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  • 1.
    Arenhall, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Sexualitet och parrelation vid hjärtsjukdom2012In: Kardiologisk omvårdnad / [ed] Bengt Fridlund, Dan Malm, Jan Mårtensson, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012, 2, 403-416 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Arenhall, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital, Department of Cardiology.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University; Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Malm, Dan
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University; County Hospital Ryhov, Jönkoping, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Örebro University.
    The male partners' experiences of the intimate relationships after a first myocardial infarction2011In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 10, no 2, 108-114 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Stress in the intimate relationship is found to worsen the prognosis in women suffering from myocardial infarction (MI). Little is known about how male spouses experience the intimate relationship.

    Aim: This study aimed to explore and describe the experience of men’s intimate relationships in connection to and after their female partner’s first MI.

    Methods: An explorative and qualitative design was used. Interviews were conducted with 16 men having a partner who the year before had suffered a first MI. The data were analysed with qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Three themes emerged: masculine image challenged; life takes another direction; and life remains unchanged. The men were forced to deal with an altered image of themselves as men, and as sexual beings. They were hesitant to approach their spouse in the same way as before the MI because they viewed her to be more fragile. The event also caused them to consider their own lifestyle, changing towards healthier dietary and exercise habits.

    Conclusions: After their spouse’s MI, men experienced a challenge to their masculine image. They viewed their spouse as being more fragile, which led the men to be gentler in sexual intimacy and more hesitant to invite sexual activity. This knowledge about how male spouses experience the intimate relationship could be helpful for health personnel in hospitals and primary care when they interact with couples where the woman suffers from cardiac disease or other chronic disorders.

  • 3.
    Arenhall, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Hälsohögskolan Jönköping.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Örebro universitet.
    The female partners' experiences of intimate relationship after a first myocardial infarction2011In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 20, no 11-12, 1677-1684 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim.

    This study aimed to explore and describe women’s experience of intimate relationships in connection to and after their partner’s first myocardial infarction.

     

    Background.

    Support from partners is important for recovery, but little is known about partners’ experience of intimate relationships after myocardial infarction.

     

    Design.

    The study used an explorative, qualitative design.

     

    Methods.

    The first author interviewed 20 women having a partner who had suffered a first myocardial infarction during the preceding year. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data.

     

    Findings.

    Three themes emerged: ‘limited life space’, ‘sense of life lost’ and ‘another dimension of life’. The women described how their self-assumed responsibility led to a more stifling and limited life. Their sense of life lost was described in terms of deficits and feeling the loss. The women also described experiencing another dimension of life characterised by three subthemes: ‘uncertainty of life’, ‘certain of relationship’ and ‘share life more’.

     

    Conclusions.

    The partners’ myocardial infarction had an impact on the interviewees’ intimate relationships; they suffered a major loss and missed their ‘former’ partner, both emotionally and sexually. They struggled with the new asymmetry in their intimate relationship and felt compelled to adapt to their partners’ lack of sexual desire or function. Also, their partner controlled them, which lead towards a stifling, more limited life space.

     

    Relevance to clinical practice.

    Caregivers in hospital and primary care settings could apply the findings in their efforts to help couples recover or maintain intimate relationships following myocardial infarction.

  • 4.
    Brännström, Margareta
    et al.
    Strategic Research Program in Health Care Sciences (SFO-V), Karolinska Institutet, and Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Bodil
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Lund University and Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Svedberg, Petra
    School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Division of Nursing Sciences, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, and Department of Cardiology UHL, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sexual knowledge in patients with a myocardial infarction and their partners2014In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 29, no 4, 332-339 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Sexual health and sexual activity are important elements of an individual’s well-being. For couples, this topic is often affected after a myocardial infarction (MI). It has become increasingly clear that, after an MI, patients are insufficiently educated on how to resume normal sexual activity. However, sufficient data on the general knowledge that patients and partners have about sexual activity and MI are lacking.

    Objective: The aims of this study were to explore and compare patients’ and partners’ sexual knowledge 1 month after a first MI and 1 year after the event and to compare whether the individual knowledge had changed over time. A second aim was to investigate whether patients and their partners report receiving information about sexual health and sexual activity from healthcare professionals during the first year after the event and how this information was perceived.

    Subjects and Methods: This descriptive, comparative survey study enrolled participants from 13 Swedish hospitals in 2007-2009. A total of 115 patients with a first MI and their partners answered the Sex After MI Knowledge Test questionnaire 1 month after the MI and 1 year after the event. Correct responses generated a maximum score of 75.

    Results: Only 41% of patients and 31% of partners stated that they had received information on sex and relationships at the 1 year follow-up. The patients scored 51±10 on the Sex After MI Knowledge Test at inclusion into the study, compared with the 52±10 score for the partners. At the 1-year follow-up, the patients’ knowledge had significantly increased to a score of 55±7, but the partners’ knowledge did not significantly change (53±10).

    Conclusions: First MI patients and their partners reported receiving limited information about sexual issues during the cardiac rehabilitation and had limited knowledge about sexual health and sexual activity.

  • 5.
    Hardy, Jennifer
    et al.
    Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Nursing and Human Movement, Australian Catholic University.
    Lindqvist, Ragny
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Dahlberg, Ola
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för medicinsk vetenskap.
    The current status of nursing informatics in undergraduate nursing programs: Comparative case studies between Sweden and Australia1997In: Nursing informatics: The impact of nursing knowledge on health care informatics / [ed] Gerdin U, Tallberg M & Wainwright P, Amsterdam: IOS Press , 1997, 132-136 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Hardy, Jenny
    et al.
    Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Nursing and Human Movement, Australian Catholic University, Australia.
    Lindqvist, Ragny
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Dahlberg, Ola
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för medicinsk vetenskap.
    The current status of nursing informatics in undergraduate nursing programs: comparative case studies between Sweden and Australia1997In: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, ISSN 0926-9630, Vol. 46, 132-136 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last ten years, the inclusion of education in health information systems has assumed an important role in graduate programs for health professionals. More recently, attention has focused on undergraduate programs. Throughout the world schools of nursing, organisations and associations are addressing the issue of educational offerings in nursing informatics. This paper reports on the status of nursing informatics at undergraduate level. Nurse academics from Gavle and Lund in Sweden, and from Melbourne and Sydney in Australia, took part in a survey of the respective nursing courses. The purpose of the study was to identify and describe examples of types of nursing informatics courses in Australia and Sweden A convenient sample of academics were approached and interviewed The results of the survey illustrate, in the schools surveyed, the slow emergence of nursing informatics into nursing curricula.

  • 7.
    Hedman, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Inst. för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    Pöder, Ulrika
    Inst. för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    Mamhidir, Anna-Greta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Inst. för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    Nilsson, Annika
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Inst. för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Inst. för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    Häggström, Elisabet
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Inst. för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    Life memories and the ability to act: the meaning of autonomy and participation for older people when living with chronic illness2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 29, no 4, 824-833 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a lack of knowledge about how older people living with chronic illness describe the meaning of autonomy and participation, indicating a risk for reduced autonomy and participation in their everyday life. The purpose of this study was to describe the meaning of autonomy and participation among older people living with chronic illness in accordance with their lived experience. The design was descriptive with a phenomenological approach guided by Giorgi's descriptive phenomenological psychological method. Purposive sampling was used, and 16 older people living with chronic illness who lived in an ordinary home participated in individual interviews. The findings showed that the meaning of autonomy and participation among the older people emerged when it was challenged and evoked emotional considerations of the lived experience of having a chronic illness. It involved living a life apart, yet still being someone who is able, trustworthy and given responsibility – still being seen and acknowledged. The meaning of autonomy and participation was derived through life memories and used by the older people in everyday life for adjustment or adaption to the present life and the future. Our conclusion is that autonomy and participation were considered in relation to older people's life memories in the past, in their present situation and also their future wishes. Ability or disability is of less importance than the meaning of everyday life among older people. We suggest using fewer labels for limitations in everyday life when caring for older people and more use of the phrase ‘ability to act’ in different ways, based on older people's descriptions of the meaning of autonomy and participation.

