hig.sePublikationer
Ändra sökning
Avgränsa sökresultatet
2345 201 - 214 av 214
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Träffar per sida
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
Markera
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 201.
    Wadman, Cecilia
    et al.
    Department for Health Behaviours, Swedish National Institute of Public Health, Östersund, Sweden.
    Kjellberg, Anders
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för teknik och byggd miljö, Ämnesavdelningen för inomhusmiljö.
    The role of the affective stress response as a mediator for the effect of psychosocial risk factors on musculoskeletal complaints - Part 2: Hospital workers2007Ingår i: International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, ISSN 0169-8141, E-ISSN 1872-8219, Vol. 37, nr 5, s. 395-403Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This cross-sectional study of 267 hospital workers from different professions tested the hypothesis that affective stress responses mediate the effects of the psychosocial work environment on musculoskeletal complaints (MSCs). Self-reported psychosocial conditions,ergonomic workloads, affective stress and energy responses, and MSCs were analysed with a series of logistic regression analyses. The psychosocial variables were strongly related to stress and energy, and stress was related to MSCs. Neck and shoulder complaints were more common in the group with high demands and low skill discretion. This was the only significant relation between psychosocial variables and MSCs that was not explained by their confounding with ergonomic workload. However, controlling for stress did not substantially reduce or reduce this interaction effect, which would have been the case if it had been mediated (completely or partially) by stress.

  • 202.
    Westerberg, Ulla
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för teknik och byggd miljö, Ämnesavdelningen för byggnadskvalitet.
    Linden, Elisabet
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för teknik och byggd miljö, Ämnesavdelningen för inomhusmiljö.
    Nilsson, Håkan
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för teknik och byggd miljö, Ämnesavdelningen för inomhusmiljö.
    Perceived windiness in urban spaces.2006Ingår i: The 6th International Conference on Urban Climate - Preprints, 2006, s. 209-212Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper discusses the perception of windiness in the urban environment and especially its visual aspects. Various urban spaces in two cities, both with a reputation of being windy, have been chosen for field studies. Perceived windiness of the spaces has been investigated through questionnaire surveys and on-site interviews simultaneous to climate measurements. Result: Windy has a negative connotation that interacts with other environmental aspects such as beauty and comfort. Also naturalness and mental images of what constitutes sheltered and windy places seem to influence the survey as well as the on-site assessments of windiness.

  • 203.
    Westerberg, Ulla
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för teknik och byggd miljö, Ämnesavdelningen för byggnadskvalitet.
    Sandberg, Mats
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för teknik och byggd miljö, Ämnesavdelningen för inomhusmiljö.
    A typology for urban form with respect to wind climate2006Ingår i: International conference for Nordic Network for Urban Morphology, Stockholm 2006 Book of Abstracts, 2006Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 204.
    Wigö, Hans
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för teknik och byggd miljö, Ämnesavdelningen för inomhusmiljö.
    Effects of intermittent air velocity on thermal and draught perception during transient temperature conditions2008Ingår i: The International Journal of Ventilation, ISSN 1473-3315, E-ISSN 2044-4044, Vol. 7, nr 1, s. 59-66Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has shown that air movement has a significant influence on humans' thermal comfort. For persons feeling cool, air movement tends to be perceived as draught, whilst when feeling warm air movements may provide a desired cooling effect. In the transition zone it therefore seems difficult to use constant air velocity as a tool for cooling without creating draught problems. Nevertheless, from an energy saving perspective it appears to be far more efficient to use enhanced convective cooling, induced by the air movement, to cool only the occupants instead of the entire building. One possible way to use air movement as a method to improve thermal comfort without resultant draught problems could be to use intermittent air velocity instead of constant velocity. The present paper reports results from three experiments where subjects have been exposed to velocity variations, showing support for the hypothesis that it is possible to cool humans and reduce the percentage of occupants who are dissatisfied with the room temperature, without creating draught problems, through intermittent cooling.

  • 205.
    Wigö, Hans
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för teknik och byggd miljö, Ämnesavdelningen för inomhusmiljö.
    Field tests of a new cooling method in a school environment2009Ingår i: Proceedings of  11th International Conference on Air Distribution in Rooms, 2009, s. 974-978Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 206.
    Wigö, Hans
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för teknik och byggd miljö, Ämnesavdelningen för inomhusmiljö.
    Innovative cooling method in a school environment2007Ingår i: Proceedings of the 2nd PALENC Conference and 28th AIVC Conference: building low energy cooling and advanced ventilation technologies in the 21st century, 27 - 29 September 2007, Crete Island, Greece, Aten: Heliotopos Conferences , 2007, s. Vol. 2, 1114-1116Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 207.
    Wigö, Hans
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för teknik och byggd miljö, Ämnesavdelningen för inomhusmiljö.
    Technique and human perception of intermittent air velocity variation.2005Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

     

    Objectives. The main objective of the present thesis was to evolve a controlled intermittent velocity field and to examine the impact of this type of dynamic indoor climate on human’s psychology and physiology. The prediction was that intermittent velocity variation could provide occupants with the desired cooling without causing draught and that this intermittent change of the indoor climate would influence peoples’ affect and cognitive performance.

