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  • 1.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. University of A Coruna, A Coruna, Spain.
    Discussing Approaches to Standard of Living2019In: Decent Work and Economic Growth: Encyclopedia of the UN Sustainable Development Goals / [ed] Walter Leal Filho, Anabela Marisa Azul, Luciana Brandli, Pinar Gökcin Özuyar, Tony Wall, Cham: Springer, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Evaluating the effects of mobile applications on course assessment: A quasi-experiment on a macroeconomics course2020In: International Review of Economics Education, ISSN 1477-3880, Vol. 34, article id 100184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Universities are facing the need to rethink their educational strategies, especially due to the emergence of new technologies, such as mobile applications, which have had great expectations. Previous studies have been focused on changes in student engagement from using mobile applications in the classroom, whereas there has been little research on the impact of mobile applications on student assessment. This research uses a quasi-experimental study to examine the relationship between student assessment and the use of a mobile application. Two groups of students (a control and an experimental group) were tested in the same academic semester with the same lecturer. Two analyses were carried out (t-test and difference-in-differences) to evaluate this relationship. Contrary to the general expectations, the results showed that there is no significant difference on assessment when comparing the two groups’ scores. However, students showed a positive attitude in engaging with the mobile application. Although there has been an increase on the use of mobile applications in classrooms, they do not directly affect student scores. This research shows that mobile applications should be used as a complement to traditional education, and not as a substitute to it.

  • 3.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bautista-Puig, Núria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Women in sustainability research: Examining gender authorship differences in peer-reviewed publications2022In: Frontiers in Sustainability, ISSN 2673-4524, no 3, article id 959438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Higher education institutions (HEIs) have been undertaking considerable efforts to embed sustainability into their system; however, there have been limited studies on the incorporation of sustainability into research. In parallel, it has been found that women have an important role in contributing to sustainability since they are more engaged and have a more holistic perspective on sustainability than men. These two phenomena have resulted in limited studies about the contribution of women to sustainability research (i.e., in scientific publishing). A bibliometric analysis of more than 39,000 documents (with 147,090 authorships) was done to fill this gap, focusing on sustainability peer-review publications in Europe between 2015 and 2020. The results show that women's presence in sustainability research has been increasing during the last years; however, there are still few female authorship publications, even in fields that have been traditionally women-oriented. In addition, their publications have been less recognized by the scientific community. The results also show substantial gender differences in terms of author leadership, where female senior researchers are more likely to mentor female junior researchers than men. Female researchers tend to collaborate nationally, but they could improve their international collaboration since this can improve their research and impact. More support should be provided to female researchers to help foster women's sustainability engagement and holistic perspectives, reduce existing negative feedback loops, and increase positive ones. Achieving gender equality is sine qua non in achieving sustainable societies.

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  • 4.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Carpenter, Angela
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability Ltd., Cardiff, UK.
    Examining Relations Between Public Participation and Public Expenditure: Opinions from English and French Users on Environmental Issues in the English Channel2019In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 8, article id 2230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Governments need to decide how to allocate their public expenditure, which is commonly misconstrued as simply targeting social issues. Most scientific literature highlights that the role of public spending is to enhance social welfare and fight poverty and inequality. Nonetheless, public expenditure also includes spending on environmental issues. This paper analyses relations between public participation, support for public expenditure, and pro-environmental behaviour (PEB) intentions in the English Channel region. An online public survey was developed to investigate public use of the English and French sides and the public's willingness to change their behaviour to better protect the Channel region. The survey was undertaken in the summer of 2014 and was answered by 2000 respondents. The Channel region public is willing to participate more in behaviour that involves direct changes or switches between buying/purchasing choices. In contrast, there is less willingness to engage in pro-environmental behaviour intentions that involve more active engagement activities. French respondents were slightly less inclined to change their consumer behaviour intentions, while women and older people were slightly more likely to do so. This research shows that pro-environmental behaviour could positively affect support for proposed public expenditure on environmental issues.

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  • 5.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. University of Gävle.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Analysing the incorporation of Sustainable Development into European Higher Education Institutions’ curricula2019Conference paper (Other academic)
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  • 6.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    How circular is the circular economy? Analysing the implementation of circular economy in organisations2020In: Business Strategy and the Environment, ISSN 0964-4733, E-ISSN 1099-0836, Vol. 29, no 8, p. 3484-3494, article id 2590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Circular Economy (CE) has become one of the most recent ways to address environmental sustainability. CE activities focus exclusively on one of three levels (macro-level, meso-level, and micro-level). The majority of CE research has focused on the macro- and meso-levels, while research on the micro-level has been limited. This paper focusses on the latter by analysing how organisations have implemented the four Rs (reduction, repairing, remanufacturing, and recycling). A survey was sent to a database of 5,299 contacts from different organisations, from whom 256 complete responses were obtained. The results show that organisations focus on reducing and recycling more than repairing and remanufacturing, and in particular on internal CE efforts. Some organisations that engage with the 4Rs do not do it under the CE umbrella, whereas some that claim to apply CE have low levels of engagement with the 4Rs. The results indicate that organisations are using the four Rs to contribute to CE, but not all of them are aware that they are applying CE principles. The paper highlights that organisations need to improve their four Rs efforts to contribute more to CE by better linking its theory with practice. CE also has to be implemented outside the organisations, in a more holistic way, e.g. through better collaboration with stakeholders on CE efforts and activities. This research stresses that the gap between CE theory and practice needs to be closed to make Circular Economy circular.

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  • 7.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Carpenter, Angela
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bautista-Puig, Núria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Analysing sustainability change management in government owned companies: Experiences from European ports2023In: Social Responsibility Journal, ISSN 1747-1117, E-ISSN 1758-857X, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 1037-1050Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Government-owned companies (GOCs), such as ports, have engaged in efforts to become more sustainable. Most of such efforts have been technological and policy ones and mainly focusing on the environment, with limited research on organisational change management. This paper aims to provide insights into how ports have been addressing sustainability change forces and pressures.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Twelve semi-structured interviews were conducted with top-level directors and sustainability managers, representing ports across Europe’s maritime regions and a range of port types and sizes. The interviews were analysed using grounded theory’s constant comparative analysis.

    Findings

    The findings highlighted that the ports’ success in their process to become more sustainable depends on how they take advantage of the thrust forces and reduce the drag ones. The findings serve to develop the “ports’ sustainability change management framework”, with five stages: reactive, proactive, transactive, interactive, and sustainable port.

    Practical implications

    Ports, and other GOCs, should capitalise on their private–public nature in their contribution to making societies more sustainable by adopting a holistic perspective and interactive changes.

    Originality/value

    This paper provides a dynamic perspective on corporate sustainability efforts, particularly on GOCs, through organisational change management complementing technocentric and managerial approaches.

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  • 8.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Temel, Melis
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Carpenter, Angela
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Exploring new waters for sustainability: gender equality in European seaports2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ports have been working towards becoming more sustainable. Although gender equality (SDG5) is very important within the 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, it is ranked almost at the bottom of port priorities. The aim of this research is to provide insights into how ports have been addressing gender equality in their efforts to contribute to sustainability. Twelve semi-structured interviews were conducted with directors and sustainability managers from six European countries. The responses from interviewees were analysed using Grounded Theory’s constant comparative analysis.

