hig.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
123456 101 - 150 of 285
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 101.
    Halling, Bengt
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. KTH.
    Renström, Jonas
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. KTH .
    Lean leadership: a matter of dualism2014In: International Journal of Human Resources Development and Management, ISSN 1465-6612, E-ISSN 1741-5160, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 242-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On the basis of previous literature, this study takes a snowball approach to identify people influential on the topics through their writings. The aim was to conceptualise leadership and management in regard to lean, thus increasing understanding of the roles of leadership and management in lean development. The findings showed that leadership and management are two different but complementary action systems, similar to the duality of Toyota's two foundational principles: respect for people and continuous improvement. Differentiating between leadership and management is important in order to meet organisational needs during a lean implementation; each has complementary functions. Practical implications include the need to further train managers in leadership and to work within organisational culture to influence on–the–job behaviour. This lack of leadership competence may be one reason companies tend to address lean as a toolbox rather than an enterprise–wide system that covers all its operations and entails cultural and behaviour standards.

  • 102.
    Halling, Bengt
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Renström, Jonas
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    LEAN och Ledarskap2012In:  , 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Research has shown that leadership is an important factor when implementing and developing a TPS (Toyota Production System) inspired Lean way of working in organizations. In spite of it´s stated importance, leadership is indicated as a weak area and a problem in many organizations striving to develop as Lean enterprises. To successfully implement and develop a sustainable Lean way of working it becomes essential to understand what kind of leadership a Lean organization requires. There is a stated gap in Lean literature regarding management and difficulties in implementation are indicated to often occur due to overlooked but crucial differences in approach in management.

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe leadership from a Lean perspective and identify possible key factors regarding leadership for a developing Lean organization.

    Method: This paper is based on a literature study.

    Results: Leadership within a Lean organization can be said to be characterized by a deep knowledge regarding the operation processes in order to be able to mentor, coach, and develop employees in line with company standards, goals and vision. It is indicated that a leaders primary responsibility is to support in the development of subordinates by taking active part in problem solving and by role modeling. To develop people in a way means to continuously challenge them, this challenge being a way to assure continuous improvement. With a long term perspective and the principle of “respect for people” in mind this means balancing the challenge to avoid overburdening (muri). Two aspects are of importance here; deep knowledge regarding company processes, standards and protocol and a close working relationship with subordinates in order to be able to continously coach, mentor, and take active part in problem solving.

    Discussion: Leadership and the role of management in Lean implementation and development will, if continuous improvement and not just implementation of tools is aspired, be to support structures and behaviors needed for problem solving and organizational learning. Toyota is by several sources described as a learning organization and Lean systems based on Toyota will thus require a leadership and a management system that meet the requirements of a learning organization. This type of leadership appears to be similar to what Bass (1999) describes as transformational and transactional leadership where inspiration & idealized influence, intellectual stimulation, and individualized consideration are key factors as well as goal setting, contracting, structure and standards.

    Value: This paper provides insights regarding possible key factors concerning leadership in regard to Lean implementation and development as well as the importance and purpose of leadership in a lean organization.

  • 103.
    Halling, Bengt
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wijk, Katarina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Department of Public Health Medicine, County Council of Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden; County Council of Gävleborg, Sweden; Faculty of Educational Science, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Experienced Barriers to Lean in Swedish Manufacturing and Health Care2013In: International Journal of Lean Thinking, ISSN 2146-0337, Vol. 4, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A B S T R A C T  

    Purpose: The purpose is to compare similarities and divergences in how the concepts of Lean and barriers to Lean are described by key informants at a production unit in a large manufacturing company and two emergency health care units in Sweden.

    Design/methodology/approach: Data was collected via semi-structured interviews and analyzed with the constant comparative method (CCM) and Porras and Robertson’s

    (1992) change model.

    Findings: In both organizations, the view of Lean changed from a toolbox to a human behavior view. Eight barriers were experienced in both organizations. Three barriers

    were unique to manufacturing or to health care, respectively. Nine barriers were elements of social factors;five were elements of organizing arrangements.

    Research limitations/implications: Only people practically involved and responsible for the implementation at the two organizations participated in the study.

    Practical implications: Persons responsible for implementing Lean should consider organizational arrangements and social factors in order to limit barriers to

    successful implementation.

    Originality/value: Most research on Lean has been about successful Lean implementations. This study focuses on how Lean is viewed and what barriers personnel in

    manufacturing and health care have experienced. In comparing the barriers to Lean experienced in the two groups, common, archetypical, and unique barriers for manufacturing and health care can be identified, thus contributing to knowledge about barriers to Lean implementation.

  • 104.
    HANIF, MUHAMMAD SAQIB
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management.
    RASTAN, MOHAMMAD REZA
    University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Service Innovation in Third Party Logistics: A case Study of Green Cargo Logistics AB2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    For a very long time, Innovation has been viewed as technological phenomenon representing technological advancement in product or process features. A lot of research can be found in literature representing product innovation management supported by empirical studies, however, prospect of service innovation management has been largely ignored. Especially there is very limited research on service development process in third party logistics companies.

    This research aims to bring a holistic view of innovation management in third party logistics (3PL) companies so that a better understanding can be developed and it can be examined if existing innovation models are valid for 3PL companies.

    To achieve the objectives of this thesis, relevant literature has been reviewed extensively so that conductors of this research can get benefit of existing knowledge in the field and a duplication of research can be avoided. This research work is based on qualitative case study and Green Cargo Logistics AB (which is one of well established third part logistics (3PL) companies) was selected in order to find answers to research questions, which were resulted from the research gaps, found in existing literature. Findings from the case company are discussed in connection with theory and an analysis is made to reach on following conclusion.

    Conclusions: An innovative 3PL company has better ability to stay competitive and increase its market share through a better ability to serve it with new better services. Along with technological advancement, spotted opportunity for business growth, threat from competition and customer demand, environmental concerns have also been recognized as driving force for innovations in 3PL. This thesis also shows that a small independent unit (group of people) can play role of innovative organization to prosper creativity by improving interactions with external and internal linkages. This research illustrates that contrary to existing literature (which says there should be one single strategy for innovation management process), a flexible and adaptive strategy can be equally or more effective. For balancing risks and rewards while selecting development projects, consideration of return on investment (ROI) is found to be the most important decision criterion. For implementing the selected innovative idea, a small-scale test should be conducted in order to avoid risks associated with development projects.

  • 105.
    Hellberg, Roland
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Intelligent Mail, an international revolution?2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The postal sector, the largest distribution network in the world, facing a decreasing letter volume due to both deregulation of the market and to substitution from electronic formats. One effect of the deregulation is that new operators are established and take market shares. The electronic media in form of e-mail and webpage’s, has taken a large part of the letter market. One way to meet this keener competition is to make distribution of mail more valuable and cost-effective for both the sender and the receiver by adding new options to the mail. In most countries there is only one operator who has the right to act as universal service provider in the meaning of UPU (Universal Post Union), called designated postal operator (DPO). Many of these DPO are developing a concept called Intelligent Mail to defense theirs market share.

     

    The purpose of this paper is to give a broad picture of intelligent mail as a concept and also to what extent this new concept will be able to use in international letter distribution within the postal sector.

     

    The data is mainly collected from different main operators through interviews and compared with written information.

     

    There are mainly to findings. The first is that the content and meaning of Intelligent Mail differ a lot from operator to operator. The second finding is that systems needed to support options in the concept are not universal within the postal sector and therefore very hard to use in an international context.

     

    The contribution of this paper is to give a deeper understanding of the Intelligent Mail concept and why this concept not is useful for international distribution within the postal industry today.

  • 106.
    Hellberg, Roland
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Successful design of warehouse layout for an extremely volatile market founded major increased market share2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to give a successful example of how and why a change in warehouse design, where different picking methods are combined and supported by an intelligent warehouse management system to meet a very huge variation in volume with very short delivery time, have founded a major increasing in the market share from 22 to 50 %.

    This research was done as a longitudinal study from 1993 to 2010, where one company was followed on daily base 1993-2000 and for the last 10 years followed on yearly base.

    At the end of the study (2010) the company distributed over 13,000,000 items (books) covering 35,000 titles. The order size varies from 1 to over 5000. In addition, the company distributes over 2,600,000 items for book clubs and online shopping, as well as providing a wide range of additional services in the form of special packaging solutions, mechanical packing, mailing information, etc. The delivery time must be within 15 min in some cases but normally order taken before 17:00 are dispatched the next day. The must books are not wrapped.

    There are mainly to findings. The first finding is the importance to really understand the variation in volume over time and to design the warehouse and processes after this. Many similar companies have tried to meet the marked demand with warehouse automation, but this case show the importance to avoid automation to keep maximum flexibility to be able to meet extreme volume variation with very short delivery times.

    The second finding is that the intelligence in meaning of supporting IT-systems both must handling different market demands and support different order fulfillment processes. To meet the customer’s different requirements with short delivery times and huge variation in volume the successful order fulfillment process includes lot of different picking methods.

    A deep and long time study of a “best practice” case of a third party logistic providers that have designed the warehouse in order to meet an extremely volatile market.

  • 107.
    Hellberg, Roland
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Successful redesigned warehouse operations in order to meet an extremely volatile market2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A study of a third party logistic provider that has continuously redesigned theirs warehouse operations in order to meet an extremely volatile market with very short delivery times and large order size fluctuation. This research was done as a longitudinal study from 1993 to 2010, where the company was followed on daily base 1993-2000 and for the last 10 years on yearly base.

     

    The paper explain how an unique combination of many different picking methods, flexible layout and an intelligent warehouse management system, have founded a major increase of the providers market share from 22 to 50 %.

     

    Many similar companies have tried to meet the marked demand with warehouse automation, this case show the importance to avoid automation to keep maximum flexibility to be able to meet extreme volume variation with very short delivery times. Instead investments are turned into intelligence of the IT-system which support different fulfillment processes.

     

  • 108.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Jonkoping Univ, Sch Engn, Dept Ind Engn & Management, POB 1026, SE-55111 Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Eriksson, David
    Jonkoping Univ, Sch Engn, Dept Ind Engn & Management, POB 1026, SE-55111 Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Tate, Wendy
    Univ Tennessee, Dept Supply Chain Management, Knoxville, TN USA..
    Kinkel, Steffen
    Karlsruhe Univ Appl Sci, ILIN, Moltkestr 30, D-76133 Karlsruhe, Germany..
    Right-shoring: Making resilient offshoring and reshoring decisions2019In: Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management, ISSN 1478-4092, E-ISSN 1873-6505, Vol. 25, no 3, article id 100540Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this special topic forum is to look at some current literature on the right-shoring debate. The papers that were selected for the special topic form use a range of qualitative and quantitative methodologies to answer specific research questions related to the right-shoring phenomenon. Each of the papers is summarized in this editorial to show the findings, implications and future research directions. The ideas from these manuscripts were used as a foundation to discuss the way in which research in this area should progress. What types of questions should we be asking as we seek to discover the best "shore"? What factors and variables should we consider in our future decisions? Are there differences across regions of the world? Research in this area has continued to progress, largely because of significant global economic, environmental and regulatory changes. The "shoring" decision appears to be an area where research is keeping up with, or potentially leading practice, but there is still more opportunity to advance decision making. The included papers address a number of factors related to specific geographies and factors related to the movement of manufacturing and products and services from one location to another.

  • 109.
    Holm, Tove
    et al.
    Sykli Environmental School of Finland, Finland.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Caeiro, Sandra
    Universidade Aberta and CENSE from Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal.
    Rieckmann, Marco
    University of Vechta, Germany.
    Dlouhá, Jana
    Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Wright, Tarah
    Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
    Ceulemans, Kim
    University of Victoria, Gustavson Business School, Centre for Social and Sustainable Innovation, Victoria, BC, Canada.
    Benayas, Javier
    Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    ournal of Cleaner Production, The Netherlands; Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Utrecht University, The Netherlands.
    Developing sustainability into a golden thread throughout all levels of education2016In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 117, p. 1-3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 110.
    Holm, Tove
    et al.
    Sykli Environmental School of Finland, Finland; Department of Biology, University of Turku, Finland; Novia University of Applied Sciences, Finland .
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Grindsted, Thomas S.
    Department of Environmental, Social and Spatial Change, Roskilde University, Denmark.
    Vuorisalo, Timo
    Department of Biology, University of Turku, Finland.
    Process framework for identifying sustainability aspects in university curricula and integrating education for sustainable development2015In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 106, p. 164-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability aspects in higher education must be enhanced with more concrete actions. Universities are globally required to have quality assurance to secure and improve teaching and learning, and they use management systems to this aim. Integrating education for sustainable development and management systems are alike in that they are based on continuous improvement and systematic thinking; for both processes all stakeholders need to be involved. Although quality assurance is compulsory for higher education, education for sustainable development has barely been examined or integrated in this context.This article examines how voluntary integration of education for sustainable development into management systems at universities could facilitate a scheme to overcome the challenges to integrating education for sustainable development that were identified in previous research. For this, a process framework for integrating education for sustainable development with management systems was developed in a network of 11 universities in the Nordic countries. The framework included planning, assessment, monitoring, and implementation of education for sustainable development. It was piloted and applied to identify relevant sustainability aspects in different disciplines, examples of which are provided in the article. The framework can be applied to visualize the implementation of education for sustainable development. 