    Methods. All experiments were performed in a classroom-like environment where groups of subjects were exposed to a temperature increase and step changes in air velocity. The changes or intermittent variations in air velocity consisted of elevated speed during five minutes, which were repeated three times. To reduce the influence of individual thermal preferences all measures were collected twice and the statistical analyses were based on the change scores in these measures.

    Results. The obtained results showed that, intermittent velocity variation may provide occupants with the desired cooling without causing draught. Subjects exposed to velocity variations were significantly less affected by the temperature rise in the room, compared to the control group. Moreover, the method reduced the expected increase of occupants who perceived the temperature condition as uncomfortable. The findings concerning air movements demonstrate that very few perceived the condition as draughty, after being exposed to the three high velocity pulses.

    The results concerning affect showed a significant effect on high activation, in the temperature range 21 - 24oC when the velocity variations made the subjects rate the temperature as slightly lowered over time, they kept their level of activation. In the higher temperature interval, 25 - 27oC, unactivated unpleasantness increased and activated pleasantness decreased significantly more in subjects in the constant velocity condition than it did for subjects in the velocity variation condition. In sum, all results concerning affect, the significant ones and tendencies point in the same direction. Subjects exposed to velocity variation report changes, over time, indicating higher activation and more positive feelings.

    No differences in cognitive performances were shown between the air velocity conditions. However, a tendency to a significant result (p = 0.10) in an attention task was shown, indicating that subjects in the velocity variation condition increased their speed in a short-term memory search, compared to subjects in the constant velocity condition.

    In the temperature range 21- 24oC, where the perception of the room temperature was measured at 0, 5 and 10 minutes respectively after the last high velocity period, the difference in MTV scores between the two groups, did decrease over time. Ten minutes after the last pulse the difference in MTV scores between the two groups was not significant. This suggests that the high velocity period should be repeated every10 to 15 minutes to keep the expected rise in subjects who judged the thermal conditions as uncomfortable down.

    The skin temperature was not affected neither by the rise in ambient temperature (from 21 to 24oC over 80 minutes) nor the periods (3 x 5 minutes) of high velocity. A consequence of this result is that the human temperature regulation system permitted an increased heat loss during the high velocity pulse, and hence a reduction of the body’s internal stored heat. For uncovered body parts the increase in heat loss was 20 % during the high velocity pulse. Summarised over the whole exposure time the three pulses produced a total energy loss that was only 2 % higher compared to constant low velocity.

  • 208.
    Wigö, Hans
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för teknik och byggd miljö, Ämnesavdelningen för inomhusmiljö.
    Knez, Igor
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för teknik och byggd miljö, Ämnesavdelningen för inomhusmiljö.
    Psychological impact of air velocity variations in a ventilated room2005Ingår i: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 48, nr 9, s. 1086-1096Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 209.
    Wigö, Hans
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för teknik och byggd miljö, Ämnesavdelningen för inomhusmiljö.
    Knez, Igor
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för teknik och byggd miljö, Ämnesavdelningen för inomhusmiljö.
    Sandberg, Mats
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för teknik och byggd miljö, Ämnesavdelningen för inomhusmiljö.
    Effects of velocity variations in ventilated room on comfort, affect and cognitive performance2002Ingår i: Indoor air 2002: proceedings of 9th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate, Monterey, California, June 30-July 5, 2002, Santa Cruz, CA: IAIAS , 2002Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 210.
    Wigö, Hans
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för teknik och byggd miljö, Ämnesavdelningen för inomhusmiljö.
    Nilsson, Håkan O.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för teknik och byggd miljö, Ämnesavdelningen för inomhusmiljö.
    Application of a thermal manikin to evaluate heat loss rates from people caused by variations in air velocity and air temperature2004Ingår i: The International Journal of Ventilation, ISSN 1473-3315, E-ISSN 2044-4044, Vol. 3, nr 3, s. 219-225Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Heat loss monitoring from a thermal manikin was undertaken representing an occupant in a classroom during a lesson period of 80 minutes in which the room temperature was increased from 21 to 24°C for various airflow velocity configurations. A group of subjects was exposed to various conditions of temperature and airflow rate so that the impact of these variations on their surface/skin temperature could be determined. It was found that skin temperature remained stable and close to 34°C for all conditions of exposure. Thus, over the temperature and air velocity range considered, these new findings verified the suitability of using a thermal manikin, set to steady uniform surface temperature, to determine the heat loss characteristics from occupants subjected to intermittent velocity variation. When the manikin was exposed to a high velocity pulse, the heat loss from the whole body increased by 10% while the heat loss from exposed areas (hands and face) increased by 20 % (when compared to no velocity pulse). After the 80 minutes monitoring period, the total energy loss from a manikin exposed to velocity variations was 2% higher than when exposed to constant low velocity.

