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  • 1.
    Nyström, Anita
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Pålsson, Ylva
    University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
    Self-efficacy improved after neonatal resuscitation teamtraining2009In: Self-efficacy improved after neonatal resuscitation teamtraining, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Handling neonatal resuscitation requires optimal team functioning. A team must be composed of individuals who have specifically assigned roles and responsibilities. Each team member should acknowledge the role of the other team members, communicate respectfully, and recognize the leader's role (1).Systematic training in simulation of realistic situations can contribute to that the multi-disciplinary team maintains and improves their competence and quality of treatment in critical situations (2).

    Training scenarios coupled with debriefings provide rich learning experiences for all the team members who are involved in neonatal resuscitation (3).

    The purpose of this study was to examine how the staff considered the teamwork in neonatal resuscitation at a small Swedish hospital and if it existed any differences between they who had participated in simulator-based training. The study was directed to all the staff involved in the neonatal resuscitation team, i.e. pediatricians, obstetricians, anaesthetists, midwives and nurses who works in a NICU.

    A questionnaire was distributed to a total of 92 staff members with a response tale of 61% (n=56). Two groups were identified, one who has implemented simulator-based training and one who hadn't. The result showed that they who had participated in simulator-based team training in neonatal resuscitation:

    - are more prepared for neonatal resuscitation situations.-   have greater opportunity to influence decisions, -   other team members took advantage of their skills, -   had greater knowledge of what is required of them in an neonatal resuscitation situation.

    Neonatal resuscitation is one of the classic low-frequency, high risk event that lends itself well to simulator-based training (3).   In a smaller hospital the neonatal resuscitation is infrequent but parents still expect optimal treatment. To participate in the rarely recurring situations require not only skills and knowledge but also the ability to work in a team. It is both an organizational, educational and medical challenge to keep the medical safety in resuscitation situations, especially because they are infrequent (2).The authors believe that it is a need to develop better methods to evaluate the impact of simulator training.

  • 2.
    Nyström, Anita
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Pålsson, Ylva
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hofsten, Anna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Bachelor nursing students' experiences of being video-recorded during examination in a simulated emergency care situation2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Nyström, Anita
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Pålsson, Ylva
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hofsten, Anna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Nursing students' experiences of being video-recorded during examination in a fictive emergency care situation2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Promoting bachelor nursing students’ learning in fictive care can be achieved through dynamic

    scenario-based training sessions that are documented using simple video equipment. One

    valuable aspect of this kind of training is the subsequent reflective dialogue that takes place

    between the teacher and the students.

    The aim of the present paper is to describe bachelor nursing students’ experiences of being videorecorded

    during an examination with a fictive patient in emergency care.

    The study was descriptive in design and used a qualitative approach with written answers to

    open-ended questions; 44 bachelor nursing students participated.

    A latent content analysis resulted in three themes: (1)

    Visualization may cause nervousness at

    first,

    (2) Visualization promotes dialogue and acknowledgement, and (3) Visualization promotes

    increased self-knowledge and professional growth.

    The conclusion is that video-recording is a good way for bachelor nursing students to develop

    skills in emergency care situations and to understand their own actions; it may also help them

    increase their self-knowledge

  • 4.
    Nyström, Anita
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Pålsson, Ylva
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Hofsten, Anna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Uppsala universitet.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Uppsala universitet.
    Nursing students' experiences of being video-recorded during examination in a fictive emergency care situation2014In: International Journal of Nursing Practice, ISSN 1322-7114, E-ISSN 1440-172X, Vol. 20, no 5, 540-548 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Promoting bachelor nursing students’ learning in simulated care can be achieved through dynamic scenario-based training sessions that are documented using simple video equipment. One valuable aspect of this kind of training is the subsequent reflective dialogue that takes place between the teacher and the students during the examination.

    Aim: The aim of the present paper is to describe bachelor nursing students’ experiences of being video-recorded during an examination with a simulated patient in emergency care.

    Method: The study was descriptive in design and used a qualitative approach with written answers to open-ended questions; 44 bachelor nursing students participated.

    Results: A latent content analysis resulted in three themes: (1) Visualization may cause nervousness at first, (2) Visualization promotes dialogue and acknowledgement, and (3) Visualization promotes increased self-knowledge and professional growth.

    Conclusion: The conclusion is that video-recording is a good way for bachelor nursing students to develop skills in emergency care situations and to understand their own actions; it may also help them increase their self-knowledge.  

  • 5.
    Nyström, Anita
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Pålsson, Ylva
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hofsten, Anna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Undergraduate nursing students experiences of beeing video-recorded during examination in a simulated emergency care situation2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Pålsson, Ylva
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Nursing Department, Medicine and Health College, Lishui University, China.
    Leo Svenne, Christine
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Surgical Sciences, Thoracic Surgery Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Gunilla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    A peer learning intervention targeting newly graduated nurses: A feasibility study with a descriptive design based on Medical Research Council framework2017In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS:

    To describe the feasibility of a peer learning intervention targeting newly graduated nurses. Feasibility was tested concerning consistency of the theoretical description of peer learning with empirical findings in a new context, compliance and acceptability, as well as usability of a questionnaire measuring the intended future outcome variables.

    BACKGROUND:

    Newly graduated nurses who meet, socialize and share experiences have described supporting each other's ability to cope with stress. Peer learning involves individuals in a similar situation learning from and with each other through interaction. When implementing new interventions, feasibility studies are used to minimize problems in future evaluation studies.

    DESIGN:

    Quasi-experimental design with an intervention group, followed over time using descriptive methods. The study was based on the Medical Research Council framework.

    METHODS:

    Repeated semi-structured interviews, a checklist for fidelity and a questionnaire were conducted with 10 newly graduated nurses from January - March 2015. The intervention's main component included pairs of newly graduated nurses working the same shift and having joint responsibility for a group of patients for a period of three weeks. The intervention also included three months of regular reflection by the pair.

    FINDINGS:

    Using deductive analysis, the peer learning intervention was found to be consistent with the theoretical description. Due to the compliance and acceptability, there were lessons learned. The tested questionnaire was found to be useful.

    CONCLUSIONS: This peer learning intervention seems to be feasible in this context. The present study will serve as the basis for a future full-scale evaluation study.

  • 7.
    Pålsson, Ylva
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Gunilla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Leo Svenne, Christine
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ädel, Eva
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Nursing Department, Medicine and Health College, Lishui University, China .
    A peer learning intervention for nursing students in clinical practice education: a quasi-experimental study2017In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 51, 81-87 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Studies of peer learning indicate that the model enables students to practice skills useful in their future profession, such as communication, cooperation, reflection and independence. However, so far most studies have used a qualitative approach and none have used a quasi-experimental design to study effects of nursing students' peer learning in clinical practice.

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effects of peer learning in clinical practice education on nursing students' self-rated performance.

    DESIGN: Quasi-experimental.

    SETTING: The study was conducted during nursing students' clinical practice.

    PARTICIPANTS: All undergraduate nursing students (n=87) attending their first clinical practice were approached. Seventy students out of 87 answered the questionnaires at both baseline and follow-up (42 of 46 in the intervention group and 28 of 39 in the comparison group).

    METHODS: During the first two weeks of the clinical practice period, all students were supervised traditionally. Thereafter, the intervention group received peer learning the last two weeks, and the comparison group received traditional supervision. Questionnaire data were collected on nursing students' self-rated performance during the second (baseline) and last (follow-up) week of their clinical practice.

    RESULTS: Self-efficacy was improved in the intervention group and a significant interaction effect was found for changes over time between the two groups. For the other self-rated variables/tests, there were no differences in changes over time between the groups. Studying each group separately, the intervention group significantly improved on thirteen of the twenty variables/tests over time and the comparison group improved on four.

    CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that peer learning is a useful method which improves nursing students' self-efficacy to a greater degree than traditional supervision does. Regarding the other self-rated performance variables, no interaction effects were found.

1 - 7 of 7
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  • Other locale
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