    The findings show that European ports have engaged in measures aimed at contributing to sustainability through gender equality classified in five stages: (1) Gender segregation, which needs to be overcome, and is, in many cases, the starting point; (2) Compliance with national laws and regulation, e.g. in recruitment and salaries; (3) Gender equity, reducing barriers to entry and compensate for the historical and social disadvantages that women had previously suffered from; (4) Gender equality, guaranteeing the equal treatment of men and women in all processes; and (5) More sustainable ports. Achieving gender equality is a sine qua non to make ports more sustainable, i.e. integrating social issues of sustainability with economic and environmental ones. Internal and external forces affect each of the stages, where thrust forces help ports reduce gender segregation and advance towards becoming more sustainability and drag forces slow or block the efforts and may lead to returning to a previous stage. The findings were used to develop a “Gender equality for sustainability in ports” framework.

    This research is especially related to SDG5, target 5.1 (End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere), and 5.5 (Ensure women’s full and effective participation and equal opportunities for leadership at all levels of decision-making in political, economic and public life). 

    Ports, and other traditionally male-dominated industries, could capitalise on women’s holistic perspective and higher engagement to better contribute to accelerating the progress to make Europe more sustainable, especially in these testing times.

  • 9.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Temel, Melis
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Carpenter, Angela
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Gender equality for sustainability in ports: Developing a framework2021In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 131, article id 104593Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ports have increasingly been addressing sustainability issues; however, gender equality has been a low priority in such efforts. This paper is aimed at providing insights into how ports have been addressing gender equality to contribute to sustainability. Twelve semi-structured interviews were conducted with top-level port managers from six European countries. The responses from the interviewees were analysed using Grounded Theory’s constant comparative analysis. The findings show that European ports have engaged in gender equality measures aimed at contributing to sustainability through gender equality in five stages: (1) Gender segregation, which needs to be overcome, and is, in many cases, the starting point; (2) Compliance with national laws and regulation; (3) Gender equity; (4) Gender equality; and (5) More sustainable ports. Internal and external forces affect each of the stages, where thrust forces help ports reduce gender segregation and advance towards becoming more sustainable and drag forces slow or block the efforts and may lead to returning to a previous stage of the framework. The findings were integrated to develop a “Gender equality for sustainability in ports” framework. Gender equality is a sine qua non for ports, and other male oriented industries, in becoming more sustainable.

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  • 10.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. University of Gävle.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Zafar, Afnan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Changes in Sustainability Priorities in Organisations due to the COVID-19 Outbreak: Averting Environmental Rebound Effects on Society2020In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 12, article id 5031Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The COVID-19 outbreak has affected societies and organisations in an unprecedented way. This has resulted in negative impacts to economic and social issues, but it is a “blessing in disguise” for environmental issues. This paper analyses how the outbreak has affected organisations’ sustainability priorities. Prior to the COVID-19 outbreak, such priorities were on the economic dimension followed by the environmental and social dimensions. A survey was sent to 11,657 organisations to analyse such changes, with a 5.60% response rate. The results show that for organisations, the main priority is now on the social dimension, followed by the economic one; however, the environmental dimension has suffered a negative impact in prioritisation, regardless of organisation type, country where they are based, organisation size, or the time they have been working on sustainability. We are currently facing an environmental conundrum, where air quality has improved and pollution has decreased in societies, but organisations are starting to neglect such environmental issues. The COVID-19 outbreak is an opportunity for organisations to better contribute to sustainability by ensuring that the efforts that have been undertaken in the last three decades are not forgotten, and that societies and organisations are better coupled to face such crises and avert rebound effects.

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  • 11.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    et al.
    Economic Development and Social Sustainability Research Unit, Department of Economic Analysis and Business Administration, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of A Coruna, Elviña, A Coruña, Spain.
    Novo-Corti, Isabel
    Economic Development and Social Sustainability Research Unit, Department of Economic Analysis and Business Administration, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of A Coruna, Elviña, A Coruña, Spain.
    Collaborative learning in environments with restricted access to the internet: Policies to bridge the digital divide and exclusion in prisons through the development of the skills of inmates2015In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 51, no B, p. 1172-1176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The deprivation of freedom for the prisoners, involves not only physical isolation, but also digital, which implies a strong isolation particularly painful in an “information society”. Spanish prison population is deprived of access Internet and all ICT that could contact inmates with outdoor life, this is mainly due to security issues. Not having enough ICT skills is a new cause of social exclusion. The objective of this research was to identify the key issues which should be focused by policy makers to avoid digital divide among prison population. A survey among inmate population in all the five penitentiary centers in Galicia, in the northwest of Spain, was undertaken to obtain a sample of 380 inmates. A Structural Equation Model (SEM) was carried out to explain prisoners’ ICT Skills, in bias to inmate’s social skills, general skills and attitude towards collaborative learning. For inmates, who are characterized by their low education level, results shown the relevance of having general and social skills to be able to have more ICT skills. Then, collaborative learning in prison it is shown as a way to bridge both walls: the physical (better reinsertion and no recidivism) and the digital one.

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  • 12.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Renzi, Maria Francesca
    Department of Business Studies, Roma Tre University, Rome, Italy.
    Tortato, Cíntia S. B.
    Department of Human Sciences and Education, Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Paraná (IFPR), Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil.
    Editorial: Women in sustainability: organizational sustainability 20212023In: Frontiers in Sustainability, E-ISSN 2673-4524, Vol. 4, article id 1240059Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 13.
    Bautista-Puig, Núria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Organisations' contributions to the SDGs2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable development and sustainability have appeared as concepts to help address the economic,environmental, and social impacts from previous generations, on this generation, and future ones through a holistic perspective. The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have become the international framework for sustainability policy. The 17 SDGs and 169 targets were agreed upon by the 193 member states of the UN in2015 and are to be achieved by 2030. It should be noted that the SDGs were designed by governments for governments. These are based on the principles of: (1) a statement of a social-political priority (goal), (2) a time-bound quantitative aspect to be achieved (target), and (3) the measurement to monitor its progress(indicator). Since the SDGs (i.e. the macro level) are fairly new there is very limited research yet on how organisations (i.e. the micro level) contribute to them, or how such contributions could be advanced.Organisations civil society; companies; and public sector organisations (PSOs) have been instrumental in driving sustainability. In the last lustrum, there has been an increasing interest in organisational sustainability, where the importance of sustainability’s dimensions depends on an organisation’s nature and purpose. The contributions of organisations to sustainability, and by implication to the SDGs, have been proposed by a number of authors,where the most complete definition states that: such contributions entail the continuous incorporation and integration of sustainability issues in the organisation’s system elements (operations and production, strategy and management, governance, organisational systems, service provision, and assessment and reporting), as well as change processes and their rate of change. In this research, we will present some case studies of organisations contributing to the SDGs. The research group is an international leader and responsible for several publications in the field of sustainability, organizational change management, sustainable business models, sustainability assessment and reporting, circular economy, collaboration for sustainability, or education for sustainable development, among others. The multidisciplinary character of the group is a strength that defines our priority research area, mainly focused on sustainability. In this regard, case studies such as the contribution of HigherEducation Institutions to the SDGs or organizational change management in companies will be presented. The results presented will further the discussions on how organisations contribute to the SDGs, and how the micro and macro-level can be better connected.

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  • 14.
    Bautista-Puig, Núria
    et al.
    Department of Library and Information Sciences, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid. Spain.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    Department of Economics, Faculty of Economics and Business, Universidad de Coruña, Coruña, Spain.
    Statulevičiūtė, Gustė
    Public Policy and Management Institute (PPMI), Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Stančiauskas, Vilius
    Public Policy and Management Institute (PPMI), Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Dikmener, Gokhan
    ICPSD SDG AI Lab, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Istanbul, Turkey.
    Akylbekova, Dina
    ICPSD SDG AI Lab, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Istanbul, Turkey.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability, London, UK.
    Unraveling public perceptions of the Sustainable Development Goals for better policy implementation2024In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 912, article id 169114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public participation is crucial for policy-making and can contribute to strengthening democracies and decision-making. Public participation can help to address sustainability challenges and plays a key role in attaining the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). While the SDGs are policy concepts, there has been limited research conducted on how the public perceives the SDGs. Public participation in scientific research has been carried out through citizen science (CS). This paper analyzes the public's perception of the SDGs through CS and how the public can participate in their implementation. The paper uses the OSDG community platform, a citizen science platform with >2000 participants, to analyze public perception of the SDGs. A set of 40,062 excerpts of text (v2023-01-01), a topic modeling and agreement scores by using CorTexT Manager software, was analyzed. The results show that some SDGs, e.g. health (SDG3) or life below water (SDG14), have higher levels of agreement from the public, whilst for other SDGs the public disagree on their perception, (e.g. zero hunger). The paper shows that issues affecting citizens' daily lives (e.g. in People related goals) tend to have a higher level of agreement among volunteers, while economic issues and directives have greater discrepancies. The results provide an overview of the differences in public perception on the SDGs and their implementation. The misperceptions regarding the SDGs should be reduced to achieve a better implementation, improve public participation, and help policy-making processes.

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  • 15.
    Bautista-Puig, Núria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Developing a sustainability implementation framework: insights from academic research on tools, initiatives and approaches2023In: Environment, Development and Sustainability, ISSN 1387-585X, E-ISSN 1573-2975, p. 11011-11031Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability has been proposed to address societal challenges. A number of efforts have been undertaken to implement sustainability, particularly through frameworks such as tools, initiatives and approaches (TIAs). Most of the research on the implementation efforts has been in the corporate context. This paper is aimed at analysing the implementation of TIAs in academic research. A bibliometric analysis of twenty TIAs during the period 1961–2020 was carried out to analyse their implementation in academic research. The results highlight that there has been research published on all the TIAs analysed. The TIAs have a better balance and interrelations between the sustainability dimensions in their implementation than in the theory. The results show that for a better implementation of TIAs in academic research it is necessary to address sustainability dimensions (economic, environmental, social, and time) in a holistic and balanced way considering alignment of general and specific efforts, i.e. TIAs, and congruence (linking ‘theory’ and ‘implementation’). The results were integrated to propose a ‘Sustainability Implementation Framework’ (SIF), which is divided into three levels (i.e., Initiatives, Approaches, and Tools). The TIAs implementation should follow more strictly the definitions, or, perhaps, the TIAs definitions should be redefined to encompass the insights from their implementation.

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  • 16.
    Bautista-Puig, Núria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Disentangling the Connections of Tools, Initiatives and Approaches (TIAs) in Literature2021Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability Ltd, Cardiff, UK.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Analysing the factors affecting the incorporation of sustainable development into European Higher Education Institutions' curricula2019In: Sustainable Development, ISSN 0968-0802, E-ISSN 1099-1719, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 965-975Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been an increase in sustainable development (SD) integration into Higher Education Institutions' (HEIs) curricula. Several tools have been developed to assess SD in HEIs; however, only a few have focussed on curricula assessment, such as the “Sustainability Tool for Assessing UNiversities' Curricula Holistically.” Curricula assessment can provide an overview on how courses and programmes incorporate SD. This paper analyses the factors affecting the incorporation of SD in curricula using a survey sent to a database of 4,099 European contacts, with a response rate of 9.85%. The responses were analysed using descriptive statistics, t test, ANOVA, and correlations. The analyses showed that (a) teaching in European courses covers many issues of sustainability in a fairly good balance, with the exception of social issues that are the least addressed; (b) there are correlations between the economic, environmental, social, and cross‐cutting themes; (c) females tend to teach SD in a more balanced way than men; (d) the HEIs types have no influence on how SD is being taught, but the education level has; and (e) some countries, in the case of this research, Italy and Spain, may show more interest, yet the average results tended to be lower than those others, in this research, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the Netherlands. Curricula assessment provides a diagnostic of SD incorporation and the factors that affect it. This can help educators improve their courses and provide students with better SD skills and insights

  • 18.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability, Cardiff, UK.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Analysing the incorporation of sustainable development into European Higher Education Institution's curricula2019In: Engineering Education towards Sustainability: Approaches for Institutionalization and Teaching Implementation: Second Internacional Conference on Engineering Education for the 21st Century – ICEE21C 2019 / [ed] Guraya, T., Cabedo, L., Bilbao: Universidad del País Vasco / Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea , 2019, p. 51-56Conference paper (Other academic)
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  • 19.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Civil society organisations as agents for societal change: Football clubs' engagement with sustainability2023In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 820-828Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Progress towards more sustainable societies requires moving from reactive responses to immediate problems, towards a more proactive focus on avoiding possible future problems and preparing for potential events. This requires that sustainability is endorsed by a group or opinion leader to be adopted by society. Organisations have been instrumental in fostering sustainability and can be such opinion leaders. During the last 10 years, there has been an increasing interest in organisational sustainability; however, research on civil society organisations (CSOs) has been scarce. Sports organisations (such as football clubs) are a particular type of CSO, and have been adopting sustainability, albeit slowly. Twelve interviews with representatives of Swedish football clubs (from which nine were male clubs and three were female clubs) were conducted between August and November 2021. The data were analysed using Grounded Theory's constant comparative analysis method. The findings show that football clubs have been undertaking several sustainability efforts (e.g. stakeholder collaboration, energy, health, gender and transportation) and have been connecting the sustainability dimensions throughout such efforts. The findings provide insights into the stages of sustainability awareness in football clubs, starting from the social dimension, then the environmental, economic and time dimensions. An important finding from the interviews was the potential that football clubs have in engaging and influencing society through their fans. This research provides insights into the contributions of football clubs to sustainability. Football clubs, and other CSOs, have the potential to become societal change agents and make societies more sustainable through a shared identity.

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  • 20.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Conclusions2021In: Developing Sustainability Competences Through Pedagogical Approaches / [ed] Rodrigo Lozano; Maria Barreiro-Gen, Springer Nature, 2021, p. 267-274Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been considerable progress in the incorporation of sustainability into HEIs curricula. Integrating sustainability into diverse academic curricula has been recognised to be essential for providing students with the skills and insights to help societies become more sustainable. A survey was developed to investigate teaching sustainability competences in 15 case studies. The responses were analysed using STAUNCH® for the contribution to sustainability part, descriptive statistics, Friedman test to rank the competences and pedagogical approaches, and Spearman correlations. The STAUNCH® results show that the cross-cutting themes are the most addressed, and that there are differences between the other three dimensions between a faculty approach and a whole institution approach. The results provide insights into the pedagogical approaches and competences rankings. The correlation analysis shows that the potential to develop sustainability competences could be better achieved if more Community and social justice and Environmental education pedagogical approaches were used. Educators are change agents at the centre of curriculum renewal and making it more sustainability oriented. They need to be made aware of the range of pedagogical approaches available so that they can better combine them and develop the ‘Full Monty’ of sustainability competences for the future decision-makers, leaders, academics, and professionals of the world. Intertwining sustainability as a concept, in and among the different disciplines and faculties, and tailored to their specific nature, can help universities move towards a more balanced, synergistic, trans-disciplinary, and holistic academic system, thus helping graduates to better contribute to making societies more sustainable.

  • 21.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Corporate Sustainability and COVID-19: Analysing the impacts of the outbreak2021In: IEEE Engineering Management Review, ISSN 0360-8581, E-ISSN 1937-4178, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 72-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corporations and their sustainability efforts are affected by external concerns, such as the COVID-19 outbreak. A survey was developed to investigate this phenomenon, of which 115 responses from corporations were obtained. The results show that COVID-19 changed their sustainability priorities, with the economic ones increasing, followed by the social ones, but the environmental ones decreasing considerably. Additionally, COVID-19 made corporations more aware about external stimuli on drivers for and barriers to sustainability. The results also show that employees are informed and engaged in sustainability issues, but do not receive enough training about them. The corporation system elements were affected negatively, with the exception of Organisational systems that had more positive impacts than negative ones, and emerged to be the most central element. The results show that corporations must have a holistic approach, i.e. they have to consider the system elements and their connections, as well as internal factors and external stimuli (or events such as COVID-19), when addressing sustainability issues.

  • 22.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Corporate Sustainability Initiatives: Their use and results2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Corporate leaders and employees have been increasingly recognising their role in contributing to sustainability. In this context, different voluntary tools, approaches, and initiatives have been developed by and for corporations to engage with sustainability. Each initiative has advantages with respect to scope and focus for the sustainability dimensions and the company system’s elements, but it has certain disadvantages when it comes to dealing with the complexity and broadness of sustainability. Relying on one initiative can result in a limited and narrow contribution to sustainability and curtail coverage of the company’s system and using too many tools wastes resources and energy due to duplication in tasks. The paper provides an analysis of the use of twenty-four of the most widely used initiatives (e.g. life cycle assessment, eco-design, cleaner production, corporate social responsibility, and sustainability reporting) by companies. A survey was developed for investigating the importance of how sustainability has been embedded in organisations. Most of the questions were on a five-point scale (extremely important to not at all important or completely agree to completely disagree) and rankings. The survey was applied using the online survey tool Qualtrics (2018). The survey was sent to a database of 5,299 contacts from different organisations (of which 3603 were companies) obtained from the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) database, and personal contacts. Of the responses 215 were from companies, but only 189 provided useable responses for the tools and approaches used, of which 27 were from Sweden.The tools most widely used were Corporate Social Responsibility, Corporate Sustainability, and GRI reports (in the top quintile) by all companies, and Corporate Sustainability, Corporate Social Responsibility, Eco-efficiency, and Socially/Sustainable Responsible Investment by Swedish companies. The tools least used (in the lowest quintile) were Factor X, The Natural Step, SA8000, and ISO 26000 by all companies, and Factor X, SA8000, Industrial ecology, ISO 26000, EMAS, AA1000, and The Natural Step by Swedish companies. For all the companies, 5.6 tools in average provided good results, 6.5 some results, 2.5 no perceived results, and 0.1 negative results. There are some initiatives that are well known and provide results (some and good) when used, such as corporate social responsibility, corporate sustainability, GRI reports, and eco-efficiency). There are some initiatives that are not known/not used (e.g. Factor X, The Natural Step, SA8000, and ISO26000). The most widely know initiatives focus mainly on management and strategy, and assessment and reporting with a broad sustainability perspective. In general, the four more widely known initiatives have a good ratio of results versus no results. The cluster and analysis and PCA groups can serve as guides to decide which initiatives to combine in order to address the company system and sustainability dimensions. A combination between four to six initiatives should provide the most efficient way to address sustainability. There have been many initiatives proposed to contribute to sustainability by and for corporations. To better achieve this, the initiatives need to be combined efficiently in a holistic way to address the company and sustainability dimensions.

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  • 23.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. University of Gävle.
    COVID-19 outbreak impacts on organisations and their sustainability efforts2020Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Barreiro-Gen, MariaUniversity of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Developing Sustainability Competences Through Pedagogical Approaches2021Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book is aimed at developing sustainability competences through pedagogical approaches by comparing 15 case studies from 12 countries in 4 continents (Africa, America, Australia, and Europe) analysing how Sustainable Development (SD) is being taught in their courses, which competences are being developed, and which pedagogical approaches are being used to develop the competences. The book brings together practice-based original research on the connection between developing sustainability competences and the pedagogical approaches used, utilizing a framework aimed at helping educators in creating and updating their courses to provide a more complete, holistic, and systemic sustainability education to future leaders, decision makers, educators, and change agents. Compared to previous works addressing SD in education, which often mostly cover tools for improving the sustainability of campus operations, this approach uses assessment tools to uniquely focus on how courses and programmes (i.e. curricula) incorporate SD. Through the case studies, readers will learn about how the 3 major groups of pedagogical approaches have been used: (1) Universal, meaning broadly applicable pedagogies that have been used in many disciplines and contexts; (2) Community and social justice, which are pedagogies developed specifically for use in addressing social justice and community-building; and (3) Environmental education, which are pedagogies emerging from environmental sciences and environmental education practices.  

  • 25.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Disrupting the brave new world: COVID-19 effects on organisations’ sustainability efforts2021In: Journal of Organizational Change Management, ISSN 0953-4814, E-ISSN 1758-7816, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 613-628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Organisations have been working towards becoming more sustainable; where their efforts have been mainly on a steady state focussing on internal proactive changes. The purpose of this paper is to analyse how external events, e.g. COVID-19, affect organisations and their sustainability efforts.

    Design/methodology/approach – A survey was sent to a database of 11,657 contacts, with a response rate of 5.60% obtained. The results were analysed using descriptive statistics, ranking and a ratio analysis comparing different types of organisations (corporations, higher education institutions, civil society and public sector organisations).

    Findings – COVID-19 changed the organisation drivers for and barriers to sustainability perspective towards external stimuli, rather than internal factors. COVID-19 also affected the system elements negatively, with the exception of organisational systems. The results also show that the system elements are affected by an external event or crisis and are dependent on the type of organisation.

    Originality/value – This paper proposes the “Organisational sustainability transition forced by exogenous events” framework to help organisations better understand and be prepared for unexpected external events. Organisations should learn from the experiences in dealing with COVID-19 and adopt a more humanistic approach to their sustainability efforts, rather than traditional approaches based on solipsism and technomanagerial centrism.

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  • 26.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Embedding Sustainability in Small and Medium-Size Enterprises: Experiences From Sweden2022In: IEEE Engineering Management Review, ISSN 0360-8581, E-ISSN 1937-4178, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 211-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most research on corporate sustainability has focused on large companies’ sustainability efforts; however, research on a holistic approach on small- and medium-size enterprises (SMEs) addressing the sustainability dimensions and the system elements is still limited. The aim of this article is to assess how SMEs embed sustainability into their systems. A survey was developed and sent to 261 SMEs, from which 72 complete responses were obtained from SMEs in Sweden. The results show that there could be a better operationalization of the priorities and aligning them with the company's impacts, particularly by focusing more on environmental issues. The results show that 1) SMEs have been embedding sustainability through technocentric and managerial approaches; 2) the focus has been on systems elements that tend to be less connected to others (e.g., products, and operations and production) and not on those with highest influence (e.g., governance and change management); and 3) employees tend to be informed about sustainability issues, but they could receive better training and be better engaged in sustainability efforts. SMEs should take a more holistic perspective when embedding sustainability into their system, and better address governance and change management issues to complement their technocentric and managerial approaches.

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    fulltext
  • 27.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Introduction2021In: Developing Sustainability Competences Through Pedagogical Approaches / [ed] Rodrigo Lozano; Maria Barreiro-Gen, Springer, 2021, p. 1-5Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Higher Education Institutions have been major agents of social change. In this context, they have been major drivers of sustainable development and sustainability. Educators are at the centre of curriculum renewal and making it more sustainability oriented, and they need to ensure that they develop their students’ sustainability competences. Several tools have been developed, or modified, to assess sustainability in universities. One of the few tools focusing specifically on curricula is the “Sustainability Tool for Assessing UNiversities’ Curricula Holistically” (STAUNCH®). In parallel, one of the most recent developments in Higher Education for Sustainable Development discourses has been on developing competences and linking them to the use of pedagogical approaches. In spite of this, there have been limited efforts connecting pedagogical approaches and competences. The book integrates practice-base original research on how sustainability is incorporated in curricula, the competences being developed, and the pedagogical approaches being used to develop the competences in 15 Higher Education Institutions case studies from 12 countries in 4 continents (Africa, America, Australia, and Europe). The book provides unique insights into sustainability issues being taught, the ranking 

  • 28.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability Ltd. London UK.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Organisations' contributions to sustainability. An analysis of impacts on the Sustainable Development Goals2023In: Business Strategy and the Environment, ISSN 0964-4733, E-ISSN 1099-0836, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 3371-3382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organisations have been driving sustainability, where some efforts have focussed on the organisation itself and some on how organisations contribute to society, such as addressing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Although organisations have been working to address the SDGs, there has been limited integration of the SDGs in organisation systems. This paper aimed at analysing how organisations have been addressing the SDGs. A survey was developed to investigate the impacts and contribution of organisations to sustainability, where 294 responses were obtained for the questions on organisations' impacts to the sustainability. The data were analysed using descriptive analysis: Friedman test to rank the impacts on the SDGs and divided into quartiles; a ratio analysis between positive impacts and negative impacts; and correlations. The results show that organisations' impacts on the SDGs are quite generalisable to all types of organisations, with three exceptions (SDGs 4, 5 and 16). The results also served to develop an SDG impact categorisation. The correlation analysis showed that organisations address the SDGs through a compartmentalised approach. The results helped to propose the ‘organisations' impacts on the SDGs framework’ focussing on the contribution of organisations to sustainability. This research shows that organisations can contribute directly to some of the SDGs, but not to others. Therefore, the discourse must change from integration of SDGs on organisations to the contribution that organisations can have on the SDGs.

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  • 29.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Central University of Technology, Bloemfontein, South Africa; Organisational Sustainability, Ltd., Cardiff, UK.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    D'Amato, Dalia
    University of Helsinki; Finnish Environment Institute.
    Gago-Cortes, Carmen
    Universidade da Coruña, A Coruña, Spain.
    Favi, Claudio
    University of Parma, Parma, Italy.
    Martins, Ricardo
    Universidad de las Américas Puebla, Puebla, Mexico.
    Monus, Ferenc
    University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary.
    Caeiro, Sandra
    Universidade Aberta, Lisbon, Portugal; Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica, Portugal.
    Benayas, Javier
    Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Caldera, Savindi
    Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia.
    Bostanci, Sevket
    European University of Lefke, Mersin, North Cyprus, Turkey.
    Djekic, Ilija
    University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia.
    Moneva, Jose Mariano
    University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain.
    Saenz, Orlando
    Universidad de Ciencias Aplicadas y Ambientales, Colombia.
    Awuzie, Bankole
    Central University of Technology, Bloemfontein, South Africa.
    Gladysz, Bartlomiej
    Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw, Poland.
    Improving sustainability teaching by grouping and interrelating pedagogical approaches and sustainability competences: Evidence from 15 Worldwide Higher Education Institutions2023In: Sustainable Development, ISSN 0968-0802, E-ISSN 1099-1719, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 349-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been increasing research on pedagogical approaches, sustainability competences, and how to connect them in Higher Education Institutions (HEIs). This paper's aim is to provide deeper insights into the system of pedagogical approaches and sustainability competences, as well as how these interrelate. A survey was developed to investigate sustainability teaching in 15 HEIs. The survey was sent to educators of each HEI from which 668 responses were obtained. The responses were analysed in a five-step process: (1) descriptive statistics; (2) Pearson correlations; (3) principal component analyses (PCAs) to detect groups; (4) Pearson correlations between the groups; and (5) regressions. The first step provided the base to carry out the PCAs, from which three groups for the pedagogical approaches (Universal, Social, and Environmental) and three for the sustainability competences (Extrospective-social, Introspective-personal, and Cogitative-processual) were obtained. The correlations between the groups showed that: (1) the competences are closely interrelated; (2) the pedagogical approaches are somehow interrelated; and (3) the pedagogical approaches are somehow interrelated to the competences. The regressions showed that the Universal and Social groups would be most suitable to develop all the competences' groups. The Environmental group develops only the cogitative-processual competences' group. The results served as bases to propose the Sustainability Teaching System (STS), which provides deeper insights into the system of pedagogical approaches and sustainability competences by grouping them, as well as showing directionality and strength. To improve sustainability teaching, it is necessary to understand the pedagogical approaches' groups and how they can develop the competences' groups.

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  • 30.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Francisco J.
    ITESM, Mexico.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Teaching Sustainability in European Higher Education Institutions: Assessing the Connections between Competences and Pedagogical Approaches2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been considerable progress in the incorporation of SD into the curricula of Higher Education Institutions (HEIs), where European HEIs have been leaders. This has included research on competences for sustainable development, and how to deliver such competences through pedagogical approaches; however, there has been limited research on the connection between how courses are delivered (pedagogical approaches) and how they may affect sustainability competences. A survey was developed to investigate sustainability being taught, sustainability competences delivered, and pedagogical approaches used in European Higher Education Institutions. The survey was sent to a database of more than 4,000 contacts of teachers and professors in Europe from which 390 complete responses (9.80%) were obtained. The social dimension of sustainability was the least addressed at 18%, while the other dimensions (economic, environmental, and cross-cutting) were addressed almost equally at between 27% and 28%. A correlation analysis was done between a) the Contribution to sustainability, b) Strength of competences, and c) Strength of pedagogical approaches, which show a stronger correlation between Strength of competences to Contribution and Strength of pedagogical approaches to Strength of competences than between the Strength of pedagogical approaches and Contribution was lower. A correlation analysis was then carried out between the sustainability STAUNCH® dimensions (economic, environmental, social, and cross-cutting themes) and the competences. The analysis showed that the correlations are stronger in the cross-cutting themes, followed by the social, the environmental, and the economic ones. Finally, a correlation analysis was carried out between the competences and the pedagogical approaches. The results obtained were between 0.0426 and 0.5555. A comparison of the survey results and the theoretical framework (see Lozano et al., 2017) was carried out to detect the differences. Three pedagogical approaches deliver the most competences (Eco-justice and community, Project and/or problem-based learning, and Community service learning). The updated framework shows that there is a general perception that the pedagogical approaches may deliver the sustainability competences, with some particular exceptions, such as Case studies, Supply chain/Life cycle analysis, and Lecturing. The updated framework provides a more precise perspective on how sustainability competences can be better delivered in class, and how to better deliver the ‘Full Monty’ of sustainability competences.

