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  • 1.
    Amiri, Shahnaz
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Energy engineering. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Energisystem.
    Economic and Environmental Benefits of CHP-based District Heating Systems in Sweden2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Future energy systems and thus the climate are affected by many factors, such as energy resources, energy demand, energy policy and the choice of energy technologies. Energy systems of the future are facing three main challenges; the steady growth of global energy demand, the energy resource depletion, as well as the increasing emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases and their impact on climate change. To meet the mentioned challenges with sustainability in mind, actions that increase energy efficiency and choosing an energy-efficient energy system which is cost efficient will be essential. Combined heat and power (CHP) plants and district heating and cooling could contribute greatly to increased system efficiency by using energy otherwise wasted.

    The aim of this study is to increase the understanding of how CHP-based district heating and cooling systems using different primary energy sources can contribute to more cost-efficient energy systems, which reduce global CO2 emissions, and to highlight the impact of some important parameters and measures on Swedish municipal district heating systems. An important assumption in this study is the estimation of CO2 emissions from electricity production, which is based on marginal electricity perspectives. In the short term, the marginal electricity is assumed to come from coal-fired condensing power plants while in the long term it consists of electricity produced by natural gas-fired combined cycle condensing power plants. This means that the local electricity production will replace the marginal electricity production. The underlying assumption is an ideal fully deregulated European electricity market where trade barriers are removed and there are no restrictions on transfer capacity.

    The results show that electricity generation in CHP plants, particularly in higher efficiency combined steam and gas turbine heat and power plants using natural gas, can reduce the global environmental impact of energy usage to a great extent. The results confirm, through the scenarios presented in this study, that waste as a fuel in CHP-based district heating systems is fully utilised since it has the lowest operational costs. The results also show how implementation of a biogas-based CHP plant in a biogas system contributes to an efficient system, as well as lowering both CO2 emissions and system costs. The results show that replacing electricity-driven (e.g. compression) cooling by heat-driven cooling using district heating (e.g. absorption chillers) in a CHP system is a cost-effective and climate friendly technology as electricity consumption is reduced while at the same time the electricity generation will be increased. The results of the study also show that there is potential to expand district heating systems to areas with lower heat density, with both environmental and economic benefits for the district heating companies.

    The results reveal that the operation of a studied CHP-based district heating system with an imposed emission limit is very sensitive to the way CO2 emissions are accounted, i.e., local CO2 emissions or emissions from marginal electricity production. The results show how the electricity production increases in the marginal case compared with the local one in order to reduce global CO2 emissions. The results also revealed that not only electricity and fuel prices but also policy instruments are important factors in promoting CHP-based district heating and cooling systems. The use of electricity certificates has a large influence for the introduction of biogas-based cogeneration. Another conclusion from the modelling is that present Swedish policy instruments are strong incentives for cogeneration with similar impact as applying external costs.

  • 2.
    Amiri, Shahnaz
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Energy engineering. Department of Management and Engineering, Division of Energy Systems, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Henning, Dag
    Optensys Energianalys, Linköping, Sweden .
    Karlsson, Björn G.
    Department of Management and Engineering, Division of Energy Systems, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Simulation and introduction of a CHP plant in a Swedish biogas system2013In: Renewable energy, ISSN 0960-1481, E-ISSN 1879-0682, Vol. 49, p. 242-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objectives of this study are to present a model for biogas production systems to help achieve a more cost-effective system, and to analyse the conditions for connecting combined heat and power (CHP) plants to the biogas system. The European electricity market is assumed to be fully deregulated. The relation between connection of CHP. increased electricity and heat production, electricity prices, and electricity certificate trading is investigated. A cost-minimising linear programming model (MODEST) is used. MODEST has been applied to many energy systems, but this is the first time the model has been used for biogas production. The new model, which is the main result of this work, can be used for operational optimisation and evaluating economic consequences of future changes in the biogas system. The results from the case study and sensitivity analysis show that the model is reliable and can be used for strategic planning. The results show that implementation of a biogas-based CHP plant result in an electricity power production of approximately 39 GW h annually. Reduced system costs provide a profitability of 46 MSEK/year if electricity and heat prices increase by 100% and electricity certificate prices increase by 50%. CO2 emission reductions up to 32,000 ton/year can be achieved if generated electricity displaces coal-fired condensing power.

