus at traditional forms of offending. The purpose of this article is to discuss the extent to which traditional criminological theories can be used to understand a modern form of terrorism. The main issue to explain is why young men and women from a Western European country, such as Sweden, are joining Daesh in Iraq and Syria. The conclusion is that many criminology theories are useful to analyse the factors behind the affiliation to Daesh. The majority of those recruited into this organization have in many respects a similar background to individuals recruited to other forms of serious organized violent crimes. It should be noted that many of the theories discussed in the paper are more relevant for the understanding of why men join Daesh. When it comes to the recruitment of women these theories’ explanatory value is more limited. However, this applies also to these theories’ ability to explain female crime in general.

  • 3.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Criminology. Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Should Criminologists Shift Their Focus Away From Juvenile Delinquency?2014In: International journal of offender therapy and comparative criminology, ISSN 0306-624X, E-ISSN 1552-6933, Vol. 58, no 5, p. 519-521Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Criminology. Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sweden2016In: International Handbook of Juvenile Justice, Cham: Springer International Publishing , 2016, p. 445-471Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish criminal code of 1864 was based on the views of the classical school of criminal justice, which rested on the two cornerstones of justice and proportionality. Thus, the punishment should proceed from the criminal act and be proportionate to the severity of the act in question. Over time, however, this classical view was abandoned, and sanctions gradually became individualized on the basis of different characteristics of the offender. When determining the severity of sanctions, increasing consideration came to be given to factors such as the offender’s anti-social nature, psychological condition, and the danger he or she posed to society. By the end of the 1960s and the beginning of the 1970s, the Swedish justice system was characterized by a treatment focus. However, this approach came to be questioned in Sweden during the latter part of the 1970s-similar to many other parts of the western world. Today’s Swedish legislation on young offenders represents a compromise between the classical theory’s demands for justice and proportionality and treatment theory’s focus on prevention and rehabilitation. Social services and diversion from the legal system has still strong influence on reaction to the criminal acts of the youngest offenders (up to 15 and often even 18 years), while the legal system’s influence increases with the offender’s age. Compared with many other countries, the system can still be considered as lenient and characterized by humanistic values.

  • 5.
    Sturup, Joakim
    et al.
    Institute for Futures Studies, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden; Stockholm Region, Police Authority, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rostami, Amir
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Criminology. Institute for Futures Studies, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; .
    Mondani, H.
    Institute for Futures Studies, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gerell, Manne
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Criminology. Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Edling, Christofer
    Institute for Futures Studies, Stockholm, Sweden; Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Increased Gun Violence Among Young Males in Sweden: a Descriptive National Survey and International Comparison2018In: European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research, ISSN 0928-1371, E-ISSN 1572-9869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This population-based time-trend study examines gun violence rates among males in Sweden during the years 1996 to 2015 and compares the rate in Sweden to other Western European countries. Data were collected from six registries and are presented descriptively per 100,000 inhabitants. The risks among males in Sweden increased considerably in both lethal and non-lethal gun victimization and perpetration. Among males aged 15 to 29 there was a five-fold increase in risk for victimization in lethal and non-lethal gun violence during the 20-year observation period. In a comparative perspective the rate of gun homicide victimization among males 15 to 29 years was higher in Sweden compared to other Western European countries, while the risk for males over age 30 was at an average level. Based on the results of this study we conclude that gun violence among young males in Sweden has been on the rise and is at a high level compared to other Western European countries. The development of gun violence in Sweden can be characterized as endemic, prevalent in both population and socially vulnerable areas.

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