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  • 31.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. University of Gävle.
    Lozano, Francisco J.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Teaching Sustainability in European Higher Education Institutions: Assessing the Connections between Competences and Pedagogical Approaches2019Conference paper (Other academic)
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    Presentation
  • 32.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability Ltd., Cardiff, UK.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Francisco J.
    Escuela de Ingeniería y Ciencias, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Campus Toluca, San Antonio Buenavista, Toluca de Lerdo, Mexico.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Teaching Sustainability in European Higher Education Institutions: Assessing the Connections between Competences and Pedagogical Approaches2019In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 6, article id 1602Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been considerable progress in the incorporation of sustainable development (SD) into higher education institutions’ curricula. This has included research on competences for SD and pedagogical approaches used; however, there has been limited research on the connection between how pedagogical approaches are used and how they may develop sustainability competences. A survey was developed, based on the ‘connecting sustainable development pedagogical approaches to competences’ framework, to investigate sustainability being taught, sustainability competences developed, and pedagogical approaches used in European higher education institutions. The survey was sent to a database of more than 4000 contacts from which 390 complete responses (9.80%) were obtained. The results show that the social dimension was the least addressed at 18% of responses, while the economic, environmental, and cross-cutting dimensions were addressed almost equally. The correlation analyses showed a relation between the contribution to sustainability and the strength of competences, and between the strength of competences and the strength of pedagogical approaches. The results from the survey helped to update the theoretical framework, which provides a more precise perspective on how sustainability competences can be better developed in class, and how to better develop all the sustainability competences

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  • 33.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Mårtensson, Gunilla
    Sustainability Competences and Pedagogical Approaches at the University of Gävle2021In: Developing Sustainability Competences Through Pedagogical Approaches / [ed] Rodrigo Lozano & Maria Barreiro-Gen, Springer Nature, 2021, p. 33-45Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The University of Gävle is located in the city of Gävle, Sweden. It has 16,000 students (about 6,500 full time equivalent) and 700 employees. The University of Gävle has been working with sustainability for the last 25 years. The university has extensive experience in working with an environmental management system, certified according to ISO 14001 since 2004. It published its first sustainability report in 2017. This chapter presents the results from the 66 survey respondents. The main focus of the university is on cross-cutting themes. The economic, environmental, and social dimensions have fairly similar percentages. The contribution to sustainability is high and the strength is high. The ranking of the competences shows that Critical thinking and analysis is the highest, followed by Justice, responsibility, and ethics. The ranking of the pedagogical approaches resulted in Project- or Problem-based learning and Case studies were the highest, followed by Inter-disciplinary team teaching. The correlation analysis showed that Project- or Problem-based learning developed the most competences followed by Case studies and then Place-based environmental education. The competences most developed were Systems thinking, Anticipatory thinking, Strategic action, Personal involvement, and Justice, responsibility and ethics. The results highlight a holistic understanding and teaching of sustainability at the University of Gävle. The results provide a necessary mapping of the competences being developed by the educators and the university and the pedagogical approaches being used. Identifying sustainability trends and patterns in teaching at the University of Gävle can help to better integrate sustainability into all educational programmes, so that students can better contribute to making societies more sustainability.

  • 34.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development University of Gävle Gävle Sweden;Organisational Sustainability, Ltd. Cardiff UK.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development University of Gävle Gävle Sweden.
    Pietikäinen, Janna
    Department of Forest Sciences Helsinki Institute of Sustainability Science (HELSUS) Teachers' Academy University of Helsinki Helsinki Finland.
    Gago‐Cortes, Carmen
    Facultade de Economía e Empresa Universidade da Coruña A Coruña Spain.
    Favi, Claudio
    Department of Engineering and Architecture University of Parma Parma Italy.
    Jimenez Munguia, Maria Teresa
    Chemical, Food and Environmental Engineering Department Universidad de las Américas Puebla Puebla Mexico.
    Monus, Ferenc
    Institute of Biology University of Nyíregyháza Nyíregyháza Hungary.
    Simão, João
    Universidade Aberta Lisbon Portugal.
    Benayas, Javier
    Universidad Autónoma de Madrid Madrid Spain.
    Desha, Cheryl
    Cities Research Institute, School of Engineering and Built Environment Griffith University Brisbane Australia.
    Bostanci, Sevket
    Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering European University of Lefke Mersin North Cyprus Turkey.
    Djekic, Ilija
    Faculty of Agriculture University of Belgrade Belgrade Serbia.
    Moneva, Jose Mariano
    School of Economics and Business University of Zaragoza Zaragoza Spain.
    Sáenz, Orlando
    Universidad de Ciencias Aplicadas y Ambientales Bogota Colombia.
    Awuzie, Bankole
    Department of Built Environment, Faculty of Engineering, Built Environment and Information Technology Central University of Technology Bloemfontein South Africa.
    Gladysz, Bartlomiej
    Faculty of Production Engineering Warsaw University of Technology Warsaw Poland.
    Adopting sustainability competence‐based education in academic disciplines: Insights from 13 higher education institutions2022In: Sustainable Development, ISSN 2160-7540, E-ISSN 2160-7559, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 620-635Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) have been incorporating sustainability into education and curricula, where recent research has focussed on sustainability competences, pedagogical approaches, and how to connect them, generally on a single HEI. The process of integrating sustainability into education based on curricula assessment has been explained using adoption of innovations; and has the potential to explain the process of developing competences through pedagogical approaches. The aim of this paper is to investigate this process at academic discipline level. An online survey was developed to investigate teaching sustainability competences in 13 HEIs, from which 678 responses from educators were obtained. The competences and pedagogical approaches from the responses were ranked, and then the connections between the competences and pedagogical approaches per discipline were analysed using a correlations-based framework, from which three disciplines groups were created. The groups were categorised using diffusion of innovations theory, which indicated that some disciplines are more innovative than others in adopting sustainability competence-based teaching. The results are used to propose two frameworks to better understand the adoption of sustainability competence-based teaching: 1) the D-RAPID framework; and 2) the Disciplinary Multi-dimensional Sustainability Influence Change for Academia (D-MuSICA) memework. The adoption of sustainability competence-base education must expand from a single HEI perspective to a disciplinary collaborative one spanning many HEIs, where academic disciplines should learn from each other’s insights and mistakes and provide students with more transdisciplinary skillsets to make societies more sustainable.  

