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  • 1.
    Amin, Hadi
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences.
    Bagherbandi, Mohammad
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Lars E.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences.
    Evaluation of the Closure of Global Mean Sea Level Rise Budget over January 2005 to August 20162019Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Sea level changes over time because of water mass exchange among the oceans and continents, ice sheets, and atmosphere. It fluctuates also due to variations of seawater salinity and temperature known as the steric contributor. GRACE-based Stokes coefficients provide a valuable source of information, about the water mass exchange as the main contributor to the Earth’s gravity field changes, within decadal scales. Moreover, measuring seawater temperature and salinity at different layers of ocean depth, Argo floats help to model the steric component of Global Mean Sea Level. In this study, we evaluate the Global Mean Sea Level (GMSL) budget closure using satellite altimetry, GRACE, and Argo products. Hereof, considering the most recent released GRACE monthly products (RL06), we examine an iterative remove-restore method to minimize the effect of artifact leaked large signal from ice sheets and land hydrology. In addition, the effect of errors and biases in geophysical model corrections, such as GIA, on the GMSL budget closure is estimated. Moreover, we quantify the influence of spatial and decorrelation filtering of GRACE data on the GMSL budget closure. In terms of the monthly fluctuations of sea level, our results confirm that closing the GMSL budget is highly dependent on the choice of the spatial averaging filter. In addition, comparing the trends and variations for both the global mean sea level time series and those estimated for mass and steric components, we find that spatial averaging functions play a significant role in the sea level budget closure.

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  • 2.
    Amin, Hadi
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences.
    Bagherbandi, Mohammad
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences. KTH.
    Sjöberg, Lars E.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences. KTH.
    Quantifying barystatic sea-level change from satellite altimetry, GRACE and Argo observations over 2005–20162020In: Advances in Space Research, ISSN 0273-1177, E-ISSN 1879-1948, Vol. 65, no 8, p. 1922-1940Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Time-varying spherical harmonic coefficients determined from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data provide a valuable source of information about the water mass exchange that is the main contributor to the Earth’s gravity field changes within a period of less than several hundred years. Moreover, by measuring seawater temperature and salinity at different layers of ocean depth, Argo floats help to measure the steric component of global mean sea level (GMSL). In this study, we quantify the rate of barystatic sea-level change using both GRACE RL05 and RL06 monthly gravity field models and compare the results with estimates achieved from a GMSL budget closure approach. Our satellite altimetry-based results show a trend of 3.90 ± 0.14 mm yr−1 for the GMSL rise. About 35% or 1.29 ± 0.07 mm yr−1 of this rate is caused by the thermosteric contribution, while the remainder is mainly due to the barystatic contribution. Our results confirm that the choice of decorrelation filters does not play a significant role in quantifying the global barystatic sea-level change, and spatial filtering may not be needed. GRACE RL05 and RL06 solutions result in the barystatic sea-level change trends of 2.19 ± 0.13 mm yr−1 and 2.25 ± 0.16 mm yr−1, respectively. Accordingly, the residual trend, defined as the difference between the altimetry-derived GMSL and sum of the steric and barystatic components, amounts to 0.51 ± 0.51 and 0.45 ± 0.44 mm yr−1 for RL05 and RL06-based barystatic sea-level changes, respectively, over January 2005 to December 2016. The exclusion of the halosteric component results in a lower residual trend of about 0.36 ± 0.46 mm yr−1 over the same period, which suggests a sea-level budget closed within the uncertainty. This could be a confirmation on a high level of salinity bias particularly after about 2015. Moreover, considering the assumption that the GRACE-based barystatic component includes all mass change signals, the rather large residual trend could be attributed to an additional contribution from the deep ocean, where salinity and temperature cannot be monitored by the current observing systems. The errors from various sources, including the model-based Glacial Isostatic Adjustment signal, independent estimation of geocenter motion that are not quantified in the GRACE solutions, as well as the uncertainty of the second degree of zonal spherical harmonic coefficients, are other possible contributors to the residual trend.

