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  • 1.
    Aboagye, Emmanuel
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. Institute of Environmental Medicine, Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björklund, Christina
    Gustafsson, Klas
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Insurance Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. .
    Hagberg, Jan
    Aronsson, Gunnar
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University.
    Marklund, Staffan
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Insurance Medicine, Karolinska Institutet.
    Leineweber, Constanze
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University.
    Bergström, Gunnar
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Institute of Environmental Medicine, Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Karolinska Institutet.
    Exhaustion and impaired work performance in the workplace: Associations with presenteeism and absenteeism2019In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 61, no 11, p. e438-e444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between presenteeism and absenteeism during the previous year and the current levels of exhaustion and impaired work performance in a Swedish university setting.

    METHODS: In a study of 3525 employees, an ordinal logistic regression and general linear model was used to examine the association between presenteeism and absenteeism during the previous year and the current exhaustion and impaired work performance, respectively.

    RESULTS: Presenteeism, but not absenteeism, during the previous year independently increased the risk of having moderate or severe exhaustion. Presenteeism, absenteeism, and exhaustion remained positively associated with impaired work performance when health status and other confounders had been adjusted for.

    CONCLUSIONS: Presenteeism, but not absenteeism, was associated with exhaustion. Both presenteeism and absenteeism were the salient correlates of impaired work performance.

  • 2.
    Aboagye, Emmanuel
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. Karolinska institutet.
    Gustafsson, Klas
    Karolinska institutet.
    Jensen, Irene
    Karolinska institutet.
    Hagberg, Jan
    Karolinska institutet.
    Aronsson, Gunnar
    Stockholms universitet.
    Marklund, Staffan
    Karolinska institutet.
    Leineweber, Constanze
    Karolinska institutet.
    Bergström, Gunnar
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Karolinska institutet.
    What is number of days in number of times? Associations between, and responsiveness of, two sickness presenteeism measures.2020In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 62, no 5, p. e180-e185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the associations between SP reported as number of days with SP reported as number of times and to evaluate their responsiveness.

    METHODS: The study population (n = 454) consisted of employed individuals, at risk of long-term sickness absence. Correlation analyses were performed to examine associations between the two SP measures and external constructs such as work performance, general health and registered sick leave. Both SP constructs were measured several times to examine responsiveness.

    RESULTS: The SP measures are moderately correlated. They moderately correlated with work performance and health status measures. SP reported as number of times seem to be more sensitive than number of days in detecting changes after rehabilitation.

    CONCLUSIONS: Numerical or categorical constructs are valid sources of data on SP. However, categorized SP seem to be more responsive.

  • 3.
    Gustafsson, Klas
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Insurance Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bergström, Gunnar
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Institute of Environmental Medicine, Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Marklund, Staffan
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Insurance Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Aboagye, Emmanuel
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. Institute of Environmental Medicine, Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research for Worker Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Leineweber, Constanze
    Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Presenteeism as a predictor of disability pension: A prospective study among nursing professionals and care assistants in Sweden2019In: Journal of Occupational Health, ISSN 1341-9145, E-ISSN 1348-9585, Vol. 61, no 6, p. 453-463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to examine how presenteeism affects the risk of future disability pension among nursing professionals and care assistants (assistant nurses, hospital ward assistants, home-based personal care workers, and child care assistants). A specific objective was to compare health and social care employees with all other occupations.

    METHODS: The study was based on a representative sample of working women and men (n = 43 682) aged 16-64 years, who had been interviewed between 2001 and 2013 for the Swedish Work Environment Survey conducted every second year since 1989. Information on disability pension was obtained from the Social Insurance Agency's database (2002-2014). The studied predictors were related to disability pension using Cox's proportional hazard regression with hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) and selected confounders were controlled for. The follow-up period was 6.7 years (SD 4.2).

    RESULTS: Health and social care employees with frequent presenteeism showed a particularly elevated risk of future disability pension after adjusting for sex, sociodemographic variables, physical and psychosocial working conditions, and self-rated health symptoms. In the amalgamated occupational group of nursing professionals and care assistants, the impact on disability pension of having engaged in presenteeism four times or more during the prior year remained significant (HR = 3.72, 95% CI = 2.43-5.68).

    CONCLUSIONS: The study suggests that frequent presenteeism contributes to an increased risk of disability pension among nursing professionals and care assistants as well as among all other occupations.

