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  • 1.
    Attia, Shady
    et al.
    Université de Liège, Belgium.
    Benzidane, Caroline
    Grenoble INP University of Grenoble Alpes, France.
    Rahif, Ramin
    Université de Liège, Belgium.
    Amaripadath, Deepak
    Université de Liège, Belgium.
    Hamdy, Mohamed
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Norway.
    Holzer, Peter
    Institute of Building Research & Innovation, Vienna, Austria.
    Koch, Annekatrin
    Darmstadt University of Technology, Germany.
    Maas, Anton
    University of Kassel, Germany.
    Moosberger, Sven
    Equa Solutions AG, Switzerland.
    Petersen, Steffen
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Mavrogianni, Anna
    University College London, United Kingdom.
    Maria Hidalgo-Betanzos, Juan
    University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Spain.
    Almeida, Manuela
    University of Minho Department of Civil Engineering, Portugal.
    Akander, Jan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Energy Systems and Building Technology.
    Khosravi Bakhtiari, Hossein
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Energy Systems and Building Technology.
    Kinnane, Olivier
    University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Kosonen, Risto
    Aalto University, Finland.
    Carlucci, Salvatore
    Overheating calculation methods, criteria, and indicators in European regulation for residential buildings2023In: Energy and Buildings, ISSN 0378-7788, E-ISSN 1872-6178, Vol. 292, article id 113170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the ongoing significance of overheating calculations in the residential building sector, building codes such as the European Energy Performance of Building Directive (EPBD) are essential for harmonizing the indicators and performance thresholds. This paper investigates Europe's overheating calculation methods, indicators, and thresholds and evaluates their ability to address climate change and heat events. e study aims to identify the suitability of existing overheating calculation methods and propose recommendations for the EPBD. The study results provide a cross-sectional overview of twenty-six European countries. The most influential overheating calculation criteria are listed the best approaches are ranked. The paper provides a thorough comparative assessment and recommendations to align current calculations with climate-sensitive metrics. The results suggest a framework and key performance indicators that are comfort-based, multi-zonal, and time-integrated to calculate overheating and modify the EU's next building energy efficiency regulations. The results can help policymakers and building professionals to develop the next overheating calculation framework and approach for the future development of climate-proof and resilient residential buildings.

  • 2.
    Khosravi Bakhtiari, Hossein
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Energy Systems and Building Technology. Department of Construction, Gavlefastigheter Company, Gävle, Sweden.
    Akander, Jan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Energy Systems and Building Technology.
    Cehlin, Mathias
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Energy Systems and Building Technology.
    Evaluation of Thermal Comfort in a Historic Building Refurbished to an Office Building with Modernized HVAC Systems2020In: Advances in Building Energy Research, ISSN 1751-2549, E-ISSN 1756-2201, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 218-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Envelopes with low thermal performance are common characteristics in European historic buildings, causing higher energy demand and insufficient thermal comfort. This paper presents the results of a study on indoor environmental quality (IEQ), with special focus on thermal comfort, in the historic City Hall of Gävle, Sweden, now used as an office building. There are two modern heat recovery ventilation systems with displacement ventilation supply devices. The district heating network heats the building via pre-heat supply air and radiators. Summer cooling comes from electric heat pump ejecting heat into the exhaust ventilation air. A building management system (BMS) controls the heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment. The methodology included on-site measurements, BMS data logging and evaluating the occupants’ perception of a summer and a winter period indoor environment using a standardized questionnaire. In conclusion, indoor environmental quality in this historic building is unsatisfactory. Stuffy air, too high, too low and varying room temperatures, lighting problems and noise are constant issues. Although it is equipped with modern ventilation systems, there are still possibilities for improving thermal comfort by improved control strategies, since upgrading the building’s envelope is not allowed according to the Swedish Building Regulations in historic buildings with heritage value.

  • 3.
    Khosravi Bakhtiari, Hossein
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Energy Systems and Building Technology.
    Akander, Jan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Energy Systems and Building Technology.
    Cehlin, Mathias
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Energy Systems and Building Technology.
    Hayati, Abolfazl
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Energy Systems and Building Technology.
    On the Performance of Night Ventilation in a Historic Office Building in Nordic Climate2020In: Energies, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 13, no 16, article id 4159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of mechanical night ventilation on thermal comfort and electricity use for cooling of a typical historic office building in north-central Sweden was assessed. IDA-ICE simulation program was used to model the potential for improving thermal comfort and electricity savings by applying night ventilation cooling. Parametric study comprised different outdoor climates, flow rates, cooling machine’s coefficient of performance and ventilation units’ specific fan power values. Additionally, the effect of different door schemes (open or closed) on thermal comfort in offices was investigated. It was shown that night ventilation cannot meet the building’s total cooling demand and auxiliary active cooling is required, although the building is located in a cold climate. Night ventilation had the potential in decreasing the percentage of exceedance hours in offices by up to 33% and decreasing the total electricity use for cooling by up to 40%. More electricity is saved with higher night ventilation rates. There is, however, a maximum beneficial ventilation rate above which the increase in electricity use in fans outweighs the decrease in electricity use in cooling machine. It depends on thermal mass capacity of the building, cooling machine´s coefficient of performance, design ventilation rate, and available night ventilation cooling potential (ambient air temperature).

    Download full text (pdf)
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  • 4.
    Khosravi Bakhtiari, Hossein
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Energy system. Department of Construction, Gavlefastigheter Company, Gävle, Sweden.
    Cehlin, Mathias
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Energy system.
    Akander, Jan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Energy system.
    Thermal Comfort in Office Rooms in a Historic Building with Modernized HVAC Systems2018In: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference On Building Energy & Environment, COBEE 2018: RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia, Feb 5-9th 2018 / [ed] Kiao Inthavong,Chi Pok Cheung, Guan Yeoh, Jiyuan Tu, Melbourne: Conference On Building Energy & Environment , 2018, p. 683-688, article id 230Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SUMMARY

    Envelopes with low thermal performance are common characteristics in European historic buildings, leading to higher energy demand and insufficient thermal comfort. This paper presents the results of a study on thermal comfort in the historic office building of City Hall in Gävle, Sweden. It is equipped with two modern heat recovery ventilation systems with displacement ventilation supply devices in offices. District heating network heats the building via pre-heat supply air and radiators. Summer cooling comes from electric heat pump, rejecting heat into the exhaust ventilation air. A building management system controls HVAC equipment. Methodology includes on-site measurements, data logging on management system and evaluating the occupants’ perception of a summer and a winter period indoor environment using a standardized questionnaire. In conclusion, thermal comfort in this historic building is poor although it is equipped with modern ventilation systems and there should be possibilities for improving comfort, by improved control strategies.

    Keywords — Historic Buildings, On-site Measurements, Standardized Questionnaire, Thermal Comfort

  • 5.
    Khosravi Bakhtiari, Hossein
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Energy Systems and Building Technology. Gavlefastigheter AB.
    Sayadi, Sana
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Energy Systems and Building Technology.
    Akander, Jan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Energy Systems and Building Technology.
    Hayati, Abolfazl
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Energy Systems and Building Technology.
    Cehlin, Mathias
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Energy Systems and Building Technology.
    How Will Mechanical Night Ventilation Affect the Electricity Use and the Electrical Peak Power Demand in 30 Years? – A Case Study of a Historic Office Building in Sweden2023In: Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Building Energy and Environment, Singapore: Springer, 2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims at assessing how well a mechanical night ventilation of today, will cope with delivering acceptable thermal comfort while minimizing the electricity use and the electrical peak power demand for cooling in a historic office building in Sweden at both typical current climate and typical future climate in 2050s. The method includes numerical study in IDA-ICE simulation program using the typical current and future climate profiles. The results show that, for coefficient of performance of 3 and specific fan power of 1.5 kW/(m3/s), it would be possible to lower the electrical peak power demand and the electricity use in cooling machine by up to 2.2 kW (13%) and 1.4 MWh (48%) by night ventilation rate of 2.1 lit/(s·m2) at typical future climate in 2050s. Corresponding figures for typical current climate are 4.6 kW (36%) and 0.9 MWh (72%) owing to cooler nights and more diurnal temperature differences. 

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