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  • 1.
    Fröjd, Camilla
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Psychosocial Oncology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Larsson, Gunnel
    Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Endocrine Oncology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Birgegård, Gunnar
    Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Haematology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    von Essen, Louise
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Psychosocial Oncology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Patient attitudes, behaviours, and other factors considered by doctors when estimating cancer patients' anxiety and desire for information2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 523-529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to describe the patient attitudes, behaviours, and other factors, considered by doctors when estimating cancer patients' worry about how the disease may develop and the desire for information about the disease and its treatment. Data was gathered through semi-structured interviews with 19 doctors regarding 29 patients within endocrine oncology and haematology care, and the data were analysed by content analysis. The doctors considered the patients' verbal expressions, verbal behaviours, questions, body language, and facial expressions together with their own professional knowledge and experience, when estimating the patients' worry and desire for information. The doctors also considered contextual factors, patients' demographical factors, and medical situation when estimating the patients' worry, and also when estimating the patients' desire for information. The findings illustrate that estimating patients' worry and desire for information is a multifaceted and complex task, and that doctors consider not only the patients' verbal and nonverbal cues, but also factors, such as their own professional knowledge and experience, contextual factors, and patients' demographical variables. The findings should be communicated to doctors who meet cancer patients in medical consultations in order to illuminate the complexity of the medical consultation. The awareness of potentially important patient cues and other factors may aid doctors in their efforts to gain insight about their patients' emotions and informational needs.

  • 2.
    Fröjd, Camilla
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Psychosocial Oncology, Uppsala University, Uppsala Science Park, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Larsson, Gunnel
    Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    von Essen, Louise
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Is satisfaction with doctors' care related to health-related quality of life, anxiety and depression among patients with carcinoid tumours?: A longitudinal report2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 107-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate (i) whether specific aspects of the initial consultation (IC) and/or patients' satisfaction with doctors' care are related to health-related quality of life (HRQoL), anxiety and depression among patients with carcinoid tumours and (ii) whether patients' satisfaction with doctors' care changes over time. The study has a longitudinal design. The HRQoL and psychosocial function among patients who met the doctors showing good ability to identify patients' worry and wish for information were compared with those patients who met doctors showing less good ability. Patients' HRQoL, anxiety, depression and satisfaction with doctors' care were assessed longitudinally, shortly after each of the first four admissions to specialist care. Patients who met doctors showing good ability to identify their wish for information at the IC reported higher levels of cognitive function. Higher satisfaction with doctors' care was related to higher emotional and cognitive function, to higher global QoL, and to lower levels of problems with diarrhoea, financial difficulties, constipation, anxiety and depression shortly after each of the first three admissions, although not after the fourth admission to the specialist care. Although most patients with carcinoid tumours report high satisfaction with care, it is important to be aware of the fact that some patients may be less satisfied. Doctors should provide patients with information which matches the individual patients' needs and preferences as patients' satisfaction with doctors' provision of information is related to patients' HRQoL, anxiety and depression.

  • 3.
    Fröjd, Camilla
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Psyc hosocial oncology, Uppsala Un iversity, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Larsson, Gunnel
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala Un iversity, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap. Department of Public Health and Caring Sc iences, Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    von Essen, Louise
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Psyc hosocial oncology, Uppsala Un iversity, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Health related quality of life and psychosocial function among patients with carcinoid tumours: a longitudinal, prospective, and comparative study2007In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 5, article id 18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim was to investigate HRQoL and psychosocial function among patients with carcinoid tumours, longitudinally and prospectively, and to compare HRQoL among patients with carcinoid tumours to that of the Swedish general population. The aim was also to investigate the prevalence of distress during the first year after diagnosis. Methods: At four assessments during the first year after diagnosis, HRQoL was measured by the EORTC QLQ-C30 3.0, anxiety and depression by the HADS, and prevalence, and worst aspects of distress by an interview guide. ANOVA was performed in order to study changes over time with regard to HRQoL, anxiety and depression. Comparisons regarding HRQoL between patients and the Swedish population were made by the use of one-sample t-tests and changes over time regarding the prevalence of distress was investigated by means of Cochran's Q. Results: High levelsof physical-, emotional-, cognitive-, and social function and somewhat lower levels of role function and global quality of life were reported at all assessments. Role- and emotional function increased over time. Patients reported lower role function and global quality of life and more problems with fatigue and diarrhoea than the Swedish general population, at all assessments. Fatigue, limitations to work and pursue daily activities, and worry that the illness will get worse were among the most prevalent aspects at all assessments. At all assessments the majority reported worrying about the family's situation, the ability to care for the family, and worrying before the check-up. Conclusion: It is concluded that HRQoL and psychosocial function among patients with carcinoid tumours remains stable during the first year, that the patients report a lower HRQoL than the Swedish general population, and that a majority of the patients report a number of aspects of emotional distress. In the clinical care, it should be considered that the majority of patients report not only fatigue and diarrhoea but also worries about their prognosis, their families, tests, and examinations. Efforts to reduce these worries should be made.