  • 111.
    Holm, Tove
    et al.
    University of Turku, Department of Biology.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Grinsted, Thomas S
    Riskilde University.
    Vuorisalo, Timo
    University ofTurku.
    Process model for integrating ESD and identifying sustainability aspects in universities’ curricula2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At the Rio + 20 UN Conference on Sustainable Development in 2012 it was decided that education for sustainable development (ESD) will be promoted more actively beyond the UN Decade of ESD (2005-2014). Integrating ESD into the management system could be a way to ensure that it will be integrated throughout the university system because quality assurance is compulsory, which ESD is not. A process model for enhancing ESD with management systems was developed and compared with drivers and barriers for enhancing ESD and for implementing management systems, and piloted. The process includes planning, assessment, monitoring and implementation of ESD, by which sustainability aspects have been identified. Examples of relevant sustainability aspects in different disciplines in Norden are provided. It was found that sustainability aspects could be identified for many fields, which indicates that the process model could be used as a tool in universities’ management systems, for enhancing ESD.

  • 112.
    Holm, Tove
    et al.
    University of Turku, Department of Biology.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Vuorisalo, Timo
    University of Turku, Department of Biology.
    Education for sustainable development and management systems in higher education in Finland and China:  a comparative study2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 113.
    Holm, Tove
    et al.
    University of Turku, Department of Biology; Novia University of Applied Sciences.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Vuorisalo, Timo
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Education for sustainable development and quality assurance in universities in China and the Nordic countries: a comparative study2015In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 107, p. 529-537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global goal for education for sustainable development (ESD) is to integrate it at all levels of education. For ensuring it the change has to be put in practice, by transforming universities. The Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden) strive to be among the regions that lead the way in enhancing ESD, and want to increase cooperation with China. It is therefore interesting to compare the region with China. We compared ESD and quality assurance between these areas at both policy and implementation levels. The former was based on literature, and the latter was studied with specific surveys in academia in both regions; in two provinces in China and in the Nordic countries. We investigated the possibilities to improve ESD in these regions by benefiting from quality assurance requirements. We found that both regions enhance ESD. The rather similar quality assurance requirements do not include ESD. In China, the respondents viewed quality assurance as sustainable development.

  • 114.
    Holm, Tove
    et al.
    University of Turku, Department of Biology.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Vuorisalo, Timo
    University of Turku.
    Grindsted, Thomas S
    University of Roskilde.
    A Model for Enhancing Education for Sustainable Development with Management Systems: Experiences from the Nordic Countries2012In: Sustainable Development at Universities: New Horizons / [ed] Leal Filho, Walter, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2012, 1, p. 261-272Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enhancing education for sustainable development, ESD, in higher education is a global challenge. Most countries have national quality assurance demands for higher education that could benefit ESD. This innovative way to develop ESD has not been investigated before. The authors studied how different higher education institutions enhance ESD, in particular with quality, environmental and integrated management systems. The research was done as an exploratory comparative study. The results in earlier research about curriculum development for ESD from the last years were studied. Based on the results a model of a process for enhancing ESD, which can be used in the management systems, was developed. 27 higher education institutions from the Nordic countries answered a survey and eleven institutions wrote reports of how they are enhancing ESD. The results from the research, survey and institutions were presented at a seminar, where the model was further developed. The authors found that in none of the Nordic countries indicators for SD are included in the quality assurance models of higher education, even though there are demands for enhancing ESD. The majority of the replies stated that the institutions have a clear connection between ESD and quality assurance and it is implemented differently in many parts of the management systems. The findings from the survey and the pilot institutions are restricted to faculty involved in enhancing ESD in higher education the Nordic countries. The findings can be used by the responsible for developing ESD and/or management systems in different higher education institutions.

  • 115.
    Holm, Tove
    et al.
    University of Turku, Finland; Novia University of Applied Sciences, Finland.
    Vuorisalo, Timo
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Integrated management systems for enhancing education for sustainable development in universities: a memetic approach2015In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 106, p. 155-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a need for new approaches for enhancing education for sustainable development in universities. Memetics, which is about effective pathways of communication, could be such a new, promising approach. Quality assurance is required in universities to secure and improve education, which could be another approach. The aim of this study is to look into whether and how frameworks for processes and procedures for quality assurance, such as management systems, could be utilized to promote higher education for sustainable development. The study approaches this from both a theoretical and a practical standpoint. An evolutionary perspective was chosen, considering higher education for sustainable development and management systems as memes, or basic units of cultural replication. The practical context was studied by looking into how 11 universities in the Nordic countries have enhanced ESD with management systems. We found that both higher education for sustainable development and management systems could be considered successful memes and that management systems could be applied to enhance higher education for sustainable development.

  • 116.
    Hu, W.
    et al.
    Faculty of Information Engineering, Guizhou Institute of Technology, Guizhou, China .
    Wu, S.
    College of Science, Guizhou University, Guizhou, China.
    Zhao, Ming
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Yang, J.
    Faculty of Information Engineering, Guizhou Institute of Technology, Guizhou, China .
    Requires analysis based on software maintainability2014In: ICRMS 2014 - Proceedings of 2014 10th International Conference on Reliability, Maintainability and Safety: More Reliable Products, More Secure Life, 2014, p. 354-357Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Requirements analysis is the most important phase of the software life cycle process. Some studies have shown the most faults of software are from the requirements phase. Therefore, the quality of Software Requirements Specification has become the key to project success, which correctness, consistency, no ambiguity of software requirements specification is more important. This paper presents a classification method based on natural language processing techniques and grey similar correlation. The first step of this method is that keywords refined from various functional requirements through segmentation of natural language processing, thus made up of heavy weight vector based on the weight of functional requirements, such a functional requirement corresponds to a weight vector. The second step is that the related technology of grey system is used to compute grey correlation coefficient between two weight vectors, in order to construct a correlation matrix. Finally, the appropriate statistical tools are used to classify functional requirements statements. The clustering results based on this method can provide work guidance for requirement analysts, software developers, software testers, software maintenance. 

  • 117.
    Hu, W
    et al.
    Guizhou University.
    Zhao, Ming
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Software reliability index reasonable allocation based on UML2012In: Journal of Convergence Information Technology, ISSN 1975-9320, Vol. 7, no 23, p. 178-185Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 118.
    Hu, W
    et al.
    Guizhou University.
    Zhao, Ming
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Yang, J
    Guizhou University.
    Jia, G
    Guizhou University.
    A Method of Software Reliability Allocation Based on UML Use Case Model2012In: Jisuanji Kexue [Computer Science], ISSN 1002-137X, Vol. 39, no 6A, p. 461-463Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 119.
    Hu, W
    et al.
    Guizhou University.
    Zhao, Ming
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Yang, J
    Guizhou University .
    Jia, G
    Guizhou University .
    Iterative Strategy Analyze During Agile Development2012In: Weidianzixue yu jisuanji [Microelectronics & Computer], ISSN 1000-7180, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 165-169Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, We used characteristic of the Unified Modeling Language (UML) use case model in describing the function of the system' s and the iteration sequence of agile development process to obtain a new iteration sequence based on the risk an value of the various use cases in UML use case diagrams. An obvious advantage of doing so is to ensure high-risk and high-value use cases will be first developed, so that the use cases will be repeatedly tested in the next iteration, thereby increasing overall system reliability.