  • 8.
    Hellström-Hyson, Eva
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Mårtensson, Gunilla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Uppsala universitet.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Uppsala universitet.
    To take responsibility or to be an onlooker: Nursing students' experiences of two models of supervision2012In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 32, no 1, 105-110 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The present study aimed at describing how nursing students engaged in their clinical practice experienced two models of supervision: supervision on student wards and traditional supervision. BACKGROUND: Supervision for nursing students in clinical practice can be organized in different ways. In the present study, parts of nursing students' clinical practice were carried out on student wards in existing hospital departments. The purpose was to give students the opportunity to assume greater responsibility for their clinical education and to apply the nursing process more independently through peer learning. METHOD: A descriptive design with a qualitative approach was used. Interviews were carried out with eight nursing students in their final semester of a 3-year degree program in nursing. The data were analyzed using content analysis. FINDINGS: Two themes were revealed in the data analysis: When supervised on the student wards, nursing students experienced assuming responsibility and finding one's professional role, while during traditional supervision, they experienced being an onlooker and having difficulties assuming responsibility. CONCLUSIONS: Supervision on a student ward was found to give nursing students a feeling of acknowledgment and more opportunities to develop independence, continuity, cooperation and confidence.

  • 9.
    Israelsson, Johan
    et al.
    Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Bremer, Anders
    University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Åsa
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Cronberg, Tobias
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Djärv, Therese
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Larsson, Ing-Marie
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lilja, Gisela
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Sunnerhagen, Katarina S
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wallin, Ewa
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ågren, Susanna
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Åkerman, Eva
    Skane University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Neurologic outcome, health-related quality of life, anxiety and symptoms of depression among in-hospital cardiac arrest survivors2015In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 96, no S1, 101-101 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Israelsson, Johan
    et al.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden; Kalmar Maritime Academy, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden; Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Bremer, Anders
    Department of Acute and Prehospital Care and Medical Technology and PreHospen – Centre for Prehospital Research, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden; Division of Emergency Medical Services, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden .
    Herlitz, Johan
    Department of Acute and Prehospital Care and Medical Technology and PreHospen – Centre for Prehospital Research, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Axelsson, Åsa B.
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Cronberg, Tobias
    Lund University, Skane University Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Neurology, Lund, Sweden.
    Djärv, Therese
    Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Larsson, Ing-Marie
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology & Intensive Care, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lilja, Gisela
    Lund University, Skane University Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Neurology, Lund, Sweden.
    Sunnerhagen, Katharina S.
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Section of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wallin, Ewa
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology & Intensive Care, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ågren, Susanna
    Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden .
    Åkerman, Eva
    Department of Perioperative Medicine and Intensive Care, Skane University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Department of Health and Caring Science, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden; Department of Health Care Science, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden; Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar, Sweden .
    Health status and psychological distress among in-hospital cardiac arrest survivors in relation to gender2017In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 114, 27-33 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe health status and psychological distress among in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) survivors in relation to gender.

    METHODS: This national register study consists of data from follow-up registration of IHCA survivors 3-6 months post cardiac arrest (CA) in Sweden. A questionnaire was sent to the survivors, including measurements of health status (EQ-5D-5L) and psychological distress (HADS).

    RESULTS: Between 2013 and 2015, 594 IHCA survivors were included in the study. The median values for EQ-5D-5L index and EQ VAS among survivors were 0.78 (q1-q3=0.67-0.86) and 70 (q1-q3=50-80) respectively. The values were significantly lower (p<0.001) in women compared to men. In addition, women reported more problems than men in all dimensions of EQ-5D-5L, except self-care. A majority of the respondents reported no problems with anxiety (85.4%) and/or symptoms of depression (87.0%). Women reported significantly more problems with anxiety (p<0.001) and symptoms of depression (p<0.001) compared to men. Gender was significantly associated with poorer health status and more psychological distress. No interaction effects for gender and age were found.

    CONCLUSIONS: Although the majority of survivors reported acceptable health status and no psychological distress, a substantial proportion reported severe problems. Women reported worse health status and more psychological distress compared to men. Therefore, a higher proportion of women may be in need of support. Health care professionals should make efforts to identify health problems among survivors and offer individualised support when needed.

  • 11.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Commentary on Kristofferzon M-L, Lofmark R & Carlsson M (2007) Striving for balance in daily life experiences of Swedish women and men shortly after a myocardial infarction. Journal of Clinical Nursing 16, 391-401 - Response2008In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 17, no 8, 1106-1106 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Health-related quality of life over the first year after myocardial infarction2006In: New Frontiers in Cardiac Care: Bergen, Norway 5–6th May 2006, 2006, s40-s41 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to compare healthrelated quality of life (HRQoL) in patients 1, 4 and 12 months after myocardial infarction with regard to (1) differences over time and (2) differences between younger (42–64 years old) and older (65–90 years old) patients.

    Methods: A longitudinal, descriptive and comparative design was used for the study, which included 69 younger (39% women) and 79 older (42% women) patients. Data were collected with the SF-36 Health Survey during the period 1999–2001.

    Results: Table 1 displays main effects of time and groups. No group-by-time interaction effects emerged. HRQoL increased in younger patients for physical functioning, bodily pain, vitality and social functioning scales between 1 and 4 months, which remained at 12 months. There was also an increase for role-physical and role-emotional scales between 1 and 4 months and a further increase between 4 and 12 months. In older patients the increase for rolephysical, vitality, social functioning and role-emotional scales was found between 1 and 4 months, which remained at 12 months. Moreover, an improvement in the physical functioning scale was found between 4 and 12 months and for the bodily pain scale between 1 and 4 months. An increase for mental health scale in the study group was evident between 4 and 12 months, but when the study group was divided into younger and older patients the change over time disappeared. The general health scale was stable over time. Compared with older patients, younger patients rated higher HRQoL for the physical functioning scale at 1, 4 and 12 months, for the social functioning scale at 1 and 12 months, for the roleemotional scale at 4 and 12 months and for the rolephysical scale at 12 months.

    Conclusion: There was an improvement in HRQoL in both younger and older patients, but the improvement was more obvious in younger patients. In addition, younger patients perceived higher HRQoL than older patients in several dimensions and at several points in time. This was most evident at 12 months.

  • 13.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Life after myocardial infarction in women and men: coping, social support and quality of life over the first year2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims : The general aim of this thesis was to describe the life situation of women and men during their first year after myocardial infarction (MI) with regard to problems in daily life, how they coped with them, the social support available and the patients’ perceived quality of life (QoL). An additional aim was to examine differences over time and between women and men in coping, social support and QoL.

