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  • 201.
    Renström, Jonas
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. KTH, Skolan för teknik och hälsa (STH), Hälso- och systemvetenskap, Ergonomi.
    Senior Managers and Lean: The importance of becoming a practitioner2014Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Considered to be one of the most influential paradigms in manufacturing, Lean has developed and expanded beyond the shop floor and manufacturing environment of the auto industry. Lean is considered to be applicable throughout organizations and other industries besides manufacturing. Interest in both research and implementation of the Lean concept, heavily influenced by Toyota Motor Company, is said to continue to increase despite the fact that the concept is said to be both ambiguous and difficult to implement. Two main traditions of Lean are said to exist: “toolboxLean” and “Lean thinking.” The particular translation of the concept that is accepted will influence management’s approach in implementing a Lean way of working. The Toyota Motor Company, where Lean originates, is described as a learning organization. Therefore, a management approach and leader behavior supporting organizational learning would be required to successfully implement an enterprise system inspired by both the Toyota Production System and Lean. This thesis approaches the Lean concept through an organizational learning perspective, thereby highlighting the importance of knowledge of organizational learning in a Lean development effort. Difficulties regarding Lean implementations have been shown to often occur due to the overlooked but crucial differences in approach in management. There is, however a stated gap in the literature on Lean production regarding management. The purpose of this thesis is to explore senior management’s ability to implement and sustain a Lean-based enterprise system. Three studies are included in the thesis. The first study focuses on how the view on Lean among managers implementing Lean affects its implementation. The study was performed as a case study and conducted at a larger, international manufacturing company. The study covered management levels from shop floor manager to the president of the company. Findings show that all management levels had a similar view of Lean and that this influenced the implementation. The first study further showed that the view on Lean may develop and change during an implementation, revealing unforeseen managerial and organizational challenges and obstacles.The second study focused on how management of Lean is described in the existing literature. The results revealed a dualistic complementarity between leadership and management, which can be seen as reflected in the two foundational Toyota principles of continuous improvement and respect for people. This duality can also be found in descriptions of prerequisites for organizational learning where the ability to combine transactional and transformational leadership is considered a success factor. The third study focused on implications for senior management and aimed to research senior managers’ ability to support a Lean implementation process. The study is based on interviews with eight senior managers. The study revealed four main managerial obstacles to Lean implementation. Lack of initial competence evaluation and ensuing competence development for senior management was found to be a central obstacle to Lean implementation. Main conclusions in the thesis are that initial understanding of the aims of a Lean implementation, and the ensuing implications for the organization is central in order to be able to support the development. Additionally, initial senior management competence development is indicated to be vital in order to ensure the ability to understand the organizational and managerial implications brought on by a Lean implementation. Leading with action is indicated as providing an opportunity for senior management competence development.

  • 202.
    Renström, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. KTH.
    Halling, Bengt
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. KTH.
    Cross-functional Alignment for Lean Development Obstacles and Facilitators for Organizational Learning2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To see and understand Lean as a management system, as well as a willingness within management to practice the desired approach, are often described as central for Lean implementation and development. To achieve this, a strategic, system-wide approach to Lean development may be required. Such an approach would require cross-functional cooperation in driving improvements that affect organizational interdependencies. Cross-functional operation is a key factor for organizational learning, where learning is said to require individuals interacting for a specific purpose, learning together by trying to solve tasks and to improve performance. This goes beyond “team learning,” since by its organizational focus it addresses the management of interdependencies between organizational functions as well as among departments and hierarchical levels. Toyota, a company linked to the Lean concept, can often be found described as a learning organization. Its success is said to be closely linked to its ability to generate and manage organizational learning. Organizational learning emphasizes cross-functional social practice as the way to learn and develop. This paper, based on an explorative case study at a global manufacturing company, assesses prerequisites for cross-functional alignment and cooperation within a larger international production company. The question for the study was how managers describe obstacles and facilitators for cross-functional interaction for Lean development. Descriptions of obstacles and facilitators for cross-functional interaction given by managers point to the importance of a controlled management turnover and induction training, as well as formally established target conditions and collective performance management. Further conclusions are that organizational learning theory can be used to further understand requirements for Lean management by highlighting the importance of how and by whom daily steering or performance management and deviation handling is set up and performed. The results stress the importance of routines and composition of local management teams and their approach to shared responsibility and target achievement.