  • 120.
    Hu, W
    et al.
    Guizhou University.
    Zhao, Ming
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Yang, J
    Guizhou University.
    Jia, W
    Guizhou University.
    VDM++ Formalization of UML Class Diagram2012In: Weidianzixue yu jisuanji [Microelectronics & Computer], ISSN 1000-7180, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 104-107Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to use the most widely used formal language-VDM + + that has characteristics of accuracy and consistent in describing syntax and semantic of the system model, combined with VDMTOOLS and Rational Rose tool to transform the various elements of the UML class model into representation of VI)M+ +. This method achieves the various elements contained UML class model about the syntax and semantics checking, and further improves the quality of UML modeling.

  • 121.
    Hu, Wensheng
    et al.
    School of Electrical and Information Engineering, Guizhou Institute of Technology, Gui Zhou, Gui Yang, China.
    Mao, Jingjing
    School of Electrical and Information Engineering, Guizhou Institute of Technology, Gui Zhou, Gui Yang, China.
    Yang, Jianfeng
    School of Electrical and Information Engineering, Guizhou Institute of Technology, Gui Zhou, Gui Yang, China.
    Zhao, Ming
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Maintainability design based on complex network2017In: 2017 14th International Computer Conference on Wavelet Active Media Technology and Information Processing (ICCWAMTIP), 2017, p. 309-314Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many faults come from the design phase. In order to improve the maintainability of the software, the design of software architecture must be adopted modular design. This paper presents a method of UML class diagram translated into a directed complex network with weight value. The relation weight coefficient matrix between classes can be calculated by Dijkstra algorithm. The clustering algorithm is implemented on the relation weight coefficient matrix. The result of clustering analysis is that the closely related classes can be clustered into a component. Finally, modular design of the software system can be realized. © 2017 IEEE.

  • 122.
    Jazairy, Amer
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Aligning the purchase of green logistics services between shippers and logistics service providers2018In: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 123.
    Jazairy, Amer
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Exploring shippers, logistics service providers and their relationships in facilitating green logistics2018Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The logistics industry causes various harms to the environment. The literature assigns the main responsibility for alleviating such harms to two supply chain actors: shippers (logistics buyers) and logistics service providers (LSPs), which motivated studying them in this thesis. Specifically, this thesis explores and identifies how green logistics practices can be facilitated through aligning both actors throughout the different phases of their relationships. Two studies are compiled. The first study is based on five distinct cases -- three shippers and five LSPs, providing the basis for two papers: (i) one that analyses the institutional pressures (regulatory, market, competitive) on shippers to purchase green logistics services, and on LSPs to provide these services, and (ii) one that investigates the two actors’ stances on environmental concerns in the four key logistics purchasing phases (request for proposal, negotiations, contracting, execution), while proposing ways to align their efforts along such phases. The second study covers a single case of a dyadic relationship between a shipper and its LSP, handling enhancing logistics performance (cost efficiency, on-time delivery) in the early stages of their relationship. The findings indicate a general lack of regulatory pressure in driving shippers and LSPs to engage in green logistics, contrasted by a long-term influence of competitive pressure and a prevalent influence of market pressure. It was also found that both actors must put substantial efforts in the beginning of their relationships to reach a mutual business understanding, allowing performance and green enhancements. In the execution, it was found that both partners should regularly communicate performance metrics while modifying working standards, which would also support their green practices. For practitioners, insights are offered to align shippers’ and LSPs’ efforts within their relationships to attain positive performance and green outcomes.

  • 124.
    Jazairy, Amer
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Harmonising the purchase of green logistics services between shippers and logistics service providers2017In: Proceedings of the 24th EurOMA conference, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the behaviours of shippers (logistics buyers) and logistics service providers (LSPs) towards environmental concerns during three phases of the logistics purchasing process: request for proposal, negotiations, and contracting. Empirical data is obtained from eight individual cases of three shippers and five LSPs within Sweden and Germany. Findings indicate that despite all recent environmental efforts, price and service levels still occupy the highest priorities when selecting LSPs, whereas green criteria are frequently overlooked. This paper offers insights for managers within shipper and LSP firms to harmonise their efforts during the purchasing process to successfully implement green logistics conducts.

  • 125.
    Jazairy, Amer
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lenhardt, Johannes
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    How to start up TPL relationships within offshoring contexts2016In: Proceedings of the 23rd EurOMA conference, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study proposes instructions to initiate relationships correctly between shippers andtheir third-party logistics (TPL) providers within an offshore outsourcing context. Thishas been achieved through studying four factors influencing relationship outcomes (trust,communication, culture, work agreements). The theoretical foundation is merged withthe empirical findings obtained from a case study examining an infant relationshipbetween a Swedish telecom provider, Ericsson, and its TPL in Saudi Arabia, Aramex.The findings recommend exerting extensive efforts from both sides in the build-up stageof TPL relationships in order to avoid potential shortcomings in the execution stage.

  • 126.
    Jazairy, Amer
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lenhardt, Johannes
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Improving logistics performance in cross-border 3PL relationships2017In: International Journal of Logistics, ISSN 1367-5567, E-ISSN 1469-848X, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 491-513Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes guidelines for improving logistics performance in terms of cost efficiency and on-time delivery in shipper–third-party logistics (3PL) provider relationships within an offshore outsourcing context. A conceptual framework is constructed based on a thorough literature review. Empirical data are collected through semi-structured interviews in a single-case study with a dyadic perspective, examining the 3PL relationship between Ericsson of Sweden and Aramex of Saudi Arabia. Accordingly, a revised framework is proposed after illustrating the case and merging the literature with practice. The findings highlight the impact of communication, trust, culture, system compliance, work agreements, and standardisation on cost efficiency and on-time delivery performance. The developed framework illustrates a sequential order for working on these factors to achieve performance improvement. This research is one of the first to propose guidelines for performance improvements within offshore outsourcing of 3PL services. 