  • 3.
    Amiri, Shahnaz
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Energy engineering.
    Moshfegh, Bahram
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Energy engineering.
    Possibilities and consequences of deregulation of the European electricity market for connection of heat sparse areas to district heating systems2010In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 87, no 7, p. 2401-2410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the study is to analyse the conditions for connection of residential buildings in heat sparse areas to district heating systems in order to increase electricity production in municipal combined heat and power plants. The European electricity market has been assumed to be fully deregulated. The relation between connection of heat sparse areas, increased electricity and heat production as well as electricity prices, fuel prices and emissions rights is investigated. The results of the study show that there is potential to expand the district heating market to areas with lower heat concentrations in the cities of Gavle, Sandviken and Borlange in Sweden, with both economic and environmental benefits. The expansion provides a substantial heat demand of approximately 181 GWh/year, which results in an electricity power production of approximately 43 GWh/year. Since the detached and stand-alone houses in the studied heat sparse areas have been heated either by oil boiler or by direct electricity, connection to district heating also provides a substantial reduction in emissions of CO(2). The largest reductions in CO(2) emissions are found to be 211 ktonnes/year assuming coal-fired condensing power as marginal electricity production. Connection of heat sparse areas to district heating decrease the system costs and provide a profitability by approximately 22 million EURO/year for the studied municipalities if the price of electricity is at a European level, i.e. 110 EURO/MWh. Sensitivity analysis shows, among other things, that a strong relation exists between the price of electricity and the profitability of connecting heat sparse areas to district heating systems.

  • 4.
    Amiri, Shahnaz
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för energi- och maskinteknik. Department of Management and Engineering, Division of Energy Systems, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Trygg, Louise
    Department of Management and Engineering, Division of Energy Systems, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Moshfegh, Bahram
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för energi- och maskinteknik. Department of Management and Engineering, Division of Energy Systems, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Assessment of the natural gas potential for heat and power generation in the County of Östergötland in Sweden2009In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 496-506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to investigate the potential use of natural gas for heat and power production for the municipality of Linkoping, Norrkoping and Finspang in the County of Ostergotland, Sweden. The results of the study revealed that these three municipalities with the present heating demand can convert 2030 GWh/year of the present fuel mixed to natural gas. The expansion of natural gas provides the possibility to increase the electricity generation with approximately 800 GWh annually in the County of Ostergotland. The global emissions of CO(2) reduce also by approximately 490 ktonne/year by assuming the coal condensing power plant as the marginal power plant. The total system cost decreases by 76 Mkr/year with the present electricity price which varies between 432 and 173 SEK/MWh and with 248 Mkr/year if the present electricity price increases to 37% which is approximately corresponding to European electricity prices. Sensitivity analysis is done with respect to the different factors such as price of electricity, natural gas, etc. The findings show that increased price of electricity and increased district heating demand increases the profitability to convert to natural gas using CHP plant. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 5.
    Amiri, Shahnaz
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Energy system. Department of Management and Engineering, Division of Energy Systems, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Weinberger, Gottfried
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Energy system.
    Increased cogeneration of renewable electricity through energy cooperation in a Swedish district heating system - A case study2018In: Renewable energy, ISSN 0960-1481, E-ISSN 1879-0682, Vol. 116, p. 866-877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study of the district heating (DH) system in the city of Kisa, Sweden, shows how, through energy cooperation with a nearby sawmill and paper mill, a local energy company contributes to energy-efficient DH and cost-effective utilization of a new biofuel combined heat and power (CHP) plant. Cases of stand-alone and integrated energy systems are optimized with the linear program MODEST. The European power market is assumed to be fully deregulated. The results show clear advantages for the energy company to cooperate with these industries to produce heat for DH and process steam for industry. The cooperating industries gain advantages from heat and/or biofuel by-product supply as well. The opening to use a biofuel CHP plant for combined heat supply results in cogenerated electricity of almost 29 GWh/a with an increased biofuel use of 13 GWh/a, zero fuel oil use and CO2 emission reductions of 25,800 tons CO2/a with coal-condensing power plant on the margin and biofuel as limited resource. The total system cost decreases by −2.18 MEUR/a through extended cooperation and renewable electricity sales. The sensitivity analysis shows that the profitability of investing in a biofuel CHP plant increases with higher electricity and electricity certificate prices.

  • 6.
    Blomqvist, Stefan
    et al.
    Division of Energy Systems, Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Amiri, Shahnaz
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Energy Systems and Building Technology. Division of Energy Systems, Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Rohdin, Patrik
    Division of Energy Systems, Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ödlund, Louise
    Division of Energy Systems, Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Analyzing the performance and control of a hydronic pavement system in a district heating network2019In: Energies, ISSN 1996-1073, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 12, no 11, article id 2078Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A hydronic pavement system (HPS) is an alternative method to clear snow and ice, which avoids the use of salt, sand, and fossil fuel in conventional snow clearance, and minimizes the risk of accidents. The aim is to analyze the performance of different control strategies for a 35,000 m2 HPS utilizing heat from a district heating and cooling (DHC) system. The key performance indicators are (1) energy performance of the HPS, and (2) primary energy use, (3) electricity production and (4) greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the DHC system. The methodology uses a simulation model of the HPS and an optimization model of the DHC system. Three operational strategies are analyzed: A reference scenario based on the current control strategy, and scenarios where the HPS is shut down at temperatures below −10 ◦C and −5 ◦C. The study shows that the DHC return temperature is suitable for use. By operational strategies, use during peak demand in the DHC system can be avoided, resulting in reduced use of fossil fuel. Moreover, the energy use of the HPS could be reduced by 10% and the local GHG emissions by 25%. The study emphasizes that the HPS may have positive effects on global GHG emissions, as it enables electricity production from renewable resources. 

  • 7.
    Holmgren, Kristina
    et al.
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Division of Energy Systems, Linköping Institute of Technology, Linköping, Sweden.
    Amiri, Shahnaz
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för energi- och maskinteknik. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Division of Energy Systems, Linköping Institute of Technology, Linköping, Sweden.
    Internalising external costs of electricity and heat production in a municipal energy system2007In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 35, no 10, p. 5242-5253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both energy supply and waste treatment give rise to negative effects on the environment, so-called external effects. In this study, monetary values on external costs collected from the EU's ExternE project are used to evaluate inclusion of these costs in comparison with an energy utility perspective including present policy instruments. The studied object is a municipal district heating system with a waste incineration plant as the base supplier of heat. The evaluation concerns fuels used for heat production and total electricity production, for scenarios with external costs included and for a scenario using the present policy instrument. Impacts of assumptions on marginal power producers (coal or natural gas power plants) are investigated, since locally produced electricity is assumed to replace marginal power and thus is credited for the avoided burden. Varying levels of external costs for carbon dioxide emissions are analysed. The method used is an economic optimisation model, MODEST. The conclusion is that present policy instruments are strong incentives for cogeneration, even when external costs are included. Waste is fully utilised in all scenarios. In cases where coal is the marginal power producer, more electricity is produced; when natural gas is the marginal power producer, less is produced. There are several uncertainties in the data for external costs, both methodological and ethical. In the ExternE data, not all environmental impacts are included. For waste incineration, ashes are not included, and another difficulty is how to treat the avoided burden of other waste treatment methods. 

  • 8.
    Weinberger, Gottfried
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Energy system.
    Amiri, Shahnaz
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Energy system. Department of Management and Engineering, Division of Energy Systems, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Moshfegh, Bahram
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Energy system. Department of Management and Engineering, Division of Energy Systems, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    On the benefit of integration of a district heating system with industrial excess heat: an economic and environmental analysis2017In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 191, p. 454-468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy-related cooperation using industrial excess heat (IEH) in district heating (DH) networks shows economic and environmental benefits. A rarely investigated approach is the energy cooperation which incorporates a jointly operated CHP plant also producing process steam for nearby industry. The present study aims to evaluate economic and environmental effects on the Hofors DH system with jointly operated CHP plant when the nearby steel mill extends the supply of recovered IEH. Various IEH supply opportunities with different capacities of hot water and steam were designed and compared with existing IEH utilization, plant heat and electricity production and DH system performance. The energy system model MODEST is used for cost-optimization. A parametric study is used to analyze influences of increasing IEH cost and fluctuating electricity prices. The results show advantages for the DH system to utilize IEH for deliveries of DH and process steam and the cogeneration of electricity. Economic and environmental benefits are decreased total system cost (-1.67 MEUR/a), less use of fuels and electricity, and reduced CO2 emissions with a maximal reachable amount of 28,200 ton/a when the use of biofuel is assumed as limited resource and the substituted marginal electricity production is based on coal condensing power plants. The results also show that industrial steam is a preferred heat supply source as long as the steam cost is below the alternative heat production cost, irrespective of the electricity price. While the cost-effective utilization of industrial hot water for DH is more sensitive and affected by a beneficial CHP production based on higher electricity price segments, it is also shown that utilization of continuously supplied industrial hot water is limited during seasons of low DH demand.

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