  • 4.
    Hayat Roshanai, Afsaneh
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nordin, Karin
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Cancer genetic counselees' self-reported psychological distress, changes in life, and adherence to recommended surveillance programs 3-7 years post counseling.2009In: Journal of Genetic Counseling, ISSN 1059-7700, E-ISSN 1573-3599, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 185-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to investigate psychological distress, changes in life, adherence to surveillance programs and satisfaction with cancer genetic counseling based on Swedish participants' self-reported data. A total of 218 probands (72% response rate) affected by breast, breast/ovarian or colorectal cancer and/or a family history of cancer were surveyed 3-7 years after receiving cancer genetic counseling. Participants reported a relatively high level of anxiety and a low level of depression. Probands affected by colorectal cancer reported a higher level of depression than did non-affected individuals with a family history of colorectal cancer. Overall, the participants reported moderate changes in family relations, priorities and appreciation of daily life activities. The majority of at-risk probands reportedly adhered to recommended surveillance programs. The mean level of satisfaction with cancer genetic counseling was high. About half of the participants would have accepted additional counseling sessions, contact with a psychologist or further help concerning informing family members. The present results indicate no adverse effects of genetic counseling, but they do suggest that typical counseling procedures could be improved by provision of additional psychosocial support.

  • 5.
    Lampic, Claudia
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Livskvalitet och Response shift2007In: Psykosocial cancervård, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2007, p. 75-96Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Lampic, Claudia
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Attitudes towards gamete donation among IVF doctors in the Nordic countries - are they in line with national legislation?2009In: Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics, ISSN 1058-0468, E-ISSN 1573-7330, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 231-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To compare attitudes towards gamete donation between IVF doctors in the Nordic countries, and to determine whether attitudes are in correspondence with national legislation. Materials and methods: A study-specific questionnaire was used to study attitudes of 108 IVF doctors (92% response). Participants constituted 78% of all IVF doctors in Sweden, Denmark and Norway and 15% of IVF doctors in Finland. Results: Despite similar legislation regarding offspring right to learn his/her donor's identity, IVF doctors from Norway reported significantly more negative attitudes towards disclosure than did Swedish physicians. A majority from all countries demonstrated positive attitudes towards embryo donation and allowing sperm donation for lesbian couples. Physicians reported strong support for anonymous donation but less support for 'known' donation. Conclusion: There are discrepancies between IVF doctors' attitudes towards gamete donation and national legislation in four Nordic countries. Negative attitudes towards disclosure to offspring may counteract legislative intentions.

  • 7.
    Mårtensson, Gunilla
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala universitet.
    Lampic, Claudia
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Agreement between cancer patients' and nurses' perceptions of patients' emotional distress, coping resources and quality of life2008In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 17, p. S95-S95Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Mårtensson, Gunilla
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala universitet.
    Lampic, Claudia
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Are cancer patients whose problems are overestimated by nurses less satisfied with their care?2010In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 382-392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main aim of the present study was to investigate whether patient-nurse dis/agreement concerning cancer patients' situation was of importance to patients' satisfaction with care. Another aim was to describe cancer patients' satisfaction with care and to investigate its relationship to cancer patients' emotional distress. A consecutive sample of individual patient-nurse pairs (n = 82) was recruited and followed during 3 days. Each pair consisted of a cancer patient newly admitted to an oncological/haematological ward and a nurse responsible for that patient's care. The known phenomenon of nurse overestimation of cancer patients' problems did not appear to be of importance to patients' satisfaction with care. However, patients whose depressive problems were underestimated by nurses were significantly less satisfied with the care they received. Furthermore, anxious and depressed patients were less satisfied with some aspects of the care they received than were the remaining patients. Although the patients' ratings and experiences of received care indicated a high degree of satisfaction, the patients also expressed negative experiences of care. To improve the quality of cancer care, nurses need to improve their ability to identify cancer patients' emotional distress if they are to satisfy patients' needs.

  • 9.
    Mårtensson, Gunilla
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala.
    Lampic, Claudia
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala.
    Do nurses and cancer patients agree on individual patients' coping resources, emotional distress and quality of life?2008In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 350-360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examines differences, associations and agreement in cancer patients' and their nurses' ratings of cancer patients' coping resources, emotional distress and quality of life. The study sample includes 90 individual patient-nurse pairs. The patient and nurse in each pair independently completed the Cancer Behaviour Inventory, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-being. The results indicate a distinct pattern in which nurses overestimate patients' emotional distress and underestimate patients' coping resources and quality of life. A nurse who overestimated a patient's emotional distress and underestimated his/her resources for handling the situation was also likely to underestimate the patient's quality of life. Patient-nurse pairs who demonstrated consistent agreement differed from remaining pairs in that they had a larger percentage of nurses with advanced education and previous responsibility for their patients' care and in that they had higher frequencies of patients who had previously received care at the ward >5 days. Nurses caring for patients with cancer should be aware of the risk of making systematic misjudgements of patients' status. Increased attention to patients' internal resources may improve nurses' ability to make correct assessments and plan for individualized care.

  • 10.
    Mårtensson, Gunilla
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Lampic, Claudia
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Do oncology nurses provide more care to patients with high levels of emotional distress?2010In: Oncology Nursing Forum, ISSN 0190-535X, E-ISSN 1538-0688, Vol. 37, no 1, p. E34-E42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose/Objectives: To investigate nurses' planning and implementation of individualized patient care in relation to patients' emotional distress as assessed by nurses and whether nurses and patients perceived the implemented care in a similar manner. Design: Prospective, comparative. Setting: Five oncologic-hematologic wards in Sweden. Sample: 90 individual nurse-patient pairs were recruited and 81 were intact after three consecutive days. Each pair consisted of a patient with cancer and a nurse responsible for that patient's care. Methods: Nurse-patient pairs were followed using questionnaires. Outcome measures were nurses' identification of patients' emotional distress, care planning, and nursepatient ratings of implemented care. Main Research Variables: Patients' emotional distress andnurses' implemented care. Findings: Nurses identified a variety of emotional issuesamong patients and planned individual nursing interventions. Nurse and patient perceptions of implemented care demonstrated weak correlations for individually planned interventions and nurses' general caring behavior. With one exception, nurse self-reports did not indicate any differences in nurses' caring behavior directed to more and less distressed patients. Nurses reported providing comfort more frequently to patients with high levels of emotional distress, but this was not substantiated in patients' ratings. Conclusions: Nurses showed an intention to provide individualized care. However, with one exception, nurses did not report providing more care to patients with cancer with high levels of emotional distress than to less distressed patients. Implications for Nursing: To ensure individualized care, nurses in cancer care should closely validate the accuracy of their interpretation of patients' needs and their planning of care in collaboration with the patients.

  • 11.
    Mårtensson, Gunilla
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Is nurse-patient agreement of importance to cancer nurses satisfaction with care?2010In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 573-582Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Roshanai, Afsaneh Hayat
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Lampic, Claudia
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nordin, Karin
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Does enhanced information at cancer genetic counseling improve counselees knowledge, risk perception, satisfaction and negotiation of information to at-risk relatives?: a randomized study2009In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 48, no 7, p. 999-1009Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. The aim of the present randomized intervention study was to investigate the effect of receiving extended cancer genetic information on counselees' knowledge, risk perception, information sharing and satisfaction with the service. Methods. In total, 147 counselees, affected by cancer and/or a family history of cancer, were randomized to extended or standard information. The levels of counselees' knowledge and personal risk estimations were measured at four time points. In addition, counselees' satisfaction with the counseling and sharing of the information to at-risk relatives was assessed. The intervention included meeting a specialist nurse, learning the breaking bad news method, receiving written material and video-taped counseling sessions. Results. A significant increase in the level of knowledge in participants in the "breast cancer group" regardless of the randomization was observed over time. The correct estimation of personal risk increased significantly in both groups after two weeks, but declined at the eight month follow-up. Most of the participants had informed at-risk relatives about their visit at the cancer genetic clinic. The majority of respondents in both groups were highly satisfied with the counseling. The only observed effects of the intervention were that counselees in the intervention group were significantly more satisfied with the content of the given information and with the way of informing relatives. Conclusion. Apparently, the current genetic counseling is managed properly and extended information does not seem necessary in all cases. However, some counselees need additional sessions.

  • 13. Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    et al.
    Lampic, Claudia
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Karlström, Per-Olov
    Tydén, Tanja
    Attitudes toward parenthood and awareness of fertility among postgraduate students in Sweden.2006In: Gender medicine, ISSN 1550-8579, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 187-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Postponing childbirth is becoming increasingly common in Western countries, especially among women with higher education.

    Objective:

    The aim of the present study was to investigate female and male postgraduate students' attitudes toward parenthood, their intentions to have children, perceived obstacles to having or raising children during postgraduate studies, and their awareness of fertility issues.

    Methods:

    A 52-question survey was mailed to randomly selected postgraduate students attending a Swedish university. The questionnaire was developed based on earlier research by, and the professional experience of, the authors. Three pilot studies were conducted to test the questionnaire's reliability and validity. The t, x2, and Mann-Whitney U tests were used, as appropriate, to analyze responses.

    Results:

    Two hundred female and 200 male postgraduate students aged ≤40 years received questionnaires. The response rate was 71% (n = 141) among women and 58% (n = 116) among men. Most childless respondents had positive attitudes toward parenthood and wanted to have 2 or 3 children, and a majority of women wanted to have their last child after age 35. Compared with men, women were more pessimistic about the effects of parenthood on their postgraduate studies, and perceived more problems related to balancing work and family life. One of 4 respondents overestimated a woman's ability to become pregnant between 35 and 40 years of age, and about half had overly optimistic perceptions of the chances to have a baby by means of in vitro fertilization.

    Conclusions:

    Most postgraduate students wanted to have children in the future. More women than men perceived that having children while completing postgraduate studies was or would be difficult, and that parenthood would negatively affect their status in the labor market. Because many female postgraduate students intend to have children at an age when female fecundity is decreased, information on fertility issues would help them make informed decisions regarding family planning.

  • 14.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    et al.
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Academic Hospital, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Attitudes towards gamete donation among Swedish gynaecologists and obstetricians2008In: Human Reproduction, ISSN 0268-1161, E-ISSN 1460-2350, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 904-911Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Assisted reproductive technology (ART) legislation in Sweden has undergone a gradual transformation from being fairly restrictive when first introduced to becoming more permissive in recent years. Regarding gamete donation, Sweden became the first country to pass legislation about disclosure by establishing a child's right to find out the identity of the gamete donor once the child has reached maturity. Our aim was to investigate attitudes towards gamete donation among Swedish gynaecologists and obstetricians. METHODS: A questionnaire was mailed to all gynaecologists and obstetricians listed from a commercial register of all working in Sweden. Among 1230 eligible gynaecologists/obstetricians, 854 (69%) answered the questionnaire. RESULTS: In general, the majority of Swedish gynaecologists/obstetricians had positive attitudes towards gamete donation. Although a majority advocated openness regarding informing the child that he or she was conceived by making use of gamete donation, ∼40% opposed allowing the child to receive any information about the donor when the child has reached maturity. Even though Swedish legislation has allowed sperm donation to lesbian couples since July 2005, one-third of the gynaecologists/obstetricians opposed donation to lesbians. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that the gynaecologists'/obstetricians' negative attitudes towards disclosure may influence patients' ability to discuss their thoughts and feelings about donation. This may also have a negative impact on donor recruitment as well as on the extent of methods made accessible within ART. © The Author 2008. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology.