  • 127.
    Jazairy, Amer
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Analysing the institutional pressures on shippers and logistics service providers to implement green supply chain management practices2020In: International Journal of Logistics, ISSN 1367-5567, E-ISSN 1469-848X, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 44-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper applies institutional theory to analyse the institutional pressures (regulatory, market, competitive) experienced by two actors within supply chains: shippers (i.e. logistics buyers) and logistics service providers (LSPs). Both actors are subject to institutional pressures to adopt green supply chain management practices, which could drive shippers to purchase green logistics services from LSPs, and LSPs to provide them. Also, the two actors are influenced by various factors that moderate the level of pressures on them and the responses they undertake. This study examines these pressures and moderators in detail to analyse how they influence green logistics purchasing/providing decisions. Empirical data were obtained from eight individual cases of three shippers and five LSPs. Accordingly, we compare these pressures and moderators based on the actors’ different roles in the supply chain. The findings aim to contribute to advancing the theory through (i) incorporating the roles of the moderating factors and (ii) providing further applications within specific shipper-LSP contexts. Further, this paper aims to assist managers within shipper and LSP organisations by demonstrating how their firm and market characteristics moderate the pressures exerted on them to buy or provide green logistics services, while providing insights on issues influencing their responsiveness.

  • 128.
    Jazairy, Amer
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Assessing the gaps between shippers and logistics service providers on green logistics practices along the logistics purchasing process2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To assess the gaps between the engagements of shippers (logistics buyers) and logistics service providers (LSPs) in different green logistics practices along the key phases of the logistics purchasing process: request for proposal, negotiations, contracting and execution.

    Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on a large scale survey of shippers and LSPs in Sweden. 331 companies (169 shippers; 162 LSPs) have responded. Data were analysed using independent sample T- tests and paired sample T-tests.

    Findings: While our findings conform with previous studies asserting that LSPs engage more extensively in green logistics practices than shippers do, we show that such situation is not uniformly applicable to all practices nor all purchasing phases; three patterns emerged that depict the gapsbetween the actors’ engagements along the process: (i) steady and wide gap, (ii) steady and narrow gap, and (iii) emergent gap – each gap is associated with distinct practices.

    Research limitations/implications: Contributing to the green logistics purchasing literature by creating three types of distinctions: (i) between shippers and LSPs, (ii) between different green logistics practices, and (iii) between different logistics purchasing phases. The survey covered actors in Sweden only, future studies could replicate the analysis in other countries.

    Practical implications: Insights are offered for managers within shipper/LSP firms to help them in spotting the green practices that are least focused upon by their partners, thus enabling them to modify their purchasing/marketing strategies accordingly.

    Social implications: Potentially contributing in reducing the carbon footprint of the logistics industry.

    Original/value: The three types of distinctions is a novel outset within the contract logistics and green supply chain management bodies of literature.

  • 129.
    Jazairy, Amer
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Do relationships matter? Linking the advancement of shipper-logistics service provider relationships with green logistics implementation2019In: Proceedings of the 26th EurOMA conference, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The contract logistics literature implicitly suggests that establishing advanced relationships between shippers (logistics buyers) and logistics service providers (LSPs) plays a role in facilitating green logistics practices. We systematically test this claim through surveying 335 companies (170 shippers; 165 LSPs) in Sweden. Using factor- and multiple regression analyses, we confirm that implementing green logistics practices is influenced by advanced relationships settings, but not all practices adhere to this. Also, a distinction is made on whether relationship advancement is expressed by the contract design or the degree of integration between the partners; the former better explains the implementation of the practices.

  • 130.
    Jazairy, Amer
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Drivers for sustainability conducts in shipper-3PL relationships: an exploratory analysis2017In: Proceedings of the 4th International EurOMA Sustainable Operations and Supply Chains Forum, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to identify the main drivers for engaging in sustainability practices in shipper-third-party logistics (3PL) provider relationships, and differentiate between both actors’ perspectives based on their roles within 3PL arrangements. A literature review is conducted to outline the main drivers for each actor among different academic themes. Then, data obtained from an explorative multiple-case study involving two large shippers and two large 3PL providers is illustrated and critically analysed. The drivers are sorted in a matrix that demonstrates nine categories to enable distinguishing both actors’ perceptions accurately. Detecting variations among the actors’ viewpoints on the drivers enables future research to focus on aligning both actors together to realise positive sustainable change.

  • 131.
    Kaltenbrunner, Monica
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Nursing Department, Medicine and Health College, Lishui University, Lishui Shi, China.
    A questionnaire measuring staff perceptions of Lean adoption in healthcare: development and psychometric testing2017In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    During the past decade, the concept of Lean has spread rapidly within the healthcare sector, but there is a lack of instruments that can measure staff's perceptions of Lean adoption. Thus, the aim of the present study was to develop a questionnaire measuring Lean in healthcare, based on Liker's description of Lean, by adapting an existing instrument developed for the service sector.

    METHODS:

    A mixed-method design was used. Initially, items from the service sector instrument were categorized according to Liker's 14 principles describing Lean within four domains: philosophy, processes, people and partners and problem-solving. Items were lacking for three of Liker's principles and were therefore developed de novo. Think-aloud interviews were conducted with 12 healthcare staff from different professions to contextualize and examine the face validity of the questionnaire prototype. Thereafter, the adjusted questionnaire's psychometric properties were assessed on the basis of a cross-sectional survey among 386 staff working in primary care.

    RESULTS:

    The think-aloud interviews led to adjustments in the questionnaire to better suit a healthcare context, and the number of items was reduced. Confirmatory factor analysis of the adjusted questionnaire showed a generally acceptable correspondence with Liker's description of Lean. Internal consistency, measured using Cronbach's alpha, for the factors in Liker's description of Lean was 0.60 for the factor people and partners, and over 0.70 for the three other factors. Test-retest reliability measured by the intra-class correlation coefficient ranged from 0.77 to 0.88 for the four factors.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    We designed a questionnaire capturing staff's perceptions of Lean adoption in healthcare on the basis of Liker's description. This Lean in Healthcare Questionnaire (LiHcQ) showed generally acceptable psychometric properties, which supports its usability for measuring Lean adoption in healthcare. We suggest that further research focus on verifying the usability of LiHcQ in other healthcare settings, and on adjusting the instrument if needed.

  • 132.
    Kaltenbrunner, Monica
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Uppsala universitet, Uppsala, Sverige; Nursing Department, Medicine and Health College, Lishui University, China.
    Lean i primärvården - en bild av hur Lean tillämpas2018In: FALF KONFERENS 2018 Arbetet – problem eller potential för en hållbar livsmiljö?   10-12 juni 2018 Gävle: Program och abstracts / [ed] Per Lindberg, Gävle: Gävle University Press , 2018, p. 112-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund

    Lean har sitt ursprung i bilindustrin och har spridits till andra sektorer såsom hälso-och sjukvård. Implementering av Lean syftar vanligtvis till att öka vårdkvaliten. Vid utvärderingar av Lean saknas ofta en beskrivning av vilka principer av Lean som implementeras och i vilken utsträckning. Föreliggande studie utgår från Likers beskrivning av Lean. Liker beskriver Lean i fyra övergripande grupper kallad 4P modellen; philosophy, processes, people and partners, och problem-solving (filosofi, processer, anställda och partners, och problemlösning), som består av ett antal principer. Att implementera alla principer och involvera alla medarbetare är ovanlig, vilket Liker menar är avgörande om organisationen ska nå de mål de satt med att införa Lean.