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  • 35.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Temel, Melis
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Literature Review and Methods2021In: Developing Sustainability Competences Through Pedagogical Approaches / [ed] Rodrigo Lozano; Maria Barreiro-Gen, Springer Nature, 2021, p. 7-31Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been considerable progress in the incorporation of sustainability into Higher Education Institutions’ curricula. This chapter discusses sustainability in curricula assessment tools, sustainability competences, pedagogical approaches, and the methods used in the book’s the case studies. A number of tools have been developed, or modified, to assess sustainability in universities. One of the tools focusing specifically on curricula assessment is the “Sustainability Tool for Assessing UNiversities’ Curricula Holistically” (STAUNCH®). In parallel, during the last 10 years, there has an increase on sustainability competences research, where lists of competences relating to education for sustainability and their use have been proposed by several authors in recent years. To develop the competences, a combination of different pedagogical approaches is needed. Sustainability competences and pedagogical approaches have, generally, been studied separately, with the exception of the “Framework connecting sustainable development pedagogical approaches to competences”, which is aimed at helping educators in creating and updating their courses to provide a more complete, holistic, and systemic sustainability education to future leaders, decision makers, educators, and change agents. A survey was developed to investigate teaching sustainability competences for the 15 case studies. The responses were analysed using STAUNCH® for the contribution to sustainability part, descriptive statistics, Friedman test to rank the competences and pedagogical approaches, and Spearman correlations.

  • 36.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Zafar, Afnan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Collaboration for organizational sustainability limits to growth: Developing a factors, benefits, and challenges framework2021In: Sustainable Development, ISSN 0968-0802, E-ISSN 1099-1719, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 728-737Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaboration plays a key role in the contribution of organizations (civil society, corporate, and public sector ones) to sustainability; nonetheless, there has been limited research on collaboration elements, benefits, and challenges. A survey was developed for investigating collaboration for organizational sustainability (through elements, benefits,and challenges), to which 253 full responses were obtained. The survey responses were analyzed using Friedman tests, correlations, and multivariate statistical analyses.The results provide insights into the rankings of the elements, benefits, and challenges. The multivariate statistical analyses show that when organizations increase their collaboration on two element factors (business-oriented and society-oriented), there will be both benefits and challenges. The optimal solution to collaboration for organizational sustainability is where the factors are balanced in such a way that there are sufficient benefits but fewer challenges. If collaboration is unbridled, then the challenges will outweigh the benefits, thus there are limits to the implementation and growth of collaboration. From the analyses, the research proposes the “Organizational sustainability collaboration” framework dependent on the factors, the benefits, and the challenges obtained from collaborating, which can help organizations understand and better collaborate, so that benefits are maximized, and the challenges curtailed

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  • 37.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bautista-Puig, Núria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Developing a holistic and panoptic framework for analysing circular economy2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Circular economy (CE) has become fundamental in accelerating the efforts towards sustainability. CE was first proposed by Leontief in 1928, as way to understand causal relationships in the economic dimension. Recently, CE has mainly focused on environmental issues i.e. closing the material cycle through recovery (3Rs to 9Rs). Literature on this topic has increased over time and a number of bibliometric studies have been carried out. However, the majority of these studies used bibliometric indicators focusing on descriptive analyses of scientific outputs, particularly on yearly trend, keyword co-occurrence, and/or coauthorship.

    This article adopts a combination of a nested approach, with grounded theory's constant comparative analysis as the overall analysis method and a bibliometric analysis within it. A total of 4,045 documents from CE during the period 1999–2019 were retrieved and analysed against an initial framework composed by different levels (economic issues, recovery and CE levels). The iterative process helped to improve the economic category, changing the level category into a scope one, and adding two new categories (scientific collaboration and themes). The results obtained were integrated to propose the holistic and panoptic framework for analysing circular economy for analysing circular economy, which consists of the integration and interconnection of three main components: (1) economy, with cost, productivity, distribution, value creation, and value added; (2) recovery loops from the 3Rs to the 9Rs; and (3) the scope of CE activities, including assessment, review, individual, organisation, process, sector, cluster, and country/region. In addition, assessment and review are transversal categories within scope.

    This paper provides depth to the understanding of the economic, environmental and scope interlinkages of CE literature, so as to better position the CE theory and practice and to detect gaps that should be addressed. Moreover, the study highlights the importance for CE to achieve its potential in helping societies become more sustainable. Thus, theory and practice must take a holistic approach that integrates the economic and environmental dimensions, the scope of CE, and collaboration.

    This research is linked to SDG12 Responsible Production and Consumption, 12.5 (By 2030, substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse); target 12.6 (Encourage companies, especially large and transnational companies, to adopt sustainable practices and to integrate sustainability information into their reporting cycle), and 12.a (Support developing countries to strengthen their scientific and technological capacity to move towards more sustainable patterns of consumption and production).

    This study contributes to accelerating progress towards SDGs, as more research of CE is needed to examine how corporations can enhance their adaptive capacity, so they can meet sustainability and their company's needs in times of crisis. 

  • 38.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development University of Gävle Gävle Sweden;Organisational Sustainability, Ltd. Cardiff UK.
    Bautista-Puig, Núria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Developing a sustainability competences paradigm in higher education or a white elephant?2022In: Sustainable Development, ISSN 0968-0802, E-ISSN 1099-1719, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 870-883Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Higher education institutions (HEIs) have been at the forefront in creating and breaking paradigms, and educating the future decision-makers, entrepreneurs, and leaders. In the last decade, there have been many efforts to develop sustainability competences in HEIs to ensure that students are prepared for challenges in making societies more sustainable. Recent discourses have focussed on how educators use pedagogical approaches to develop such competences, which has begun to create a sustainability competences paradigm. This research focuses on the benefits and challenges of teaching sustainability, the use of pedagogical approaches, and the developmentof competences. A survey was sent to 4099 European HEI educators, with 319 full responses obtained for the open-ended questions. The data was analysed using quantitative content analysis and network analysis. The results provide insights into the rankings of the benefits, and challenges in teaching, competences, and pedagogical approaches. The co-occurrence maps show a high students' awareness and engagement when educators use pedagogical approaches other than lecturing, and they focus on providing a practice-oriented perspective. The research discusses that in order to develop a sustainability competences paradigm the benefits of teaching sustainability, using pedagogical approaches, and development of competences need to be fostered, whereas the challenges need to be addressed to avoid creating a White Elephant. The development of sustainability competences in HEI can lead to more sustainability literate decision-makers, leaders, scientists, and professionals, and thus, better address the pressing challenges that ail our societies and Earth.

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  • 39.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bautista-Puig, Núria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. Carlos III University of Madrid.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Elucidating a holistic and panoptic framework for analysing circular economy2021In: Business Strategy and the Environment, ISSN 0964-4733, E-ISSN 1099-0836, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 1644-1654Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Circular economy (CE) has been proposed as a concept to help address sustainability issues. CE was first proposed in 1928 as a way of understanding causal relationships in the economic sphere. Recently, CE has been focused, mainly, on environmental issues main typically represented by closing material loops through recovery. Literature on CE has been increasing during this time, where a number of bibliometric analyses have been carried out with, mainly, descriptive outputs. This paper uses a nested approach, with grounded theory's constant comparative analysis as the overarching one and bibliometric analyses within it. A total of 4,045 documents from CE during the period 1999–2019 were analysed against an initial framework composed of economic issues, recovery and CE levels. The results helped to improve the economic category, to change the level category into a scope one and to add two categories (collaboration and themes). The results were then integrated to propose the holistic and panoptic framework for analysing circular economy, which can help to understand the economic, environmental and scope interlinkages of CE literature, in order to better position CE theory and practice and to detect gaps that should be addressed. For CE to achieve its potential in helping societies become more sustainable, theory and practice must take a holistic approach that integrates the economic and environmental dimensions, the scope of CE, and collaboration.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 40.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Santos, Felippe
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Developing a harmonic sustainable public procurement framework2024In: Environment, Development and Sustainability, ISSN 1387-585X, E-ISSN 1573-2975, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 2291-2306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability is aimed at addressing the environmental and socio-economic issues of this generation and future ones. In this context, sustainable public procurement (SPP) has been proposed to link the consumption side (government) to the production side (companies), whilst addressing the four dimensions of sustainability (economic, environmental, social, and time). This paper undertakes an analysis, through hermeneutics, of four sets of system elements of SPP: (1) demand-offering, which includes products, services, and their combination; (2) procurement specifications (technical, non-technical, and socio-cultural); (3) stakeholder interactions; and, (4) research disciplinary approaches. The analysis shows that despite most SPP efforts focussing on demand-offerings or specifications, there have been some framework proposals aimed at explaining the complexities and interactions between the system elements. Additionally, most research on SPP has been carried out through single disciplinary approaches. The paper proposes the Harmonic SPP framework, which integrates the demand-offering, specifications, stakeholder interactions, disciplinary approaches, and the four sustainability dimensions, where the harmonisation of their interrelations is sine qua non. The Harmonic SPP framework is aimed at providing a more holistic perspective to SPP and thus fostering more effective and efficient SPP research and implementation.

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  • 41.
    Novo-Corti, Isabel
    et al.
    Universidade da Coruña.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. University of Gävle.
    Public policies based on social networks for the introduction of technology at home: Demographic and socioeconomic profiles of households2015In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 51, p. 1216-1228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The promotion of the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) among the population has been shown as an important matter of public policy to avoid the digital divide. In this paper differences in the impact of ICT in households are analyzed, and main demographic characteristics are considered. Based on the ICT Development Index (IDI), proposed by the United Nations, a regional index (RIDI) is developed to evaluate the comparative impact on different Spanish regions. Subsequently, the regions are grouped through cluster analysis, based on indices measuring their ICT development. Household characteristics were examined by calculating a discriminate regional Index (DIRIDI). It is composed of highly disaggregated indicators concerning socio-demographic characteristics of households and municipalities, and only those which have shown to be different between regions have been selected. The results indicate a strong polarization in the development of ICT, favorable to Mediterranean and Northeast areas, for both indices calculated. The differential profiles of households point to household size and municipality as well as the age of household members. It highlights the usefulness of designing general policies for particular types of homes, combined with different regional policies, taking into account the benefits of the social networks and collaborative learning.

  • 42.
    Novo-Corti, Isabel
    et al.
    University of A Coruña.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. University of Gävle.
    Walking from imprisonment towards true social integration: Getting a job as a key factor2015In: Journal of Offender Rehabilitation, ISSN 1050-9674, E-ISSN 1540-8558, Vol. 54, no 6, p. 445-464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Employment is one of the most effective mechanisms for inclusion, especially for groups who have a high risk of social exclusion such as the inmate population. This study analyzes data collected from in-depth interviews with 22 prisoners in an intermediate position (between prison and full freedom, classified as third grade) in two social integration centers and two prisons in Galicia, an autonomous community in northern Spain. The results show that the availability of a strong social and family network is a key factor in obtaining employment after prison; without this network, self-employment is a good choice.

  • 43.
    Temel, Melis
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Analysing the governance factors for sustainability in organisations and their inter-relations2021In: Frontiers in Sustainability, E-ISSN 2673-4524, Vol. 2, article id 684585Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Governance is instrumental to the implementing sustainability in organisations (civil society, companies, and public sector ones). Seven governance factors have been identified to achieve this: vision and mission, policies, reporting, communication, board of directors, department, and person in charge. However, their importance and interrelations are still under-researched. A survey was sent to 5,299 organisations, with 305 responses. The responses were analysed using descriptive statistics, rankings, comparison between organisation types, correlations, and centrality. The results provide the ranking of the factors, where vision and mission, person in charge, and reporting were highest ranked. The analysis also reveals that the seven factors are interrelated, albeit some more than others. The research provides a comparison of the rankings and interrelations between the organisation types. Each factor and its relation to other factors can contribute to better governance for sustainability, and better governance can contribute to a more holistic implementation of sustainability in organisations.

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  • 44.
    Temel, Melis
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Making organizations sustainable through employee participation: An analysis of factors and their interactions2022In: IEEE Engineering Management Review, ISSN 0360-8581, E-ISSN 1937-4178, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 93-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizations have been integrating sustainability issues into their systems. Employees are a core component of the human dimension of the organizational systems; however, there has been limited research on the factors of employee participation (EP) for organizational sustainability. This article is aimed at investigating the importance of EP factors and how they are related. A survey was conducted to investigate the importance and relationships of EP factors for sustainability, and 305 full responses were received. The responses were analyzed using Friedman tests, Kruskal–Wallis test, correlation analysis, and centrality measures. The results highlight that all factors are important for organizational sustainability, albeit some more than others. The correlation and centrality analyses showed that all factors are interrelated. This article provides insights into EP factors by 1) ranking of EP factors in organizations, 2) analyzing the interrelations and centrality of the EP factors, and 3) comparing the rankings, the interrelations, and centrality measures. This research contributes to organizational sustainability by focusing on the human dimensions through the EP factors and their interrelations. The EP factors must be recognized and integrated to implement sustainability more efficiently in organizations. No organization exists without its employees, and no organization can become sustainable without engaging them.

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  • 45.
    Varela-Candamio, Laura
    et al.
    University of A Coruña.
    Novo-Corti, Isabel
    University of A Coruña.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. University of Gävle.
    Do studies level and age matter in learning and social relationship in the assessment of web 3.0? A case study for ‘digital natives’ in Spain2014In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 30, p. 595-605Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the recent years, a growing body of research calls into question the homogeneity of digital natives in the knowledge and use of the web. This paper studies the assessment of the current web 3.0 by youth in terms of social networks and the Internet reliability using a model based on univariate and multivariate analysis with structural equations. A sample of 152 young people was interviewed in Spain between August and September 2012 and divided into different subsamples: a sample of Higher Education Students (HES) and a mixed group of young people (MGS) used as the control group. A double analysis is presented using both statistical-descriptive and a comparison between means between the two groups and then a structural equation multivariate analysis is implemented to complete the analysis. This paper concludes that whilst there are strong age and level of education related variations between both samples in the assessment of web 3.0. In particular, higher education students increase the assessment of the web 3.0, not only for purposes of social relationship and friendship but as an important role of knowledge and learning, whether formal or informal and they are able to better harness the Internet resources and social networks, combining both academic and social uses.

  • 46.
    Zen, Irina Safitri
    et al.
    Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Kulliyyah of Architecture and Environmental Design, International Islamic University Malaysia, Selayang, Malaysia.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Awuzie, Bankole
    Department of Built Environment, Faculty of Engineering, Built Environment and Information Technology, Central University of Technology, Bloemfontein, South Africa.
    Ceulemans, Kim
    Department of Management Control, Accounting and Auditing, TBS Business School, Toulouse, France.
    Editorial: Education for sustainable development: How can changes in local practices help address global challenges2022In: Frontiers in Sustainability, E-ISSN 2673-4524, Vol. 3, article id 862068Article in journal (Other academic)
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