  • 3.
    Amin, Hadi
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Lars E.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences.
    Bagherbandi, Mohammad
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences.
    A global vertical datum defined by the conventional geoid potentialand the Earth ellipsoid parameters2020Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    According to the classical Gauss–Listing definition, the geoid is the equipotential surface of the Earth’s gravity field that in a least-squares sense best fits the undisturbed mean sea level. This equipotential surface, except for its zero-degree harmonic, can be characterized using the Earth’s Global Gravity Models (GGM). Although nowadays, the satellite altimetry technique provides the absolute geoid height over oceans that can be used to calibrate the unknown zero-degree harmonic of the gravimetric geoid models, this technique cannot be utilized to estimate the geometric parameters of the Mean Earth Ellipsoid (MEE). In this study, we perform joint estimation of W0, which defines the zero datum of vertical coordinates, and the MEE parameters relying on a new approach and on the newest gravity field, mean sea surface, and mean dynamic topography models. As our approach utilizes both satellite altimetry observations and a GGM model, we consider different aspects of the input data to evaluate the sensitivity of our estimations to the input data. Unlike previous studies, our results show that it is not sufficient to use only the satellite componentof a quasi-stationary GGM to estimate W0. In addition, our results confirm a high sensitivity of the applied approach to the altimetry-based geoid heights, i.e. mean sea surface and mean dynamic topography models. Moreover, as W0 should be considered a quasi-stationary parameter, we quantify the effect of time-dependent Earth’s gravity field changes as well as the time-dependent sea-level changes on the estimation of W0. Our computations resulted in the geoid potential W0 = 62636848.102 ± 0.004 m2s-2 and the semi-major and –minor axes of the MEE,a = 6378137.678 ± 0.0003 m and b = 6356752.964 ± 0.0005 m, which are 0.678 and 0.650 m larger than those axes of the GRS80 reference ellipsoid, respectively. Moreover, a new estimation for the geocentric gravitational constant was obtained as GM = (398600460.55 ± 0.03) × 106 m3s-2.

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  • 4.
    Bagherbandi, Mohammad
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences.
    Gido, Nureldin A. A.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Lars E.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences.
    Tenzer, Robert
    Hong Kong Polytechnic University.
    Studying permafrost using GRACE and in situ data in the northern high-latitudes regions2019Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    There is an exceptional opportunity of achieving simultaneous and complementary data from a multitude of geoscience and environmental near-earth orbiting artificial satellites to study phenomena related to the climate change e.g. sea level change, ice melting, soil moisture variation, temperature changes, and earth surface deformations. In this study, we focus on permafrost thawing and its associated gravity change, and organic material changes using GRACE data and other satellite- and ground-based observations. The estimation of permafrost changes requires combining information from various sources, particularly using the gravity field change, surface temperature change, and GIA. The most significant factor for careful monitoring of the permafrost thawing is the fact that this process could be responsible for releasing an additional enormous amount of greenhouse gases emitted to the atmosphere, most importantly to mention Carbone dioxide and Methane that are currently stored in the frozen ground. The results of a preliminary numerical analysis reveal a possible existence of a high correlation between the secular trends of greenhouse gases, temperature and equivalent water thickness in the selected regions. Furthermore, according to our estimates based on processing the GRACE data, the groundwater storage attributed to the due to permafrost thawing increased at the annual rates of 3.4, 3.8, 4.4 and 4.0 cm, in Siberia, northern Alaska, and Canada. Despite a rather preliminary character of our results, these findings indicate that the methodology developed and applied in this study should be improved by incorporating the in situ permafrost measurements.

  • 5.
    Bagherbandi, Mohammad
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Lars E.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences.
    Amin, Hadi
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences.
    Towards a world vertical datum defined by the geoid potential and Earth’s ellipsoidal parameters2018Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable development and digitalization need reliable data. Geospatial data becomes a more and more important tool in society for many kinds of research of immediate use, but also for future planning and enterprise. Harmonization of geodata is very important for data producers and organizations, e.g. for mapping agencies. Establishing a uniform horizontal/vertical reference system is a basic prerequisite for combining data from different sources, and for allowing cross-border presentations and analyzes. If we do not use the same reference for positioning, it is not certain that one can compose reliable geodata from different organizations.

    The overall aim of this study is to provide a theoretical and practical solution to unifying height systems in order to overcome systematic datum inconsistencies in height data and digital terrain models. The study deals with a variety of issues in physical geodesy such as Earth’s gravity field, sea level rise, sea surface topography and GNSS data. The advent of satellite altimetry in the 1970s provided a tool for the realization of a global vertical datum as being the equipotential surface of the Earth’s gravity field that minimizes the sea-surface topography (SST) all over the oceans in a least-squares sense. This leads to a direct determination of the geoid potential (W0) from satellite altimetry and an Earth Gravitational Model (EGM).  In contrast, here we will first determine the Mean Earth Ellipsoid parameters and from these follows W0. This means that once the size of the axes of the globally best-fitting ellipsoid is determined, W0 follows. A major problem with this method is that satellite altimetry is only successful over the oceans, but the method requires global data. This problem is solved by employing satellite altimetry and the EGM in a practical combination.  

  • 6.
    Gido, Nureldin A. A.
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences. Division of Geodesy and Satellite Positioning, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bagherbandi, Mohammad
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences. Division of Geodesy and Satellite Positioning, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Lars E.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences. Division of Geodesy and Satellite Positioning, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    A gravimetric method to determine horizontal stress field due to flow in the mantle in Fennoscandia2019In: Geosciences Journal, ISSN 1226-4806, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 377-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mass changes and flow in the Earth's mantle causes the Earth's crust not only to movevertically, but also horizontally and to tilt, and produce a major stress in the lithosphere.Here we use a gravimetric approach to model sub-lithosphere horizontal stress in theEarth's mantle and its temporal changes caused by geodynamical movements likemantle convection in Fennoscandia. The flow in the mantle is inferred from tectonicsand convection currents carrying heat from the interior of the Earth to the crust. Theresult is useful in studying how changes of the stress influence the stability of crust.The outcome of this study is an alternative approach to studying the stress and itschange using forward modelling and the Earth's viscoelastic models. We show that thedetermined horizontal stress using a gravimetric method is consistent with tectonicsand seismic activities. In addition, the secular rate of change of the horizontal stress,which is within 95 kPa/year, is larger outside the uplift dome than inside.

  • 7.
    Gido, Nureldin A. A.
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences. Division of Geodesy and Satellite Positioning, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bagherbandi, Mohammad
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences. Division of Geodesy and Satellite Positioning, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Lars E.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences. Division of Geodesy and Satellite Positioning, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tenzer, Robert
    Department of Land Surveying and Geo‑Informatics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong.
    Studying permafrost by integrating satellite and in situ data in the northern high-latitude regions2019In: Acta Geophysica, ISSN 1895-6572, E-ISSN 1895-7455, Vol. 67, no 2, p. 721-734Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an exceptional opportunity of achieving simultaneous and complementary data from a multitude of geoscience and environmental near-earth orbiting artificial satellites to study phenomena related to the climate change. These satellite missions provide the information about the various phenomena, such as sea level change, ice melting, soil moisture variation, temperature changes and earth surface deformations. In this study, we focus on permafrost thawing and its associated gravity change (in terms of the groundwater storage), and organic material changes using the gravity recovery and climate experiment (GRACE) data and other satellite- and ground-based observations. The estimation of permafrost changes requires combining information from various sources, particularly using the gravity field change, surface temperature change, and glacial isostatic adjustment. The most significant factor for a careful monitoring of the permafrost thawing is the fact that this process could be responsible for releasing an additional enormous amount of greenhouse gases emitted to the atmosphere, most importantly to mention carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane that are currently stored in the frozen ground. The results of a preliminary numerical analysis reveal a possible existence of a high correlation between the secular trends of greenhouse gases (CO2), temperature and equivalent water thickness (in permafrost active layer) in the selected regions. Furthermore, according to our estimates based on processing the GRACE data, the groundwater storage attributed due to permafrost thawing increased at the annual rates of 3.4, 3.8, 4.4 and 4.0 cm, respectively, in Siberia, North Alaska and Canada (Yukon and Hudson Bay). Despite a rather preliminary character of our results, these findings indicate that the methodology developed and applied in this study should be further improved by incorporating the in situ permafrost measurements.

  • 8. Shafiei, Mehdi
    et al.
    Bagherbandi, Mohammad
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Lars E.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences.
    A satellite-based gravimetric approach to GIA modelling2018Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    In view of the GRACE Follow-On mission, we will study the capability of temporal gravity field from the GRACE data to detect the present gravity variation in the process of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA). Motivated to reducing the dependency of GIA to the knowledge of the ice load history modelling, also, to researching various GRACE-type signal analysis methods

    A number of gravimetric GIA modelling methods are investigated in order to their compatibility with a total number of 515 GPS data points in North America and Fennoscandia. We investigate three mathematical methods, namely regression, principal component, and independent component analysis (ICA) in extracting the GIA signal from the GRACE monthly geoid height. To exploit the GRACE data to their maximum spatial resolution we will utilize some regularization techniques to recover the signal-to-noise ratio of the short wavelengths. One of the results of this investigation is the relative success of the ICA method. We will produce our final gravimetric model using the fast-ICA algorithm of Hyvärinen and Oja (2000). The gravimetric models will be shown to be in a complete agreement with the GPS data and the best GIA forward model for the areas near the centre of the uplifting regions. We will show that the gravimetric method provides a relatively high-resolution GIA model, while largest discrepancies occur in Alaska, and Svalbard collocated with the present ice mass changes.

    Finally, we assimilate the best gravimetric models and the GPS data into a GIA forward model, for North America and Fennoscandia, while the contribution of the forward model is set to minimum and compare it with the ICE-6g_C (Peltier et al. 2015) model. We found that for the whole area subjected to epeirogenic movement, their discrepancies reach to the extrema at -1.8 and +3.3, and -0.45 and +0.75 mm⁄a, respectively. Further improvement of the gravimetric model is achieved after reducing for the strong hydrological gravity signals.

  • 9.
    Sjöberg, Lars E.
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences. KTH.
    Bagherbandi, Mohammad
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences.
    Upper mantle density and surface gravity change in Fennoscandia, determined from GRACE monthly data2020In: Tectonophysics, ISSN 0040-1951, E-ISSN 1879-3266, Vol. 782-783, article id 228428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Precise gravity measurements have been repeatedly observed in Fennoscandia since the 1960-ties, first by relative gravimeters, then by absolute gravimeters, for studying the temporal change of gravity related with the on-going glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). The results of such studies are vital for understanding GIA processes and tuning GIA and Earth structure models.

    This study uses monthly repeated data from the twin satellite mission GRACE for 164 months between 2003 and 2016 for estimating the temporal change of surface gravity, its ratio (f) to the land uplift rate as well as the upper mantle density related with the viscous mass flow in the mantle. The maximum negative change of gravity is estimated to −1.8 μGal/yr, and f is estimated to −0.172 ± 0.018 μGal/mm.

    The solutions for f from the three independent techniques (relative, absolute and satellite gravity observations) were found to agree statistically without significant biases, and they were merged in a joint solution to −0.166 ± 0.004 μGal/mm, corresponding to a mean upper mantle mass flow density of 3402.5 ± 95 kg/m3, which decreases towards the uplift center.

  • 10.
    Tenzer, Robert
    et al.
    Hong Kong Polytechnic University.
    Foroughi, Ismael
    University of New Brunswick, Canada.
    Sjöberg, Lars E.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences. KTH.
    Bagherbandi, Mohammad
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences.
    Hirt, Christian
    TU Munich, Germany.
    Pitoňák, Martin
    University of West Bohemia, Czech Republic.
    Theoretical and practical aspects of defining the heights for planets and moons2018Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    In planetary sciences, the geodetic (geometric) heights defined with respect to the reference surface (the sphere or the ellipsoid) or with respect to the center of the planet/moon are typically used for mapping topographic surface, compilation of global topographic models, detailed mapping of potential landing sites, and other space science and engineering purposes. Nevertheless, certain applications, such as studies of gravity-driven mass movements, require the physical heights to be defined with respect to the equipotential surface. Taking the analogy with terrestrial height systems, the realization of height systems for telluric planets and moons could be done by means of defining the orthometric and geoidal heights. In this case, however, the definition of the orthometric heights in principle differs. Whereas the terrestrial geoid is described as an equipotential surface that best approximates the mean sea level, such a definition for planets/moons is irrelevant in the absence of (liquid) global oceans. A more natural choice for planets and moons is to adopt the geoidal equipotential surface that closely approximates the geometric reference surface (the sphere or the ellipsoid). In this study, we address these aspects by proposing a more accurate approach for defining the orthometric heights for telluric planets and moons from available topographic and gravity models, while adopting the average crustal density in the absence of reliable crustal density models. In particular, we discuss a proper treatment of topographic masses in the context of gravimetric geoid determination. In numerical studies, we investigate differences between the geodetic and orthometric heights, represented by the geoidal heights, on Mercury, Venus, Mars, and Moon. Our results reveal that these differences are significant. The geoidal heights on Mercury vary from − 132 to 166 m. On Venus, the geoidal heights are between − 51 and 137 m with maxima on this planet at Atla Regio and Beta Regio. The largest geoid undulations between − 747 and 1685 m were found on Mars, with the extreme positive geoidal heights under Olympus Mons in Tharsis region. Large variations in the geoidal geometry are also confirmed on the Moon, with the geoidal heights ranging from − 298 to 461 m. For comparison, the terrestrial geoid undulations are mostly within ± 100 m. We also demonstrate that a commonly used method for computing the geoidal heights that disregards the differences between the gravity field outside and inside topographic masses yields relatively large errors. According to our estimates, these errors are − 0.3/+ 3.4 m for Mercury, 0.0/+ 13.3 m for Venus, − 1.4/+ 125.6 m for Mars, and − 5.6/+ 45.2 m for the Moon.

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