    Syfte

    Syftet med studien var att illustrera hur Lean praktiseras inom primärvården. 

    Metod

    Studien utgår från ett större forskningsprojekt där både privata och landstingsägda primärvårdsenheter deltog. All personal vid enheterna fick 2016 besvara en enkät om Lean-principer, svarsfrekvens 35% (298 medarbetare vid 45 enheter). Höga Lean skattningar indikerade hög mognad av Lean vilket innebar att medarbetarna var kunniga rörande den efterfrågade Lean-principen; låg mognad av Lean innebar att man helt saknade principen på sin arbetsplats eller hade implementerat den i liten utsträckning av ett fåtal medarbetare. Baserat på enkätsvaren valdes fyra enheter ut för observationer, två med hög mognad av Lean och två med låg mognad. Observationerna inkluderade intervjuer och fältanteckningar som illustrerade hur 4P-modellen praktiserades på enheterna. Hälso- och sjukvårdspersonal med olika professioner deltog (n=28).

    Resultat

    Rörande filosofi ansåg medarbetarna vid alla fyra enheter att den närmaste chefen, återkommande men i varierande utsträckning, kommunicerade gemensamma mål. Patienternas behov styrde planeringen av vården. Processer kunde innefatta att medarbetarna baserade sin planering av vården på statistik. För vissa patientgrupper eller symtom fanns generella ordinationer, d.v.s. utan kontakt med läkare, t.ex. på vilka prover som skulle tas. Rörande anställda och partners var det vanligt att arbeta i team både inom och utanför sin enhet. Men det framkom även att medarbetarna inte arbetade tillsammans fast de borde det. Problemlösning förekom men ofta ostrukturerat med brister på uppföljning. En enhet hade påbörjat utvecklande av problemlösning genom dagliga möten och strullistor att dokumentera problemen på.

    Konklusion

    Tillämpning av Lean varierar i stor utsträckning mellan vårdcentralerna. Ett par enheter hade implementerat Lean i större utsträckning och dessa enheter var mer strukturerade rörande t.ex. problemlösning och teamarbete.

     

  • 133.
    Kaltenbrunner, Monica
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science.
    Lean maturity and quality in primary care2019In: Journal of Health Organisation & Management, ISSN 1477-7266, E-ISSN 1758-7247, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 141-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to 1) describe Lean maturity in primary care using a questionnaire based on Liker’s description of Lean, complemented with observations, and 2) determine the extent to which Lean maturity is associated with quality of care measured as staff-rated satisfaction with care and adherence to national guidelines. High Lean maturity indicates adoption of all Lean principles throughout the organization and by all staff.

    Design/methodology/approach - Data were collected using a survey based on Liker’s four principles, divided into 16 items (n = 298 staff in 45 units). Complementary observations (n = 28 staff) were carried out at four units.

    Findings - Lean maturity varied both between and within units. The highest Lean maturity was found for ‘adhering to routines’ and the lowest for ‘having a change agent at the unit’. Lean maturity was positively associated with satisfaction with care and with adherence to national guidelines to improve healthcare quality. 

    Practical implications - Quality of primary care may benefit from increasing Lean maturity. When implementing Lean, managers could benefit from measuring and adopting Lean maturity repeatedly, addressing all Liker’s principles and using the results as guidance for further development.

    Originality/value - This is one of the first studies to evaluate Lean maturity in primary care, addressing all Liker’s principles from the perspective of quality of care. The results suggest that repeated actions based on evaluations of Lean maturity may help to improve quality of care.

  • 134.
    Kaltenbrunner Nykvist, Monica
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Towards a Questionnaire to Measure Lean in Health Care2014In: 8th NOVO Symposium, Sustainable health care production systems - Abstract book / [ed] Kasper Edwards och Jørgen Winkel, Lyngby: Danmarks Tekniske Universitet, DTU, 2014, p. 19-20Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid spread of Lean implementation within the health care sector has made it urgent to evaluate the effects of Lean on productivity, working conditions and health. Therefor an instrument is needed to measure Lean in primary care. The aim with this research is to find an instrument that captures the character of Lean. A literature search was conducted in Academic Search Elite, WileyOnlineLibrary, PubMed, Cinahl, PsycInfo, JSTOR, ScienceDirect, Emerald and Scopus. Keywords used were reflecting Lean and measurement and the search resulted in 7933 hits. Included were articles that presented an instrument that had the possibilities to distinguish between high or low Lean adoption. Malmbrandt and Åhlstöm´s (2014) instrument fulfilled criteria and was chosen. The original instrument was firstly translated to Swedish. A back translation was made by a bilingual authorized translator. The prototype will be tested among health care professions in Sweden using the think aloud method (TA) with the aim to explore how the participants perceive and interpret the Swedish version (Collins 2003). Immediately afterwards, they will be interviewed about how they interprets specific expressions in the questionnaire. After every round of 5-15 interviews the prototype will be adjusted and when saturation is reached the TA will terminate. After psychometric tests the finalized Swedish version of the instrument is to be used in a longitudinal study to describe status of Lean and how Lean correlate with the health of primary health care staff, there working conditions and productivity over time.

  • 135.
    Kaltenbrunner Nykvist, Monica
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Högberg, Hans
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science.
    Staff perception of Lean, care-giving, thriving and exhaustion: a longitudinal study in primary care2019In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 652Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Lean is commonly adopted in healthcare to increase quality of care and efficiency. Few studies of Lean involve staff-related outcomes, and few have a longitudinal design. Thus, the aim was to examine the extent to which changes over time in Lean maturity are associated with changes over time in care-giving, thriving and exhaustion, as perceived by staff, with a particular emphasis on the extent to which job demands and job resources, as perceived by staff, have a moderated mediation effect.

    Method

    A longitudinal study with a correlational design was used. In total, 260 staff at 46 primary care units responded to a web survey in 2015 and 2016. All variables in the study were measured using staff ratings. Ratings of Lean maturity reflect participants’ judgements regarding the entire unit; ratings of care-giving, thriving, exhaustion and job demands and resources reflect participants’ judgements regarding their own situation.

    Results

    First, over time, increased Lean maturity was associated with increased staff satisfaction with their care-giving and increased thriving, mediated by increased job resources. Second, over time, increased Lean maturity was associated with decreased staff exhaustion, mediated by decreased job demands. No evidence was found showing that job demands and job resources had a moderated mediation effect.

    Conclusion

    The results indicate that primary care staff may benefit from working in organizations characterized by high levels of Lean maturity and that caregiving may also be improved as perceived by staff.

  • 136.
    Karlsson, Anna
    et al.
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    The Managerial Challenge of Setting Goals Conducive to Individual Ambidexterity2017In: 18th International CINet Conference: Digitalization and innovation: designing the organization of the future, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 137.
    Kärna, Päivi
    et al.
    Lahti University of Applied Sciences, Lahti, Finland.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Sorvari, Jaana
    Aalto University, Aalto, Finland.
    Aarrevaara, Eeva
    Lahti University of Applied Sciences, Lahti, Finland.
    Sergienko, Olga
    ITMO University, St. Petersburg, Russia.
    Autio, Sakari
    Lahti University of Applied Sciences, Lahti, Finland.
    Learning sustainability in an intercultural way – Case ERREC2016In: Lahti Cleantech Annual Review 2016 / [ed] Kirsti Cura, Lahti: Lahti University of Applied Sciences , 2016, Vol. 24, p. 62-70Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    During the year 2016, Lahti University of Applied Sciences coordinated the ERREC - Environmental Responsibility and Resource Efficiency of Companies project, which aims at starting and strengthening the cooperation between Finnish, Russian and Swedish universities around the topic of environmental sustainability of companies. The activities of the project included two workshops with companies, an intensive week, guest lectures and project meetings. The partners were interested to join the project because of the opportunity to learn from each other and develop cooperation with their neighboring countries. The partners of the project are Lahti University of Applied Sciences (Finland), ITMO University (Russia), NOvSU University (Russia), University of Gävle (Sweden) and Aalto University (Finland). Each partner has its own education and research profile. This provides a fruitful starting point for the cooperation that is important for the countries around the Baltic Sea.

  • 138.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Laursen, Keld
    Copenhagen Business School.
    Tell, Fredrik
    Uppsala universitet.
    Knowledge integration across boundaries in open innovation2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 139.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    et al.
    KITE, Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Laursen, Keld
    DRUID, Department of Innovation and Organizational Economics, Copenhagen Business School, Frederiksberg, Denmark; Department of Industrial Economics and Technology Management, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway.
    Tell, Fredrik
    KITE, Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Business Studies, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Match and manage: the use of knowledge matching and project management to integrate knowledge in collaborative inbound open innovation2016In: Industrial and Corporate Change, ISSN 0960-6491, E-ISSN 1464-3650, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 333-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite mounting evidence on the potential benefits of inbound open innovation, little is known about how firms purposefully manage inflows of knowledge. We investigate the use of two knowledge governance procedures—project management and knowledge matching—in collaborative inbound open innovation. Our findings suggest that, in addition to “knowledge-precursors,” which the literature on open innovation and absorptive capacity has shown to be important for the integration of external knowledge, the firm’s choice of knowledge governance matters for innovation performance.

  • 140.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Laursen, Keld
    Copenhagen Business School.
    Tell, Fredrik
    Linköpings universitet.
    The role of knowledge governance in open innovation2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 141.
    Lazzarotti, Valentina
    et al.
    Carlo Cattaneo University (LIUC), Castellanza, Italy.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Manzini, Raffaella
    Carlo Cattaneo University (LIUC), Castellanza, Italy.
    Pellegrini, Luisa
    University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    Pierluigi, Rippa
    University of Naples Federico II, Napoli, Italy.
    Openness and innovation performance: an empirical analysis of openness determinants and performance mediators2017In: European Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1460-1060, E-ISSN 1758-7115, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 463-492Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Focusing on some relevant constructs defined by the open innovation (OI) literature (i.e. determinants of openness; openness choices operationalized in terms of collaboration depth with scientific and business partners; organizational and social context; innovation performance in terms of novelty and efficiency), this paper investigates the relationships among such constructs. More specifically, the purpose of this paper is to empirically analyse two types of relationships: between some contextual factors and firms’ openness choices; and among openness choices, a set of organizational-managerial and social factors, and OI performance outcomes.

    Design/methodology/approach The authors carried out a theory testing survey, involving four European countries (Finland, Italy, Sweden and the UK). The authors applied descriptive statistics and a series of regressions.

    Findings The authors analysed the impact exerted by external and internal variables on the collaboration depth with scientific and business partners: technological trends are relevant to move firms towards external collaborations, with both types of partners; efficiency goals pursued in collaborations are related to the collaboration depth with both types of partners, while an aggressive innovation strategy is positively related only to scientific-partner depth. Besides, collaboration depths with both partners are positively related to the both sides of innovation performance (i.e. novelty and efficiency), but the organizational-managerial and social contexts emerge as relevant mediator variables. Organizational-managerial and external relational social capital exert a beneficial role on the both types of innovation performance, while internal relational social capital benefits only novelty.

    Research limitations/implications The work shows important limitations such as the low level of the explanatory values in the regression models. Therefore, the results must be considered as preliminary explorative insights that may be useful to encourage further studies.

    Practical implications This work serves to raise managers’ awareness on the opportunity of developing organizational-managerial mechanisms, as well as on the importance of social capital to profit from collaborations.

    Originality/value Although during the last decade many researchers have claimed that we are in the era of OI, empirical works, which provide both a more comprehensive and detailed understanding of the phenomenon, are still few. Moreover, the specific action of the context (managerial, organizational and social) as possible mediator of the performance outcomes of openness is empirically under-studied. The authors’ work attempts to fulfil these gaps.

  • 142.
    Lazzarotti, Valentina
    et al.
    LIUC Universita Cattaneo, Castellanza, Italy.
    Manzini, Raffaella
    LIUC Universita Cattaneo, Castellanza, Italy.
    Pellegrini, Luisa
    Universita di Pisa, Italy.
    Rippa, Pierluigi
    Universita degli Studi di Napoli, Italy.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Current practices of European Open Innovators2015In: R&D Management Conference 2015: Book of abstracts, RADMA , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 143.
    Liu, Yu
    et al.
    Department of Systems Engineering and Engineering Management, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong .
    Xie, Min
    Department of Systems Engineering and Engineering Management, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong .
    Yang, Jianfeng
    Faculty of Information Engineering, Guizhou Institute of Technology, Guiyang, China .
    Zhao, Ming
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    A New Framework and Application of Software Reliability Estimation Based on Fault Detection and Correction Processes2015In: Proceedings: IEEE International Conference on Software Quality, Reliability and Security, QRS 2015, IEEE conference proceedings, 2015, p. 65-74, article id 7272916Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Software reliability growth modeling plays an important role in software reliability evaluation. To incorporate more information and provide more accurate analysis, modeling software fault detection and correction processes has attracted widespread research attention recently. However, the assumption of the stochastic fault correction time delay brings more difficulties in modeling and estimating the parameters. In practice, other than the grouped fault data, software test records often include some more detailed information, such as the rough time when one fault is detected or corrected. Such semi-grouped dataset contains more information about fault removal processes than commonly used grouped dataset. Using the semi-grouped datasets can improve the accuracy of time delayed models. In this paper, a fault removal modelling framework for software reliability with semi-grouped data is studied and extended into multi-released software. Also, the corresponding parameter estimation is carried out with Maximum Likelihood estimation method. One test dataset with three releases from a practical software project is applied with the proposed framework, which shows satisfactory performance with the results.