    Methods : A consecutive series of 74 women and 97 men were selected 1 month after MI and followed over the first year. A qualitative approach was used to describe experiences of everyday life of 20 women and 19 men from the study group, from the onset of MI through the first months after the event (retrospectively). Focus was on managing problems and support from the network (I). Also experiences at 4 to 6 months and expectations of the future were explored (II). Coping, social support and QoL were compared between women and men both with a cross-sectional (at 1 month; 74 women and 97 men; III) as well as with a longitudinal design (at 1, 4 and 12 months; 60 women and 88 men; IV).

    Findings : Physical symptoms and emotional distress were the most commonly described problems during the first months after MI. The patients managed the problems by negotiating with themselves, relying on their own capabilities, changing attitudes and behaviour and taking their own decisions. The network was generally supportive but also communication problems were described (I). Many of the patients had not established a stable health condition after 6 months. They managed the consequences of their disease, found a meaning in what had happened, and confidence in the future. The support from their social network encouraged them to move on (II). Women used more evasive and supportive coping than men 1 month after MI. More women perceived support being available from grandchildren and friends and more men from their partners. Compared with men, women rated lower health-related QoL and QoL (III). Coping and social support were stable over time, women used more evasive coping than men and health-related QoL increased for both women and men. (IV).

    Conclusions : The first month after MI seems to be a vulnerable period especially for women. They had difficulties interpreting their heart symptoms, did not want to bother others with their worries and rated lower QoL than men. Patients redefined normal life, found hopes for the future and women did not demonstrate a poorer QoL profile than men over time.

  • 14.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Johansson, Ingela
    Linköpings universitet.
    Brännström, Margareta
    Umeå universitet.
    Arenhall, Eva
    Örebro universitet.
    Baigi, Amir
    Landstinget Halland Primärvården.
    Brunt, David
    Växjö universitet.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Hälsohögskolan Jönköping.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Örebro universitet.
    Persson, Sylvi
    Växjö universitet.
    Rask, Mikael
    Växjö universitet.
    Wieslander, Inger
    Hälsohögskolan Jönköping.
    Ivarsson, Bodil
    Lunds universitet.
    Evaluation of a Swedish version of the Watts Sexual Function Questionnaire (WSFQ) in persons with heart disease: a pilot study2010In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 9, no 3, 168-174 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: As part of preparation for a Swedish multicentre study, exploring sexual and married life in patients with myocardial infarction and their partners, a Swedish validated instrument was required.

    Aims: The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of a Swedish version of the Watts Sexual Function Questionnaire (WSFQ) among persons with a heart disease.

    Methods: A convenience sample of 79 persons (47 men and 32 women) living with a heart disease was recruited from the members of the National Association of Heart and Lung Patients. They completed a Swedish version of the WSFQ on two occasions.

    Results: Two separate factor analyses each revealed a two-factor structure on both occasions: “Sexual appetite” and “Sexual expectations” with gender-neutral questions and “Sexual sensitiveness” and “Sexual ability” with gender-specific questions. Cronbach's alpha coefficients ranged from 0.48 to 0.86 and test–retest values for all but one question exceeded 0.70.

    Conclusions: The Swedish version of the WSFQ showed good validity and stability and acceptable internal homogeneity. Extended evaluations of the questionnaire are recommended.

  • 15.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Lindqvist, Ragny
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Nilsson, Annika
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Living with chronic illness2009In: The 2nd International Research Seminar on Salutogenesis: Helsinki, May 14-16, 2009, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To study differences between two groups, end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and chronic heart failure (CHF), regarding sense of coherence (SOC), General Self-efficacy (GSE), and quality of life (QoL) as well as relationships between these variables. 

    Design: Descriptive, comparative and correlative design.  

    Sample: A Swedish sample of 100 patients (59 CHF and 41 ESRD) was included. The mean age was 68 years (46 – 80 years).  

    Measures: Data were collected with the SOC, the GSE and the Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (LSQ). Age, sex, educational level and living area were also examined.    

    Data analysis: Differences were tested with chi-square and Mann-Whitney U-test and correlations with Pearson’s correlation coefficient. 

    Results: Both SOC (r=0.58, P<0.01) and GSE (r=0.46, P=<0.01) were positively correlated with LSQ. No significant differences between the two groups were found for the study variables. Older persons (>65 years) rated their personal relationships within QoL higher (P=0.045) and older ESRD patients their SOC stronger (P=0.049). Men with CHF rated their self-efficacy higher (P=0.034).

    Conclusions: Our preliminary results indicate that it seems more important how the individual tackle their present situation than what chronic illness they have.  

     

  • 16.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Ragny
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Nilsson, Annika
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Relationships between coping, coping resources and quality of life in patients with chronic illness: a pilot study2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 25, no 3, 476-483 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden there are approximately about 3500 end-stage renal disease and 250 000 chronic heart failure patients. 

    Objectives: The original purpose of the study was to determine differences between two groups of patients with chronic illness (end-stage renal disease and chronic heart failure) regarding the following study variables: coping, sense of coherence, self-efficacy and quality of life. Following this, the aim was to explore the relationships between demographic variables (sex, age, educational level and living area) and quality of life as well as between coping, sense of coherence, self-efficacy and quality of life for the combined sample of patients with end-stage renal disease and chronic heart failure.

    Methods: A comparative and correlative design was used with a sample of 100 patients (n=41 end-stage renal disease, n=59 chronic heart failure). The data were collected during 2004, using four standardized questionnaires and regression analyses were conducted.

    Results: No significant differences were found between the two groups. Positive correlations were identified between sense of coherence, general self-efficacy and quality of life, whereas negative correlations emerge between emotion-focused coping, sense of coherence, general self-efficacy and quality of life. Sense of coherence, general self-efficacy and emotion-focused coping explained 40% of the variance in quality of life. Those with low sense of coherence and general self-efficacy showed negative correlations between emotion-focused coping and quality of life, whereas no such correlations were shown for those with high values on sense of coherence and general self-efficacy.    

    Conclusions: The present results on coping and quality of life correspond with previous research regarding how other groups with chronic illness handled their daily life. Preliminary results indicate that how individuals tackle their present situation is more important than which chronic illness they have. Women used more emotion-focused coping than men, which constitute an important finding for further research.

  • 17.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Löfmark, Rurik
    Länssjukhuset Gävle-Sandviken.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala universitet.
    Coping, social support and quality of life over time after myocardial infarction2005In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 52, no 2, 113-124 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. This paper describes gender differences in perceived coping, social support and quality of life 1, 4 and 12 months after myocardial infarction.

    Background. There is a shortage of studies with a longitudinal research design investigating coping, social support and quality of life in women and men after myocardial infarction.

    Methods. A longitudinal, descriptive and comparative design was used for the study, which included 74 women and 97 men. At 12 months, 60 women and 88 men remained. Data were collected using the Jalowiec Coping Scale, a social support questionnaire, the SF-36 Health Survey (health-related quality of life) and the Quality of Life Index-Cardiac version (quality of life). The data were collected during the period 1999–2001.

    Results. No statistically significant changes over time in coping assessments emerged in the study group, except for fatalistic coping, which diminished over time in men. Women used more evasive coping than men at 4 and 12 months. The perceived efficiency in coping with physical aspects of the heart disease increased. More women than men perceived available support from grandchildren and staff of the church. Health-related quality of life increased in women and men in physical functioning, role-physical, vitality, social functioning, and role-emotional scales.

