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  • 1.
    Ahmadi, Zahra
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Sundström, Agneta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    The market intelligence impact on strategic performance in declining markets2017In: International Journal of Applied Business and Economic Research, ISSN 0972-7302, Vol. 15, no 15, p. 457-473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines how companies in declining markets operate in the context of market intelligence, responding to customer needs and applying them tostrategic performance. A quantitative survey was sent to 214 public housing companies. The results indicate that market intelligence creates commitment and is significant. A positive relationship was found between data gathering, dissemination, and responsiveness, which indicates that the companies comprehend market needs but companies have difficult to manage construction strategies that improve strategic performance. There was a low value of strategic performance; a link between market intelligence and the chosen strategy was not confirmed. Companies know what the market wants but base their decision on previous strategic performanceon economic conditions in the municipality instead.

  • 2.
    Hyder, Akmal S.
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Chowdhury, Ehsanul
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Sundström, Agneta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Balancing Control and Trust to Manage CSR Compliance in Supply Chains2017In: International Journal of Supply Chain Management, ISSN 2051-3771, E-ISSN 2050-7399, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines how buyers and suppliers balance control and trust to manage compliance with corporate social responsibility (CSR) requirements in supply chains (SCs). Two in-depth, qualitative case studies of the Bangladesh apparel industry on two multinational companies of the same European country were conducted. This study indicates that a buyer’s need for control and trust is important in contact with other actors for managing CSR compliance. Formal control is found to generate competence trust, whereas intentional trust is achieved through informal control. Intentional trust is helpful for competence and capacity development, but for it to continue the supplier needs to fulfill the buyer’s expectations. Competence of the supplier is viewed as a prerequisite for developing competence trust. This study analyzes control and trust to fill an important gap in SC theory on relationships by stressing how these constructs interact and complement each other to manage CSR compliance in apparel industry. Firms must focus on a balanced relationship between trust and control to manage CSR compliance. Willingness to collaborate can only work when supplier competence and managerial resources are ensured. This study notes that managers need both formal and informal control to create competence and intentional trust in the supply chains. Capacity building is viewed as a complement, not an alternative to CSR compliance. With its closer attention to control and trust, this study fills an important gap in SC theory on relationships by stressing how these constructs interact and complement each other for managing CSR compliance in supply chains.

  • 3.
    Hyder, Akmal S
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Sundström, Agneta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Is CSR focused Internationalization Realistic for High-Tech Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs)?2018In: Proceedings of the 32nd International Business Information Management Association Conference, IBIMA 2018 - Vision 2020: Sustainable Economic Development and Application of Innovation Management from Regional expansion to Global Growth / [ed] Soliman K. S., International Business Information Management Association (IBIMA), 2018, Vol. -, p. 3868-3872Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyzes how high-tech SMEs approach CSR focused internationalization through networking and trust. Research has so far concentrated on CSR in large companies as it is not a usual practice in SMEs, particularly in connection with internationalization. High-tech SMEs face resource constraints and knowledge to apply CSR as a competitive tool in internationalization. In this paper, it is argued that development and implementation of CSR based internationalization in SMEs is a difficult learning process, which needs to be coordinated and supported by other firms in their network. Trust between the partners is necessary for collaboration. By applying an interactive approach, data has been collected from the ongoing marketing process in four high-tech Swedish SMEs in the steel industry. All the participating SMEs understand the importance of CSR in international marketing. However, success of CSR implementation in the SMEs varied depending on the area of business. The least CSR implemented SME focused on the improvement of work environment and financial sustainability through partnership with the customers and the investors. The most successful CSR focused company dealt with industrial residues and extraction of other minerals from hazardous waste for selling, making the reuse of residues possible. This study highlights the need of sustainability, both for the high-tech manufacturing SMEs and creating a strong selling argument towards the international buyers.

  • 4.
    Sundström, Agneta
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Ahmadi, Zahra
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    The Mediating Effects of CSR on Market Orientation Responsiveness in Housing Companies’ Business2018In: XIX ISA World Congress of Sociology: Book of Abstracts, 2018, p. 928-928Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Market orientation research assumes that the company’s knowledge of customer needs has an impact on their responsiveness to customer requirements. From a Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) perspective, it is not enough to be responsive to customers’ expressed needs, as accountability should be proactively integrated in core business operations including taking responsibility for stakeholders. As CSR effects on market orientation have received limited interest in research, this study investigates the mediating role of CSR on company responsiveness to customer needs from a market intelligence perspective.

    Attention is paid to Swedish public housing companies to manage the transformation from being socially-driven to becoming economically-driving based on return of investments. Traditionally, the public HCs’ offered living conditions based on the principle that all people are entitled to good housing, which meant that they gained a price-setting role in the housing market. Their social role and economic importance are especially critical in declining markets. The new legislation expects of companies to act market oriented and based on economic principles. Suggested is that customer needs are handled by CSR. In this study the three elements of CSR (social, economic and environmental) are investigated to improve knowledge of their separate mediating role on market orientation. To improve comparability both public and private HCs in declining markets are investigated.

    The purpose of this study is to examine how CSR elements have mediating effects on public housing companies’ activities in the markets.

    The quantitative method is applied. The result is based on a survey sent to 289 Swedish public housing companies.

    The results show that the all dimension of CSR are more positively correlated with market orientation responsiveness in public HCs.

    This study deal with public housing companies and intend only to highlight the effects of CSR as having mediating influence as crucial for company´s customer commitment.

  • 5.
    Sundström, Agneta
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Ahmadi, Zahra
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    The Mediating Role of CSR on the Market Orientation and Strategic Performance Relationship: A Study of the Public Housing Companies in Sweden2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 6, article id 1537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article serves to analyze the impact of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on (1) the market orientation and strategic performance relationship related to public housing companies’ choice of construction strategies and (2) the companies’ responsiveness to gathered and disseminated customer information. The quantitative method is applied, with data analyzed by the PROCESS analysis. The result is based on a survey sent to 289 public housing companies in Sweden. Previous research suggests a positive relationship between market orientation and strategic performance, which was not confirmed by this study. When testing the mediation effects of CSR on the market orientation and construction strategies relationship, these hypotheses were confirmed related to social and environmental dimensions—not economic ones. This study was limited to public housing companies, a sector that radically differs from the situation of companies in the open market. The study increases public housing companies’ knowledge of CSR effects on the market orientation and strategic performance relationship. This result contributes useful information for companies implementing CSR in their activities. The study highlights the importance of integrating CSR into an organization’s market orientation work and shows how CSR improves the companies’ ability to meet customers’ strategic needs.

  • 6.
    Sundström, Agneta
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Ahmadi, Zahra
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Mickelsson, Kristina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Implementing social sustainability for innovative industrialwork environments2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 12, article id 3402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrial companies are in a situation that requires them to reconsider their social sustainability agenda in order to attract new employees. Building upon interviews with CEOs and HR managers in 20 small medium enterprises (SMEs), this study aims to analyze how high-tech companies and industrial engineering companies define and implement social sustainability into business strategies and operations. Data was collected from 20 interviews and secondary information coded for categorical data analysis in SPSS Statistics 22 software. The findings show that although the companies have adopted several kinds of International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standards, social sustainability is still absent from their operational activities and is considered of lower importance than environmental sustainability. Thus, the implementation of social sustainability can be considered symbolic rather substantive. The study also shows differences between the two groups of companies. The high-tech company group pays little attention to social sustainability aspects, instead focusing on product innovation development. While the industrial engineering group has some interest in social sustainability, their focus is primarily on issues linked to health and safety in order to meet increasing demands from supply chain compliance. Neglecting social aspects of sustainability, such as addressing gender equality and diversity, may cause difficulties in attracting a new workforce.

  • 7.
    Sundström, Agneta
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics.
    Hyder, Akmal S.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Chowdhury, Ehsanul Huda
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    CSR implementation strategy constraints in emerging market supply chain context: Bangladesh garment industry experiences2016In: International Journal of Applied Business and Economic Research, ISSN 0972-7302, Vol. 14, no 13, p. 9041-9062Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The study aims to explore how SC suppliers respond to corporate social responsibility (CSR) implementation strategies and deal with institutional constraints within the global supply chain. Design/Methodology/approach: This research study followed a mixed method approach. A qualitative case study was developed based on data collected through in-depth interviews, observations, workshops and seminar discussions. Findings: Two CSR strategies were identified, together with managerial, organizational, and societal constraints. Both strategies fail due to CSR ignorance and economic constraints of the suppliers. The corporate-driven strategy is constrained by limiting the supplier's margins forcing them to use less responsible subcontractors. The partnership strategy fails as it allows the suppliers to ignore compliance to CSR implementation rules and especially in economically difficult situations. Research limitations/implications: This paper has several limitations. The data illustrate a specific industry and SC companies in a specific country context which makes generalizations difficult. Practical implications: Long-term economic cooperation and negotiation between involved supply chain (SC) parties is prerequisite to improve supplier ability to act independently. This means that the corporate-driven CSR strategy in SC is so far easier to manage but elicit costs for suppliers. Originality/value: This study addresses the difficulties in managing the corporate-driven strategy and the partnership strategy in emerging market business context that traditionally has institutionalized corporate-driven SC control. With focus on two main CSR implementation strategies applied by two case corporations, this article contributes to show how institutional constraints influence on supplier ability in the studied SC context.

1 - 7 of 7
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