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  • 101.
    Lyskov, Eugene
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Stress and daily physical activity in chronic neck-shoulder pain2013Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims Chronic work-related stress is a risk factor for the development of chronic musculo-skeletal pain and cardiovascular disease. The link between stress and chronic diseases is probably mediated by the autonomic nervous system (ANS) and the hypothalamus-pituatary-adrenal (HPA) axis; however the character and level of deviations in these regulatory systems have  not been sufficiently examined in persons with neck-shoulder pain (NSP).

    Physical activity has shown a wide range of benefits extending to musculoskeletal health (1), while inactive behavior may contribute to chronic muscle pain (2). The development of NSP is associated with perceived stress (3) and altered regulation of physiological stress systems, mainly with increased sympathetic and/or reduced parasympathetic activation (4, 5). The role of daily physical activity in the development and maintenance of NSP is still largely unknown. Therefore, we investigated daily physical activity, autonomic regulation and symptoms among persons with chronic NSP and healthy controls, by using long-term ambulatory monitoring in daily life.

    Methods In field studies, we investigated the relations between autonomic regulation, patterning of physical activity and stress perception in persons with chronic NSP (trapezius myalgia or tension neck syndrome, exhausted syndrome with somatic pain component) and symptom-free controls. Physical activity was objectively monitored by accelerometry or inclinometry, whereas heart rate variability (HRV) as an indicator of ANS regulation were recorded in parallel with  self- ratings of pain, stress and fatigue during several working days. Results Subjects with muscle pain showed relatively higher perceived stress and increased fatigue levels. Sleep quality was lower in patients in comparison with controls. Daily physical activity in chronic NSP was characterized by a different activity pattern than the control group. Particularly, lower activity levels and more time lying in the evening were observed. Increased heart rate and diminished HRV were observed in NSP as compared to controls. Correlations revealed a negative relationship between hour-to-hour changes in physical activity and HRV. Between subjects, physical activity was positively associated to HRV.

    Conclusion The groups with chronic NSP showed reduced physical activity, especially in the evening. Higher heart rate and reduced HRV reflected chronic stress in terms of autonomic imbalance among those with NSP. Positive correlations between physical activity and HRV indicate a reduced parasympathetic activation in individuals with lower levels of physical activity in daily life. We suggest that chronic stress and physical activity might be important factors in chronic NSP. Interventions with increasing daily physical activity are warranted.

    References

    1.         Powell KE, Paluch AE, Blair SN. Physical Activity for Health: What Kind? How Much? How Intense? On Top of What? Annu Rev Public Health. 2011;32(1):349-65.

    2.         van Weering M, Vollenbroek-Hutten MMR, Kotte EM, Hermens HJ. Daily physical activities of patients with chronic pain or fatigue versus asymptomatic controls. A systematic review. Clin Rehabil. 2007;21(11):1007-23.

    3.         Bongers P, Ijmker S, van den Heuvel S, Blatter B. Epidemiology of work related neck and upper limb problems: Psychosocial and personal risk factors (Part I) and effective interventions from a bio behavioural perspective (Part II). J Occup Rehabil. 2006;16(3):272-95.

    4.         Hallman DM, Lindberg L-G, Arnetz BB, Lyskov E. Effects of static contraction and cold stimulation on cardiovascular autonomic indices, trapezius blood flow and muscle activity in chronic neck–shoulder pain. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2011;111(8):1725-35.

    5.         Gockel M, Lindholm H, Alaranta H, Viljanen A, Lindquist A, Lindholm T. Cardiovascular functional disorder and stress among patients having neck-shoulder symptoms. Ann Rheum Dis. 1995;54(6):494-7.

     

  • 102.
    Lyskov, Eugene
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Directly measured physical activity and heart rate variability among workers with and without musculoskeletal disorders2015Ingår i: / [ed] University of Limerick, 2015, s. 74-Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Aberration in autonomous nervous system regulation may play an important role in the development of work related musculoskeletal disorders (MSD). Recent studies indicated that sympathetic activity was increased relative to vagal effects in subjects with MSD, as measured through heart rate variability (HRV). However, the cause of this physiological change is difficult to determine, since several factors influence HRV, almost importantly the pattern of daily physical activity (PA).The aim of this study was to identify possible differences in PA between workers with and without MSD, and assess associations between HRV and PA. Methods: Twenty-six workers with MSD (41 years, 13 females) and twenty-four matched symptom-free controls from an industry in mid-Sweden participated in the study. ECG was monitored by the First Beat system whereas PA was recorded by a tri-axial accelerometer ActivPAL attached to thigh. GPS data were collected to identify the spatial location of the participants

    Results

    The groups showed similar distributions of total time spent at work, at home and "elsewhere". The lowest PA levels were found at work for both groups. Leisure time PA "elsewhere" was significantly lower among subjects with MSD than among controls. Time domain HRV variables were clearly correlated with PA levels and showed trend differences (0.05<p<0.1) between the MSD and the control group during sedentary and physically active periods.

    Conclusions

    Workers with MSD showed a different pattern of leisure time PA compared with symptom-free workers. These PA differences may have contributed in explaining the difference in autonomic activity, as measured through HRV, observed between the two groups, and even in previous studies of similar groups.

  • 103.
    Lyskov, Eugene
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, CBF. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, CBF. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Sakajev, Eduard
    Ermakova, I
    Stress and work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Long-term monitoring of physiological and behavioral data in real-life studies2012Ingår i: 8th International Interdisciplinary Congress “Neuroscience for Medicine and Psychology”, 2012, s. 258-Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 104.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Lyskov, Eugene
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hygge, Staffan
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för teknik och miljö, Avdelningen för bygg- energi- och miljöteknik, Miljöpsykologi.
    Can cognitive activities during breaks in repetitive manual work accelerate recovery from fatigue? A controlled experiment2014Ingår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, nr 11, artikel-id e112090Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Neurophysiologic theory and some empirical evidence suggests that fatigue caused by physical work maybe more effectively recovered during “diverting” periods of cognitive activity than during passive rest; a phenomenon of great interest in working life. We investigated the extent to which development and recovery of fatigue during repeated bouts of an occupationally relevant reaching task was influenced by the complexity of a cognitive activity between these bouts. Eighteen male volunteers performed three sessions, consisting of six 7-min bouts of reaching alternating with 3minutes of a memory test differing in complexity between sessions. Throughout the session, recordings were made of upper trapezius muscle activity using electromyography (EMG), heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV) using electrocardiography,arterial blood pressure, and perceived fatigue (Borg CR10 scale and SOFI). A test battery before, immediately after and 1 hour after the work period included measurements of shoulder elevation strength (MVC), pressure pain threshold (PPT) over the trapezius muscles, and a submaximal isometric contraction. As intended, perceived fatigue, HRV, and EMG amplitude increased during the physical work bouts. Recovery did occur between the bouts, but fatigue accumulated throughout the work period. Neither EMG changes nor recovery of perceived fatigue during breaks were influenced by cognitive task complexity, while heart rate and HRV recovered the most during breaks with the most difficult task. Recovery of perceived fatigue after the 1 hour work period was also most pronounced for the most difficult cognitive condition, while MVC and PPT showed ambiguous patterns, and EMG recovered similarly after all three cognitive protocols. Thus, we could confirm that cognitive tasks between bouts of fatiguing physical work can,indeed, accelerate recovery of central components of fatigue, even if benefits may be moderate. Our results encourage further research into combinations of physical and mental tasks in an occupational context.

  • 105.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Johansson, Elin
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Sitting, standing and physical activity among male and female office workers of different age: behaviours examined using compositional data analysis2019Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Excessive sitting is an increasing concern in working life. Negative health effects may, to some extent, be mitigated by interrupting prolonged sitting by standing or more active behaviours, like walking. Alternations between these behaviours may also influence variation in neck-shoulder-arm exposures, and thus musculoskeletal disorder risks. This study examined time spent sitting, standing and active among office workers, and determined the extent to which these behaviours differed by gender and age.

    Methods. Ninety-nine workers at a Swedish government agency (50/49 men/women; mean(SD) age 47.1(9.0) years) wore a thigh accelerometer (Actigraph GT3X) for five working days. Data were processed to give the percentage of time spent sitting in short (<30 min) and long (≥30 min) bouts, in standing, and in more active behaviours. In adding up to 100%, such data are constrained and inherently dependent. This requires further examination to be performed using Compositional Data Analysis (CoDA). Thus, Isometric Log-transformed Ratios were constructed, describing sitting vs. non-sitting (sit/nonsit), short-bout vs. long-bout sitting (shortsit/longsit), and standing vs. active (stand/active). These ratios were examined for pairwise correlations, and for associations with gender and age.

    Results. On average, workers spent 28.9%, 42.2%, 21.6%, and 7.3% time in shortsit, longsit, standing, and active. Sit/nonsit correlated negatively with shortsit/longsit (r=–0.49) and stand/active (r=–0.64); shortsit/longsit correlated positively with stand/active (r=0.19). Gender showed small associations with all three ratios (partial-ƞ2=0.01-0.03; p=0.08-0.43). Stand/active increased with increasing age (partial-ƞ2=0.07; p=0.01), while sit/nonsit and shortsit/longsit were very weakly associated with age (partial-ƞ2=0.01 and 0.01; p=0.26 and 0.40).

    Conclusions. Workers spending more time sitting also spent a larger part of that time in long, uninterrupted sitting bouts. However, when not sitting, these workers were more physically active than workers who sat less. These behaviours differed little by gender and age, besides older workers being relatively less active during non-sitting periods.

  • 106.
    Mixter, Susanna
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Alternations between physical and cognitive tasks in repetitive work – Effect of cognitive task difficulty on fatigue development in women2019Ingår i: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 62, nr 8, s. 1008-1022Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In a context of job rotation, this study determined the extent to which the difficulty of a cognitive task (CT) interspersed between bouts of repetitive, low-intensity work (pipetting) influences recovery from fatigue. Fifteen participants performed three experimental sessions, each comprising 10 repeats of a 7 min + 3 min combination of pipetting and CT. The CT was easy, moderate or hard. Surface electromyography (EMG amplitude of the forearm extensor and trapezius muscles) and self-reports was used to assess fatigability. Perceived fatigue and trapezius EMG amplitude increased during sessions. CT difficulty influenced fatigue development only little, besides forearm extensor EMG increasing more in CT3 than in CT1 and CT2. During CT bouts, fatigability recovered, and to a similar extent irrespective of CT. Thus, CT difficulty influenced recovery of perceived as well as performance fatigability to a minor extent, and may not be a critical issue in job rotation comprising alternating physical and cognitive tasks.

  • 107.
    Mixter, Susanna
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Alternations between physical and mental tasks – a viable option for job rotation?2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 108.
    Mixter, Susanna
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Bjärntoft, Sofie
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Alternations between physical and cognitive tasks – does temporal pattern and cognitive task difficulty influence fatigue development?2019Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Some evidence suggests that alternations between physical and cognitive work tasks may be a viable option for job rotation, since production can be maintained without excessive fatigue. Effects on fatigue and pain of the temporal distribution of physical and cognitive tasks are, however, uncertain. The aim of this study was to examine development of fatigue and pain during physical and cognitive work tasks of different difficulties, alternating in different temporal patterns.

    Methods

    Fifteen women performed alternating bouts of a physical task (phys) and a cognitive task (CT) for a total of 100 minutes. Four experimental conditions were tested in a repeated-measures design. Conditions 1 and 2 consisted of five long-cycle sequences (phys+CT, 14+6 minutes), and in conditions 3 and 4, 10 short-cycle sequences (7+3 minutes) were performed. Each temporal pattern was completed with an easy or a difficult CT. Muscle fatigue was assessed using surface electromyography (EMG) from the right trapezius, and perceived fatigue and pain in the right shoulder was assessed using CR-10 ratings. Effects of time and experimental condition on these outcomes were tested using ANOVA.

    Results

    Perceived fatigue and pain in right shoulder after pipetting work bouts increased in all four conditions (long-cycle, fatigue F=5.68, p<0.001, pain F=4.12, p=0.01; short-cycle, fatigue F=10.59, p<0.001, pain F=5.45, p<0.001). Trapezius EMG did not change significantly across work bouts (long-cycle, F=2.14, p=0.09; short-cycle, F=1.03, p=0.42). Irrespective of the temporal alternation pattern, neither EMG nor fatigue and pain were influenced by CT difficulty (CT main effect and CT×time interaction: EMG, all F≤2.5, p≥0.1; fatigue and pain, all F≤2.0, p≥0.7).

    Conclusions

    The temporal pattern of alternations between a repetitive physical task and a CT did not influence fatigue development, and the difficulty level of the CT did not significantly influence fatigue and pain, irrespective of the temporal alternation pattern.

  • 109.
    Mixter, Susanna
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Jahncke, Helena
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Lindfors, Petra
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University.
    Does the difficulty of a memory task interspersed between bouts of repetitive work influence recovery?2016Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Controlled experiments suggest that active breaks with mental activity interspersed between physical work bouts can lead to more effective recovery from fatigue than passive rest. However, most of these studies investigated a highly stereotyped physical task until exhaustion. Research investigating the effects of mental breaks in tasks of higher occupational relevance is limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent to which a working memory task performed at three difficulty levels would enhance recovery of perceived fatigue after a repetitive physical work task.

    Methods. 12 women (mean age 26.4) performed 10 work cycles each comprising seven minutes of pipetting (to model repetitive work) followed by three minutes devoted to a working memory task. Three difficulty levels (MT1, MT2, MT3) of the memory task were tested on three different days in a randomized order across participants. During the last minute of pipetting and after the memory task, participants rated fatigue on the Borg CR-10 scale. Before, during and after each experiment, salivary a-amylase was measured.

    Results. Perceived fatigue in the right shoulder during the last minute of pipetting increased with time (p<0.001) but did not significantly differ between types of MT (p=0.314). Perceived fatigue in the right shoulder just after the memory task also increased with time (p<0.001), and in a pattern differing between MT types (time*MT: p=0.042), while MT type showed no significant main effect (p=0.169). Post-hoc tests showed that MT3 led to better recovery than MT1 (effect of MT: p=0.041; time*MT: p=0.025). Salivary a-amylase increased with time (p=0.001) but showed no significant effects of MT type (p=0.214).

    Discussion. Our results indicate that recovery of perceived fatigue after a repetitive task was better when performing a difficult — as compared to an easy — memory task. This effect was not accompanied by any differences in a-amylase response.

  • 110.
    Mixter, Susanna
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Lindfors, Petra
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dimberg, Kenth
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för teknik och miljö, Avdelningen för elektroteknik, matematik och naturvetenskap, Biologi.
    Jahncke, Helena
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Lyskov, Eugene
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Stress-related responses to alternations between repetitive physical work and cognitive tasks of different difficulties2019Ingår i: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This experimental study aimed to determine the extent to which a repetitive physical task alternatingwith a cognitive task (CT) influences stress responses and whether the CT difficulty is important. Fifteen women performed three sessions of 10 consecutive work bouts, each including a seven-minutere petitive physical task and a three-minute CT at either of three difficulty levels. Stress-related responses were assessed using heart rate variability, blood pressure, salivary alpha-amylase, salivary cortisol, perceived stress and cognitive performance.The alternating work did not result in any marked increase in perceived stress or changes in stressresponses. CT difficulty did not influence stress responses (all p>0.05), apart from alpha-amylase which was higher during the easiest CT (F= 5.34, p= 0.02). Thus, introducing cognitive work bouts into repetitive physical work did not result in increased levels of stress, suggesting this approach to be viable in job rotation.

  • 111.
    Neupane, Subas
    et al.
    Unit of Health Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Karstad, Kristina
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Rugulies, Reiner
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Holtermann, Andreas
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Objectively measured versus self-reported occupational physical activity and multisite musculoskeletal pain: A prospective follow-up study at 20 nursing homes in Denmark2019Ingår i: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    To explore the prospective association of objectively measured and self-reported occupational physical activity (OPA) with multisite musculoskeletal pain (MSP) among Danish eldercare workers.

    Methods

    The study population consisted of eldercare workers in 20 Danish nursing homes (N = 553, response rate 59%, 525 female). Baseline data were collected in 2013–2014 and the 1-year follow-up was completed in 2016. At baseline, we measured objective OPA by a thigh-worn ActiGraph GT3X + accelerometer during work and self-reported OPA by a questionnaire survey. Information on musculoskeletal pain during the past four weeks in seven different body sites was reported by a structured questionnaire at baseline (n = 389) and by SMS and telephone interview during follow-up (n = 284). MSP was defined as having pain in two or more body sites. Using log-binomial models we calculated risk ratios (RRs) with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to estimate the association between objectively measured and self-reported OPA and MSP.

    Results

    We found statistically significant positive associations between self-reported OPA (RR for high OPA 1.24, 95% CI 1.05–1.46) and MSP while there was no significant association found between objective OPA and MSP.

    Conclusion

    Our study indicates that self-reported, but not objectively measured OPA is positively associated with MSP. This finding highlights the need for better understanding, use, and interpretation of self-reported and objectively measured OPA in the study of MSP.

  • 112.
    Picchiottino, Mathieu
    et al.
    CIAMS, Université Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Orsay Cedex, France.
    Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte
    Institute for Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Gagey, Olivier
    CIAMS, Université Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Orsay Cedex, France..
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    The acute effects of joint manipulative techniques on markers of autonomic nervous system activity: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized sham-controlled trials2019Ingår i: Chiropractic and Manual Therapies, ISSN 2045-709X, E-ISSN 2045-709X, Vol. 27, artikel-id 17Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundThe autonomic nervous system (ANS) interests many chiropractors and manual therapists, because joint manipulative techniques (JMT), e.g. high velocity low amplitude (HVLA) manipulations and mobilizations, appear to produce acute changes in ANS mediated physiology. The complexity of this issue justifies a systematic critical literature review.

    ObjectiveTo review the literature comparing the acute changes in markers of ANS activity between JMT applied on spinal or peripheral joints and a sham procedure in healthy or symptomatic subjects.

    MethodWe searched PsycINFO, PEDro, PubMed, Cochrane library, EMBASE, and Medline up to December 2017. We updated the search with PubMed, Cochrane library, EMBASE, and Medline including July 2018. Inclusion criteria were: randomized sham-controlled trials assessing the effect of JMT on markers of ANS activity; manually applied JMT, regardless of technique, applied on either healthy or symptomatic humans; outcome measurements recorded at baseline and repeated during and/or after interventions. Selection of articles and data extraction were performed independently by two reviewers. The quality of studies was assessed using the Cochrane ‘risk of bias’ tool and a technical check-list. Results were reported narratively with some meta-analyses. The Cochrane GRADE approach was used to assess the certainty of evidence.

    ResultsTwenty-nine of 2267 studies were included in the synthesis. Mobilizations (oscillatory technique) probably produce an immediate and short-term, bilateral increase in skin sympathetic nerve activity (reflected by an increase in skin conductance) regardless of the area treated (moderate-certainty evidence). It is uncertain whether the sympathetic arousal also explains an increase in respiratory rate (very low-certainty evidence). Our evaluation of the literature suggests that spinal sustained apophyseal glides (SNAGs) mobilization and HVLA manipulation of the spine may have no acute effect on the studied markers of ANS activity (very low- to low-certainty evidence).

    ConclusionSome types of mobilizations probably produce an immediate and short-term, statistically significant increase in skin sympathetic nerve activity when compared to a sham procedure, whereas spinal SNAGs and spinal HVLA techniques may have no acute effect on the studied markers of ANS activity. No region-specific results were noted. The literature suffers from several shortcomings, for which reason we strongly suggest further research.

  • 113.
    Rasmussen, Charlotte
    et al.
    National research centre for the working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hellström, Fredrik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Symposia: Musculoskeletal pain as an outcome - how can we get better insight into the time course of musculoskeletal pain?2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 114.
    Sato, Tatiana
    et al.
    Physical Therapy Department, Federal University of São Carlos (UFSCar), Brazil.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Kristiansen, Jesper
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Holtermann, Andreas
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    The association between multisite musculoskeletal pain and cardiac autonomic modulation during work, leisure and sleep - a cross-sectional study2018Ingår i: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 19, nr 1, artikel-id 405Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    The prevention and rehabilitation of multisite musculoskeletal pain would benefit from studies aiming to understand its underlying mechanism. Autonomic imbalance is a suggested mechanism for multisite pain, but hardly been studied during normal daily living. Therefore, the aim of the study is to investigate the association between multisite musculoskeletal pain and cardiac autonomic modulation during work, leisure and sleep.

    METHODS:

    This study is based on data from the "Danish Physical activity cohort with objective measurements" among 568 blue-collar workers. Pain intensity scales were dichotomized according to the median of each scale, and the number of pain sites was calculated. No site was regarded as the pain-free, one site was considered as single-site musculoskeletal pain and pain in two or more sites was regarded as multisite musculoskeletal pain. Heart rate variability (HRV) was measured by an electrocardiogram system (ActiHeart) and physical activity using accelerometers (Actigraph). Crude and adjusted linear mixed models were applied to investigate the association between groups and cardiac autonomic regulation during work, leisure and sleep.

    RESULTS:

    There was no significant difference between groups and no significant interaction between groups and domains in the crude or adjusted models for any HRV index. Significant differences between domains were found in the crude and adjusted model for all indices, except SDNN; sleep time showed higher values than leisure and work time, except for LF and LF/HF, which were higher during work.

    CONCLUSION:

    This cross-sectional study showed that multisite musculoskeletal pain is not associated with imbalanced cardiac autonomic regulation during work, leisure and sleep time.

  • 115.
    Sato, Tatiana
    et al.
    Physical Therapy Department, Federal University of São Carlos (UFSCar), Brazil.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Kristiansen, Jesper
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Skotte, Jørgen
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Holtermann, Andreas
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Different autonomic responses to occupational and leisure time physical activities among blue-collar workers2018Ingår i: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 91, nr 3, s. 293-304Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    The differential effect of occupational and leisure time physical activity on cardiovascular health is termed the physical activity health paradox. Cardiac autonomic modulation could bring insights about the underlying mechanism behind this differential effect. The aim was to compare heart rate variability (HRV) during different activities (sitting, standing and moving) at work and leisure among blue-collar workers.

    METHODS:

    One hundred thirty-eight workers from the NOMAD cohort were included. Data from physical activity and HRV were obtained for 3-4 days using tri-axial accelerometers (Actigraph GT3X+) and a heart rate monitor (Actiheart). HRV indices were determined during sitting, standing and moving both at work and leisure. Linear mixed-models with two fixed factors (activities and domains) were applied to investigate differences in HRV indices adjusting for individual and occupational factors.

    RESULTS:

    The results showed significant effects of domain (p < 0.01), physical activity type (p < 0.01) and interaction between domain and activity type (p < 0.01) on HRV indices. Mean heart rate (IBI) and parasympathetic measures of HRV (RMSSD and HF) were lower for sitting (p < 0.01) and higher for moving (p < 0.01) during work compared with leisure, while no difference between domains was found for standing (p > 0.05). Sympathovagal balance (LF/HF) was higher during work for sitting and moving (p < 0.01), but showed no difference for standing (p = 0.62).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Differences in cardiac autonomic modulation between work and leisure were found, indicating sympathetic predominance during work and parasympathetic predominance during leisure for sitting. Autonomic responses can be part of the mechanism that explains the differential effect of occupational and leisure time physical activity on health.

  • 116.
    Sato, Tatiana
    et al.
    Physical Therapy Department, Federal University of São Carlos, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Kristiansen, Jesper
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Skotte, Jørgen
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Holtermann, Andreas
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Different autonomic responses to occupational and leisure time physical activity among blue-collar workers2016Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: There is a well-established relationship between high physical activity at leisure time and decreased mortality risk. On the other hand, high physical demands at work seem to increase this risk. However, the underlying mechanism behind this effect remains unknown. Heart rate variability (HRV) measurements may bring some insight into the mechanism. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether HRV differs between work and leisure time among blue-collar workers.

    Methods: This study was based on data from the cross-sectional NOMAD study among blue-collar workers from seven workplaces in Denmark. One hundred thirty-eight blue-collar workers, which had at least 7 recording hours during work and leisure time were included in the analysis. Data from physical activity and HRV were obtained for four days using tri-axial accelerometers (Actigraph GT3X+) and heart rate monitor (Actiheart), respectively. Parametric (paired t test) and nonparametric (Wilcoxon signed-ranks test) tests for pairwise comparisons were applied to compare mean HRV indices in time and frequency domains between work and leisure time.

    Results: The mean age of the workers was 45.2 years, 51% were females, 42% were smokers, 18% reported lifetime occurrence of hypertension and 45% reported to perform lifting and carrying for more than half of the work time. A significant higher overall HRV was found during leisure time compared to work. Leisure time showed higher parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) measures of HRV (p<.05), while sympathetic nervous system (SNS) related indices (p<.05) were reduced in comparison to work.

    Conclusions: Leisure time showed high HRV and PNS indices and work time showed high SNS-related indices. The higher SNS modulation during work can be related to a greater risk of developing heart diseases among blue-collar workers.

  • 117.
    Srinivasan, Divya
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hallman, David M.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Samani, Afshin
    SMI, Department of Health Science and Technology, Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Madeleine, Pascal
    SMI, Department of Health Science and Technology, Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Lyskov, Eugene
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Effects of concurrent physical and cognitive demands on muscle activity and heart rate variability in a repetitive upper-extremity precision task2016Ingår i: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 116, nr 1, s. 227-239Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Most previous studies of concurrent physical and cognitive demands have addressed tasks of limited relevance to occupational work, and with dissociated physical and cognitive task components. This study investigated effects on muscle activity and heart rate variability of executing a repetitive occupational task with an added cognitive demand integral to correct task performance.

    Methods Thirty-five healthy females performed 7.5 min of standardized repetitive pipetting work in a baseline condition and a concurrent cognitive condition involving a complex instruction for correct performance. Average levels and variabilities of electromyographic activities in the upper trapezius and extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscles were compared between these two conditions. Heart rate and heart rate variability were also assessed to measure autonomic nervous system activation. Subjects also rated perceived fatigue in the neck–shoulder region, as well as exertion.

    Results Concurrent cognitive demands increased trapezius muscle activity from 8.2 % of maximum voluntary exertion (MVE) in baseline to 9.0 % MVE (p = 0.0005), but did not significantly affect ECR muscle activity, heart rate, heart rate variability, perceived fatigue or exertion.

    Conclusion Trapezius muscle activity increased by about 10 %, without any accompanying cardiovascular response to indicate increased sympathetic activation. We suggest this slight increase in trapezius muscle activity to be due to changed muscle activation patterns within or among shoulder muscles. The results suggest that it may be possible to introduce modest cognitive demands necessary for correct performance in repetitive precision work without any major physiological effects, at least in the short term.

  • 118.
    Stevens, Matthew
    et al.
    The National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Denmark.
    Crowley, Patrick
    The National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Denmark.
    Lund Rasmussen, Charlotte
    National research centre for the working environment, Denmark.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Mortensen, Ole
    Section of Social Medicine, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nygård, Clas-Håkan
    Unit of Health Sciences, Faculty of Social Science, Tampere University, Finland.
    Holtermann, Andreas
    The National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Denmark.
    Accelerometer-measured physical activity at work and need for recovery: A compositional analysis of cross-sectional data2019Ingår i: Annals of Work Exposures and Health, ISSN 2398-7308Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 119.
    Straker, Leon
    et al.
    School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Curtin University, Perth.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Gupta, Nidhi
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Holtermann, Andreas
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen.
    The Goldilocks Principle: Innovative work design for improved health2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 120.
    Wijk, Katarina
    et al.
    Centre for Research and Development, Region Gavleborg/Uppsala University, Gävle, Sweden.
    Bergsten, Eva L.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbetshälsovetenskap och psykologi, Arbetshälsovetenskap. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Perceptions of facilitating factors and barriers when implementing activity based workplaces before and after implementation, with particularly regard to Sense of Coherence2019Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 121.
    Yermakova, Irena
    et al.
    International scientific training centre for information technologies and systems.
    Boiko, K
    Bortkiewicz, A
    Hallman, David
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, CBF. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Lyskov, Eugene
    Högskolan i Gävle, Akademin för hälsa och arbetsliv, Avdelningen för arbets- och folkhälsovetenskap, CBF. Högskolan i Gävle, Centrum för belastningsskadeforskning.
    Heart rate, blood pressure and electromyogram in assessment of physical activity fatigue using neural network model2011Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
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