  • 15.
    Sundberg, Kay
    et al.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Björk, Olle
    Department of Women and Child Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Johan
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University Children's Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wettergren, Lena
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Positive and negative consequences of childhood cancer influencing the lives of young adults2009In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 164-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to describe how young adults who have survived childhood cancer consider their present life to be influenced by the cancer experience. A cohort of 246 long-term survivors were approached a median of 16 years after diagnosis. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted based on the Swedish version of the Schedule for the Evaluation of Individual Quality of Life-Direct Weighting (SEIQoL-DW). Interviews were analysed using content analyses. When asked if cancer negatively or positively currently affected their lives, 68% reported at least one negative consequence and 53% at least one positive consequence. The most frequently reported negative consequences include a variety of physical impairments and limitations in participating in activities; positive consequences describe a more positive view of life and of self. Women more often than men reported negative psychological impact, a changed body appearance and positive interaction with others. CNS tumours and combined treatment were somewhat associated to a higher extent of negative consequences. Overall, the results indicate that long-term survivors of childhood cancer are getting along quite well despite shortcomings.

  • 16.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    et al.
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala Science Park, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sunnerud, Sofia
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Academic Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nurses promote openness regarding the genetic origins after gamete donation2007In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 96, no 10, p. 1500-1504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To study attitudes and knowledge concerning different aspects of sperm and oocyte donation among paediatric nurses at child health care centres (CHCs) in Sweden. Method: A study-specific questionnaire, to be completed anonymously, was sent to 188 nurses, 141 of whom (75%) responded. Results: The majority of the respondents (62%) stated that they had no professional experience of families created with the help of a donor. A majority (53%) stated that they had good knowledge of the procedure followed in sperm donation, whereas 43% stated that they had good knowledge of the procedure of oocyte donation. More than 80% agreed that the parents should be honest with their child with regard to the child's genetic origin. Among the respondents who were in favour of disclosure, the preferred age for informing the child varied between 0 to 19 years (mean 7.2, SD 5.7). Conclusion: We conclude that the nurses working in CHCs need guidance and information about gamete donation in order to be able to support parents in the disclosure of information to their children and also how to inform or withhold information to significant others in their surrounding milieu.

  • 17.
    Tydén, Tanja
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Skoog Svanberg, Agneta
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Karlström, Per-Olof
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lihoff, Lina
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lampic, Claudia
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Female university students' attitudes to future motherhood and their understanding about fertility2006In: European journal of contraception & reproductive health care, ISSN 1362-5187, E-ISSN 1473-0782, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 181-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives As highly educated women tend to postpone childbearing, the purpose was to explore female university students' attitudes to future motherhood and their understanding about fertility.

    Methods Female students (n = 300), visiting a Student Health Centre in Sweden, answered a questionnaire with mainly multiple choice questions and verbal rating scales.

    Results The women wanted to have two to three children at the age of 29 for the first birth and 35 for the last. Only 2.7% did not plan to have any children. Six out of 10 would consider having an abortion if confronted with an unplanned pregnancy 'right now'. The most important circumstances for women's decision to have children were to be sufficiently mature, have a stable partner to share parenthood with, have completed studies and have a good economy. Having children before they got 'too old' was only ranked as very important by 18% of women. The women had an acceptable understanding about fertility.

    Conclusions It appears that female university students are not very concerned about having children before they get 'too old'. Therefore, it is important that caregivers, working with contraceptive counselling also include information about fertility, especially to women who intend to postpone their motherhood.

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