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  • 151.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Organisational sustainability2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 152.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability, Ltd., Cardiff, UK.
    Proposing a Definition and a Framework of Organisational Sustainability: A Review of Efforts and a Survey of Approaches to Change2018In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 4, article id 1157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organisations (civil society, companies, and public-sector organisations (PSOs)) have beeninstrumental in driving sustainability. In the last five years, there has been an increasing interest inorganisational sustainability, where the importance of sustainability’s dimensions depends on anorganisation’s nature and purpose. A large body of literature on organisational sustainability hasfocused on companies, followed by education institutions, in particular higher education. Limited,yet increasing, attention has been directed to PSOs and other civil society organisations. Althoughthere have been some attempts to define a sustainable organisation, there is still a need to defineand establish the principles of how organisations can address and contribute to sustainability.The sustainability efforts in the different types of organisations were reviewed and then analysedin this paper by using hermeneutics. This was complemented with a survey on sustainabilitychanges. The survey was sent to a database of 1574 contacts from different organisations. In addition,106 anonymous links were sent out. From the total list of emails, 118 full responses were obtained,with 39 from civil society (37 from higher education and 2 NGOs), 66 corporations, and 13 PSOs.This research distils the key system elements of the efforts in each of the organisations in order tosynthesise and propose a definition and a conceptual framework of organisational sustainability.These can help organisations understand where their efforts are and how they could better embedsustainability into their systems, thus contributing to the well-being of societies and the environmentfor this generation and future ones.

  • 153.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Proposing a sustainable business models typology2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 154.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Re-conceptualising Sustainable Business Models: An update to Stubb and Cocklin’s paper2017In: Re-conceptualising Sustainable Business Models: An update to Stubb and Cocklin’s paper, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 155.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Reinforcing the holistic perspective of sustainability: Analysis of the importance of sustainability drivers in organisations2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 156.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Reinforcing the holistic perspective of sustainability: Analysis of the importance of sustainability drivers in organisations2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 157.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    State of the art on sustainable business models: A discussion on sustainable business models : Providing a more holistic perspective on sustainable business models2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 158.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability, Ltd, Cardiff, UK.
    Sustainable business models: providing a more holistic perspective2018In: Business Strategy and the Environment, ISSN 0964-4733, E-ISSN 1099-0836, Vol. 27, no 8, p. 1159-1166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corporate sustainability has recently been challenging traditional business models that have been based on value proposition, creation and capture. There has been a steady increase in publications using the term “sustainable business models”; however, there have been few that have theoretically defined or characterized the term, and in most cases, they just apply the term. Seven peer‐reviewed papers were selected that aimed to define and explain sustainable business models and that have been widely cited. The papers were analyzed by assessing the elements and activities covered using the corporate sustainability framework, and by comparing them against four approaches to explain organizations. The paper proposes a definition and framework for more sustainable business models aimed at integrating organizational approaches, the company system, stakeholders, change and sustainability dimensions, thus providing a more holistic and systemic approach to discourses on sustainable business models.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-04-10 00:01
  • 159.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability Ltd, Cardiff, UK.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Analysing the factors affecting the incorporation of sustainable development into European Higher Education Institutions' curricula2019In: Sustainable Development, ISSN 0968-0802, E-ISSN 1099-1719, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 965-975Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been an increase in sustainable development (SD) integration into Higher Education Institutions' (HEIs) curricula. Several tools have been developed to assess SD in HEIs; however, only a few have focussed on curricula assessment, such as the “Sustainability Tool for Assessing UNiversities' Curricula Holistically.” Curricula assessment can provide an overview on how courses and programmes incorporate SD. This paper analyses the factors affecting the incorporation of SD in curricula using a survey sent to a database of 4,099 European contacts, with a response rate of 9.85%. The responses were analysed using descriptive statistics, t test, ANOVA, and correlations. The analyses showed that (a) teaching in European courses covers many issues of sustainability in a fairly good balance, with the exception of social issues that are the least addressed; (b) there are correlations between the economic, environmental, social, and cross‐cutting themes; (c) females tend to teach SD in a more balanced way than men; (d) the HEIs types have no influence on how SD is being taught, but the education level has; and (e) some countries, in the case of this research, Italy and Spain, may show more interest, yet the average results tended to be lower than those others, in this research, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the Netherlands. Curricula assessment provides a diagnostic of SD incorporation and the factors that affect it. This can help educators improve their courses and provide students with better SD skills and insights

  • 160.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability, Cardiff, UK.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Analysing the incorporation of sustainable development into European Higher Education Institution's curricula2019In: Engineering Education towards Sustainability: Approaches for Institutionalization and Teaching Implementation: Second Internacional Conference on Engineering Education for the 21st Century – ICEE21C 2019 / [ed] Guraya, T., Cabedo, L., Bilbao: Universidad del País Vasco / Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea , 2019, p. 51-56Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 161.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Corporate Sustainability Initiatives: Their use and results2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Corporate leaders and employees have been increasingly recognising their role in contributing to sustainability. In this context, different voluntary tools, approaches, and initiatives have been developed by and for corporations to engage with sustainability. Each initiative has advantages with respect to scope and focus for the sustainability dimensions and the company system’s elements, but it has certain disadvantages when it comes to dealing with the complexity and broadness of sustainability. Relying on one initiative can result in a limited and narrow contribution to sustainability and curtail coverage of the company’s system and using too many tools wastes resources and energy due to duplication in tasks. The paper provides an analysis of the use of twenty-four of the most widely used initiatives (e.g. life cycle assessment, eco-design, cleaner production, corporate social responsibility, and sustainability reporting) by companies. A survey was developed for investigating the importance of how sustainability has been embedded in organisations. Most of the questions were on a five-point scale (extremely important to not at all important or completely agree to completely disagree) and rankings. The survey was applied using the online survey tool Qualtrics (2018). The survey was sent to a database of 5,299 contacts from different organisations (of which 3603 were companies) obtained from the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) database, and personal contacts. Of the responses 215 were from companies, but only 189 provided useable responses for the tools and approaches used, of which 27 were from Sweden.The tools most widely used were Corporate Social Responsibility, Corporate Sustainability, and GRI reports (in the top quintile) by all companies, and Corporate Sustainability, Corporate Social Responsibility, Eco-efficiency, and Socially/Sustainable Responsible Investment by Swedish companies. The tools least used (in the lowest quintile) were Factor X, The Natural Step, SA8000, and ISO 26000 by all companies, and Factor X, SA8000, Industrial ecology, ISO 26000, EMAS, AA1000, and The Natural Step by Swedish companies. For all the companies, 5.6 tools in average provided good results, 6.5 some results, 2.5 no perceived results, and 0.1 negative results. There are some initiatives that are well known and provide results (some and good) when used, such as corporate social responsibility, corporate sustainability, GRI reports, and eco-efficiency). There are some initiatives that are not known/not used (e.g. Factor X, The Natural Step, SA8000, and ISO26000). The most widely know initiatives focus mainly on management and strategy, and assessment and reporting with a broad sustainability perspective. In general, the four more widely known initiatives have a good ratio of results versus no results. The cluster and analysis and PCA groups can serve as guides to decide which initiatives to combine in order to address the company system and sustainability dimensions. A combination between four to six initiatives should provide the most efficient way to address sustainability. There have been many initiatives proposed to contribute to sustainability by and for corporations. To better achieve this, the initiatives need to be combined efficiently in a holistic way to address the company and sustainability dimensions.

  • 162.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Francisco J.
    ITESM, Mexico.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Teaching Sustainability in European Higher Education Institutions: Assessing the Connections between Competences and Pedagogical Approaches2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been considerable progress in the incorporation of SD into the curricula of Higher Education Institutions (HEIs), where European HEIs have been leaders. This has included research on competences for sustainable development, and how to deliver such competences through pedagogical approaches; however, there has been limited research on the connection between how courses are delivered (pedagogical approaches) and how they may affect sustainability competences. A survey was developed to investigate sustainability being taught, sustainability competences delivered, and pedagogical approaches used in European Higher Education Institutions. The survey was sent to a database of more than 4,000 contacts of teachers and professors in Europe from which 390 complete responses (9.80%) were obtained. The social dimension of sustainability was the least addressed at 18%, while the other dimensions (economic, environmental, and cross-cutting) were addressed almost equally at between 27% and 28%. A correlation analysis was done between a) the Contribution to sustainability, b) Strength of competences, and c) Strength of pedagogical approaches, which show a stronger correlation between Strength of competences to Contribution and Strength of pedagogical approaches to Strength of competences than between the Strength of pedagogical approaches and Contribution was lower. A correlation analysis was then carried out between the sustainability STAUNCH® dimensions (economic, environmental, social, and cross-cutting themes) and the competences. The analysis showed that the correlations are stronger in the cross-cutting themes, followed by the social, the environmental, and the economic ones. Finally, a correlation analysis was carried out between the competences and the pedagogical approaches. The results obtained were between 0.0426 and 0.5555. A comparison of the survey results and the theoretical framework (see Lozano et al., 2017) was carried out to detect the differences. Three pedagogical approaches deliver the most competences (Eco-justice and community, Project and/or problem-based learning, and Community service learning). The updated framework shows that there is a general perception that the pedagogical approaches may deliver the sustainability competences, with some particular exceptions, such as Case studies, Supply chain/Life cycle analysis, and Lecturing. The updated framework provides a more precise perspective on how sustainability competences can be better delivered in class, and how to better deliver the ‘Full Monty’ of sustainability competences.

  • 163.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. University of Gävle.
    Lozano, Francisco J.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Teaching Sustainability in European Higher Education Institutions: Assessing the Connections between Competences and Pedagogical Approaches2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 164.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability Ltd., Cardiff, UK.
    Barreiro-Gen, María
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Francisco J.
    Escuela de Ingeniería y Ciencias, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Campus Toluca, San Antonio Buenavista, Toluca de Lerdo, Mexico.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Teaching Sustainability in European Higher Education Institutions: Assessing the Connections between Competences and Pedagogical Approaches2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 6, article id 1602Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been considerable progress in the incorporation of sustainable development (SD) into higher education institutions’ curricula. This has included research on competences for SD and pedagogical approaches used; however, there has been limited research on the connection between how pedagogical approaches are used and how they may develop sustainability competences. A survey was developed, based on the ‘connecting sustainable development pedagogical approaches to competences’ framework, to investigate sustainability being taught, sustainability competences developed, and pedagogical approaches used in European higher education institutions. The survey was sent to a database of more than 4000 contacts from which 390 complete responses (9.80%) were obtained. The results show that the social dimension was the least addressed at 18% of responses, while the economic, environmental, and cross-cutting dimensions were addressed almost equally. The correlation analyses showed a relation between the contribution to sustainability and the strength of competences, and between the strength of competences and the strength of pedagogical approaches. The results from the survey helped to update the theoretical framework, which provides a more precise perspective on how sustainability competences can be better developed in class, and how to better develop all the sustainability competences

  • 165.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Ceulemans, Kim
    Alonso-Almeida, Mar
    Huisingh, Donald
    Lozano, Francisco J.
    Waas, Tom
    Lambrechts, Wim
    Lukman, Rebeka
    Hugé, Jean
    Commitment and implementation of Sustainable Development in Higher Education2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 166.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Findler, Florian
    Schönherr, Norma
    Stacherl, Barbara
    Making the Invisible Visible: Impact Assessment in Higher Education2018In: Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society: Proceedings of the Twenty-Ninth Annual Meeting, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 167.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability Ltd., Cardiff, UK.
    Fobbe, Lea
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Carpenter, Angela
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Analysing sustainability changes in seaports: experiences from the Gävle Port Authority2019In: Sustainable Development, ISSN 0968-0802, E-ISSN 1099-1719, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 409-418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ports are under increasing pressure to become more sustainable. Although some ports have been including sustainability into their operations, this has been mainly done from economic and environmental perspectives and technological or policy‐related approaches, while there has been little research on organisational change management for sustainability. This paper analyses organisational change efforts for sustainability at the Port of Gävle, Sweden. Twenty‐three face‐to‐face interviews were conducted with various stakeholders. The findings show that there were differences in perception of sustainability; but similarities in the drivers for and the barriers to sustainability (with some key differences between the internal and external stakeholders). This research shows that, in their journey towards becoming more sustainable, ports have to take a holistic approach encompassing the four dimensions of sustainability (economic, environmental, social, and time); their stakeholders (internal and external); and legislative, technological, financial, cultural/social, voluntary initiatives, and organisational change management approaches.

  • 168.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Merrill, Michelle
    Lozano, Francisco
    Ceulemans, Kim
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bridging aims and delivery of higher education for sustainable development: Using pedagogical approaches to fulfil competences2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 169.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability, Ltd., Cardiff, UK.
    Merrill, Michelle Y.
    Independent Researcher and Consultant, Capitola, CA, USA.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Ceulemans, Kim
    Toulouse Business School, University of Toulouse, Toulouse, France.
    Lozano, Francisco J.
    Escuela de Ingeniería y Ciencias, Tecnologico de Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico.
    Connecting Competences and Pedagogical Approaches for Sustainable Development in Higher Education: A Literature Review and Framework Proposal2017In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 9, no 10, article id 1889Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research into and practice of Higher Education for Sustainable Development (HESD) have been increasing during the last two decades. These have focused on providing sustainability education to future generations of professionals. In this context, there has been considerable progress in the incorporation of SD in universities’ curricula. Most of these efforts have focussed on the design and delivery of sustainability-oriented competences. Some peer-reviewed articles have proposed different pedagogical approaches to better deliver SD in these courses; however, there has been limited research on the connection between how courses are delivered (pedagogical approaches) and how they may affect sustainability competences. This paper analyses competences and pedagogical approaches, using hermeneutics to connect these in a framework based on twelve competences and twelve pedagogical approaches found in the literature. The framework connects the course aims to delivery in HESD by highlighting the connections between pedagogical approaches and competences in a matrix structure. The framework is aimed at helping educators in creating and updating their courses to provide a more complete, holistic, and systemic sustainability education to future leaders, decision makers, educators, and change agents. To better develop mind-sets and actions of future generations, we must provide students with a complete set of sustainability competences.

  • 170.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Muñoz Torres, Maria Jesus
    University of Jaume I, Castellón de la Plana, Spain.
    Typologies of Sustainable Business2019In: Decent Work and Economic Growth / [ed] Walter Leal Filho, Anabela Marisa Azul, Luciana Brandli, Pinar Gökcin Özuyar, Tony Wall, Cham: Springer, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 171.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Pettersen, Sigrid
    Jonsall, Anette
    Niss, Camilla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Moving to a quadruple/quintuple helix in Sustainable Public Procurement2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 172.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Petterssén, Sigrid
    Jonsäll, Anette
    Niss, Camilla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bergstrôm, Bjôrn
    Moving to a quintuple helixapproach in SPP: Collaboration and LCC forlighting procurements2019In: Cost and EU Public Procurement Law: Life-cycle costing for sustainability / [ed] Marta Andhov, Roberto Caranta, Anja Wiesbrock, Oxon: Routledge, 2019Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 173.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Reid, Angus
    Investors, Electricity Utility Companies, and Transformative Change in Europe2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 174.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability, Ltd., Cardiff, Wales.
    Reid, Angus
    Organisational Sustainability, Ltd., Cardiff, Wales.
    Socially responsible or reprehensible? Investors, electricity utility companies, and transformative change in Europe2018In: Energy Research & Social Science, ISSN 2214-6296, E-ISSN 2214-6326, Vol. 37, p. 37-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overwhelming reliance of modern society based fossil-based non-renewable sources of energy productionrepresent a major challenge to sustainability. Moving towards a new more sustainable generation mix affectsinvestments on electricity utility companies. This presents a dual challenge for companies: 1) the electricitygeneration mix decision; and 2) their future access to and cost of capital. This research focuses on the role thatinvestors have in developing new more sustainable generation mix models. Five semi-structured interviews wereconducted with investors working at a major European asset manager company. The interviewees highlightedthe integration of renewable technologies as a key challenge to the viability of the utilities in the future. Otherkey challenges included a rising carbon price, greater decoupling of energy use and GDP growth, policy constraintsand uncertain regulatory frameworks, lack of relevant core competencies to innovate in their businessmodels, the integration of renewable energy into their own generation mixes and the grid, the role of newtechnologies, and a lack of urgency from top management. The findings indicate that investors play a key role inshaping electricity generation mixes, where the principal, agents, and clients must be willing to develop andadopt more sustainable generation mix models.

  • 175.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability Ltd., Cardiff, UK.
    Suzuki, Masachika
    Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies, Sophia University, Tokyo, Japan.
    Carpenter, Angela
    Organisational Sustainability Ltd., Cardiff, UK; School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
    Tyunina, Olga
    Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Chiba, Japan.
    An analysis of the contribution of Japanese Business terms to Corporate Sustainability: learnings from the ‘looking-glasses’ of the East to the West and vice versa2017In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 9, no 2, article id 188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decade, there has been increasing research on Corporate Sustainability, whereby most of such research was undertaken in the Western world. This paper is aimed at analysing the contribution of Japanese Business terms to Corporate Sustainability. The paper analyses, using Grounded Theory, 28 Japanese business terms through a Corporate Sustainability framework based on the four dimensions of sustainability (economic, environmental, social, and time), the company system (operations and processes, strategy and management, organisational systems, procurement and marketing, and assessment and communication), and stakeholders (internal, interconnecting, and external). The underpinning principles of the Japanese business terms provide complementary approaches to Western views on corporate sustainability by offering a more holistic perspective by linking the company system and its stakeholders to the four dimensions of sustainability. The paper proposes that Corporate Sustainability can learn from Japanese business approaches through: (1) the interaction and alignment of the factory, the firm, and inter-firm network; (2) the relationships between management and employees; (3) the inter-linkages between the company system elements; and (4) how Japanese companies remained competitive, even under the stress of a long-term major economic crisis. However, the analysis indicates that the relationship with external stakeholders and communicating with them through assessment and reporting is lacking in Japanese business management practice. Japanese businesses and their management can also learn from the Corporate Sustainability of the West by: (1) considering the four dimensions of sustainability and how they interact; (2) taking a holistic and systemic approach to Corporate Sustainability; (3) engaging in more Corporate Sustainability research; and (4) making Corporate Sustainability part of a company’s culture and activities. Businesses in the East and the West need to recognise that they can both contribute to making the world more sustainable by learning from each other’s approaches on Corporate Sustainability and adapting them to their own contexts. 

  • 176.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability Ltd, Cardiff, UK.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Reinforcing the Holistic Perspective of Sustainability: Analysis of the Importance of Sustainability Drivers in Organizations2018In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 508-522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although several sustainability drivers have been recognized for different organizations, there has been limited research on analyzing which are considered to be the most important. A survey was sent to more than 1,502 organizations, of which 108 completed all the questions. The survey responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics, rankings in order of importance, comparison between types of organizations, and analyses of the interlinkages between drivers. This paper provides depth to the sustainability drivers’ discussion by: (1) expanding it to the three types of organizations; (2) providing the importance of each driver; (3) offering a ranking of the drivers; (4) analyzing the relations between drivers to categorize them; and (5) assessing the relations between the drivers’ categories. This research highlights the importance of recognizing the drivers that have the highest importance and influence for each type of organization, in order to foster them and make organizations more sustainable.

  • 177.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Resistance to sustainability in organisations: Analyses of the importance of sustainability barriers to change2018In: EurOMA 2018 Proceedings, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organisations in civil society, companies, and governments contexts have been instrumental in driving sustainability. Organisational change for sustainability aims to move an organisation from the current state to a more desirable one. An increasing body of literature has been focussed on organisational changes, including drivers for and barriers to sustainability. This paper focusses on analysing factors of sustainability resistance in organisations. A survey was sent to more than 1500 organisations to analyse sustainability barriers to change, of which 73 completed all the questions. The survey responses were analysed using descriptive statistics, rankings in order of importance, comparison between types of organisations, and analyses of the interlinkages between drivers. The statistical methods and tests used were Friedman, Kruskall-Wallis, Mann Whitney U, principal component analysis, and network analysis. The barriers to sustainability were ranked in order of importance within their category: individual-, group- and organisational. Most important barriers we found to be lack of information and awareness, sustainability not being prioritised highly, and simple cynicism. On a group level, the most important barrier was ‘ignoring group institutions’ . On the organisation level, barriers such as financial issues, and a lack of resources, incentives and accountability were considered very important. Although a very higher number of barriers were included in the survey, they numbers were reduced to 20 using a principal component analysis. The analysis shows that many barriers are highly interlinked within their categories. Further analysis shows that many of the barriers are highly interlinked across categories, indicating that efforts at overcoming the barriers should be done in a holistic way. This paper shows that barriers to change will affect organisations in different ways depending on their goals and contexts. This paper provides depth to the sustainability barriers to change discussion by: 1) expanding it to the three types of organisations; 2) providing the importance of each barrier; 3) offering a ranking of the barriers in general and for each type of organisation; 4) analysing the relations between barriers and grouping them according to their correlations; and 5) showing the relations between the barriers’ groups. This research highlights that it is important to recognise which barriers have the highest importance and influence for each type of organisation, in order to overcome them and make organisations more sustainable. Identifying the barriers to change can help to apply appropriate strategies to overcome them, thus helping to better incorporate and institutionalise sustainability in organisations.

  • 178. Luzzini, Davide
    et al.
    Caniato, Federico
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för industriell ekonomi. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    A proposal for research in Purchasing and Supply Management2009In: Proceedings of the 18th IPSERA conference in Oestrich-Winkel, Germany, 5 – 8 April., 2009, p. 1328-1346Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 179.
    Lättilä, Lauri
    et al.
    SimAnalytics Oy, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kortelainen, Samuli
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Jönköping university.
    Assumptions for inventory modelling: Insights from practice2019In: World Review of Intermodal Transportation Research (WRITR), ISSN 1749-4729, E-ISSN 1749-4737, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 147-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many types of models have been developed to analyse multi-echelon supply chains. These models tend to rely on certain assumptions which might be too restrictive to be used in practical applications. In this paper we present a decision support system developed for a manufacturing company to aid decision making in both manufacturing and distribution strategy. The model is based on the assumptions of the decision-makers instead of relying on a preexisting model architecture, which guarantees that the assumptions made are not too restrictive for practical use. The decision support system is based on agent-based modelling. The model was done in close co-operation with the personnel from the case company, and emphasis was based on how the company can use the model in decision making without requiring any special expertise in developing the supply chain alternatives. By using agent-based modelling we were able to take the central assumptions into account and create a decision support system, which the supply chain manager can use to evaluate various supply chain alternatives. 

  • 180.
    Löfqvist, Lars
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för industriell ekonomi. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Design processes and novelty in small companies: a multiple case study2009In: ICED 09 - THE 17TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING DESIGN: Proceedings, Vol. 1, Design processes, 2009, p. 265-278Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the design processes in small established companies and investigates how these design processes are executed. How two different kinds of novelty influence the design processes is further examined: the relative novelty of the product being developed and the relative novelty of design processes. The relative novelty of the product is high if it is a radically new product to develop.

    High relative novelty for design processes typically means no experience or knowledge about design processes. Based on an embedded multiple case study of three small established companies in Sweden, eight different design processes are described and analyzed. The results show that the design processes differ, even within the same company. The results also show that relative novelty affects the design process. If the relative novelty of both the product to be developed and of design processes is low, a linear, structured, and systematic design process was found to work. A design process that is cyclical, experimental, and knowledge-creating seems to work no matter the relative novelty.

  • 181.
    Löfqvist, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    How small enterprises manage resource scarcity in their product innovation processes2011In: Proceedings of the 6th European Conference on Innovation and Entrepreneurship / [ed] H. Fulford, Reading: Academic Conferences Limited, 2011, p. 583-592Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small enterprises have scarce resources, which is the main factor hindering their innovation of new products. Despite this resource scarcity, some small enterprises do innovate. The research question is: how do small enterprises manage resource scarcity in their product innovation processes? A multiple case study of three different small enterprises was used to answer the research question. The enterprises implement several approaches to use existing resources more efficiently or increase existing resources, such as reducing formality and including customers and users in the innovation processes, intertwining innovation processes, working concurrently on innovation and operational processes, adopting lead-user inventions, and only starting innovation processes when a current customer asks for or needs the potential new product. The efficiency of these approaches is found to be explained by common small enterprise characteristics. One conclusion from this study is that resource scarcity can be managed and small enterprises’ specific characteristics can facilitate innovation if these are recognized and used as strengths. 

  • 182.
    Löfqvist, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Initiation of innovation in small companies2010In: Proceedings of the 11th CINet conference, 5-7 September, Zürich, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 183.
    Löfqvist, Lars
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för industriell ekonomi. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Innovation and Design Processes in Small Established Companies2009Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examines innovation and design processes in small established companies. There is a great interest in this area yet paradoxically the area is under-researched, since most innovation research is done on large companies. The research questions are: How do small established companies carry out their innovation and design processes? and How does the context and novelty of the process and product affect the same processes?

    The thesis is built on three research papers that used the research method of multiple case studies of different small established companies. The innovation and design processes found were highly context dependent and were facilitated by committed resources, a creative climate, vision, low family involvement, delegated power and authority, and linkages to external actors such as customers and users. Both experimental cyclical and linear structured design processes were found. The choice of structure is explained by the relative product and process novelty experienced by those developing the product innovation. Linear design processes worked within a low relative novelty situation and cyclical design processes worked no matter the relative novelty. The innovation and design processes found were informal, with a low usage of formal systematic design methods, except in the case of design processes for software. The use of formal systematic methods in small companies seems not always to be efficient, because many of the problems the methods are designed to solve are not present. Customers and users were found to play a large and important role in the innovation and design processes found and gave continuous feedback during the design processes. Innovation processes were found to be intertwined, yielding synergy effects, but it was common that resources were taken from the innovation processes for acute problems that threatened the cash flow. In sum, small established companies have the natural prerequisites to take advantage of lead-user inventions and cyclical design processes. Scarce resources were found to be the main factor hindering innovation, but the examined companies practiced several approaches to increase their resources or use existing scarce resources more efficiently in their innovation and design processes. Examples of these approaches include adopting lead-user inventions and reducing formality in the innovation and design processes.

  • 184.
    Löfqvist, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Managing Resource Scarcity in Small Enterprises’ Design Processes2011In: Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Engineering Design (ICED 11): Impacting Society Through Engineering Design: Vol. 3: Design Organisation and Management / [ed] Steve. Culley et al., Glasgow: The Design Society, 2011, p. 164-175Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small enterprises have scarce resources, which is the main factor hindering their innovation and design of new products. Despite this resource scarcity, some small enterprises do innovate and design new products. The research question is: how do small enterprises manage resource scarcity in their design processes? A multiple case study of three different small enterprises was used to answer the research question. The enterprises implement several approaches to use existing resources more efficiently or increase existing resources, such as reducing formality and including customers and users in the design processes, intertwining design processes, working concurrently on design and operational processes, adopting lead-user inventions, and only starting design processes when a current customer asks for or needs the potential new product. The efficiency of these approaches is found to be explained by common small enterprise characteristics. One conclusion from this study is that resource scarcity can be managed and small enterprises’ specific characteristics can facilitate innovation and design if these are recognized and used as strengths.

  • 185.
    Löfqvist, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Motivation for innovation in small enterprises2012In: International Journal of Technology Management, ISSN 0267-5730, E-ISSN 1741-5276, Vol. 60, no 3-4, p. 242-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines which factors motivate small enterprises to realise product innovations and how these factors affect their innovation processes. In a multiple embedded case study of three small enterprises, 11 different innovation processes, both realised and unrealised, were discovered and analysed. Strategy, competition, profit, growth, source of innovation idea, innovation process size and novelty were not found to explain the motivation to innovate, but ten interdependent motivating factors did, of which four externally oriented factors were found conclusive for innovation to occur. The factors found, dealing with resource scarcity, technology and market uncertainty and risk, and cash flow, highly affected how the innovation processes were carried out. The findings further show that the need to maintain steady cash flow seems to be the overall motive for product innovation in small enterprises.

  • 186.
    Löfqvist, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Product and Process Novelty in Small Companies' Design Processes2010In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 405-416Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the design processes in small companies and investigates how these design processes are executed. The influence of two different kinds of novelty on the design processes is further examined: the relative novelty of the product being developed and the relative novelty of design processes. The relative novelty of the product is high if it is a radically new product to develop. High relative novelty for design processes typically means no experience or knowledge about design processes. Based on an embedded multiple case study of three small companies in Sweden, eight different design processes are described and analysed. The results show that the design processes differ, even within the same company, and that relative novelty affects the design process. If the relative novelty of both the product to be developed and of the design processes is low, a formalized and linear design process was found to work. A design process that is cyclical, iterative and knowledge-creating was found to work irrespective of the relative novelty. Customers and users were found to play a large and important role in the design processes.

  • 187.
    Löfqvist, Lars
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för industriell ekonomi. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Product and process novelty in small companies´design processes: A multiple case study2009In: 10th International CINet Conference: Enhancing the innovation environment, Brisbane, Australia, 6-8 September 2009, 2009, p. 1-16Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the design processes in small established companies and investigates how these design processes are executed. How two different kinds of novelty influence the design processes is further examined: the relative novelty of the product being developed and the relative novelty of design processes. The relative novelty of the product is high if it is a radically new product to develop. High relative novelty for design processes typically means no experience or knowledge about design processes. Based on an embedded multiple case study of three small established companies in Sweden, eight different design processes are described and analyzed. The results show that the design processes differ, even within the same company. The results also show that relative novelty affects the design process. If the relative novelty of both the product to be developed and of design processes is low, a linear, structured, and systematic design process was found to work. A design process that is cyclical, experimental, and knowledge-creating seems to work no matter the relative novelty.

  • 188.
    Löfqvist, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Product innovation in small companies: managing resource scarcity through financial bootstrapping2017In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 21, no 2, article id UNSP 1750020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers have proposed that scarce resources are the main factor hindering product innovation in small companies. However, despite scarce resources, small companies do innovate, so the research question is: How do small companies manage resource scarcity in product innovation? To answer the research question a multiple case study of three small established companies and their product innovation was used, including interviews and observations over a period of five months. The small companies were found to use many different bootstrapping methods in combination within their product innovation. The methods can be classified into three different functional categories: bootstrapping methods for increasing resources, for using existing resources more efficiently, and those for securing a fast payback on resources put into product innovation. Due to their resource scarcity, the studied companies also favoured an innovation strategy only involving new products done with known technology and targeting existing markets. This strategy seems to avoid unsuccessful innovation but at the same time exclude technologically radical innovation.

  • 189.
    Löfqvist, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation (Inst.).
    Product innovation in small established enterprises: Managing processes and resource scarcity2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examines product innovation processes in small established enterprises. The research questions are: (1) what motivates small established enterprises to innovate, (2) how do small established enterprises perform product innovation, and (3) how do small established enterprises manage resource scarcity in their product innovation processes? To answer the research questions, a multiple case study approach was chosen with three small established enterprises as cases and different product innovation processes as embedded units of study. The data collection method used was observation during a period of five months, complemented by interviews and secondary data. Product innovation in small established enterprises seems to be motivated by solving existing customers’ problems and the need for a sustained steady cash flow. A steady cash flow is also found to be a prerequisite during the product innovation processes. Product innovation seems to occur when there is a risk of decreased cash flow and/or when existing customers can be satisfied with new products that increase their loyalty so as to secure future sales, cash flow, and the enterprise’s survival in the long run. Promising innovation ideas alone do not result in product innovation. An innovation idea must also have supportive existing customers for product innovation to occur.

    Product innovation processes in the studied small established enterprises are found highly context dependent, intertwined in operational processes and made possible by a small organic organization and closeness to existing customers. The product innovation processes are further found to follow a flexible and informal overall scheme optimized for decreasing market and technology uncertainty and risk, dealing with resource scarcity, and facilitating fast and easy commercialization to avoid or moderate dips in cash flow. The design processes within the innovation processes can be linearly structured or cyclical and experimental, depending on the experienced novelty.

    To manage resource scarcity during the product innovation processes, the studied small enterprises used many different bootstrapping methods in combination. These methods can be divided into three categories according to their overall functions: for using existing resources more efficiently, for increasing resources and to secure a fast payback on resources invested in NPD. The studied small enterprises were due to their resource scarcity further found to favor an innovation strategy, only involving new products done with known technology and targeting existing markets. This way to innovate, which creates new products in a resource-efficient way that are accepted by the enterprises’ existing markets, seems to prevent unsuccessful product innovation, while at the same time excluding technologically radical innovation and innovation targeting new markets. 

  • 190.
    Löfqvist, Lars
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Renngård, Ivar
    Movexum AB.
    The creation of mutual benefit within innovation management research on small companies2015In: 16th International CINet Conference: Pursuing Innovation Leadership, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research and small company practice have a different logic. It is difficult to bring these two greatly differing activities together to create mutual benefit within a research project on innovation management. This is a problem especially if the researcher wishes to make a direct practical contribution to the companies involved in the research. This research aims to explore the difficulties in collaboration for mutual benefit, but also provides an example of a research approach which created mutual benefit for all involved. The conclusions build on an earlier PhD project on product innovation processes in small companies together with extensive reflections and discussions with the strategic manager at one of the involved companies. The study presents several major differences between research and small company practice and gives arguments for why more traditional research approaches in the innovation management field by themselves, such as survey and interview research, seem to be less suitable if mutual benefit is a goal. Finally, the study illustrates a research approach creating mutual benefit, knowledge creation, and knowledge transfer from academia to business practice and vice versa. This research approach includes concurrently giving the involved company valuable input and flexibility so as not to disturb the company’s cash flow.

  • 191.
    Manzini, Raffaella
    et al.
    LIUC University Cattaneo.
    Lazzarotti, Valentina
    LIUC University Cattaneo.
    Pellegrini, Luisa
    University of Pisa.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    Linköpings universitet.
    Tell, Fredrik
    Linköpings universitet.
    Öhrwall-Rönnbäck, Anna
    Ölundh, Gunilla
    Garcia Matrinez, Marian
    Kianto, Aino
    Pikko, Harri
    Sanchez, Mercedes
    Are we actually in the open innovation era?: Current practices of Europeanmanufacturing companies2013In: Proceedings of the 14th international CINetconference, 9-11 September, 2013, Nijmegen, Netherlands, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 192.
    Moreira e Silva Bernardes, Maurício
    et al.
    Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Allegre, Brazil.
    Brunhari Kauling, Graziela
    Federal Institute of Santa Catarina, Araranguá, Brazil.
    Chang Chain, Milena
    University of Quebec at Trois-Rivieres, Trois - Rivières, Canada.
    Löfqvist, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Original Design in a Copying-Intensive Industry2017In: International Journal of Computer Applications, ISSN 0975-8887, E-ISSN 0975-8887, Vol. 159, no 7, p. 29-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In some industries, copying is common and extensive. Most literature on the topic focuses on legal issues and interprets copying as a problem. To better understand the copying phenomenon, this study investigates the relationship between copying and design processes in five case companies in a copying-intensive industry. The findings reveal that unlike design processes, copying processes lack early conceptual activities. Furthermore, resources and contact with the end market are found to be prerequisites for professional and strategic design processes, whereas a lack of these better suits copying processes, especially in industries with low product variety and limited design problems.

  • 193.
    Murillo-Oviedo, Ana Beatriz
    et al.
    National University of Costa Rica, Heredia, Costa Rica.
    Lopes Pimenta, Márcio
    Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG, Brazil.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Reitsma, Ewout
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Achieving market orientation through cross-functional intergration2019In: Operations and Supply Chain Management, ISSN 1979-3561, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 175-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to understand how cross-functional integration contributes to the market orientation of a company that strives to increase market responsiveness. A case study in the Brazilian beverages industry was conducted and empirical data was collected through fourteen in-depth interviews from various functions within the company. The findings indicate that cross-functional integration enables the company to achieve market orientation through two main processes: product launch and customer complaints. Cross-functional integration enables a company to disseminate knowledge about organizational dynamics at both departmental and individual levels, to generate interdependency, to improve the awareness about the internal needs, and to improve the internal knowledge about the customer. This study shows that practitioners need to establish cross-functional integration, as it contributes to the market orientation of a company. Internal knowledge enables practitioners to create value through products and services, while still preserving the corporate image. It also shows that cross-functional teams and meetings are necessary to achieve market orientation in a company.

  • 194.
    Niesten, Eva
    et al.
    Alliance Manchester Business School, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
    Stefan, Ioana
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Department of Industrial Economics and Management, School of Industrial Engineering and Management, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Embracing the Paradox of Interorganizational Value Co-creation–Value Capture: A Literature Review towards Paradox Resolution2019In: International journal of management reviews (Print), ISSN 1460-8545, E-ISSN 1468-2370, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 231-255Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study reviews literature on paradoxical tensions between value co-creation and capture in interorganizational relationships (IORs). The purpose of this review is to make a re-evaluation of the literature by engaging a paradox theory lens, thereby identifying factors that render tensions salient and factors that lead to virtuous or vicious cycles. This review of 143 articles reveals factors that make tensions salient; these relate to plurality (e.g. coopetition), scarcity (e.g. lack of experience with IORs), change (e.g. changes in collaboration scope) or combinations thereof (e.g. IORs in weak appropriability regimes). Results also uncover factors that resolve paradoxical tensions of value co-creation and capture, thus spurring virtuous cycles (e.g. carefully mixing trust and contracts), as well as factors that promote vicious cycles, owing to the emphasis on either value co-creation or capture (e.g. myopia of learning). This review also uncovers a new category of factors that may stimulate either virtuous or vicious cycles, depending on the extent to which they are enforced. This finding expands the value co-creation–capture paradox resolution, and brings to light new dynamics in the paradox framework of dynamic equilibrium. The authors thus contribute by: (1) reassessing the existing literature and applying paradox theory to the well-known hazard of value co-creation and capture; (2) highlighting factors that amplify paradoxical tensions related to this hazard; and (3) outlining factors that solve the paradox by embracing its contradictory poles and factors that hinder paradox resolution by emphasizing either value co-creation or appropriation. 

  • 195.
    Niss, Camilla
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för industriell ekonomi. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Project Becoming and Knowing Trajectories: An Epistemological Perspective on Human and Non-human Project Making2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 196.
    Panova, Y.
    et al.
    Department of E-Commerce, Luoyang Normal University, Luoyang City, Henan Province, China.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Krasinskaya, J.
    Department of Logistics and Commerce, Faculty of Railway Operation and Logistics, Emperor Alexander i St. Petersburg State Transport University, Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation.
    Mitigating the break-of-gauge problem in international transportation corridors2018In: World Review of Intermodal Transportation Research (WRITR), ISSN 1749-4729, E-ISSN 1749-4737, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 124-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to investigate technologies for mitigating the break-of-gauge problem at the border crossing points in international transportation corridors. This issue has been examined through a literature review. The research revealed three technologies for mitigating the break-of-gauge problem, including trans-shipment operations, removable coach bogies and variable bogie axles. The medium-term solution would be more rapid trans-shipment operations in the railway container terminals while the long-term solution would be adjustable bogie axles. This could reduce lead-time and improve the overall productivity and competitiveness of international corridors and in turn lead to reduced logistics costs for companies using this transportation alternative.

  • 197.
    Panova, Yulia
    et al.
    Department of E-Commerce, Luoyang Normal University, Luoyang, China; Department of Logistics and Supply Chain Management, National Research University Higher School of Economics, St Petersburg, Russia.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Managing supply chain risks and delays in construction project2018In: Industrial management + data systems, ISSN 0263-5577, E-ISSN 1758-5783, Vol. 118, no 7 (SI), p. 1413-1431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate models and methods for managing supply chain risks and delays in construction projects.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The study mainly employs quantitative analysis in order to identify disruptions in construction supply chains. It also uses paradigms of simulation modeling, which are suitable for risk assessment and management. Both qualitative and quantitative data were collected through a literature review and details of specific construction projects, respectively. A dynamic modeling method was used, and the model was provided with an event-based simulation. Simulation modeling was used to measure the performance of the system.

    Findings

    The study shows the benefits of applying the dynamic modeling method to a construction project. Using event-based simulation, it was found that construction delays influence both the magnitude and the probability of disruption. This method contributes to the existing theoretical foundations of risk management practices, since it also considers the time factor. This method supplements the Monte Carlo statistical simulation method, which has no time representation. Using empirical analysis, the study proposes increasing the safety stock of construction materials at the distribution center, so as to mitigate risks in the construction supply chain.

    Research limitations/implications

    The research considers a single case of a hypothetical construction project. The simulation models represent a simple supply chain with only one supplier. The calculations are based on the current economic scenario, which will of course change over time.

    Practical implications

    The outcomes of the study show that the introduction of a safety stock of construction materials at the distribution center can prevent supply chain disruption. Since the consideration of risks at all stages of construction supply chain is essential to investors, entrepreneurs and regulatory bodies, the adoption of new approaches for their management during strategic planning of the investment projects is essential.

    Originality/value

    This dynamic modeling method is used in combination with the Monte Carlo simulation, thus, providing an explicit cause-and-effect dependency over time, as well as a distributed value of outcomes.

  • 198.
    Papargyropoulou, Effie
    et al.
    University of Leeds, UK.
    Steinberger, Julia K.
    University of Leeds, UK.
    Wright, Nigel
    Nottingham Trent University, UK.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Padfield, Rory
    University of Leeds; Universiti Teknologi Malaysia.
    Ujang, Zaini
    Universiti Teknologi Malaysia.
    Patterns and causes of food waste in the hospitality and food service sector: Food waste prevention insights from Malaysia2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 21, article id 6016Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Food waste has formidable detrimental impacts on food security, the environment, and the economy, which makes it a global challenge that requires urgent attention. This study investigates the patterns and causes of food waste generation in the hospitality and food service sector, with the aim of identifying the most promising food waste prevention measures. It presents a comparative analysis of five case studies from the hospitality and food service (HaFS) sector in Malaysia and uses a mixed-methods approach. This paper provides new empirical evidence to highlight the significant opportunity and scope for food waste reduction in the HaFS sector. The findings suggest that the scale of the problem is even bigger than previously thought. Nearly a third of all food was wasted in the case studies presented, and almost half of it was avoidable. Preparation waste was the largest fraction, followed by buffet leftover and then customer plate waste. Food waste represented an economic loss equal to 23% of the value of the food purchased. Causes of food waste generation included the restaurants’ operating procedures and policies, and the social practices related to food consumption. Therefore, food waste prevention strategies should be twofold, tackling both the way the hospitality and food service sector outlets operate and organise themselves, and the customers’ social practices related to food consumption.

  • 199.
    Reitsma, Ewout
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Mukhtar, Umer
    Department of Management Sciences, GIFT University, Punjab, Pakistan.
    Enterprise resource planning system implementation: A user perspective2018In: Operations and Supply Chain Management, ISSN 1979-3561, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 110-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate critical success factors (CSFs) for the implementation of an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system from a user perspective. Users play a vital role when implementing an ERP system, but their perspective has been neglected in the literature. A better understanding of their perspective promises to contribute to the design of more effective ERP systems, its implementation, and management. In order to identify the user perspective, a survey was conducted within three organizations from Pakistan that have recently implemented an ERP system. The questionnaire was developed based on thirteen CSFs deduced from literature. Based on each CSF’s level of importance, they are ranked in order of importance and divided into three groups: most important, important and not important. Findings reveal that users of the three organizations in Pakistan believe that the implementing organization should prioritize the following four CSFs when implementing an ERP system: education and training, strategic decision-making, communication, and business process alignment.

  • 200.
    Renström, Jonas
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. KTH, Skolan för teknik och hälsa (STH), Hälso- och systemvetenskap, Ergonomi.
    Senior Managers and Lean: The importance of becoming a practitioner2014Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Considered to be one of the most influential paradigms in manufacturing, Lean has developed and expanded beyond the shop floor and manufacturing environment of the auto industry. Lean is considered to be applicable throughout organizations and other industries besides manufacturing. Interest in both research and implementation of the Lean concept, heavily influenced by Toyota Motor Company, is said to continue to increase despite the fact that the concept is said to be both ambiguous and difficult to implement. Two main traditions of Lean are said to exist: “toolboxLean” and “Lean thinking.” The particular translation of the concept that is accepted will influence management’s approach in implementing a Lean way of working. The Toyota Motor Company, where Lean originates, is described as a learning organization. Therefore, a management approach and leader behavior supporting organizational learning would be required to successfully implement an enterprise system inspired by both the Toyota Production System and Lean. This thesis approaches the Lean concept through an organizational learning perspective, thereby highlighting the importance of knowledge of organizational learning in a Lean development effort. Difficulties regarding Lean implementations have been shown to often occur due to the overlooked but crucial differences in approach in management. There is, however a stated gap in the literature on Lean production regarding management. The purpose of this thesis is to explore senior management’s ability to implement and sustain a Lean-based enterprise system. Three studies are included in the thesis. The first study focuses on how the view on Lean among managers implementing Lean affects its implementation. The study was performed as a case study and conducted at a larger, international manufacturing company. The study covered management levels from shop floor manager to the president of the company. Findings show that all management levels had a similar view of Lean and that this influenced the implementation. The first study further showed that the view on Lean may develop and change during an implementation, revealing unforeseen managerial and organizational challenges and obstacles.The second study focused on how management of Lean is described in the existing literature. The results revealed a dualistic complementarity between leadership and management, which can be seen as reflected in the two foundational Toyota principles of continuous improvement and respect for people. This duality can also be found in descriptions of prerequisites for organizational learning where the ability to combine transactional and transformational leadership is considered a success factor. The third study focused on implications for senior management and aimed to research senior managers’ ability to support a Lean implementation process. The study is based on interviews with eight senior managers. The study revealed four main managerial obstacles to Lean implementation. Lack of initial competence evaluation and ensuing competence development for senior management was found to be a central obstacle to Lean implementation. Main conclusions in the thesis are that initial understanding of the aims of a Lean implementation, and the ensuing implications for the organization is central in order to be able to support the development. Additionally, initial senior management competence development is indicated to be vital in order to ensure the ability to understand the organizational and managerial implications brought on by a Lean implementation. Leading with action is indicated as providing an opportunity for senior management competence development.

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