    Moreover, an improvement in the mental health scale was evident in women and a reduction in pain in men. No statistically significant gender differences were found for quality of life at any point in time.

    Conclusions. The findings can be used to inform caregivers that optimistic, selfreliant and confrontational coping were the most frequently used by both women and men over the first year after myocardial infarction, and that confrontational coping has been shown to have positive outcomes in the longer term. Nurses should tell women about the importance of seeking prompt treatment and discuss health problems with caregivers and significant others. Care planning should include family members and significant others so that they can support and encourage patients to cope with problems in daily life.

  • 18.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Löfmark, Rurik
    Centre for Bioethics, Karolinska Institutet, Uppsala University, Solna, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Managing consequences and finding hope: experiences of Swedish women and men 4-6 months after myocardial infarction2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 22, no 3, 367-375 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has focused more on symptoms, risk factors and treatment, than on individuals’ experiences of illness and recovery after myocardial infarction (MI). Therefore, the aim of the study was to describe the experiences of present everyday life of women and men 4–6 months after MI and their expectations for the future. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 women and 19 men from January 2000 to November 2001. Data were analysed with content analysis. Two themes, ‘Managing consequences of MI’ and ‘Finding a meaning in what had happened’, were generated. The first theme reveals that many of the patients had not established a stable health condition, even if symptoms and emotional distress had diminished over time. They had to manage health problems, lifestyle modifications, emotional reactions and changes in social life. The support from their social network encouraged them to move on. The second theme shows that patients also found positive consequences of what they had gone through, new life values and hopes in the future. The conclusions were that most of the patients moved on and began to regain a balance in everyday life, but some patients still struggled hard to find this balance. Those patients experienced large difficulties with managing their everyday life and felt a lack of support from their social network. Health professionals can be an important resource in helping patients in their adaptation to changes if they are more sensitive to patients’ needs of support both in a short- and long-term perspective.

  • 19.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Löfmark, Rurik
    Länssjukhuset Gävle-Sandviken.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala universitet.
    Myocardial infarction: gender differences in coping and social support2003In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 44, no 4, 360-374 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. The aim of this review is to summarize current knowledge about gender differences in perceptions of coping and social support among patients who have experienced myocardial infarction.

    Rationale. Women with coronary heart disease have physical, social and medical disadvantages compared with their male counterparts, which can influence their perception of recovery after cardiac events. No review has been found which focuses

    on gender differences in coping and social support in myocardial infarction patients.

    Method. A computerized search was conducted using the keywords ‘myocardial infarction’, ‘coping’, ‘gender differences’ and ‘social support’. Forty-one articles, published between 1990 and October 2002, were scrutinized.

    Findings. Two studies report that women used more coping strategies than men. Several qualitative studies found that women used a variety of coping strategies. Women minimized the impact of the disease, tended to delay in seeking treatment

    and did not want to bother others with their health problems. Household activities were important to them and aided their recovery. Men were more likely to involve their spouses in their recovery, and resuming work and keeping physically fit were

    important to them. Women tended to report that they had less social support up to 1 year after a myocardial infarction compared with men. They received less information

    about the disease and rehabilitation and experienced lack of belief in their heart problems from caregivers. Further, they received less assistance with household duties from informal caregivers. Men tended to report more support from their

    spouses than did women.

    Conclusions. Traditional gender-role patterns may influence the recovery of patients who have experienced myocardial infarction. Caregivers may need to be more sensitive to gender-specific needs with regard to risk profiles, social roles, and the patient’s own role identity. For many women, especially older ones, household duties and family responsibilities may be an opportunity and a base for cardiac rehabilitation.

  • 20.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Löfmark, Rurik
    Länssjukhuset Gävle-Sandviken.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala universitet.
    Perceived coping, social support, and quality of life 1 month after myocardial infarction: A comparison between Swedish women and men2005In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 34, no 1, 39-50 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The study objective was to compare coping, social support, and quality of life in Swedish women and men 1 month after myocardial infarction.

    DESIGN: The study design was cross-sectional and descriptive-comparative.

    SETTING: The study took place in 1 hospital service area in the middle of Sweden.

    SUBJECTS: The sample consisted of 74 women and 97 men.

    INSTRUMENTS: The Jalowiec Coping Scale, the Social Network and Social Support Questionnaire, the Short Form-36 Health Survey, and the Quality of Life Index-Cardiac Version were used.

    RESULTS: Compared with men, women used more evasive and supportive coping and rated psychologic aspects of the heart disease as more problematic to manage. More women perceived available support from friends and grandchildren, and more men perceived available support from their partner. Women rated lower levels in physical and psychologic dimensions of quality of life.

    CONCLUSION: The first month after myocardial infarction is a susceptible period especially for women. They used more evasive and supportive coping and experienced a lower quality of life compared with men.

  • 21.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Löfmark, Rurik
    Centre for Bioethics at Karolinska Institutet and Uppsala University, Solna, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Striving for balance in daily life: experiences of Swedish women and men shortly after myocardial infarction2007In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, no 2, 391-401 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim is to describe experiences of daily life of women and men during the first four to six months after a myocardial infarction. The focus is on problems, managing problems and support from their network.

    Background: A cardiac event is traumatic and may influence well-being during a significant period of time. Few qualitative studies have investigated experiences of both women and men after a myocardial infarction and remarkably little research has been conducted on men’s experiences.

    Design: The study design was descriptive, retrospective and qualitative.

    Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 women and 19 men from January 2000 to November 2001. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Three themes were generated from the analysis; ‘Threatening ordinary life’, ‘Struggling for control’ and ‘The ambiguous network’. Physical symptoms and emotional distress were the most commonly described problems during the first months after a myocardial infarction. The informants manage the problems by negotiating with themselves, relying on their own capabilities, changing attitudes and behaviours and taking their own decisions and actions. The network was generally supportive but rather often the informants also experienced communication problems when they interacted with their network.

    Conclusions: Women and men strive for balance between problems and resources in daily life after a myocardial infarction. How well they succeeded depends on how secure they feel how well they communicate their needs to their network and how sensitive their network is to their spoken and unspoken needs.

    Relevance to clinical practice: The findings provide an insight into what kind of problems women and men may experience after myocardial infarction and how caregivers can aid them to increase security in their daily life. Some risk characteristics that may have increased their problems in daily life are suggested, for women and men respectively.

  • 22.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Mårtensson, Gunilla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Stöd och utmaningar i verksamhetsförlagd utbildning - vem bidrar till lärandet ur studenters perspektiv?2013In: / [ed] SSF, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Gunilla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Mamhidir, Anna-Greta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Löfmark, Anna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Stord/Haugesund University College, Department of Health Sciences, Haugesund, Norway.
    Nursing students' perceptions of clinical supervision: The contributions of preceptors, head preceptors and clinical lecturers2013In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 33, no 10, 1252-1257 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aims of the study were 1) to investigate to what extent nursing students were satisfied with the supervision provided by facilitators (preceptor, head preceptor, and clinical lecturer), 2) to compare nursing students' ratings of facilitators' contribution to supervision as supportive and challenging, and 3) to examine relationships between facilitators' supportive and challenging behavior in supervision and nursing students' perception of fulfillment of expected learning outcomes in clinical education.

    Background: Although there are many studies on support of students in clinical education, few have addressed this from the students' point of view or made comparisons between different facilitators.

    Methods: A cross-sectional survey study was conducted during April to November 2010, where 107 nursing students, from a university in central Sweden, answered a questionnaire about supervision immediately after their period of clinical education.

    Result: Supportive behavior in supervision was rated higher by students for all facilitator groups as compared with challenging behavior. The students rated preceptors and clinical lecturers as more supportive than head preceptors and clinical lecturers as providing more challenges than the two other facilitator groups. Supportive and challenging behavior in supervision explained 39% of the variance in students' overall learning outcomes. However, the regression coefficient was only significant for students' ratings of supportive behavior for the preceptor.

    Conclusions: Nursing students were satisfied with facilitators' supervision and by their contribution to fulfillment of overall learning outcomes. Comparisons showed that preceptors in a higher degree were perceived as supportive while clinical lecturers were perceived as more important as challengers for critical thinking, reflection and exchange of experiences between students. The model of supervision seems to be promising, but the roles across facilitators need to be made clearer, especially the head preceptor's role, which seemed to be the most unclear role in this model.

  • 24.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Uppsala universitet.
    Ternesten-Hasséus, Ewa
    Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Institution of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A study of two generic health-related quality of life questionnaires - Nottingham Health Profile and Short-Form 36 Health Survey - and of coping in patients with sensory hyperreactivity2013In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 11, 182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Sensory hyperreactivity (SHR) is one explanation for airway symptoms induced by chemicals and scents. Little is known about health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and coping, in this group of patients. A study was done in patients with SHR to (1) compare the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) and the Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) in regard to their suitability, validity, reliability, and acceptability; (2) evaluate how the patients cope with the illness; (3) assess whether there are differences between women and men with respect to HRQOL and coping; and (4) assess whether there are differences between patients and normative data with respect to HRQOL and coping.

    Methods

    A total of 115 patients (91 women) with SHR were asked to answer five questionnaires: a study-specific questionnaire, the Chemical Sensitivity Scale for Sensory Hyperreactivity (CSS-SHR), the NHP, the SF-36, and the Jalowiec Coping Scale-60.

    Results

    Eighty-three patients (72%; 70 women) completed all questionnaires. The SF-36 scores were less skewed and more homogeneously distributed and showed fewer floor and ceiling effects than the NHP scores. The SF-36 was also discriminated better between patients with high and low CSS-SHR scores. The reliability standard for both questionnaires was satisfactory. There were no gender differences in HRQOL. Patients with SHR had significantly lower HRQOL scores than the normative data in comparable domains of the NHP and the SF-36: emotional reactions/mental health, energy/vitality, physical mobility/functioning, and pain/bodily pain. In social isolation/functioning, the results were different; the NHP scores were similar to the normative data and the SF-36 scores were lower. The most commonly used coping styles were optimistic, self-reliant, and confrontational. Women used optimistic coping more than men. Compared with the normative group, patients with SHR used confrontational and optimistic coping more and emotive coping less.

    Conclusions

    The current findings showed that both the NHP and the SF-36 were reliable instruments; but the results suggest that the SF-36 is a more sensitive instrument than the NHP for elucidating HRQOL in patients with SHR. Patients with SHR experienced a poor HRQOL and they followed the Western tradition of preferring problem-focused coping strategies to palliative and emotive strategies.

  • 25. Larsson, I. -M
    et al.
    Wallin, E.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Rubertsson, S.
    HEALTH RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE IMPROVES DURING THE FIRST 6 MONTH AFTER CARDIAC ARREST AND HYPOTHERMIA TREATMENT2013In: Intensive Care Medicine, ISSN 0342-4642, E-ISSN 1432-1238, Vol. 39, S221-S221 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Larsson, I-M
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Wallin, E.
    Uppsala University.
    Sellert-Rydberg, M.
    Rubertsson, S.
    Uppsala University.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    THERAPEUTIC HYPOTHERMIA AFTER CARDIAC ARREST: RELATIVES EXPERIENCES DURING THE FIRST SIX WEEKS AFTER CARDIAC ARREST2011In: Intensive Care Medicine, ISSN 0342-4642, E-ISSN 1432-1238, Vol. 37, no S1, S74-S74 p., 0274Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Larsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Wallin, Ewa
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Niessner, Marion
    Roche Diagnostics GmbH, Penzberg, Germany.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg; UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London.
    Rubertsson, Sten
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Post-cardiac arrest serum levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein for predicting neurological outcome2014In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 85, no 12, 1654-1661 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim of the study: To investigate serum levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) for evaluation of neurological outcome in cardiac arrest (CA) patients and compare GFAP sensitivity and specificity to that of more studied biomarkers neuron-specific enolas (NSE) and S100B. Method: A prospective observational study was performed in three hospitals in Sweden during 2008-2012. The participants were 125 CA patients treated with therapeutic hypothermia (TH) to 32-34. °C for 24. hours. Samples were collected from peripheral blood (n. =. 125) and the jugular bulb (n. =. 47) up to 108. hours post-CA. GFAP serum levels were quantified using a novel, fully automated immunochemical method. Other biomarkers investigated were NSE and S100B. Neurological outcome was assessed using the Cerebral Performance Categories scale (CPC) and dichotomized into good and poor outcome. Results: GFAP predicted poor neurological outcome with 100% specificity and 14-23% sensitivity at 24, 48 and 72. hours post-CA. The corresponding values for NSE were 27-50% sensitivity and for S100B 21-30% sensitivity when specificity was set to 100%. A logistic regression with stepwise combination of the investigated biomarkers, GFAP, did not increase the ability to predict neurological outcome. No differences were found in GFAP, NSE and S100B levels when peripheral and jugular bulb blood samples were compared. Conclusion: Serum GFAP increase in patients with poor outcome but did not show sufficient sensitivity to predict neurological outcome after CA. Both NSE and S100B were shown to be better predictors. The ability to predict neurological outcome did not increased when combining the three biomarkers.

  • 28.
    Larsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wallin, Ewa
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rubertsson, Sten
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Health-related quality of life improves during the first six months after cardiac arrest and hypothermia treatment2014In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 85, no 2, 215-220 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim of the study:

    To investigate whether there were any changes in and correlations between anxiety, depression and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) over time, between hospital discharge and one and six months after cardiac arrest (CA), in patients treated with therapeutic hypothermia (TH). Method: During a 4-year period at three hospitals in Sweden, 26 patients were prospectively included after CA treated with TH. All patients completed the questionnaires Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Euroqol (EQ5D), Euroqol visual analogue scale (EQ-VAS) and Short Form 12 (SF12) at three occasions, at hospital discharge, and at one and 6 months after CA. Result: There was improvement over time in HRQoL, the EQ5D index (p = 0.002) and the SF12 physical component score (PCS) (p = 0.005). Changes over time in anxiety and depression were not found. Seventy-three percent of patients had an EQ-VAS score below 70 (scale 0–100) on overall health status at discharge from hospital; at 6 months the corresponding figure was 41%. Physical problems were the most com-mon complaint affecting HRQoL. A correlation was found between depression and HRQoL, and this was strongest at six months (rs = −0.44 to −0.71, p ≤ 0.001). Conclusion: HRQoL improves over the first 6 months after a CA. Patients reported lower levels of HRQoL on the physical as compared to mental component. The results indicate that the less anxiety and depression patients perceive, the better HRQoL they have and that time can be an important factor in recovery after CA.

  • 29.
    Larsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Inst. för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Uppsala universitet.
    Wallin, Ewa
    Inst. för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Uppsala universitet.
    Rubertsson, Sten
    Inst. för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Uppsala universitet.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Uppsala universitet.
    Relatives' experiences during the next of kin's hospital stay after surviving cardiac arrest and therapeutic hypothermia2013In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 12, no 4, 353-359 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe relatives’ experiences during the next of kin’s hospital stay after surviving a cardiac arrest (CA) treated with hypothermia at an intensive care unit (ICU).

    Methods: Twenty relatives were interviewed when the person having suffered the CA was discharged from hospital, 1.5 to 6 weeks post-CA. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Three themes are described: The first period of chaos, Feeling secure in a difficult situation, and Living in a changed existence. Relatives found it difficult to assimilate the medical information and wanted it in written form. They wanted honest and clear information about their next of kin’s condition and prognosis. They lacked rehabilitation plans after discharge from the medical ward. Relatives felt a need to maintain telephone contact with family members and friends, which was time-consuming. They felt guilty and had a conscience about these feelings. Relatives felt uncertain about the future, but still hopeful.

    Conclusion: Relatives asked for more information and individual rehabilitation plans. Booklets describing CA, the ICU stay and continuing care and rehabilitation directed at both the patients and their relatives are needed. Follow-up visits to the ICU staff, for both patients and relatives, need to be arranged. Hospitals should consider having a rehabilitation plan for this group of patients, which is presented by a team of healthcare professionals and that focuses on the individual’s situation, including the consequences of their heart disease and brain damage.

  • 30.
    Lindqvist, Ragny
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Computer skills among Swedish nursing students2000In: Nursing informatics one step beyond: The evolution of technology and nursing / [ed] Saba V, Carr R, Sermeus W & Rocha P, Auckland: Adis International Limited , 2000, 822-822 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Mamhidir, Anna-Greta
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hellström-Hyson, Eva
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Persson, Elisabeth
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Mårtensson, Gunilla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Nursing preceptors' experiences of two clinical education models2014In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 14, no 4, 427-433 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preceptors play an important role in the process of developing students' knowledge and skills. There is an ongoing search for the best learning and teaching models in clinical education. Little is known about preceptors' perspectives on different models. The aim of the study was to describe nursing preceptors' experiences of two clinical models of clinical education: peer learning and traditional supervision. A descriptive design and qualitative approach was used. Eighteen preceptors from surgical and medical departments at two hospitals were interviewed, ten representing peer learning (student work in pairs) and eight traditional supervision (one student follows a nurse during a shift). The findings showed that preceptors using peer learning created room for students to assume responsibility for their own learning, challenged students' knowledge by refraining from stepping in and encouraged critical thinking. Using traditional supervision, the preceptors' individual ambitions influenced the preceptorship and their own knowledge was empathized as being important to impart. They demonstrated, observed and gradually relinquished responsibility to the students. The choice of clinical education model is important. Peer learning seemed to create learning environments that integrate clinical and academic skills. Investigation of pedagogical models in clinical education should be of major concern to managers and preceptors.

  • 32.
    Mårtensson, Gunilla
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Mamhidir, Anna-Greta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    What are the structural conditions of importance to preceptors' performance?2013In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 33, no 5, 444-449 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Preceptors play a critical role in the process of developing nursing students' knowledge, skills and ability to make independent and critical judgments, however relatively little is known about what aspects are associated with nurses' performance as preceptors.

    OBJECTIVES:

    To investigate structural conditions and professional aspects of potential importance to nurses' perceptions of their performance as preceptors, and to evaluate the validity and reliability of a questionnaire measuring nurses' perceptions of being a preceptor.

    METHODS:

    The study had a correlational design. Total population sampling (N=1720) in a county council district in central Sweden was used to screen for nurses with recent preceptor experience, 933 nurses responded (response rate 54%), of those 323 nurses fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The present findings are based on data from 243 of these subjects. Data were collected with a questionnaire and analyzed using multiple regressions analyses, exploratory factor analyses and reliability coefficients.

    RESULTS:

    The results show that aspects such as receiving feedback on the function as a preceptor, being able to plan and prepare the clinical education period, receiving support from unit managers and having specific supervision education explain 31% of nurses' overall view of their performance as preceptors. However, structural conditions and professional experiences could not explain preceptors' use of reflection and critical thinking when acting as preceptors. These findings are discussed within the framework of Kanter's structural theory of power in organizations. Further, the psychometric evaluation showed that the questionnaire is a valid and reliable instrument for measuring nurses' structural conditions for and perceptions of their performance as preceptors.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Structural conditions such as feedback and support seemed to strengthen nurses' general view of their performance as preceptors but did not seem to facilitate nurses' work toward the aim of higher education and helping nursing students develop critical thinking.

  • 33.
    Nilsson, Annika
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Ragny
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    A comparative correlational study of coping strategies and quality of life in patient with chronic heart failure and the general Swedish population2017In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to compare coping strategies and quality of life (QoL) in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) with such strategies and QOL in persons from two general Swedish populations as well as to investigate relationships between personal characteristics and coping strategies. Methods:A cross-sectional, comparative and correlational design was used to examine data from three sources. The patient group (n=124), defined using ICD-10, was selected consecutively from two hospitals in central Sweden. The population group (n=515) consisted of persons drawn randomly from the Swedish population. Data were collected with questionnaires in 2011; regarding QoL, Swedish population reference data from 1994 were used. Results: Overall, women used more coping strategies than men did. Compared to the general population data from SF-36, patients with CHF rated lower QoL. In the regression models, perceived low ‘efficiency in managing psychological aspects of daily life’ increased use of coping. Other personal characteristics related to increased use of coping strategies were higher education, lower age and unsatisfactory economic situation. Conclusion: Differences between the patients and the general Swedish population showed an unclear pattern for coping and a clear pattern for QoL. To deal with the psychological consequences of daily life, men with CHF and persons in the general Swedish population seemed to use both problem- and emotion-focused coping. 

  • 34.
    Rashid, Mamunur
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Heiden, Marina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Nilsson, Annika
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Predictors of work ability among women on long-term sick leave due to musculoskeletal pain2017In: NES2017 conference proceedings / [ed] Anna-Lisa Osvalder, Mikael Blomé and Hajnalka Bodnar, 2017, 140- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Musculoskeletal pain is one of the leading causes of sick leave (SL), especially among women in Sweden and in other western countries. It is, therefore, important to know which health- and work-related factors are associated with work ability (WA) among women with long-term musculoskeletal pain.

         Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether there is any association between self-efficacy, anxiety, depression, sense of coherence, job strain, support at work, pain intensity, physical activity, beliefs to be back at the same work, coping strategies, and WA.

         Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on women with long-term pain who were on SL. Inclusion criteria: (i) age 18-65 years, (ii) SL: ≥ 1 months, (iii) SL: ≥ 50%, (iv) pain in neck, shoulder or back (≥ 3 months), and (v) understanding Swedish. Exclusion criteria: (i) rheumatoid arthritis, (ii) multiple sclerosis, (iii) stroke, (iv) cancer, (v) Parkinson, (vi) bipolar disease, (vii) schizophrenia, (viii) pregnancy. In spring 2016, self-administered questionnaires were sent out to 600 women who were receiving time-loss benefits according to the Swedish Social Insurance registers. Out of these, a total of 208 participants responded and were included in the analysis. For assessing the predictors and the outcome, seven instruments were used: General Self-Efficacy, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Demand-Control-Support Questionnaire, Sense of Coherence, Multidimensional Pain Inventory, Coping Strategy Questionnaire and Work Ability Index. Two of the predictors, physical activity and beliefs to be back at the same work, were measured by single questions. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to detect which of the factors were associated with WA.

         Results: Women who more strongly believed that they would return to the same work within 6 months had higher WA (β= 0.39, p < .001), whereas women with higher pain intensity (β= -0.28, p < .001) and higher job strain (β= -0.12, p < .05) had lower WA. The results did not change when age, cohabitant, economic situation and social support were controlled for in the analysis. The regression model was significant (p < .0001), and its adjusted R- square was 48%.

         Discussion and practical implications: Women’s positive beliefs are associated with higher WA in accordance with previous studies. Our study also found that pain intensity and high job strain are associated with reduced WA. The results suggest that health care providers and employers should take women’s beliefs to be back at the same work into account for supporting them to return to work. Furthermore, the focus of rehabilitation program should be on women suffering from high pain intensity to increase WA.

         Conclusion: This study showed that beliefs to be back at the same work, pain intensity and job strain might be predictors of WA. Further studies are needed to identify if these predictors are also important for WA among women with long-term pain who are at work.

     

    Key words: Factors, ability to work, sickness absence, women and pain

  • 35.
    Rashid, Mamunur
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Nilsson, Annika
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Heiden, Marina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Factors associated with return-to-work among people on work absence due to long-term neck or back pain: a narrative systematic review2017In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, no 6, e014939Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    The purpose of this narrative systematic review was to summarise prognostic factors for return to work (RTW) among people with long-term neck/shoulder or back pain.

    METHODS:

    A systematic literature search was performed through three databases (Medline, CINAHL and PsycINFO) for studies published until February 2016. Only observational studies of people on work absence (≥2 weeks) due to neck/shoulder or back pain were included. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed using guidelines for assessing quality in prognostic studies on the basis of Framework of Potential Biases. Factors found in the included studies were grouped into categories based on similarities and then labelled according to the aspects covered by the factors in the category.

    RESULTS:

    Nine longitudinal prospective cohort studies and one retrospective study fulfilled the inclusion criteria. From these, five categories of factors were extracted. Our findings indicate that recovery beliefs, health-related factors and work capacity are important for RTW among people with long-term neck or back pain. We did not find support for workplace factors and behaviour being predictive of RTW.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Our findings suggest that recovery beliefs, perceived health and work capacity may be important targets of intervention for people with long-term neck or back pain. However, more high-quality prospective studies are needed to confirm the results and improve our understanding of what is needed to facilitate RTW in this population.

  • 36.
    Rask, Mikael
    et al.
    Växjö universitet.
    Malm, Dan
    Hälsohögskolan Jönköping.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Department of public health and caring sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Roxberg, Åsa
    Växjö universitet; University college of Haraldsplass, Bergen, Norway.
    Svedberg, Petra
    Växjö universitet; Halmstad University.
    Arenhall, Eva
    Örebro universitet.
    Baigi, Amir
    Landstinget Halland Primärvården.
    Brunt, David
    Växjö universitet.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Växjö University; Hälsohögskolan Jönköping.
    Ivarsson, Bodil
    Lunds universitet.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Örebro universitet.
    Sjöström-Strand, Annica
    Lunds universitetssjukhus.
    Wieslander, Inger
    Hälsohögskolan Jönköping; Halmstad University.
    Benzein, Eva
    Högskolan i Kalmar; Halmstad University.
    Validity and reliability of a Swedish version of the Relationship Assessment Scale (RAS): A pilot study2010In: Canadian Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN ISSN 0843-6096, Vol. 20, no 1, 16-21 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is a need for a short and easily administered scale, in the Swedish language, for assessing partner relationship in the health care of persons with cardiac disease.

    Purpose: To establish the reliability and validity of the Swedish version of the Relationship Assessment Scale (RAS):

    Design: The present pilot study has a methodological design.

    Findings: Content validity has been tested for relevance, clarity and readability. The scale was tested for construct validity with explorative factor analysis. The reliability was tested by internal consistancy and test-retest analysis. The result showed a two-factor solution, which does not correspond to the original proposed one-factor solution. The factor analyses revealed two quite distinct factors of RAS, labelled "Relationship built on expectations and satisfaction of needs" and "Relationship built on love and devotion".

    Conclusions: The scale has satisfactory psychometric properties in terms of content validity, construct validity, homogeneity and stability in a population of persons with cardiac disease. Vider evaluations of the RAS for other populations and settings are recommended. 

  • 37.
    Ternesten Hasséus, Ewa
    et al.
    Avd för Invärtes Medicin/Lungmedicin och Allergologi, Inst för Medicin, Sahlgrenska Akademin, Götegorgs universitet.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Livskvalitet och copingstrategier hos patienter med sensorisk hypereaktivitet2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38. Wallin, E.
    et al.
    Larsson, I. M.
    Sellert-Rydberg, M.
    Rubertsson, S.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    SUPPORT AND IMPACT ON EVERYDAY LIFE AFTER SURVIVAL FROM CARDIAC ARREST: RELATIVES' DESCRIPTIONS 6 MONTHS AFTER A SIGNIFICANT OTHER'S CARDIAC ARREST2011In: Intensive Care Medicine, ISSN 0342-4642, E-ISSN 1432-1238, Vol. 37, S74-S74 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 39. Wallin, E.
    et al.
    Larsson, I-M
    Kristoferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Rubertsson, S.
    SURVIVORS AFTER CARDIAC ARREST AND HYPOTHERMIA TREATMENT: FUNCTION AND SATISFACTION IN THE FIRST 6 MONTHS2013In: Intensive Care Medicine, ISSN 0342-4642, E-ISSN 1432-1238, Vol. 39, S289-S289 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Wallin, Ewa
    et al.
    Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Uppsala universitet.
    Larsson, Ing-Marie
    Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Uppsala universitet.
    Rubertsson, Sten
    Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Uppsala universitet.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Cardiac arrest and hypothermia treatment-function and life satisfaction among survivors in the first 6 months2014In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 85, no 4, 538-543 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim of the study:

    To describe differences over time in outcome, physical and cognitive function among survivors of cardiac arrest treated with hypothermia and to examine survivors’ life satisfaction 6 months after cardiac arrest as well as gender differences. Methods: The study was prospective and included 45 cardiac arrest survivors admitted to three Swedish hospitals between 2008 and 2012. Participants were followed from intensive care unit discharge to one and six months after cardiac arrest. In addition to cerebral performance category (CPC), participants were asked to complete questionnaires regarding activities in daily life (Barthel index), cognitive function (mini mental state examination), and life satisfaction (LiSat-11). Results: Outcome measured using CPC scores improved over time. At 6 months, all participants were classified as having a good outcome. At one month, participants were impaired but improved over time in their activities in daily life and cognitive function. At 6 months satisfaction with "life as a whole" was seen in 70%. Conclusions: Cardiac arrest survivors are satisfied with life as a whole despite a severe illness that has impaired their physical and cognitive function, which seemed to improve over time. Predicting patients’ functional outcome in early stages is difficult, and the CPC score alone is not sufficient to assess patients’ function. It is a need to reach a consensus to which instruments best reflect physical and cognitive function as well as to specify a rehabilitation plan.

  • 41.
    Wallin, Ewa
    et al.
    Inst. för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Uppsala universitet.
    Larsson, Ing-Marie
    Inst. för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Uppsala universitet.
    Rubertsson, Sten
    Inst. för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Uppsala universitet.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Relatives' experiences of everyday life six months after hypothermia treatment of a significant other's cardiac arrest2013In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 22, no 11-12, 1639-1646 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Wallin, Ewa
    et al.
    Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Uppsala universitet.
    Larsson, Ing-Marie
    Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Uppsala universitet.
    Rubertsson, Sten
    Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Uppsala universitet.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Relatives' experiences of everyday life six months after hypothermia treatment of a significant other's cardiac arrest2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Wallin, Ewa
    et al.
    Department of Surgical Sciences – Anaesthesiology & Intensive Care, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rubertsson, Sten
    Department of Surgical Sciences – Anaesthesiology & Intensive Care, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Larsson, Ing-Marie
    Department of Surgical Sciences – Anaesthesiology & Intensive Care, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Department of Surgical Sciences – Radiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Raininko, Raili
    Department of Surgical Sciences – Radiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Acute brain lesion on MRI in relation to neorological outcome 6 months after cardiac arrest treated with hypothermia2015In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 96, no S1, 147-147 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Östlund, Ann-Sofi
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala universitet.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala universitet.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala universitet.
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala universitet.
    Primary care nurses' performance in motivational interviewing: a quantitative descriptive study2015In: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 16, no 1, 89-100 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Motivational interviewing is a collaborative conversational style intended to strengthen motivation to change. It has been shown to be effective in addressing many different lifestyle problems as well as in chronic disease management, and many disease prevention guidelines promote use of motivational interviewing. The aim of the present study was twofold: to assess to what extent the primary care nurses in the study perform motivational interviewing according to the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity Code and to investigate how the participating primary care nurses rated their own performance in motivational interviewing.

    Method: The study was based on twelve primary care nurses’ audio-recorded motivational interviewing sessions with patients (total 32 sessions). After each session, the nurses completed a questionnaire regarding their experience of their own performance in motivational interviewing. The audio-recorded sessions were analyzed using Motivational Interviewing Integrity Code 3.1.1.

    Results: None of the nurses achieved beginning proficiency in all parts of any motivational interviewing sessions and two nurses did not achieve beginning proficiency in any parts or sessions. Making more complex than simple reflections was the specific verbal behavior/summary score that most nurses achieved. Beginning proficiency/competency in “percent open questions” was the summary score that fewest achieved.

    Conclusion: Primary care nurses did not achieve beginning proficiency/competency in all aspects of motivational interviewing in their recorded sessions with patients, where lifestyle change was discussed. This indicates a need for improvement and thus additional training, feedback and supervision in clinical practice with motivational interviewing.

  • 45.
    Östlund, Ann-Sofi
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala universitet.
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala universitet.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    District nurses' and registered nurses' training in and use of motivational interviewing in primary care settings2014In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 23, no 15-16, 2284-2294 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    To examine to what extent district nurses and registered nurses have training in motivational interviewing, to what extent they use it and what prerequisites they have for using it; to compare district nurses and registered nurses, as well as to compare users and nonusers of motivational interviewing; and to examine possible relationships between use of motivational interviewing and the variables training, supervision and feedback in motivational interviewing and prerequisites for use.

    Background

    Motivational interviewing is an effective method for motivating patients to change their lifestyle, used increasingly in primary care.

    Design

    A cross-sectional survey study.

    Methods

    A study-specific questionnaire was sent to all district nurses and registered nurses (n = 980) in primary care in three counties in Sweden, from September 2011–January 2012; 673 (69%) responded. Differences between groups as well as relationships between study variables were tested.

    Results

    According to self-reports, 59% of the respondents had training in motivational interviewing and 57% used it. Approximately 15% of those who reported using it had no specific training in the method. More district nurses than registered nurses had training in motivational interviewing and used it. The following factors were independently associated with the use of motivational interviewing: training in and knowledge of motivational interviewing, conditions for using it, time and absence of ‘other’ obstacles.

    Conclusions

    Having knowledge in motivational interviewing and personal as well as workplace prerequisites for using it may promote increased use of motivational interviewing.

    Relevance to clinical practice

    Having the prerequisites for using motivational interviewing at the workplace is of significance to the use of motivational interviewing. In the context of primary care, district nurses seem to have better prerequisites than registered nurses for using motivational interviewing.

  • 46.
    Östlund, Ann-Sofi
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Helena
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, MIC Lab, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Primary care nurses' communication and its influence on patient talk during motivational interviewing2016In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 11, 2844-2856 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To describe what verbal behaviors/kinds of talk occur during recorded motivational interviewing sessions between nurses in primary care and their patients. The aim was also to examine what kinds of nurse talk predict patient change talk, neutral talk and/or sustain talk.

    Background

    Motivational interviewing is a collaborative conversational style. It has been shown to be effective, in addressing health behaviors such as diet, exercise, weight loss and chronic disease management. In Sweden, it is one of the approaches to disease prevention conversations with patients recommended in the National Guidelines for Disease Prevention. Research on the mechanisms underlying motivational interviewing is growing, but research on motivational interviewing and disease prevention has also been called for.

    Design

    A descriptive and predictive design was used.

    Methods

    Data were collected during 2011-2014. Fifty audio-recorded motivational interviewing sessions between 23 primary care nurses and 50 patients were analyzed using Motivational Interviewing Sequential Code for Observing Process Exchanges. The frequency of specific kinds of talk and sequential analysis (to predict patient talk from nurse talk) were computed using the software Generalized Sequential Querier 5.

    Findings

    The primary care nurses and patients used neutral talk most frequently. Open and negative questions, complex and positive reflections were significantly more likely to be followed by change talk and motivational interviewing-inconsistent talk, positive questions and negative reflections by sustain talk.

    Conclusions

    To increase patients’ change talk, primary care nurses need to use more open questions, complex reflections as well as questions and reflections directed toward change.

  • 47.
    Östlund, Ann-Sofi
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap.
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap.
    Motivational interviewing: Experiences of primary care nurses trained in the method2015In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 15, no 2, 111-118 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Motivational interviewing is a person-centered counseling style used to promote behavioral change regarding a wide variety of lifestyle problems. Use of motivational interview is growing worldwide and among many different healthcare professions, including primary care nursing. The study aim was to describe motivational interview trained nurses' experiences of motivational interviewing in primary care settings. The study had a qualitative descriptive design. It was carried out in Swedish primary care settings in two county council districts, with 20 primary care nurses trained in motivational interviewing. Half of them used the method in their work, half did not. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were used. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The nurses experienced that openness to the approach and an encouraging working climate are required to overcome internal resistance and to increase use of motivational interviewing. They also experienced mutual benefit: motivational interviewing elicits and develops abilities in both nurses and patients. For the nurses using it, motivational interviewing is perceived to facilitate work with patients in need of lifestyle change. Lack of training/education, support, interest and appropriate work tasks/patients are reasons for not using motivational interviewing.

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