  • 203.
    Renström, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. School of Techonology and Health, KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Niss, Camilla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Senior managers’ perspectives on obstacles to Lean implementation2016In: International Journal of Lean Enterprise Research, ISSN 1754-2294, E-ISSN 1754-2308, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 317-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many lean implementations fail; previous research suggests an important reason is that senior managers are unable to support the implementation. We investigate this problem by exploring senior managers' perspectives on lean implementation, aiming to identify possible obstacles to their support of implementation processes. The paper is based on an explorative case study at a global manufacturing company implementing lean. Interviews were performed with senior managers at the top two hierarchical levels, the president and area presidents. The analysis revealed four main obstacles: 1) competence development needs of senior management were not addressed; 2) the lean development initiative was not connected to company strategy; 3) key players within the organisation were initially not involved or tasked; 4) the initiative was not system wide. The results stress the importance of initial competence evaluation and development of senior management in lean development.

  • 204.
    Rosell, David
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    Linköping University.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    KTH.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Purchasing Capabilities for Supplier Innovation in New Product Development2011In: Proceedings of the 18th International Product Development Management Conference, Delft, 5-7 June, 2011, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 205.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Sustainability in the University of Gävle for a sustainable future2017In: A good life for all: Essays on sustainability celebrating 60 years of making life better / [ed] Fagerström, Arne and Cunningham, Gary M., Mjölby: Atremi AB , 2017, 1, p. 3-8Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been interesting to follow the journey of the University of Gävle on its way towards sustainability during the pas quarter foa decade. The University has led the way as an example for other universities in Sweden and internationally in many ways. It is good to see the change that has taken place and that it continues.

  • 206.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Institutionalising sustainability in HEIs: Experiences from the University of Gävle2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 207.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Sundström, Agneta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Utmaningar vid implementering av CSR i globala försörjningskedjor2013In: Innovation eller kvartalskapitalism?: Utmaningar för global svensk produktion / [ed] Lind, J. and Bengtsson, L., Stockholm: Liber, 2013, p. 91-108Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 208.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Sundström, Agneta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Holm, Tove
    Novia University of Applied Sciences, Vaasa, Finland.
    Implementation of sustainability in universities as perceived by faculty and staff: a model from a Swedish university2015In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 106, p. 45-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Education for sustainable development creates new challenges for universities where faculty and staff are expected to prepare students to meet complexities in society and take responsibility for sustainability, which scientists are urgently calling for today. Few studies exist on how faculty and staff perceive sustainability in their functions at the university based on long-term sustainability implementation and training within a 14001 certified environmental management system. This university case study with data collected by open-ended survey questions explores how faculty and staff express their role in sustainability work within a Swedish university.The authors developed a model to illustrate development of sustainability competence and its institutionalization. Results show a large variation in perceptions of sustainability from waste separation to a complex understanding and integration of issues into education. Integration of sustainable development as a university core competence is difficult for a whole university to reach. Interpretational flexibility provides opportunities for discussing the sustainability concept in diverse academic traditions in different disciplines. Top management inspiration on different university levels is essential for integration. Continuous training and routines contribute to movement towards institutionalization of sustainability activities and to following up the process in universities.

  • 209.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Sundström, Agneta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Holm, Tove
    University of Turku, Department of Biology.
    Perceptions of sustainability among faculty and staff in a Swedish University2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Education for sustainable development creates new challenges for universities expected to prepare students to meet the complexities and take their responsibility in promoting sustainability, which is urgently called for by scientist today. The concept of sustainability and the difficulty in defining it is not just a problem, but also opportunity for the different academic traditions in different disciplines. Environmental management systems like ISO 14001 have been used to institutionalizing the activities for sustainable development in organizations.  

    This single empirical case study explores with a survey how faculty and staff have perceive their role in university sustainability work at the University of Gävle in Swede, which was certified according to ISO 14001 in July 2004. In 2010 the faculty and staff were asked in open questions how they in their activities at a university contribute to sustainable development. The answers indicate their perceptions of sustainable development in a university context and show that both faculty and staff perceive that their activities in university contribute to sustainable development in many ways. Examples from the answers reveal that contribution to sustainable development is becoming as a more natural part in academic activities and the institutions are becoming more aware of their role in educating academics to meet the complexities in society.