  • 4.
    Gustafsson, Klas
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Marklund, Staffan
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Leineweber, Constanze
    Stockholm University.
    Bergström, Gunnar
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Karolinska Institutet.
    Aboagye, Emmanuel
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. Karolinska Institutet.
    Helgesson, Magnus
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Presenteeism, psychosocial working conditions and work ability among care workers - a cross-sectional Swedish population-based study2020In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 7, article id 2419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Presenteeism, attending work while ill, has been examined in different contexts in the last few decades. The aim was to examine whether poor psychosocial working conditions and perceived work ability are associated with increased odds ratios for presenteeism, focusing on nursing professionals and care assistants. A cross-sectional population-based study was conducted. The selected individuals were extracted from representative samples of employees, aged 16–64, who participated in the Swedish Work Environment Surveys between 2001 and 2013 (n = 45,098). Three dimensions of psychosocial working conditions were measured: job demands, job control, and job support. Presenteeism and perceived work ability was measured. Using multiple logistic regression analyses, odds ratios for presenteeism with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated. While nurses (n = 1716) showed the same presenteeism level as all the other occupation groups (n = 37,125), it was more common among care assistants (n = 6257). The odds ratio for presenteeism among those with high job demands (OR = 2.37, 95% CI 2.21–2.53), were higher among women than among men. For nursing professionals and care assistants, the odds ratios for presenteeism were highest among those with the lowest work ability level. The problems of presenteeism and low work ability among many health and care workers may be lessened by a reduction in psychosocial demands.

  • 5.
    Jensen, I
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Bjorklund, C.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Hagberg, J.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Aboagye, Emmanuel
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. Karolinska institutet.
    Bodin, L.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    An overlooked key to excellence in research: a longitudinal cohort study on the association between the psycho-social work environment and research performance2020In: Studies in Higher Education, ISSN 0307-5079, E-ISSN 1470-174XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Theories of what determines research performance have evolved from political and economic science, amongst other disciplines. Contemporary research shows that universities have a problematic work environment characterized by bullying, insecure jobs, and dysfunctional leadership. In this study, we explore the relationship between the psycho-social work environment (PSWE) and research performance. The study consists of longitudinal data from a medical university in Sweden. PSWE was assessed by employee surveys and the outcome was register data from 8 years of bibliometrics and external funding. SEM-analyses were applied building on theoretical and empirical models. Results show that PSWE explained future research performance, with the highest impact on the quality of publications. The most important PSWE factors for good performance were fair, considerate leaders and a supportive social climate. The results suggest that improving the psycho-social work environment at the universities could be one strategy to improve research performance.

  • 6.
    Pico-Espinosa, Oscar Javier
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Aboagye, Emmanuel
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. Karolinska institutet.
    Côté, Pierre
    Ontario Tech University, Canada.
    Peterson, Anna
    Karolinska institutet.
    Holm, Lena W.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Jensen, Irene
    Karolinska institutet.
    Skillgate, Eva
    Karolinska institutet; Sophiahemmet university; Naprapathögskola .
    Deep tissue massage, strengthening and stretching exercises, and a combination of both compared with advice to stay active for subacute or persistent non-specific neck pain: A cost-effectiveness analysis of the Stockholm Neck trial (STONE)2020In: Musculoskeletal Science and Practice, ISSN 2468-7812, Vol. 46, article id 102109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of deep tissue massage (‘massage’), strengthening and stretching exercises (‘exercises’) or a combination of both (‘combined therapy’) in comparison with advice to stay active (‘advice’) for subacute and persistent neck pain, from a societal perspective.

    Methods We conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis alongside a four-arm randomized controlled trial of 619 participants followed-up for one year. Health-related quality of life was measured using EQ-5D-3L and costs were calculated from baseline to one year. The interventions were ranked according to quality adjusted life years (QALYs) in a cost-consequence analysis. Thereafter, an incremental cost per QALY was calculated.

    Results In the cost-consequence analysis, in comparison with advice, exercises resulted in higher QALY gains, and massage and the combined therapy were more costly and less beneficial. Exercises may be a cost-effective treatment compared with advice to stay active if society is willing to pay 17 640 EUR per QALY. However, differences in QALY gains were minimal; on average, participants in the massage group, spent a year in a state of health valued at 0.88, exercises: 0.89, combined therapy: 0.88 and, advice: 0.88.

    Conclusions Exercises are cost-effective compared to advice given that the societal willingness to pay is above 17 640 EUR per year in full health gained. Massage and a combined therapy are not cost-effective. While exercise appeared to have the best cost/benefit profile, even this treatment had only a modest benefit and treatment innovation is needed. Advice to stay active remains as a good therapeutic alternative from an economical perspective.

1 - 6 of 6
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