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  • 1.
    Silvén Hagström, Anneli
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    “Why did he choose to die?”: A meaning-searching approach to parental suicide bereavement in youth2019In: Death Studies, ISSN 0748-1187, E-ISSN 1091-7683, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 113-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyzes from a narrative perspective how young people talk about their experience of parental suicide in different social contexts. The results show how these young grievers are preoccupied with the question of Why the parent committed suicide. Moreover, they tend primarily to interpret the suicide in line with stigmatizing discourses regarding Who is to blame, which has negative impacts on their identities. In contrast, a ?meaning-searching approach? seeks to answer the question of What caused the suicide and to identify a combination of internal vulnerabilities and external stressors. Professional interventions are recommended to foster the latter health promoting coping strategy.

  • 2.
    Silvén Hagström, Anneli
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work. Stockholm university.
    Forinder, Ulla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    'If I whistled in her ear she'd wake up': children's narration about their experiences of growing up in alcoholic families2019In: Journal of Family Studies, ISSN 1322-9400, E-ISSN 1839-3543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to investigate what it means to grow up in an alcoholic family environment. Nineteen children aged 6-11 who participated in a psycho-educational programme in the 1990s for children living with parents who misuse alcohol were interviewed about their experiences in a longitudinal study. A narrative analysis of their life stories demonstrates how, on the one hand, they positioned themselves as 'vulnerable victims' exposed to their parent's alcoholism and to situations of severe neglect, domestic violence and sexual abuse. This position was characterized by a sense of powerlessness and lack of resources for coping with emotional distress and risk, as well as an urgent need for protection and care. On the other hand, the children positioned themselves as 'competent agents' who had developed purposeful strategies for managing their life situation, such as trying to reduce their parent's drinking and undertaking the role of a 'young carer'. The children primarily tried to normalize themselves in their social circle in a position of 'silenced and invisible victims'. However, the alcoholism was usually exposed and the children occasionally also found themselves in the position of 'help-seeking victims' obliged to disclose the 'family secret'. Remarkably, this rarely changed their situation very much. Instead, the children were commonly left in the position of 'visible but unprotected victims'.

  • 3.
    Silvén Hagström, Anneli
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Criminology, Social Work.
    Toft, Teolinda
    Clinical Psychology in Healthcare, Department of Children's and Women's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    "Together we are unbeatable": young sisters’ narration of a sibling’s cancer in personal blogs on the internet2019In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 1586625Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Siblings of children and young people diagnosed with cancer are commonly reluctant to talk about their experiences due to the circumstances of the illness situation. This article aims to bring voice to experience and inform practice by investigating what and how three young sisters narrate about their illness experiences in personal blogs on the Internet.

    Methods: A narrative methodology for the analysis of life storytelling was applied primarily to investigate the sister?s coping strategies and support needs.

    Results: The results show how the sisters constructed their own space for narration, with the main aims of expressing their feelings about the illness and seeking social support. The telling of their experiences along with encouraging comments from a supportive audience enabled a change in position from feeling neglected and silenced to being a recognized agent and caring sister. In addition, through their narrative coping the sisters went from powerless to powerful in their position in relation to cancer.

    Conclusion: The results highlight the need for siblings to be able to narrate experience in a supportive context, where the processing of their relationship with the ill sister/brother should be understood as an important element of their coping with cancer and death.

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