  • 210.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Sundström, Agneta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Holm, Tove
    Sykli Environmental School of Finland, Finland; Department of Biology, University of Turku, Finland; Novia University of Applied Sciences, Finland .
    Yao, Zhilei
    Development of students´ sustainability knowledge, awareness and actions during university education2015In: : , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 211.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Sundström, Agneta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Holm, Tove
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management. Sykli Environmental School of Finland, Finland.
    Yao, Zhilei
    Learning about sustainability: what influences students’ self-perceived sustainability actions after undergraduate education?2016In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 8, no 6, article id 510Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Changing societies’ minds about sustainability requires knowledge about the situation, awareness of what needs to be done and actions to change today’s unsustainable behaviors. Universities are challenged to develop students’ ability to appreciate the complexities of sustainability and translate sustainability knowledge of education into systemic, anticipatory and critical thinking and actions. To meet this challenge, universities provide specific study programs and courses and integrate sustainability in education and activities. There is limited research on the results of such efforts from a student perspective. The study focused on an identical cohort of 108 undergraduate students who answered a survey about their self-perceived knowledge, awareness and actions before and after their studies in a Swedish university. All 108 students had sustainability integrated into their study programs; forty-eight also attended specific sustainability courses. The test model explains variations in students’ self-perceived sustainability actions at the end of their studies. There were differences already in students’ initial self-perceived knowledge between the groups. The students’ female gender, self-perceived initial actions, studying sustainability courses as well as the increase in self-perceived sustainability knowledge contribute significantly to the later sustainability actions. The results show student development, which can encourage those working with education for sustainable development in universities.

  • 212.
    Sergienko, Olga I.
    et al.
    ITMO University, St. Petersburg, Russia.
    Dinkelaker, N. V.
    ITMO University, St. Petersburg, Russia.
    Arrevaara, Eeva
    Lahti University of Applied Sciences, Lahti, Finland.
    Kärnä, Päivi
    Lahti University of Applied Sciences, Lahti, Finland.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Jonsson, Daniel
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Sorvari, Jaana
    Aalto University, Aalto, Finland.
    Serkkola, Ari
    Aalto University, Aalto, Finland.
    The concepts of resource efficiency and corporate environmental responsibility: a brief overview of the ERREC intensive week in St. Petersburg [Концепции ресурсной эффективности и корпоративной экологической ответственности: краткий обзор интенсивной недели по проекту ERREC в Санкт-Петербурге]2016In: Scientific journal NRU ITMO, ISSN 2310-1172, Vol. 4, p. 95-101Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Over 40 participants from five universities and four companies attended and actively contributed to the Intensive week «Sustainable Product Design & Resource Efficiency» organized at the ITMO University in St. Petersburg, 10–14 October, 2016 as a part of the ERREC «Environmental Responsibility and Resource Efficiency in companies» project, funded by the Nordic-Russian Cooperation in Education and Research program (SIU) and the Nordic Council of Ministers. Representatives of universities, including students, and business exchanged their views on how resourceefficiency could be achieved and the environmental impact of current consumption and production patterns decreased. A number of key tools and recommendations were formulated for companies under the new educational paradigm of blended learning, which is introducing a mix of traditional and modern educational methods. The trainees obtained a comprehensive experience for solving specific industry-related problems from the viewpoint of resource efficiency on the basis of pre-course assignments, lectures, teamwork, round-table discussions and an excursion. Particularly the waste management problems in Russia and abroad were highlighted. This paper summarizes the lectures and results from the case studies focusing on technical, managerial, and new information and communication technology applications for improving resource efficiency, and developing environmental responsibility in companies.

  • 213.
    Stefan, Ioana
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation.
    Disentangling the nature of tensions in Arrow’s paradox of disclosureManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 214.
    Stefan, Ioana
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation.
    Exploring Tensions between Appropriability and Openness to Collaboration in Innovation2017Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers, policy makers and practitioners alike have in recent years acknowledged a growing tendency towards opening up the innovation process by combining internal organizational assets with external actors’ resources. However, opening up the innovation process usually also entails revealing ideas, which may result in misappropriation. The purpose of this thesis is to investigate tensions related to the openness-appropriability relationship; this is done in three studies. The first study concerns a specific contextual factor that is likely to stress the openness-appropriability tensions: the location of external partners in innovation. The second study relates to the way managing openness-appropriability tensions affects performance, and the third study involves a theoretical discussion about the nature of the tensions occurring in the openness-appropriability relationship, i.e. paradoxical, dilemmatic, or dialectical. The first two studies apply quantitative methods, using survey data, while the third is a conceptual paper. The findings from the first study indicate that the use of different groups of appropriability mechanisms varies across various types of openness and that the location of external partners in innovation refines these linkages even more. The second study’s main takeaway is that the higher appropriability intensity, i.e. the extent to which appropriability mechanisms are put into practice, explains higher performance outcomes. The third study suggests that the tensions between openness and appropriability are more likely of paradoxical nature. From a theoretical perspective, findings indicate that paradoxical tensions between openness and appropriability may have a spatial dimension, and that these tensions should also be investigated in regards to performance. Managerial implications point out that opening up to innovation partners located abroad is likely to require more costly appropriability mechanisms.