  • 211.
    Wigö, Hans
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för teknik och byggd miljö, Ämnesavdelningen för inomhusmiljö.
    Sandberg, Mats
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för teknik och byggd miljö, Ämnesavdelningen för inomhusmiljö.
    Creating velocity variations in a whole room2002Ingår i: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Air Distribution in Rooms, 2002, s. 273-276Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 212.
    Wigö, Hans
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för teknik och byggd miljö, Ämnesavdelningen för inomhusmiljö.
    Sandberg, Mats
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för teknik och byggd miljö, Ämnesavdelningen för inomhusmiljö.
    Draught free intermittent cooling at moderate over temperatures by generating pulses of high velocities.2005Ingår i: Proceedings of 10th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate, 2005, s. 209-213Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Schools in Scandinavia are buildings where there is a need of cooling only for a short period of time. Due to the large number of students the ventilation system often cannot provide the necessary cooling without causing draught. We introduce additional cooling by an internal high velocity system that cool people. This system creates a downward air stream of five minutes duration that blows the rising thermal plume above a person away, thus exposing the student to an enhanced convective cooling. As the heat load was high the occupants were at the same time exposed to a rising room temperature. Assessments have been made where groups of subjects were exposed to velocity variations respectively constant low velocity. The mean thermal votes and air quality were measured during 80 minutes. The results are analysed as differences between the two groups in change over time.

  • 213.
    Wigö, Hans
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för teknik och byggd miljö, Ämnesavdelningen för inomhusmiljö.
    Sandberg, Mats
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för teknik och byggd miljö, Ämnesavdelningen för inomhusmiljö.
    Velocity variations in ventilated rooms as a method for creating comfort2001Ingår i: Proceedings of 22nd AIVC Conference, 2001, s. 27.1-27.12Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim is to develop a new method for comfort in settings with high thermal load in buildings that do not require continuous cooling but cooling only during shorter periods. Example of such buildings is schools. The present ventilation and control systems are designed for supply of air at a constant flowrate or to respond to relatively slow variations in load or step changes in load. The slow variations in load are mainly governed by the diurnal cycle and sudden step changes in load are mainly due to people entering or leaving a room. Systems of today are monotonous in the sense that the indoor climate is kept almost constant over long periods. However, there are indications that intermittent variations in velocities can be beneficial to people's perceived comfort. For example when people feel too warm the introduction of a short "breeze" of "high velocity" air may make them feel more comfortable. One example is window airing. The use of (non-turbulent) variations as a stimulus for creating comfort has not as yet been explored systematically or been technically implemented. The idea is to create velocity variations in the head region on people. Both momentum (mixing ventilation) and pure buoyancy driven (displacement system) ventilation are used for creating velocity variations. In addition to using the ventilation system for introducing velocity variations, stirring generated by propellers (ceiling fans) are used. The paper reports on the velocity field obtained in the occupied zone.

  • 214. Witkowska, Ewa
    et al.
    Kjellberg, Anders
    Högskolan i Gävle, Institutionen för teknik och byggd miljö, Ämnesavdelningen för inomhusmiljö.
    Structural analysis of sexual harassment in Swedish schools: What Factor Structures Show the Best Fit to Girls' and Boys' Self-Reports?2005Ingår i: Sex Roles, ISSN 0360-0025, E-ISSN 1573-2762, Vol. 53, nr 9-10, s. 677-687Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Dimensions of peer sexual harassment in schools were analyzed with confirmatory factor analyses of data from a questionnaire study of 980 Swedish high-school students. The factorial structures suggested in the literature on sexual harassment in the workplace showed a bad fit to the student data, especially for boys. A nested structure, with one general factor and two specific factors (closest to the hostile environment and sexual attention categories), appeared to offer the best fit-to-data for female students. For male students, however, the structure was less clear, and the fit worse, but the presence of a general sexual harassment factor was supported also there. No acceptable model common to boys and girls could be identified.

2345 201 - 214 av 214
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf