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  • 1.
    Andersson, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Beijer Institute, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Barthel, Stephan
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Borgström, Sara
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Colding, Johan
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; The Beijer Institute, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Elmqvist, Thomas
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; The Beijer Institute, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gren, Åsa
    The Beijer Institute, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Reconnecting Cities to the Biosphere: Stewardship of Green Infrastructure and Urban Ecosystem Services2014Ingår i: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 43, nr 4, s. 445-453Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Within-city green infrastructure can offer opportunities and new contexts for people to become stewards of ecosystem services. We analyze cities as social-ecological systems, synthesize the literature, and provide examples from more than 15 years of research in the Stockholm urban region, Sweden. The social-ecological approach spans from investigating ecosystem properties to the social frameworks and personal values that drive and shape human interactions with nature. Key findings demonstrate that urban ecosystem services are generated by social-ecological systems and that local stewards are critically important. However, land-use planning and management seldom account for their role in the generation of urban ecosystem services. While the small scale patchwork of land uses in cities stimulates intense interactions across borders much focus is still on individual patches. The results highlight the importance and complexity of stewardship of urban biodiversity and ecosystem services and of the planning and governance of urban green infrastructure.

  • 2.
    Bringmark, Ewa
    et al.
    Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bringmark, Lage
    Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sonesten, Lars
    Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Mjöfors, Kristina
    Department of Soil and Environment, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Johansson, Maj-Britt
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Long-term monitoring of scots pine litter decomposition rates throughout sweden indicates formation of a more recalcitrant litter in the south2011Ingår i: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 40, nr 8, s. 878-890Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Decomposition studies were carried out at sites throughout Sweden, including the four Integrated Monitoring sites. Scots pine needle litterbag weight loss measurements over 3 or 5 years were determined at 26 sites and repeated up to 27 times, depending on the site. Humus layer respiration rates were determined for 20 sites in 1987-1989 and repeated in 2007-2008. Partial Least Squares (PLS) regression was used to elucidate the relative importance of climatic and soil factors. Annual needle weight losses decreased only slowly (20-10%) over 3-5 years for all northern (> 60A degrees N) sites but decreased sharply from 30 to 10% in the third year in southern (< 60A degrees N) sites. Respiration rates of southern sites were less (40% on average) than those of northern sites. Humus layer N was positively correlated to needle weight loss during the first and the second years, but negatively correlated in the third year and to respiration rates. The results indicated that litter formed in southern Sweden became more recalcitrant in later stages of decomposition compared to litter produced in northern Sweden.

  • 3.
    Colding, Johan
    et al.
    Swedish Sub-Global Millennium Ecosystem Assessment, Sweden; Resilience Alliance, Sweden; Beijer International Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Jakob
    Centre for Transdisciplinary Environmental Research, Department of Systems Ecology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Folke, Carl
    Resilience Alliance, Sweden; Beijer International Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden; Centre for Transdisciplinary Environmental Research, Department of Systems Ecology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Incorporating Green-Area User Groups in Urban Ecosystem Management2006Ingår i: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 35, nr 5, s. 237-244Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyze the role of urban green areas managed by local user groups in their potential for supporting biodiversity and ecosystem services in growing city-regions, with focus on allotment areas, domestic gardens, and golf courses. Using Stockholm, Sweden, as an example city-region, we compile GIS data of its spatial characteristics and relate these data to GIS data for protected areas and "green wedges" prioritized in biodiversity conservation. Results reveal that the three land uses cover 18% of the studied land area of metropolitan Stockholm, which corresponds to more than twice the land set aside as protected areas. We review the literature to identify ecosystem functions and services provided by the three green areas and discuss their potential in urban ecosystem management. We conclude that the incorporation of locally managed lands, and their stewards and institutions, into comanagement designs holds potential for improving conditions for urban biodiversity, reducing transaction costs in ecosystem management, and realizing local Agenda 21.

  • 4.
    Collentine, Dennis
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för ekonomi, Ämnesavdelningen för nationalekonomi.
    Phase-in of nonpoint sources in a transferable discharge permit system for water quality management: setting permit prices2005Ingår i: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 34, nr 7, s. 573-578Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The composite market design is a proposal for a transferable discharge permit system that specifically includes agricultural non-point-source dischargers and addresses both property rights and transaction cost problems. The first step to implementation of a composite market scheme is the estimation of a supply curve for abatement measures in the catchment area. Estimation is performed by combining costs with modeled loss reductions from selected best management practices and then using this information to estimate the supply curve for abatement, which in turn can then be used to set permit prices. The Rönneå catchment in southern Sweden is used as a pilot study area for making this type of estimate. Costs for existing measures that reduce nutrient losses from farmland (catch crops and spring planting) are based on existing programs financed by the Swedish Agricultural Board. A set of supply curves is calculated for these measures using retention estimates for seven subcatchments and three soil types in the area. Although existing information is sufficient to calculate partial supply curves and may be used to set permit prices, additional measures should be included as well as an increased number of variables for differentiating site specific reduction costs.

  • 5.
    Collentine, Dennis
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för ekonomi, Ämnesavdelningen för nationalekonomi.
    Galaz, Victor
    Kallner Bastviken, Sofia
    Ståhl-Delbanco, Annika
    CATCH: A method for structured discussions and a tool for decision support2005Ingår i: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 34, nr 7, s. 579-580Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 6.
    Gren, Åsa
    et al.
    The Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Colding, Johan
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för teknik och miljö, Avdelningen för byggnadsteknik, energisystem och miljövetenskap, Miljövetenskap. The Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden; The Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Berghauser-Pont, Meta
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Marcus, Lars
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    How smart is smart growth?: Examining the environmental validation behind city compaction2019Ingår i: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 48, nr 6, s. 580-589Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Smart growth (SG) is widely adopted by planners and policy makers as an environmentally friendly way of building cities. In this paper, we analyze the environmental validity of the SG-approach based on a review of the scientific literature. We found a lack of proof of environmental gains, in combination with a great inconsistency in the measurements of different SG attributes. We found that a surprisingly limited number of studies have actually examined the environmental rationales behind SG, with 34% of those studies displaying negative environmental outcomes of SG. Based on the insights from the review, we propose that research within this context must first be founded in more advanced and consistent knowledge of geographic and spatial analyses. Second, it needs to a greater degree be based on a system's understanding of urban processes. Third, it needs to aim at making cities more resilient, e.g., against climate-change effects.

  • 7.
    Jansson, Åsa
    et al.
    Beijer International Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Colding, Johan
    Beijer International Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tradeoffs between environmental goals and urban development: The case of nitrogen load from the Stockholm county to the Baltic Sea2007Ingår i: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 36, nr 8, s. 650-656Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban dwellers depend on the generation of ecosystem services for their welfare. The city of Stockholm is growing, and a 25% increase in population is projected by 2030. The effects of urban development were estimated through the quantification of nitrogen (N) leakage to the Baltic Sea under two urban development scenarios. We found that total net N load will increase by 6% or 8%, depending on which growth scenario is applied, and population increase by itself will contribute at least 15% of the point source N leakage. Technical improvements in sewage treatment could, according to our results, decrease total N load to the Baltic Sea by 4%. Based on our results, we conclude that proactive measures such as spatial urban planning can provide a constructive tool for sustainable urban development on regional as well as national and international scales, depending on geographical context as well as the ecosystem services' scale of operation. © Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences 2007.

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