  • 215.
    Stefan, Ioana
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    If it looks like a paradox and walks like a paradox: an attempt to disentangle openness- and appropriability-related tensions2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 216.
    Stefan, Ioana
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Illustrating and managing paradoxical tensions between openness and appropriability2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 217.
    Stefan, Ioana
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation .
    Knowing the Ropes in Open Innovation: Understanding Tensions through a Paradox Lens2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The fundamental paradox of disclosure suggested by Kenneth Arrow represents a challenge in contemporary open innovation settings. Potential negative outcomes of this paradox – e.g. misappropriation of ideas – are still not fully avertable. Researchers, practitioners and policy makers strive to untangle tensions related to this paradox, because failure to manage such tensions might entail lost jobs and hampered economic and technological growth.The purpose of this thesis is to provide a deeper understanding of this paradox by combining three perspectives on tensions in open innovation and applying a paradox lens. The overarching perspective is of value co-creation–value capture. The thesis comprises of five papers that are based on quantitative, qualitative and conceptual studies. The findings reveal: 1) characteristics of tensions; 2) factors that create tensions; and 3) possible solutions and pitfalls to managing said tensions. Findings show that tensions may be managed as paradoxical, dilemmatic or dialectical, depending e.g. on the need to be open or on the overlap between a product’s solution and its characteristics. Moreover, tensions could be spurred by a variety of factors, which may be categorized as: plurality of views, scarcity of resources, change, and combinations thereof (compound factors).Possible solutions to managing tensions include e.g. increasing staff awareness about intellectual property issues or improving collaboration contracts. Possible pitfalls are linked to over-focusing on either co-creating or on capturing value, and also to subsequent tensions. Findings also reveal a category of factors with dual role, which depending on their intensity, may lead to either solutions or to pitfalls. This hints towards additional layers of complexity concerning the paradox of disclosure. The findings contribute to theory on open innovation, appropriability and organizational paradox, and have important implications for practitioners and policy makers.

  • 218.
    Stefan, Ioana
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. KTH royal Institute of Technology.
    Through paradox lens: Disentangling paradoxical tensions between appropriability and openness2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 219.
    Stefan, Ioana
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Appropriability: a key to opening innovation internationally?2016In: International Journal of Technology Management, ISSN 0267-5730, E-ISSN 1741-5276, Vol. 71, no 3-4, p. 232-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on the tense appropriability-openness relationship, defined by some as paradox. Based on an international survey of 415 manufacturing firms, we investigate how the use of different kinds of intellectual property protection mechanisms (IPPMs) affects interfirm R&D collaboration while considering partner location in the analysis as well. Our results show that the use of formal, semi-formal or informal IPPMs has different effects on openness in terms of partner variety and depth of collaboration with academic partners, value chain partners and competitors. Moreover, when considering location we uncover previously hidden appropriability-openness liaisons showing that semi-formal or informal IPPMs are mainly valid in relation to national partners, whereas formal appropriability explains international collaborations. One implication of the study is that to better understand the appropriability-openness relationship it is imperative to differentiate between national and international settings. We further suggest that the potential paradox delineating this relationship has a geographical dimension.

  • 220.
    Stefan, Ioana
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Appropriability mechanisms, openness and firm performance2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is unclear how companies choose intellectual property protection mechanisms (IPPMs) in open innovation and how this choice affects firm performance. Our study addresses these gaps by using a data sample of 415 manufacturing firms from three European countries. The analysis covers eight IPPMs used in open innovation with four types of partners. Findings show that combinations of IPPMs vary according to partner openness. Moreover, companies using all kinds of IPPMs perform better than those relying on informal or semiformal IPPMs.

  • 221.
    Stefan, Ioana
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Global open innovation: the effects of IPRs and contracts2014In: Proceedings of the 15th CINet conference, 7-9 September 2014, Budapest, CINet , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study set out to investigate the use of formal protection mechanisms (formal contracts and IPRs) in interorganisational R&D collaboration with various types of partners within and across national borders. Considering the scarcity of studies that analyse both IPRs and formal contracts in the context of open innovation with different partner types located both nationally and abroad, our study contributes with new evidence about the actual formal mechanisms that are used in R&D endeavours with external partners. Our results suggest that firms mainly engaged in R&D collaboration with local firms mainly rely on contracts and agreements as formal protection mechanisms, while companies with mostly international R&D partners seem to enable knowledge exchange in the context of open innovation by means of IPRs.

  • 222.
    Stefan, Ioana
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. KTH.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    The whole nine yards: the moderating effects of appropriability intensity on the relationship between external search and performance2016Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 223.
    Stefan, Ioana
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Unravelling appropriability mechanisms and openness depth effects on firm performance across stages in the innovation process2017In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 120, p. 252-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is to date abundant evidence about the way openness-performance liaisons are shaped, yet parallel streams of research point towards an intricate relationship between appropriability and openness. Accordingly, while openness may reveal ample opportunities, risks of e.g. misappropriation should also be accounted for in open innovation processes, as they might affect performance. Recent research highlights the scarcity of studies investigating openness, appropriability and performance, and suggests a further need to analyze this in different stages of the innovation process. This study therefore aims to investigate the effects of three groups of intellectual property protection mechanisms (formal, semi-formal and informal) and openness (in terms of collaboration depth with eight types of partners) on two types of innovation performance (efficiency and novelty) across innovation phases. The analysis is based on a sample of 340 manufacturing firms from three European countries. Findings show that in early stages of the innovation process, efficiency is positively linked to the use of semi-formal appropriability mechanisms, such as contracts, yet negatively related to the use of formal ones, such as patents. The latter potentially illustrates the high uncertainty and increased risks of imitation or misappropriation in early innovation phases. Informal appropriability mechanisms contribute to novelty in earlier as well as later stages. Results further indicate novelty is explained by university collaboration throughout the innovation process, while competitor collaboration positively associates with novelty in later innovation stages. Vertical collaborations with supplier and customers reveal contrasting effects, which could also have implications linked to imitation risks. Furthermore, the negative effects of formal appropriability mechanisms and supplier collaboration on innovation performance in distinct stages of the innovation process might have implications for the so-called paradox of disclosure.

  • 224.
    Stefan, Ioana
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Niss, Camilla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Exploring the paradox of openness in high tech and low tech industries2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Firms relying on external sources of knowledge for innovation may encounter a paradox of openness concerning the need to both share and protect knowledge in collaborations. Based on an international survey of manufacturing firms this study attempts to illustrate various forms of the paradox by investigating the effects firms’ openness has on appropriability and performance in high and low tech industries. Findings reveal that the paradox is more likely to occur in the high tech industry cluster, thus hinting towards additional challenges firms in this cluster face in practice and underlining the need to include the technological dimension when researching the paradox. Moreover, in the majority of openness-appropriability combinations where we find a potential paradox of openness, firms do not succeed to overcome the paradox. The one exception in our sample is for the high tech firms when collaborating with suppliers and using formal appropriability. By pinpointing the different forms of the paradox this study also contributes to the ongoing debate concerning the role of intellectual property mechanisms in inbound open innovation.

  • 225.
    Stefan, Ioana
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Niss, Camilla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Potential and realized knowledge integration mechanisms in open innovation2015In: R&D Management Conference: Book of Abstracts, Pisa: Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna , 2015, p. 186-186Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 226.
    Stefan, Ioana
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Niss, Camilla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    The effects of appropriability on firm performance: the moderating effect of openness breadth2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 227.
    Stefan, Ioana
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Patents in Logistics2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 228.
    Stefan, Ioana
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Fobbe, Lea
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Open Business Model Innovation: Antecedents, Dynamics and Subsequent Challenges2018In: 2018 ISPIM Innovation Conference (Stockholm): Innovation, The Name of The Game / [ed] I. Bitran; S. Conn; K.R.E. Huizingh; O. Kokshagina; M. Torkkeli; M. Tynnhammar, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 229.
    Stefan, Ioana
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. KTH, Industriell ekonomi och organisation .
    Hurmelinna-Laukkanen, Pia
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Vanhaverbeke, Wim
    Hasselt University, Belgium.
    Coping with tensions in open innovation: challenges and solutions to co-create and capture value2018In: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 230.
    Steiner, Lars
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Sundström, Agneta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    A Model for University Identity and Reputation Strategy Work2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 231.
    Steiner, Lars
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Sundström, Agneta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    An analytical model for university identity and reputation strategy work2013In: Higher Education, ISSN 0018-1560, E-ISSN 1573-174X, Vol. 65, no 4, p. 401-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Universities face increasing global competition, pressuring them to restructure and find new identities. A multidimensional model: identity, image and reputation of strategic university identity and reputation work is developed. The model includes: organizational identity; employee and student attitudes; symbolic identity; influence from buildings, artefacts and reputation; and external stakeholders’ valuations. Image perceptions among employees, students and external stakeholders are proposed to have a transition-mediating function with respect to university identity. The model serves as an analytical tool for both academic scholars and university administrators in the strategic work with university identity, image and reputation, and aim to clarify the complex relations between these concepts.

  • 232.
    Sundström, Agneta
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Gyll, Janna
    Fiber Optic Valley, Hudiksvall, Sweden.
    Developing social sustainability for innovative industrial work environments2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 233.
    Söderberg, Lennart
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för industriell ekonomi. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för industriell ekonomi. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Supply Chain Management Maturity and Performance in SME2009In: Proceedings of the 16th International Annual EurOMA Conference, 14-17 June 2009, Göteborg., 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 234.
    Söderberg, Lennart
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Supply Chain Management Maturity and Performance in SMEs2010In: Operations Management Research, ISSN 1936-9735, E-ISSN 1936-9743, Vol. 3, no 1-2, p. 90-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Supply chain maturity models attempt to disseminate best practices in supply chain management (SCM). One basic idea behind these models is that increased maturity will lead to improved supply chain performance, which in turn will lead to improved financial performance. There is, however, little empirical evidence about the relationship between supply chain (SC) maturity and financial performance, specifically in SMEs. The results of this study indicate that there is a strong relationship between SCM maturity and SC performance in SMEs, as well as some relationships between SCM maturity and financial performance. One conclusion is that if firms use maturity indicators in the Supply Chain Operations Reference areas to improve their processes, they will most likely achieve positive effects on supply chain performance and probably also on financial performance.

  • 235.
    Söderberg, Lennart
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    What is the right governance type for your maintenance?2014In: : Proceedings of the 21th Euroma conference, 20-25 June, Palermo., 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 236.
    Söderberg, Lennart
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Kaulio, Matti
    Industriell ekonomi och organisation, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    A model for outsourcing and governing of maintenance within the process industry2017In: Operations Management Research, ISSN 1936-9735, E-ISSN 1936-9743, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 20-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many industrial firms motivate structural changes by an increased focus on core activities and reduced ownership of non-core activities. However, classifying maintenance activities as either core or non-core can be difficult, since maintenance is a support function strongly linked to the production core within a manufacturing firm. Based on a multiple case study that included four buying firms and four suppliers within the process industry, this paper investigates how the relative capabilities of the firms affect the governance decision about maintenance outsourcing. A conceptual framework built on a distinction between core-close and core-distant maintenance and between different maintenance capabilities is presented. The subsequent empirical analysis illustrates how the developed framework can be used for both analyzing and guiding firms’ decisions about outsourcing and governance regarding maintenance.

  • 237.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Beyond Fisher’s Product-Supply Chain Matrix: Illustrating the Actual Impact of Technological Maturity on Supply Chain Design2012In: International Journal of Logistics Systems and Management, ISSN 1742-7967, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 318-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature suggests that supply chains should be designed based on product characteristics, with particular focus on technological maturity and its effect on the predictability of demand. However, other factors influence the predictability of demand and technological maturity has effects that go beyond demand forecasts. This paper discusses the actual challenges of designing a supply chain and, based on a single case study, illustrates how a leading technology-based company solves these problems. The study found that although technological maturity drives a change towards a more efficient supply chain, a partially separate supply chain had to be maintained for unpredictable demand.

  • 238.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Do Customers Improve New Product Development Efficiency?: Revealing the Impact of Manufacturing-Based Absorptive Capacity2013In: International Journal of Business Performance Management, ISSN 1368-4892, E-ISSN 1741-5039, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 149-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to collaborate with customers in new product development efficiently, companies need to maintain some inherent competence that allows them to both understand the external party’s processes and absorb external knowledge. The aim of this study was to operationalise absorptive capacity for manufacturing and examine its impact on new product development efficiency. A large scale survey was sent out to Swedish manufacturing companies and the data was analysed using hierarchical regression. The results show that it is not manufacturing competence per se that increases new product development (NPD) efficiency, but rather how the competence is leveraged through various integration mechanisms. The results indicate that the indirect ability to improve NPD efficiency should also be taken into account when a firm is deciding whether to invest in manufacturing or not.

  • 239.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Manufacturing capabilities: expendable commodities or catalysts for effective supply chain management2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Many large companies have for a long time been very successful in their industries by combining leading edge R&D and marketing with strong internal manufacturing capabilities. An alternative model is now getting increased attention, where R&D and marketing is conducted internally and manufacturing performed by outsourcing partners. This development is partly due to divergent views on the strategic role of manufacturing capabilities: expendable commodities that can be purchased from a low-cost provider versus resources essential for sustaining long-term competitive advantage. Although assessments of the strategic role of manufacturing capabilities have been performed previously, recent supply chain trends such as globalisation and fragmentation mean that they may no longer be relevant. The purpose of the thesis is to assess the strategic role of manufacturing capabilities for a product-owning firm, by focusing on what impact its internal manufacturing capabilities have on the effectiveness of the supply chain.

    Two methods have been used for the research: survey and case study. The survey is representative for the entire Swedish manufacturing sector, whereas the case studies are to some extent industry- or company-specific. Two companies were researched: one in the telecom equipment sector, the other a supplier to multiple sectors, including the telecom equipment sector. The results of the research have been presented in five scientific articles that are also found in the appendices.

    The thesis argues that in order to evaluate the strategic role of manufacturing capabilities, it is important to look at how they contribute to the focal firm’s competitive priorities. When the technology is new, the competitive priority tends to be innovation, and the role of manufacturing capabilities is to facilitate more efficient NPD. When products mature, low cost becomes the dominant competitive priority, and the role of manufacturing capabilities is to facilitate a high operational efficiency of the supply chain. Although the potential role of manufacturing capabilities is dependent on the firms’ competitive priorities, just possessing manufacturing capabilities will not automatically translate into high performance. Instead, the performance outcome is dependent on both the level of manufacturing capabilities and, even more importantly, how they are leveraged through the integration of customers, suppliers and the product development department.

    This thesis contributes to the discourse on the role of manufacturing in two ways. First, the thesis investigates how competitive priorities impact the role of manufacturing capabilities in the supply chain. Second, this thesis explores how manufacturing capabilities influence the efficiency of integration. The main theoretical contribution is to develop and test the concept of manufacturing absorptive capacity within the context of manufacturing capabilities’ role in the supply chain. The thesis concludes that manufacturing capabilities are almost inevitably seen as strategic because they help firms integrate external sources more efficiently, thereby achieving performance improvement in terms of both operational efficiency and efficient product development. When the performance improvement corresponds with the prevailing competitive priority, the supply chain can be said to be effective. Manufacturing capabilities can thus act as a catalyst for effective supply chain management.

  • 240.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Manufacturing capabilities: Mere drivers of operational performance or critical for customer-driven innovation?2012In: Proceeding of 4th Joint World Conference on Production & Operations Management, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In is becoming increasingly common that R&D and marketing is conducted internally and manufacturing performed by outsourcing partners, raising questions about the strategic role of internal manufacturing capabilities. This role can be evaluated by how they contribute to the focal firm’s competitive priorities. Based on a survey of 267 Swedish manufacturing firms, the paper show that when the competitive priority is innovation, the role of manufacturing capabilities is to facilitate more efficient product development in collaboration with customers. When operational efficiency is the dominant competitive priority, the role of manufacturing capabilities is naturally to provide high operational efficiency.

  • 241.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Tillverkningskompetens: en förutsättning för innovativa försörjningskedjor?2013In: Innovation eller kvartalskapitalism?: Utmaningar för global svensk produktion / [ed] Lars Bengtsson och Johnny Lind, Stockholm: Liber, 2013, 1, p. 76-90Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 242.
    von Haartman, Robin
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för industriell ekonomi. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för industriell ekonomi. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Boosting New Product Development Efficiency by Leveraging Firms' Manufacturing Absorptive Capacity2009In: Proceedings of the 16th International Annual EurOMA Conference, 14-17 June 2009, Göteborg, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 243.
    von Haartman, Robin
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Global sourcing for innovation2013In: Proceedings of the 14th international CINet conference, 9-11 September, 2013, Nijmegen, Netherlands, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 244.
    von Haartman, Robin
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Global sourcing for innovation and sustainable development2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interest in global sourcing has increased significantly in recent years, but the effects on innovation are not well understood. The purpose of this paper is to empirically analyse the impact of global sourcing on innovation, while taking into account both purchasing proficiency and supply chain integration practices. Based on a large scale survey of purchasing managers in 679 firms in Europe and North America, the paper shows that global sourcing has no direct impact on innovation performance. However, firms that source globally are significantly better at using their purchasing proficiency, and supplier integration for increasing the innovation provided by their suppliers.

  • 245.
    von Haartman, Robin
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Global sourcing’s impact on sustainability: Vile or virtue?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Firms sourcing globally have been accused of committing, supporting or just turning a blind eye to a number environmental and social problem. Based on an international survey of 680 firms' purchasing departments, this paper provides empirical evidence on global sourcing's actual contribution to social and environmental sustainability. The findings show that the level of sustainability is not directly dependent on global purchasing, but firms purchasing globally are better at making use of their purchasing proficiency and are better at fulfilling their sustainability goals.

  • 246.
    von Haartman, Robin
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för industriell ekonomi. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för industriell ekonomi. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Manufacturing competence: A key to successful supplier integration2009In: International Journal of Manufacturing Technology and Management (IJMTM), ISSN 1368-2148, E-ISSN 1741-5195, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 283-299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extensive involvement of suppliers in new product development and manufacturing development has often been associated with superior performance. Some authors have also alleged that companies need comprehensive internal competencies, or absorptive capacity, in order to fully benefit from external expertise. This paper analyses this relationship on an operational level in manufacturing companies. Based on a large-scale survey it is shown that companies with greater internal manufacturing competencies gain significantly from supplier involvement in terms of most performance indicators, whereas those with lesser internal competencies have little to gain from such external cooperation.

  • 247.
    von Haartman, Robin
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för industriell ekonomi. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för industriell ekonomi.
    Manufacturing competence and external integration: absorptive capacity in a first tier supplier2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 248.
    von Haartman, Robin
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Sustainable global purchasing: assessing the relative impact of sustainability goals and programs2018In: International Journal of Business Performance Management, ISSN 1368-4892, E-ISSN 1741-5039, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 169-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global purchasing and offshoring are established strategic means for lowering costs and improving competitiveness. However, firms purchasing globally have also been accused of committing, supporting or just turning a blind eye to a number of environmental and social misdemeanours, such as disregard for environmental regulation, poor working conditions and corruption. The purpose of this paper is to provide quantitative evidence, based on a large scale survey, on how global purchasing actually impacts sustainability performance. The paper finds that there are no significant differences in sustainability performance between firms purchasing globally and firms purchasing regionally. However, firms purchasing globally are significantly more likely to fulfil their sustainability goals compared to firms purchasing regionally. Moreover, only firms that purchase globally show a significant impact of sustainability programmes on supplier sustainability compliance. Global purchasing can thus aid in social and environmental responsibility if it is accompanied by ambitious sustainability targets and sustainability programmes.

  • 249.
    von Haartman, Robin
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    The impact of global purchasing and supplier integration on product innovation2015In: International Journal of Operations & Production Management, ISSN 0144-3577, E-ISSN 1758-6593, Vol. 35, no 9, p. 1295-1311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The interest in global purchasing has increased significantly in recent years, but the impact on product innovation is not well understood. The purpose of this paper is to empirically analyse the impact of global purchasing on product innovation sourced from suppliers, while taking into account how firms integrate their suppliers.

    Design/methodology/approach – The data used in this study are from the International Purchasing Survey, an international online survey on purchasing and supply management conducted in 2009. The data are analysed using factor and regression analyses.

    Findings – The paper shows that global purchasing has no direct impact on product innovation performance. However, supplier integration is more strongly associated with product innovation performance for firms purchasing globally compared to firms purchasing regionally.

    Practical implications – The implication is that when companies purchase globally, they must have a highly developed purchasing department in order to sustain a high level of innovation. For firms purchasing only regionally, the role of the purchasing department is diminished, at least in terms of contributing to innovation.

    Originality/value – This paper contributes to the discussion of potential advantages and disadvantages of global purchasing. First, the paper provides an explanation for the ambiguous results of previous research. Product innovation does not depend on whether firms are purchasing globally or not, it depends on how they purchase. This paper has showed that when purchasing globally, the role of the purchasing department becomes crucial for product innovation. The proficiency and activities of the purchasing department largely determine the success, in terms of supplier product innovation, of global purchasing.

  • 250.
    von Haartman, Robin
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Niss, Camilla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Digital or lean? Lean practices and adoption of digital technologies in assembly- and process-based industries2016Conference paper (Refereed)
23456 201 - 250 of 279
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