  • 144.
    Lozano, Francisco J.
    et al.
    Tecnologico de Monterrey, Campus Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Assessing the potential sustainability benefits of agricultural residues: biomass conversion to syngas for energy generation or to chemicals production2018In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 172, p. 4162-4169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Crop residues represent more than half of the world's agricultural phytomass. Residual biomass, from agriculture or forestry, can be converted into synthesis gas (syngas) to generate energy (electrical or thermal) or chemicals. The paper uses eco-efficiency as a tool to compare these two options. A basis of 1000 kg/hour of residual pecan nut shell residue was considered to estimate the material flow of chemicals that can be produced, as well as the power that can be generated through residual biomass gasification. This study compares two alternate routes: (1) gasification with air, which renders a gas stream with hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane and other hydrocarbons, as well as nitrogen; and (2) gasification with steam, where a residual biomass amount is used as fuel, rendering a gas stream like the first route, but without nitrogen. The eco-efficiency index shows that a decrease of environmental influence leads to a high output material flow for the alternative process with higher economic values, thus a higher proportion of input raw materials can be transformed into chemical products. The paper highlights that eco-efficiency can be used as a decision-making tool to choose between transformation processes by combining scientific and technical issues with economic ones. This can help to move towards a better and more sustainable use of natural resources through the utilisation of residual biomass.

  • 145.
    Lozano, Francisco J.
    et al.
    Escuela de Ingeniería y Ciencias, Tecnologico de Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
    Freire, Paulo
    LaProma (Laboratório de Produção e Meio Ambiente), São Paulo, Brazil.
    Jiménez-Gonzalez, Concepción
    GlaxoSmithKline; North Carolina State University, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ortiz, María Gabriela
    Escuela de Ingeniería y Ciencias, Tecnologico de Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico.
    Trianni, Andrea
    Politecnico di Milano, Milan, Italy.
    Carpenter, Angela
    University of Leeds, United Kingdom.
    Viveros, Tomás
    University of Leeds, United Kingdom; Process and Hydraulics Engineering Department, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, Col. Vicentina, México D.F., Mexico.
    New perspectives for green and sustainable chemistry and engineering: approaches from sustainable resource and energy use, management, and transformation2018In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 172, p. 227-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The special volume on green and sustainable chemistry and engineering has fourteen papers that were considered relevant to the present day issues and discussion, such as adequate use of raw materials and efficient energy, besides considering renewable sources for materials and energy; and changing economical canons towards circular economy. Businesses, governments and Society are facing a number of challenges to tread the sustainability path and provide wellbeing for future generations. This special volume relevance provides discussions and contributions to foster that desirable future. Chemicals are ubiquitous in everyday activities. Their widespread presence provides benefits to societies’ wellbeing, but can have some deleterious effects. To counteract such effect, green engineering and sustainable assessment in industrial processes have been gathering momentum in the last thirty years. Green chemistry, green engineering, eco-efficiency, and sustainability are becoming a necessity for assessing and managing products and processes in the chemical industry. This special volume presents fourteen articles related to sustainable resource and energy use (five articles), circular economy (one article), cleaner production and sustainable process assessment (five article), and innovation in chemical products (three articles). Green and sustainable chemistry, as well as sustainable chemical engineering and renewable energy sources are required to foster and consolidate a transition towards more sustainable societies. This special volume present current trends in chemistry and chemical engineering, such as sustainable resource and energy use, circular economy, cleaner production and sustainable process assessment, and innovation in chemical products. This special volume provides insights in this direction and complementing other efforts towards such transition.

  • 146.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Analysing the use of tools, initiatives, and approaches to promote sustainability in corporations2019In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interest in sustainability from the corporate sector is evidenced by over 13,000 companiesin 160 countries that have signed the United Nations Global Compact. In thiscontext, a number of tools, initiatives, and approaches (TIAs), e.g., circular economy,corporate social responsibility, eco-efficiency, life cycle assessment, and sustainabilityreporting have been developed by and for corporations to engage and promote sustainabilitywithin their systems. Each of the TIAs has advantages when addressingsustainability issues and the company system's elements, but it has disadvantages indealing with their complexities and interactions. Relying only on one TIA results in alimited contribution to sustainability, whereas using too many TIAs wastes resourcesand energy. The Corporate and Industrial Voluntary Initiatives for Sustainability(CIVIS) has been proposed to better combine the TIAs. A survey was developed toinvestigate the use of 24 TIAs. The survey was sent to a database of 5,299 organisations(of which 3,603 were companies), from which 202 responses were obtained.The responses were analysed using ratio analysis, principal component analysis, andcluster analysis. The responses show that some TIAs are well known and providegood results when used, for example, corporate social responsibility, corporate sustainability,and Global Reporting Initiative reports. The analyses show a number ofgroups of the TIAs that can help to better combine them. The paper updates theCIVIS framework in order to provide clearer guidance on how to combine the TIAs. Acombination of between four and six initiatives appears to be most effective way topromote sustainability. The TIAs can help to promote sustainability in corporations,but they need to be combined correctly in order to address holistically the fourdimensions of sustainability, the system elements, and stakeholders, while avoidingduplication of tasks and wasting resources.

  • 147.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Analysis of the importance of sustainability drivers and barriers to change in Higher Education Institutions2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although several drivers for and barriers to sustainability have been recognised in Higher Education Institutions, there has been limited research on analysing which are considered to be the most important. Two survey were sent to analyse this. The first survey was answered by nineteen respondents, whilst the second by eleven. The survey responses were analysed using descriptive statistics, rankings in order of importance, and comparison between types of drivers and barriers. This paper provides depth to the drivers for and barriers to sustainability in HEIs’ discussion by: 1) providing the importance of each driver and barrier; 3) offering a ranking of the drivers and barriers; 4) and analysing the relations between drivers and barriers to categorise them.

  • 148.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Assessing sustainability in higher education institutions2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 149.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bridging aims and delivery of higher education for sustainable development: Using pedagogical approaches to fulfil competences2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 150.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Chemical Engineering and Sustainability: the need for holistic education and practice2019Conference paper (Other academic)
123456 101 - 150 of 285
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf