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  • 351.
    Jahncke, Helena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Edvinsson, Johanna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bjärntoft, Sofie
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bergsten, Eva
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Kjellberg, Anders
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Larsson, Johan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Zetterberg, Camilla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Flexibelt arbete - Hälsofrämjande interventioner för en hållbar digitalisering: Delområde Stora projekt2017Report (Other academic)
  • 352.
    Jahncke, Helena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Edvinsson, Johanna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bjärntoft, Sofie
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bergsten, Eva
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Kjellberg, Anders
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Larsson, Johan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Zetterberg, Camilla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Flexibelt arbete - Hälsofrämjande interventioner för en hållbar digitalisering: Delområde Trafikledning2017Report (Other academic)
  • 353.
    Jahncke, Helena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Edvinsson, Johanna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bjärntoft, Sofie
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bergsten, Eva
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Kjellberg, Anders
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Larsson, Johan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Zetterberg, Camilla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Flexibelt arbete - Hälsofrämjande interventioner för en hållbar digitalisering: Delområde Underhåll2017Report (Other academic)
  • 354.
    Jahncke, Helena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Edvinsson, Johanna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bjärntoft, Sofie
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bergsten, Eva
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Kjellberg, Anders
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Larsson, Johan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Zetterberg, Camilla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Uppsala universitet, Arbets- och miljömedicin.
    Flexibelt arbete: Hälsofrämjande interventioner för en hållbar digitalisering: Kartlägning hösten 20162017Report (Other academic)
  • 355.
    Jahncke, Helena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Edvinsson, Johanna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bjärntoft, Sofie
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Larsson, Johan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Zetterberg, Camilla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Symposium: Återhämtning och ledarskap i flexibla arbeten: resultat från ett forskningsprojekt på Trafikverket2018In: FALF KONFERENS 2018 Arbetet – problem eller potential för en hållbar livsmiljö?   10-12 juni 2018 Gävle: Program och abstracts / [ed] Lindberg, Per, Gävle: Gävle University Press , 2018, p. 78-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Introduktion

    Den stressrelaterade ohälsan ökar i samhället i stort och det är möjligt att bristande återhämtning kan vara bidragande. Det finns dock ännu inte några tydliga svar på hur ett gynnsamt mönster av arbete och återhämtning bör se ut. Frågan om balansen mellan krav i arbetet och möjligheter till återhämtning är särskilt aktuell i yrken där digital teknik möjliggör flexibelt arbete, dvs. ett arbete där de anställda till stor del själva kan styra över sin arbetstid, sitt arbetsställe och/eller sitt arbetssätt. Möjligheten att arbeta flexibelt kan innebära både för- och nackdelar för såväl individen som organisationen och medföra nya utmaningar för chefer när det gäller hur de ska leda sina medarbetare på ett hälsofrämjande sätt. Samtidigt kan flexibiliteten underlätta för medarbetare att få ihop livspusslet och att anpassa arbetsinsatsen utifrån arbetstoppar, vilket kan gynna organisationens produktivitet. Risken är dock att den stressrelaterade ohälsan ökar om balansen mellan arbete och återhämtning rubbas genom t.ex. övertidsarbete och ständig tillgänglighet till arbetet på ogynnsamma tider.

    Det här symposiet presenterar resultat från ett forskningsprojekt som undersökt flexibelt arbete på Trafikverket. I ett första steg genomfördes en kartläggning av arbetsvillkor, återhämtning och hälsa med hjälp av en webbaserad enkät till 4926 anställda. Resultaten från kartläggningen har sedan legat till grund för fokusgruppsdiskussioner med chefer och medarbetare, där åtgärdsförslag har tagits fram i syfte att förstärka fördelarna och reducera riskerna med flexibelt arbete. Även åtgärdsförslagen från fokusgrupperna kommer att presenteras vid symposiet.

  • 356.
    Jahncke, Helena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Edvinsson, Johanna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Delrapport kontor A: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor2016Report (Other academic)
  • 357.
    Jahncke, Helena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Edvinsson, Johanna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Delrapport kontor B: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor2016Report (Other academic)
  • 358.
    Jahncke, Helena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Edvinsson, Johanna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Delrapport kontor C: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor2016Report (Other academic)
  • 359.
    Jahncke, Helena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Edvinsson, Johanna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Delrapport kontor D: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor2016Report (Other academic)
  • 360.
    Jahncke, Helena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Edvinsson, Johanna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Delrapport kontor E: Effekter av aktivitetsbaserade kontor på stillasittande, koncentration och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor2016Report (Other academic)
  • 361.
    Jahncke, Helena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental psychology.
    Eriksson, Karolina
    Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Naula, Sanna
    Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för psykologi.
    The effects of auditive and visual settings on perceived restoration likelihood2015In: Noise & Health, ISSN 1463-1741, E-ISSN 1998-4030, Vol. 17, no 74, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has so far paid little attention to how environmental sounds might affect restorative processes. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of auditive and visual stimuli on perceived restoration likelihood and attitudes towards varying environmental resting conditions. Assuming a condition of cognitive fatigue, all participants (N = 40) were presented with images of an open plan office and urban nature, each under four sound conditions (nature sound, quiet, broadband noise, office noise). After the presentation of each setting/sound combination, the participants assessed it according to restorative qualities, restoration likelihood and attitude. The results mainly showed predicted effects of the sound manipulations on the perceived restorative qualities of the settings. Further, significant interactions between auditive and visual stimuli were found for all measures. Both nature sounds and quiet more positively influenced evaluations of the nature setting compared to the office setting. When office noise was present, both settings received poor evaluations. The results agree with expectations that nature sounds and quiet areas support restoration, while office noise and broadband noise (e.g. ventilation, traffic noise) do not. The findings illustrate the significance of environmental sound for restorative experience.

  • 362.
    Jahncke, Helena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Objective measures of cognitive performance in activity based workplaces and traditional office types2020In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 363.
    Jahncke, Helena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hygge, Staffan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental psychology.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mixter, Susanna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Lyskov, Eugene
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    A cross-sectional study of alternations between physical and mental tasks2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Health and well-being at work is generally assumed to be associated with sufficient physical and mental variation. Job rotation, where workers typically alternate between different physical tasks, is a popular initiative. Controlled experiments suggest that favourable effects are associated with alternations between mental and physical tasks, but little is known about this intervention in real work. The aims of this study were (1) to describe the occurrence of alternations between mental and physical tasks, and (2) to identify key determinants of such alternations.

    Method. We developed a questionnaire combining established questions with specific questions about alternations. Workers from two occupations (industrial and non-industrial blue-collar work), in jobs containing both physical and mental tasks, were included in the study. 122 (55 females) out of 293 workers approached at four companies answered the questionnaire.

    Results. On average, the workers alternated 3.5 times per day between mental and physical tasks. In the non-industrial companies, workers reported wanting more alternations than they had, while desired and actual alternations did not differ in the industrial companies. This effect of occupation on the difference between the number of alternations wanted and the actual alternations available was significant (p < 0.001). Furthermore, there was a general preference for performing a physical task after a mental task, and vice versa. This main effect of primarily performed task type (i.e. either physical or mental) on preferred subsequent task type was significant (p < 0.001). In a univariate analysis, gender appeared to be a strong determinant of the occurrence of alternations, but the effect was absorbed when adding the occupation variable.

    Discussion. Within the studied companies, work offered alternations between mental and physical tasks and there was a preference among workers to alternate between tasks. Occupation rather than gender was a key determinant of the number of alternations reported.

  • 364.
    Jahncke, Helena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hygge, Staffan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental psychology.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mixter, Susanna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Lyskov, Eugene
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Variation at work: alternations between physically and mentally demanding tasks in blue-collar occupations2017In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 60, no 9, p. 1218-1227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this questionnaire study were to describe the occurrence and desired number of alternations between mental and physical tasks in industrial and non-industrial blue-collar work, and determine to which extent selected personal and occupational factors influence these conditions. On average, the 122 participating workers (55 females) reported to have close to four alternations per day between mental and physical tasks, and to desire more alternations than they actually had. They also expressed a general preference for performing a physical task after a mental task and vice versa. In univariate regression models, the desired change in task alternations was significantly associated with Gender, Age, Occupation, Years with current work tasks, and Perceived job control, while Occupation was the only significant determinant in a multiple regression model including all factors. Our results suggest that alternations between productive physical and mental tasks could be a viable option in future job rotation.

  • 365.
    Jahncke, Helena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Keus van de Poll, Marijke
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building Engineering, Energy Systems and Sustainability Science, Environmental Science.
    Viktiga frågor glöms bort i debatten om kontorslandskap2019In: Göteborgs-Posten, ISSN 1103-9345, no 18-sepArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 366.
    Jahncke, Helena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Edvinsson, Johanna
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Persson, Lina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Activity-based workplaces: changes in cognitive performance among workers previously employed at cellular offices or open-plan offices2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 367.
    Jahncke, Helena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Persson, Lina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Aktivitetsbaserade arbetsplatser: Koncentration, stillasittande och hälsa i jämförelse med traditionella kontor: Kartläggning år 2015-20172017Report (Other academic)
  • 368.
    Januario, Leticia
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science.
    Karstad, Kristina
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Dk.
    Rugulies, Reiner
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Dk.
    Bergström, Gunnar
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Holtermann, Andreas
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Dk.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Association between psychosocial working conditions and perceived physical exertion among eldercare workers: a cross-sectional multilevel analysis of nursing homes, wards and workers2019In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 19, article id 3610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This cross-sectional multilevel study aims at investigating the associations between psychosocial working conditions of different workplace levels and perceived physical exertion among eldercare workers. Data were obtained from the ‘Danish Observational Study of Eldercare work and musculoskeletal disorderS’ (DOSES) study, including 536 eldercare workers, nested in 126 wards and 20 nursing homes. Psychosocial working conditions were measured by the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ). The physical workload was measured with a self-administered scale (0–10) rating perceived physical exertion. Multilevel linear mixed models were used to determine associations of psychosocial conditions between nursing homes, wards, and workers with physical exertion. Most of the variance in the perceived physical exertion was explained by differences between workers (83%), but some variance was explained by wards (11%) and nursing homes (6%). Workers employed in nursing homes with low influence (p = 0.01) and poor leadership (p = 0.02), and in wards with high quantitative demands (p = 0.03), high work pace (p < 0.001), and low justice (p = 0.01) were at increased risk of reporting higher physical exertion. The strongest associations were found for low influence, low quality of leadership, and high work pace at nursing homes and ward levels. In conclusion, improving specific psychosocial working conditions at nursing home and ward levels may be of particular importance to reduce excessive physical workload in eldercare workers

  • 369.
    Januario, Leticia
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Stevens, Matthew
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Holtermann, Andreas
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Karstad, Kristina
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Combined effects of physical behavior compositions and psychosocial resources on perceived exertion among eldercare workers2020In: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 370.
    Jarebrant, Caroline
    et al.
    Swerea IVF Mölndal; Institutionen för sociologi och arbetsvetenskap, Göteborgs universitet.
    Winkel, Jörgen
    Institutionen för sociologi och arbetsvetenskap, Göteborgs universitet; Department of Management Engineering, Technical University of Denmark.
    Johansson Hanse, Jan
    Psykologiska institutionen, Göteborgs universitet.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Öjmertz, Birgitta
    Swerea IVF Mölndal.
    ErgoVSM: A tool for integrating Value Stream Mapping and ergonomics in manufacturing2016In: Human Factors and Ergonomics in Manufacturing, ISSN 1090-8471, E-ISSN 1520-6564, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 191-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Value stream mapping (VSM) is a Lean tool aiming at waste reduction. Previous research suggests that the use of VSM may result in work intensification and thus an increased risk for the workers of developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSD). In the current study, VSM has been developed to also consider physical exposure in the analyzed production system (ErgoVSM). As the VSM, ErgoVSM is based on a participatory approach. ErgoVSM was tested in Swedish manufacturing industry. The results suggest that ErgoVSM catalyzes change processes that include intervention proposals emphasizing ergonomics in addition to waste reduction. Thus, it seems to be usable for the intended target group of engineers. The suggested performance improvements obtained by VSM seem not to be hampered by adding the ergonomics complement. However, the use of ErgoVSM is somewhat more time-consuming than the use of VSM. In conclusion, ErgoVSM may be suggested as a feasible tool to be used by production planners for including ergonomics considerations in the rationalization process.

  • 371.
    Jensen, B. R.
    et al.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Krag, I. R.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Bronée, L.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Crenshaw, Albert G.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Tissue oxygenation and haemoglobin kinetics as a function of depth in two shoulder muscles differing in fibre-type composition2010In: International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, ISSN 0169-8141, E-ISSN 1872-8219, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 135-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main aim was to examine the effects of measurement depth on tissue oxygenation, and haemoglobin kinetics in the oxidative supraspinatus/trapezius muscle and in the deltoid muscle. Seven female subjects performed dynamic arm abductions (0.5 Hz) with an external load of 1.2 kg at level of the elbows. Tissue oxygenation (StO2) expressed as %StO2 saturation, total haemoglobin (HbT) , oxyhaemoglobin (HbO2) and deoxyhaemoglobin (Hb) were measured in two different measurement depth using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). HbT reflects blood volume. Measurements were performed simultaneously in the supraspinatus/trapezius and in the anterior part of the deltoid muscles.

    The average StO2 level at rest was in general lower in the supraspinatus/trapezius muscles (67.7(5.3) % StO2) than in the deltoid muscle (85.4(4.4) % StO2). Submaximal dynamic arm abductions resulted in decreased StO2 in both muscles. However, the initial decrease was steeper and larger for the deltoid muscle than for the supraspinatus/trapezius region. Correspondingly, the initial reoxygenation in the recovery phase was faster for the deltoid muscle than for the supraspinatus/trapezius muscle.

    At rest no differences in StO2 were found with increasing measurement depth in any of the two muscles. However, during exercise StO2 decreased with increasing measurement depth in the deltoid muscle whereas StO2 was more homogeneous in the supraspinatus/trapezius muscle.

    Furthermore, HbT and HbO2 were largely maintained in the supraspinatus/trapezius muscle whereas HbT and HbO2 decreased during exercise and with increasing measurement depth (HbT) in the deltoid muscle. Hb increased during exercise in both muscles.

    The hemodynamic differential responses to exercise for the two regions may reflect a combined effect of differences in muscle fibre composition and a dependency of depth related changes in the intramuscular pressure during exercise. Thus, the supraspinatus/trapezius muscles seems to be more

    efficiently adapted to the oxygen demand during submaximal dynamic exercise than the deltoid muscle although the intramuscular pressure during the contractions is expected to be higher in the supraspinatus muscle than in the deltoid muscle.

    In conclusion, muscle hemodynamic responses to dynamic exercise are highly muscle specific and may be spatially homogeneous or inhomogeneous depending on the muscle

  • 372.
    Johansson, Amanda
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Forsgren, Sture
    Department of Integrative Medical Biology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Stenberg, Berndt
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Wilen, Jonna
    Department of Radiation Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Kaiezic, Nebojsa
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Sandstrom, Monica
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    No effect of mobile phone-like RF exposure on patients with atopic dermatitis2008In: Bioelectromagnetics, ISSN 0197-8462, E-ISSN 1521-186X, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 353-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the effect of exposure to a mobile phone-like radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic field on people with atopic dermatitis (AD). Fifteen subjects with AD were recruited and matched with 15 controls without AD. The subjects were exposed for 30 min to an RF field at 1 W/kg via an indoor base station antenna attached to a 900 MHz GSM mobile phone. Blood samples for ELISA analysis of the concentration of substance P (SP), tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNF RI), and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in serum were drawn before and after the provocation (exposure/sham). Baseline heart rate and heart rate variability, local blood flow, and electrodermal activity were also recorded. No significant differences between the subject groups were found for baseline neurophysiological data. The cases displayed a serum concentration of TNF RI significantly higher than the control subjects and a significantly lower serum concentration of BDNF in the baseline condition. For SP there was no difference between groups. However, no effects related to RF exposure condition were encountered for any of the measured substances. As to symptoms, a possible correlation with exposure could not be evaluated, due to too few symptom reports. The result of the study does not support the hypothesis of an effect of mobile phone-like RF exposure on serum levels of SP, TNF RI, and BDNF in persons with AD.

  • 373.
    Johansson, Amanda
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Nordin, Steven
    Umeå University.
    Heiden, Marina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Sandstrom, Monica
    Umeå Unversity.
    Symptoms, personality traits, and stress in people with mobile phone-related symptoms and electromagnetic hypersensitivity2010In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 68, no 1, p. 37-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Some people report symptoms that they associate with electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure. These symptoms may be related to specific EMF sources or to electrical equipment in general (perceived electromagnetic hypersensitivity, EHS). Research and clinical observations suggest a difference between mobile phone (MP)-related symptoms and El-IS with respect to symptom prevalence, psychological factors, and health prognosis. This study assessed prevalence of EMF-related and EMF-nonrelated symptoms, anxiety, depression, somatization, exhaustion, and stress in people with MP-related symptoms or EHS versus a population-based sample and a control sample without EMF-related symptoms. Methods: Forty-five participants with MP-related symptoms and 71 with EHS were compared with a population-based sample (n=106) and a control group (n=63) using self-report questionnaires. Results: The EHS group reported more symptoms than the MP group, both EMF-related and EMF-nonrelated. The MP group reported a high prevalence of somatosensory symptoms, whereas the EHS group reported more neurasthenic symptoms. As to self-reported personality traits and stress, the case groups differed only on somatization and listlessness in a direct comparison. In comparison with the reference groups, the MP group showed increased levels of exhaustion and depression but not of anxiety, somatization, and stress; the EHS group showed increased levels for all of the conditions except for stress. Conclusion: The findings support the idea of a difference between people with symptoms related to specific EMF sources and people with general EHS with respect to symptoms and anxiety, depression, somatization, exhaustion, and stress. The differences are likely to be important in the management of patients. (C) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 374.
    Johansson, Bo
    et al.
    Uppsala University Hospital, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Helgesson, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lundberg, Ingvar
    Uppsala University, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nordquist, Tobias
    Uppsala University Hospital, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Leijon, Ola
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lindberg, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Vingård, Eva
    Uppsala University, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Work and health among native and foreign-born residents in Sweden 1990-2008: a register-based study on hospitalization for common potentially work-related disorders, disability pension and mortality2012In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 845-854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There are many immigrants in the Swedish workforce, but knowledge of their general and work-related health is limited. The aim of this register-based study was to explore whether documented migrant residents in Sweden have a different health status regarding receipt of a disability pension, mortality and hospitalization for lung, heart, psychiatric, and musculoskeletal disorders compared with the native population, and if there were variations in relation to sex, geographical origin, position on the labor market, and time since first immigration.

    Methods: This study included migrants to Sweden since 1960 who were 28-47 years old in 1990, and included 243 860 individuals. The comparison group comprised a random sample of 859 653 native Swedes. These cohorts were followed from 1991 to 2008 in national registers. The immigrants were divided into four groups based on geographic origin. Hazard ratios for men and women from different geographic origins and with different employment status were analyzed separately for the six outcomes, with adjustment for age, education level, and income. The influence of length of residence in Sweden was analyzed separately.

    Results: Nordic immigrants had increased risks for all investigated outcomes while most other groups had equal or lower risks for those outcomes than the Swedes. The lowest HRs were found in the EU 15+ group (from western Europe, North America, Australia and New Zealand). All groups, except Nordic immigrants, had lower risk of mortality, but all had higher risk of disability pension receipt compared with native Swedes. Unemployed non-Nordic men displayed equal or lower HRs for most outcomes, except disability pension receipt, compared with unemployed Swedish men. A longer time since first immigration improved the health status of men, while women showed opposite results.

    Conclusions: Employment status and length of residence are important factors for health. The contradictory results of low mortality and high disability pension risks need more attention. There is great potential to increase the knowledge in this field in Sweden, because of the high quality registers.

  • 375.
    Johansson, Bo
    et al.
    Uppsala University Hospital, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lundberg, Ingvar
    Uppsala University, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nordquist, Tobias
    Uppsala University Hospital, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Helgesson, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Leijon, Ola
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lindberg, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Vingård, Eva
    Uppsala University, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Work and health among native and foreign-born residents in Sweden 1990-2008: a register-based study on hospitalization due to common potentially work-related disorders, disability pension and mortality2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 376.
    Johansson, Elin
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bolin, Malin
    Avdelningen för Samhällsvetenskap, Mittuniversitetet .
    Olofsdotter, Gunilla
    Avdelningen för Samhällsvetenskap, Mittuniversitetet .
    Jämställd arbetshälsa? Genus, arbetsorganisation och fysisk belastning inom detaljhandeln2018In: FALF KONFERENS 2018 Arbetet – problem eller potential för en hållbar livsmiljö?   10-12 juni 2018 Gävle: Program och abstracts / [ed] Per Lindberg, Gävle: Gävle University Press , 2018, p. 118-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund

    Det har länge varit känt att kvinnor har betydligt sämre arbetshälsa än män. En viktig orsak är att kvinnor och män till stor del befinner sig i olika branscher, men forskning tyder påatt arbetshälsan är ojämnställd även inom t.ex. städbranschen, monteringsyrken och detaljhandel. Kvinnor och män i dessa yrken har ofta olika arbetsuppgifter och kvinnornas uppgifter är överlag mer enahanda och repetitiva än männens. Kvinnor tros också ha en högre biomekanisk belastning än män när de utför samma arbetsuppgift, möjligen därför att arbetsstationer och verktyg ofta anpassats utifrån mannen som norm. Könssegregeringen på arbetsmarknaden och inom organisationer verkar alltså vara en viktig orsak till bristande jämställdhet i belastningsrelaterad arbetshälsa inom vissa yrken. Kunskapen om hur arbetsroller och arbetsvillkor påverkar belastningar hos kvinnor och män är i stora delar åldersdigen och inte anpassad till svenska förhållanden. Dessutom saknas studier av könsskillnader i fysisk belastning i relation till hur arbetet organiseras på enskilda arbetsplatser. Detaljhandeln är en lämplig bransch att studera då den sysselsätter män och kvinnor i någorlunda likartad omfattning och förekomsten av belastningsbesvär är hög. Dessutom har forskning visat att de arbetsuppgifter som förekommer i detaljhandeln har en stor spännvidd i fysisk belastning och att de olika arbetsuppgifterna är genuskodade, dvs ses som ”kvinnliga” eller ”manliga”.

    Syfte

    Att undersöka kvinnors och mäns arbetsuppgifter, arbetsbelastningar, arbetsvillkor och belastningsbesvär inom en organisation i detaljhandeln, och förklara organisatoriska orsaker till könsskillnader och -likheter. Syftet är också att ta reda på hur dessa förhållanden ändras över tid.

    Metod

    Två matvarubutiker inom samma koncern med vardera ca 50 anställda studeras. I varje butik samlas data in vid två tillfällen med ett års mellanrum. Kvantitativa och kvalitativa metoder används: Semi-strukturerade intervjuer med chefer för att kartlägga organisationoch bemanning; enkät till de anställda med frågor om arbetssituation, muskuloskeletala besvär mm; fokusgruppsintervjuer med ett urval anställda för fördjupad insikt i arbetsroller, arbetsvillkor och arbetsmiljö; mätning av arbetsställningar, arbetsrörelser och puls på ca hälften av de anställda. Under mätperioden dokumenteras olika arbetsuppgifter i en dagbok och under en dag videofilmas den anställde under arbete. Datainsamling påbörjas i mars 2018 och preliminära resultat väntas tillgängliga under våren. Studien finansieras av Arbetsmiljöverket och Högskolan i Gävle.

  • 377.
    Johansson, Elin
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Lund Rasmussen, Charlotte
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Sitting, standing and moving during work and leisure among male and female office workers of different age: A compositional data analysis2019In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 378.
    Johansson, Elin
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Lund Rasmussen, Charlotte
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lyskov, Eugene
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Compositional analysis of sedentary behavior and physical activity during work and leisure among male and female office workers2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To determine the extent to which male and female office workers differ in their time-use composition of sitting behaviors (SB) and physical activity (PA) during work and leisure.

    Methods: SB and PA was measured using thigh-worn accelerometers for up to 8 full days in 77 male and 104 female office workers. Daily time-use compositions during work and leisure were described in four exhaustive categories, i.e. sitting in short (<30  min) and long (≥30 min) bouts, standing, and active behaviors. Following a compositional data analysis procedure, isometric log-ratios (ilr) were calculated to express time in sitting relative to non-sitting, short relative to long sitting bouts, and standing relative to active behaviors. Differences between sexes (men and women) and domains (work and leisure) were examined on the basis of these ilrs using ANOVA.

    Results: At work, time spent sitting in short bouts, long bouts, standing, and active was, on average, 34%, 36%, 22% and 8% among men and 31%, 37%, 24% and 8% among women. Corresponding proportions during leisure were 34%, 25%, 28% and 13% among men and 29%, 28%, 31% and 12% among women. Time spent sitting relative to non-sitting differed significantly between work and leisure (ilr sitting-vs-non-sitting, partial eta squared=0.09, p<0.01). During leisure, men used proportionally more time than women in short sitting bouts (ilr short-vs-long, partial eta squared=0.06, p<0.01) and spent more time in active behaviors relative to standing (ilr standing-vs-active, partial eta squared=0.04, p<0.01). No significant sex differences were observed during work (p>0.05).

    Conclusions:  The leisure behavior observed among men is probably more beneficial for health than that observed for women. However, both men and women spent a major proportion of their time sitting, both at and outside their office work, and they were, in general, only little active. Thus, both men and women could benefit from interventions to reduce SB and increase PA both at work and during leisure.

  • 379.
    Johansson, Sara
    et al.
    Department of Health Science, Luleå University of Technology.
    Rissén, Dag
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Centre for Research & Development, Uppsala University/Region of Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden.
    Fjellman-Wiklund, Annchristine
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University.
    Paarup, Helene M
    Research Unit of Occupational & Environmental Medicine, Clinical Institute, University of Southern Denmark; Department of Occupational Medicine, Hospital of South-west Jutland, Esbjerg.
    Röijezon, Ulrik
    Department of Health Science, Luleå University of Technology.
    Musculoskeletal pain, work posture and physical activity among professional symphony and opera musicians in Sweden2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The objectives were to 1) investigate the point prevalence and the one year prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms among professional classical orchestra musicians, 2) estimate the work posture regarding standing vs. sitting, and the physical activity among the musicians, and 3) investigate associations between pain and gender, work posture, and physical activity.

    Methods: The study is part of an ongoing national survey investigating the health situation among Swedish professional orchestra musicians. The data were collected from two orchestras. Seventy-eight musicians (80%) participated, aged 45 ±9.6 years with 41% women.

    Result: Ninety-one percent of the musicians reported pain during the last 12 months; 80% at more than one site. For both men and women the most frequently reported problem within the last year was neck pain (figure 1). While 96% of the musicians had a seated work posture all or most of the time in the orchestra, work posture was more diverse while practicing alone (figure 2). In total 73% (for females 67%; for males 77%) of the musicians fulfilled the Nordic recommendations for physical activity. Binominal logistic regressions including pain prevalence during last 12 months and gender, work posture, and physical activity were significant for hip pain (p=0.020) with gender (Odds ratio 4.9, p=0.007) as significant predictor, and knee pain (p=0.035) with work posture (Odds ratio 0.517, p=0.046) as significant predictor.

    Conclusion: In harmony with previous studies [1-2], the majority of the examined orchestra musicians experienced pain at some time point during a year. While almost all musicians play in a sitting position during orchestra rehearsals and concerts, playing posture varied more when practicing alone. Regression models including gender, work posture and physical activity revealed that 1) women were more prone to hip pain compared to men, 2) an association between knee pain and standing posture, while 3) no impact was found for physical activity in these preliminary results.

  • 380.
    Kaiser, Niclas
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Psychiatry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Sjölander, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Southern Lapland Research Department, Vilhelmina, Sweden.
    Liljegren, Annette Edin
    Southern Lapland Research Department, Vilhelmina, Sweden.
    Jacobsson, Lars
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Psychiatry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Renberg, Ellinor Salander
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Psychiatry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Depression and anxiety in the reindeer-herding Sami population of Sweden2010In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 69, no 4, p. 383-393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. The objective of this study was to investigate symptoms and predicting factors of depression and anxiety among reindeer-herding Sami in Sweden. Study design. A total of 319 reindeer-herding Sami (168 men, 151 women) were compared with urban and rural reference populations comprising 1,393 persons (662 men, 731 women). Methods. A cross-sectional questionnaire study on mental health, which included the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Data were analysed with regard to population, gender, age group, education and work-related stress. Results. The Sami population disclosed higher mean values for both depression and anxiety than the reference groups, with Sami men reporting the highest rates. Work-related stress was associated with anxiety and depression in the Sami group. Conclusions. By comparing Sami men and women with reference groups of men and women living in urban and rural areas in northern Sweden, this study identified that reindeer-herding Sami men require special attention with regard to mental health problems.

  • 381.
    Kalezic, Ivana
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Department of Surgical and Perioperative Science, Sport Medicine Unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Steffens, Heinz
    Changes in Tetrodotoxin-Resistant C-Fibre Activity during Fatiguing Isometric Contractions in the Rat2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 9, article id e73980Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is by now well established that tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) afferent fibres from muscle in the rat exhibit a multisensitive profile, including nociception. TTX-R afferent fibres play an important role in motor control, via spinal and supraspinal loops, but their activation and function during muscle exercise and fatigue are still unknown. Therefore, the specific effect of isometric fatiguing muscle contraction on the responsiveness of TTX-R C-fibres has been investigated in this study. To quantify the TTX-R afferent input we recorded the cord dorsum potential (CDP), which is the result of the electrical fields set up within the spinal cord by the depolarisation of the interneurons located in the dorsal horn, activated by an incoming volley of TTX-R muscle afferents. The changes in TTX-R CDP size before, during and after fatiguing electrical stimulation of the gastrocnemius-soleus (GS) muscle have been taken as a measure of TTX-R C-unit activation. At the end of the fatiguing protocol, following an exponential drop in force, TTX-R CDP area decreased in the majority of trials (9/14) to 0.75 +/- 0.03% (mean +/- SEM) of the pre-fatigue value. Recovery to the control size of the TTX-R CDP was incomplete after 10 min. Furthermore, fatiguing trials could sensitise a fraction of the TTX-R C-fibres responding to muscle pinch. The results suggest a long-lasting activation of the TTX-R muscle afferents after fatiguing stimulation. The role of this behaviour in chronic muscle fatigue in connection with pain development is discussed. Accumulation of metabolites released into the interstitium during fatiguing stimulation might be one of the reasons underlying the C-fibres' long-lasting activation.

  • 382.
    Kalezic, Nebojsa
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Autonomic reactivity in muscle pain: clinical and experimental assessment2006Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    There are numerous indications of possible involvement of the autonomic nervous system in the genesis of chronic pain. The possibility exists that sympathetic activation is related to motor dysfunction and changes in sensory processing, which have otherwise been implicated in musculoskeletal disorders.

    The primary aim of the thesis has been to investigate autonomic regulation at rest and in response to laboratory tests of autonomic function in subjects suffering from chronic pain in different localisations (lower back, neck-shoulder and neck-jaw), as well as to study the relations between autonomic regulation, proprioceptive acuity and clinical data. Secondary aim has been to assess autonomic regulation in fit, pain-free subjects in response to experimentally induced pain and in occupationally relevant settings.

    A total of 194 subjects suffering from chronic pain participated [low back pain (LBP) n=93; non-traumatic neck pain (NT) n=40, Whiplash associated disorder (WAD) n=40, Whiplash with temporomandibular dysfunction (WADj) n=21]. Each chronic pain group was subjected to a battery of autonomic function tests combining cognitive (Stroop Colour-Word conflict tests), physical (handgrip), sensory (unpleasant sound) and motor tasks (chewing tests) as well as the activation of reflex pathways (paced breathing and the orthostatic test) and compared to an age- and gender balanced control group. Autonomic regulation was also assessed in exposure to experimentally induced muscle pain in healthy subjects (n=24) in order to describe acute pain reaction. Further assessment was carried out during monotonous repetitive work and dynamic work in healthy subjects (n=10) and in a three-day monitoring of ambulance personnel (n=26) in occupational settings.

    Autonomic regulation was evaluated using cardiovascular (heart rate and heart rate variability, local blood flow and blood pressure), respiratory (breathing rate) electrodermal (skin conductance), muscular (trapezius and masseter EMG) and biochemical (insulin, cortisol, catecholamines) variables. Proprioceptive acuity was assessed using active-active repositioning tests. Pain levels were assessed using Visual-analogue or Numerical Rating scales. General health was evaluated through the Short-Form SF-36 Health Related Quality of Life questionnaire and Self-Efficacy Score questionnaires, whereas dysfunction was evaluated using the Oswestry Low Back Pain questionnaire, Pain Disability and Neck Disability Index questionnaires, the McKenzie evaluation and primary healthcare diagnoses. Self-reports of pain, stress and exertion were acquired prior to, during and post-testing.

    Chronic pain subjects were characterised by increased sympathetic and decreased parasympathetic activity as reflected in heart rate (LBP, WAD, WADj), heart rate variability (LBP, WAD, WADj), blood pressure (WADj) and electrodermal activity (LBP). In general, WAD showed more pain and dysfunction than NT, with lower self-efficacy and health-related quality of life. Differential reactivity was observed only in WAD, with increased responsiveness to sensory stimuli (heart rate variability, electrodermal activity), and motor tasks (heart rate) and a decreased response to cognitive challenge (heart rate variability, electrodermal activity). A significant part of WADj subjects showed sensorimotor impairment and low endurance in chewing tests, concomitant with a cardiovascular response that correlated with pain levels. Proprioceptive acuity was not found to be impaired among subjects suffering from chronic pain, and there were no indications of significant individual response specificity. Response to experimentally induced muscle pain in healthy subjects was also characterised by a prominent cardiovascular component. In simulated occupational settings autonomic activation and transient insulin resistance were detected in healthy subjects following monotonous repetitive work, with no similar effects following dynamic exercise. Modest deviations in circadian heart rate variability patterns during workdays were detected in ambulance personnel reporting more pronounced musculoskeletal symptoms, with no such effects on work-free days.

    Autonomic balance observed in chronic pain subjects was characterised by a trend towards increased sympathetic activity in comparison with pain-free controls. Moderate signs of affected reactivity to autonomic function tests were observed in patients with WAD, however no specific reaction patterns have been observed in any chronic pain group. Correspondence between the intensity of pain and autonomic activity was observed in acute pain and in chronic pain groups characterised by higher pain levels. As indicated by autonomic and neurohormonal changes in the recovery from real and simulated work, further studies with physiological monitoring of the effects of work-related stress are warranted for better understanding of the mechanism of musculoskeletal disorders

  • 383.
    Kalezic, Nebojsa
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Åsell, Malin
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Vocational Reahabilitiation Center Rygginstitut in Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Kerschbaumer, Helmut
    Vocational Rehabilitation Center Rygginstitut in Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Lyskov, Eugene
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Physiological reactivity to functional tests in patients with chronic low back pain2007In: Journal of Musculoskeletal Pain, ISSN 1058-2452, E-ISSN 1540-7012, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 29-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate autonomic regulation at rest and in response to functional laboratory tests in patients with chronic low back pain [CLBP], as well as its possible relations to different characteristics of the clinical picture. Methods: Ninety-three CLBP patients [47 females, 45 males; age 38 ± 7 years] and 32 healthy normal control subjects [15 females, 16 males; 36 ± 9 years] participated. Subjects were examined according to the McKenzie procedure, and filled in Short Form 36 and Oswestry Disability Questionnaires in addition to self-reports of pain. An electrocardiogram, finger plethysmogram, respiration, and skin conductance were recorded. Functional tests included the Stroop Color-Word test, orthostatic test, paced breathing, and handgrip. A five-minute baseline recording was followed by four counterbalanced functional tests, separated by twoto three-minute long pauses. Results: An analysis of variance revealed higher baseline heart rate [P = 0.011 in females only], low frequency spectral power [P = 0.001] and electrodermal activity [P = 0.048], and lower high frequency spectral power [P = 0.001]. Each functional test evoked a response, without any group differences in physiological reactivity. There were no significant differences with respect to physiological reactivity between subgroups formed on the basis of prior diagnoses, McKenzie evaluation, VAS pain estimates, Short Form 36, and Oswestry Disability Questionnaire data. The patients did not show high levels of individual response specificity. Conclusions: Presented data show that patients with CLBP exhibit increased sympathetic tonus in comparison with the control group, regardless of CLBP patients' level of pain, functional disability, or clinical status indices

  • 384.
    Kaltenbrunner, Monica
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    A staff perspective on Lean maturity, well-being, and quality in primary care2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Lean is commonly implemented in healthcare but it is unclear how much of Lean is adopted and whether Lean is associated with staff’s well-being and quality of care.

    Aim: To describe staff perception of Lean maturity in primary care, and to determine to what extent staff-rated Lean maturity is associated with staff rated thriving, exhaustion, and musculoskeletal complaints, as well as staff rated quality of care.

    Method: Survey data were collected in 2015 (n=481 staff) and 2016 (n=351 staff) at 48 primary care units; they were analyzed using confirmatory factor analysis (Paper I), and multiple regression analysis, taking nesting within units into account when possible (Paper II-IV). Interviews (n=12 staff) and observations (n=28 staff) were analyzed deductively.

    Results: The developed Lean in Healthcare Questionnaire, based on Liker’sdescription of Lean, generally showed acceptable psychometric properties (Paper I). Lean maturity varied within and between units. The highest maturity concerned staff adherence to routines, and the lowest concerned having a change agent at the unit (Paper II). Lean maturity was positively associated with staff satisfaction with care, both cross-sectionally (Paper II) and, mediated by increased resources, in a longitudinal analysis (Paper IV). The 12-month prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints in the shoulders, neck, and low back was 50-58%, and the 7-day prevalence 25-37% (PaperIII). Lean maturity was not associated with musculoskeletal complaints (PaperIII). Increased Lean maturity was, however, associated with increased thriving, mediated by increased job resources, as well as with decreased exhaustion, mediated by decreased job demands (Paper IV).

    Conclusion: Lean maturity varied in primary care. It was positively associated with staff-rated quality of care and thriving, and negatively associated with exhaustion. Musculoskeletal complaints were common, but not associatedwith Lean maturity.

  • 385.
    Kaltenbrunner, Monica
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Lean maturity and musculoskeletal complaints among primary care staff. A longitudinal studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 386.
    Kaltenbrunner, Monica
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Nursing Department, Medicine and Health College, Lishui University, Lishui Shi, China.
    A questionnaire measuring staff perceptions of Lean adoption in healthcare: development and psychometric testing2017In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    During the past decade, the concept of Lean has spread rapidly within the healthcare sector, but there is a lack of instruments that can measure staff's perceptions of Lean adoption. Thus, the aim of the present study was to develop a questionnaire measuring Lean in healthcare, based on Liker's description of Lean, by adapting an existing instrument developed for the service sector.

    METHODS:

    A mixed-method design was used. Initially, items from the service sector instrument were categorized according to Liker's 14 principles describing Lean within four domains: philosophy, processes, people and partners and problem-solving. Items were lacking for three of Liker's principles and were therefore developed de novo. Think-aloud interviews were conducted with 12 healthcare staff from different professions to contextualize and examine the face validity of the questionnaire prototype. Thereafter, the adjusted questionnaire's psychometric properties were assessed on the basis of a cross-sectional survey among 386 staff working in primary care.

    RESULTS:

    The think-aloud interviews led to adjustments in the questionnaire to better suit a healthcare context, and the number of items was reduced. Confirmatory factor analysis of the adjusted questionnaire showed a generally acceptable correspondence with Liker's description of Lean. Internal consistency, measured using Cronbach's alpha, for the factors in Liker's description of Lean was 0.60 for the factor people and partners, and over 0.70 for the three other factors. Test-retest reliability measured by the intra-class correlation coefficient ranged from 0.77 to 0.88 for the four factors.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    We designed a questionnaire capturing staff's perceptions of Lean adoption in healthcare on the basis of Liker's description. This Lean in Healthcare Questionnaire (LiHcQ) showed generally acceptable psychometric properties, which supports its usability for measuring Lean adoption in healthcare. We suggest that further research focus on verifying the usability of LiHcQ in other healthcare settings, and on adjusting the instrument if needed.

  • 387.
    Kaltenbrunner, Monica
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Uppsala universitet, Uppsala, Sverige; Nursing Department, Medicine and Health College, Lishui University, China.
    Lean i primärvården - en bild av hur Lean tillämpas2018In: FALF KONFERENS 2018 Arbetet – problem eller potential för en hållbar livsmiljö?   10-12 juni 2018 Gävle: Program och abstracts / [ed] Per Lindberg, Gävle: Gävle University Press , 2018, p. 112-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund

    Lean har sitt ursprung i bilindustrin och har spridits till andra sektorer såsom hälso-och sjukvård. Implementering av Lean syftar vanligtvis till att öka vårdkvaliten. Vid utvärderingar av Lean saknas ofta en beskrivning av vilka principer av Lean som implementeras och i vilken utsträckning. Föreliggande studie utgår från Likers beskrivning av Lean. Liker beskriver Lean i fyra övergripande grupper kallad 4P modellen; philosophy, processes, people and partners, och problem-solving (filosofi, processer, anställda och partners, och problemlösning), som består av ett antal principer. Att implementera alla principer och involvera alla medarbetare är ovanlig, vilket Liker menar är avgörande om organisationen ska nå de mål de satt med att införa Lean.

    Syfte

    Syftet med studien var att illustrera hur Lean praktiseras inom primärvården. 

    Metod

    Studien utgår från ett större forskningsprojekt där både privata och landstingsägda primärvårdsenheter deltog. All personal vid enheterna fick 2016 besvara en enkät om Lean-principer, svarsfrekvens 35% (298 medarbetare vid 45 enheter). Höga Lean skattningar indikerade hög mognad av Lean vilket innebar att medarbetarna var kunniga rörande den efterfrågade Lean-principen; låg mognad av Lean innebar att man helt saknade principen på sin arbetsplats eller hade implementerat den i liten utsträckning av ett fåtal medarbetare. Baserat på enkätsvaren valdes fyra enheter ut för observationer, två med hög mognad av Lean och två med låg mognad. Observationerna inkluderade intervjuer och fältanteckningar som illustrerade hur 4P-modellen praktiserades på enheterna. Hälso- och sjukvårdspersonal med olika professioner deltog (n=28).

    Resultat

    Rörande filosofi ansåg medarbetarna vid alla fyra enheter att den närmaste chefen, återkommande men i varierande utsträckning, kommunicerade gemensamma mål. Patienternas behov styrde planeringen av vården. Processer kunde innefatta att medarbetarna baserade sin planering av vården på statistik. För vissa patientgrupper eller symtom fanns generella ordinationer, d.v.s. utan kontakt med läkare, t.ex. på vilka prover som skulle tas. Rörande anställda och partners var det vanligt att arbeta i team både inom och utanför sin enhet. Men det framkom även att medarbetarna inte arbetade tillsammans fast de borde det. Problemlösning förekom men ofta ostrukturerat med brister på uppföljning. En enhet hade påbörjat utvecklande av problemlösning genom dagliga möten och strullistor att dokumentera problemen på.

    Konklusion

    Tillämpning av Lean varierar i stor utsträckning mellan vårdcentralerna. Ett par enheter hade implementerat Lean i större utsträckning och dessa enheter var mer strukturerade rörande t.ex. problemlösning och teamarbete.

     

  • 388.
    Kaltenbrunner, Monica
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science.
    Lean maturity and quality in primary care2019In: Journal of Health Organisation & Management, ISSN 1477-7266, E-ISSN 1758-7247, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 141-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to 1) describe Lean maturity in primary care using a questionnaire based on Liker’s description of Lean, complemented with observations, and 2) determine the extent to which Lean maturity is associated with quality of care measured as staff-rated satisfaction with care and adherence to national guidelines. High Lean maturity indicates adoption of all Lean principles throughout the organization and by all staff.

    Design/methodology/approach - Data were collected using a survey based on Liker’s four principles, divided into 16 items (n = 298 staff in 45 units). Complementary observations (n = 28 staff) were carried out at four units.

    Findings - Lean maturity varied both between and within units. The highest Lean maturity was found for ‘adhering to routines’ and the lowest for ‘having a change agent at the unit’. Lean maturity was positively associated with satisfaction with care and with adherence to national guidelines to improve healthcare quality. 

    Practical implications - Quality of primary care may benefit from increasing Lean maturity. When implementing Lean, managers could benefit from measuring and adopting Lean maturity repeatedly, addressing all Liker’s principles and using the results as guidance for further development.

    Originality/value - This is one of the first studies to evaluate Lean maturity in primary care, addressing all Liker’s principles from the perspective of quality of care. The results suggest that repeated actions based on evaluations of Lean maturity may help to improve quality of care.

  • 389.
    Kaltenbrunner Nykvist, Monica
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Towards a Questionnaire to Measure Lean in Health Care2014In: 8th NOVO Symposium, Sustainable health care production systems - Abstract book / [ed] Kasper Edwards och Jørgen Winkel, Lyngby: Danmarks Tekniske Universitet, DTU, 2014, p. 19-20Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid spread of Lean implementation within the health care sector has made it urgent to evaluate the effects of Lean on productivity, working conditions and health. Therefor an instrument is needed to measure Lean in primary care. The aim with this research is to find an instrument that captures the character of Lean. A literature search was conducted in Academic Search Elite, WileyOnlineLibrary, PubMed, Cinahl, PsycInfo, JSTOR, ScienceDirect, Emerald and Scopus. Keywords used were reflecting Lean and measurement and the search resulted in 7933 hits. Included were articles that presented an instrument that had the possibilities to distinguish between high or low Lean adoption. Malmbrandt and Åhlstöm´s (2014) instrument fulfilled criteria and was chosen. The original instrument was firstly translated to Swedish. A back translation was made by a bilingual authorized translator. The prototype will be tested among health care professions in Sweden using the think aloud method (TA) with the aim to explore how the participants perceive and interpret the Swedish version (Collins 2003). Immediately afterwards, they will be interviewed about how they interprets specific expressions in the questionnaire. After every round of 5-15 interviews the prototype will be adjusted and when saturation is reached the TA will terminate. After psychometric tests the finalized Swedish version of the instrument is to be used in a longitudinal study to describe status of Lean and how Lean correlate with the health of primary health care staff, there working conditions and productivity over time.

  • 390.
    Kaltenbrunner Nykvist, Monica
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Högberg, Hans
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science.
    Staff perception of Lean, care-giving, thriving and exhaustion: a longitudinal study in primary care2019In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 652Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Lean is commonly adopted in healthcare to increase quality of care and efficiency. Few studies of Lean involve staff-related outcomes, and few have a longitudinal design. Thus, the aim was to examine the extent to which changes over time in Lean maturity are associated with changes over time in care-giving, thriving and exhaustion, as perceived by staff, with a particular emphasis on the extent to which job demands and job resources, as perceived by staff, have a moderated mediation effect.

    Method

    A longitudinal study with a correlational design was used. In total, 260 staff at 46 primary care units responded to a web survey in 2015 and 2016. All variables in the study were measured using staff ratings. Ratings of Lean maturity reflect participants’ judgements regarding the entire unit; ratings of care-giving, thriving, exhaustion and job demands and resources reflect participants’ judgements regarding their own situation.

    Results

    First, over time, increased Lean maturity was associated with increased staff satisfaction with their care-giving and increased thriving, mediated by increased job resources. Second, over time, increased Lean maturity was associated with decreased staff exhaustion, mediated by decreased job demands. No evidence was found showing that job demands and job resources had a moderated mediation effect.

    Conclusion

    The results indicate that primary care staff may benefit from working in organizations characterized by high levels of Lean maturity and that caregiving may also be improved as perceived by staff.

  • 391.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Lindberg, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Employees' and managers' perception of a healthy workplace - interviews from three medium-sized companies2015In: Proceedings 19th Triennial Congress of the IEA, Melbourne 9-14 August 2015, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a recent review by van der Noordt et al. (2014), aimed at systematically summarize the literature on the health effects of employment, strong evidence was found for a protective effect of employment as such on depression and general mental health. Another review by Lindberg & Vingård (2012), aimed at systematically review the scientific literature and search for indicators of healthy working environments, defined as working environments that not just have a lack of detrimental factors at work but also yield a positive return in the form of rich job content, job satisfaction, social participation and personal development (Swedish Work Environment Authority 2010). The authors found 23 studies that either investigated employee´s views of what constitute a healthy workplace or were guidelines for how to create such a workplace. The most pronounced factors, considered as important for a healthy workplace were: collaboration/teamwork; growth and development of the individual; recognition; employee involvement; positive, accessible and fair leadership; autonomy and empowerment; appropriate staffing; skilled communication; and safe physical work (Lindberg and Vingård 2012).

    The knowledge in the field is still rather vague concerning what creates, promotes and sustains health and wellbeing at work among managers and employees and what factors might be the most important. In order to take action we need to further explore and understand these underlying factors, the “healthy work factors”. The aim of this study was therefore to explore how a sample of Swedish blue- and white collar workers describe healthy factors at work as well as understand the concept of wellbeing at work.

  • 392.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Lindberg, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    God arbetsmiljö och välbefinnande på arbetet – en intervjustudie på tre medelstora företag2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 393.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Lindberg, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    God arbetsmiljö och välbefinnande på arbetet: en intervjustudie på tre medelstora företag2013In: Arbetslivets föränderlighet: Individ-, organisations- och metodperspektiv / [ed] Sverke, Magnus, Stockholms universitets förlag, 2013, p. 17-17Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Introduktion

    Under de senaste decennierna har ett promotivt perspektiv vidgat arbetsmiljödiskursen i Sverige och internationellt. Främjande faktorer antas kunna bidra till såväl individers prestation, hälsa och välbefinnande, som till företags konkurrenskraft och lönsamhet. Den här studien har för avsikt att ur ett arbetstagarperspektiv stärka kunskapen om hälsofrämjande faktorer i arbetslivet.

     

    Syfte

    Syftet med studien var att undersöka hur en grupp svenska arbetstagare tolkar och beskriver begreppet god arbetsmiljö, vad de anser ger välbefinnande på arbetet samt hur de upplever sin egen arbetsmiljö.

     

    Metod

    På tre medelstora energiföretag genomfördes fokusgrupper med medarbetarna och individuella intervjuer med chefer. Därutöver fick deltagarna svara på en kort enkät rörande demografiska data. Rekrytering till fokusgrupperna gjordes i samarbete med cheferna för de avdelningar forskarna utsett genom strategiskt urval.  Cheferna ombads att rekrytera sex fokusgruppsdeltagare med, så långt det var möjligt, olika arbetsfunktion, kön, ålder, anställningslängd och etniskt ursprung. Tre huvudteman diskuterades vid intervjuerna: 1. Vad är en god arbetsmiljö? 2. Vad ger välbefinnande på arbetet? och 3. Upplevelser av den egna arbetsmiljön. Individual- och fokusgruppsintervjuerna utfördes av försteförfattaren, vid fokusgrupperna assisterad av andreförfattaren med uppgift att ta anteckningar och ställa kompletterande frågor.

     

    Resultat

    Efter 11 fokusgrupper med 3-6 medarbetare per grupp och 10 individualintervjuer med chefer ansågs datamättnad uppnådd. Demografiska data visade att deltagarna (n=62) till 84 % bestod av män, att 58 % fanns i åldersspannet 31-49 år och att 42 % hade en anställningstid av 11 år eller mer. Vid intervjuerna beskrevs visserligen fysiska faktorer (t.ex. lokaler och utrustning) som en fundamental grund i arbetsmiljön, men att psykosociala faktorer (t.ex. kamratskap och arbetsglädje) och organisatoriska faktorer (t.ex. kommunikation, delaktighet och ledarskap) var av större vikt för att skapa en god arbetsmiljö och välbefinnande på arbetet. Ett gott kamratskap var den faktor som, i de flesta fokusgrupper, spontant nämndes först som beskrivning av en god arbetsmiljö. Den egna arbetsmiljön upplevdes generellt som god, dock med en varierande grad av förbättringsbehov.

     

    Slutsatser

    En god arbetsmiljö antas inneha en stor potential för både individer och företag. Den här studien indikerar att psykosociala och organisatoriska faktorer är av stor vikt för att skapa en god arbetsmiljö. Resultatet kan fungera vägledande i företags strävan mot en hälsofrämjande arbetsplats samt i framtida arbetsmiljöforskning.

  • 394.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Lindberg, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Utvärdering av Ergonomi på rätt sätt - såhär gör du2011Report (Other academic)
  • 395.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Lindberg, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Berntson, Erik
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Wellbeing at work and the development of a questionnaire2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Improved employee wellbeing has been suggested to contribute to individual motivation and health, as well as to corporate competitiveness (Grawitch et al, 2006). However, in order to reach these potential benefits, we need to better understand the underlying factors that create wellbeing at work and healthy work environments.

    Aim. The aim of the study is to explore how a sample of Swedish blue- and white collar workers interprets the concepts of healthy work environments and workplace wellbeing, as a basis for the development of a questionnaire. In addition, a second aim is to investigate the psychometric properties of the subsequent questionnaire.

    Method. Interviews focusing on healthy work environments and workplace wellbeing were undertaken with managers and employees (n=62) at three medium-sized companies. All interviews were verbatim transcribed and analyzed in order to identify factors reported as important for healthy work environments and workplace wellbeing. The interview findings, together with factors identified in a systematic review about indicators of healthy work environments (Lindberg & Vingård, 2012) were used to develop items for a questionnaire aimed at measuring underlying factors for workplace wellbeing. The questionnaire, including newly constructed “workplace wellbeing items” as well as well-established questions for employee health, working conditions, and organizational factors was distributed to all employees at the three companies, where 74 % (n=303) responded. A retest survey was distributed to a subsample of the participants. 86 % (n=107) responded. 

    Preliminary results. The interview data suggested a broad spectrum of factors to be significant for establishing healthy work environments and workplace wellbeing. These factors represented six categories: Psychosocial climate; Physical working conditions; Communication; Management; Autonomy & Competence; and Values. The survey data showed that the single most important statement for workplace wellbeing was “that work- and family life can be combined in a good way”. Further psychometric properties, including reliability and factor analysis, are being conducted and will be presented at the conference.

    Conclusion. A healthy work environment is believed to hold great potential for both individuals and companies. With a mixed method approach this study test a set of questions measuring factors for a healthy work environment and wellbeing at work.

     

    References

    Grawitch MJ, Gottschalk M, Munz DC. (2006)The path to a healthy workplace: A critical review linking healthy workplace practices, employee well-being, and organizational improvements. Consulting Psychology Journal,58(3):129-47

    Lindberg P & Vingård E. (2012). Indicators of healthy work environments – a systematic review. Work, 41(0), 3032-3038.

  • 396.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Wijk, Katarina
    Samhällsmedicin Gävleborg, Landstinget i Gävleborg.
    Företagsledares uppfattningar om arbetsmiljöprioritering och dess samband med framgång2012In: Makt, Myter och Motstridigheter: Utmaningar i dagens arbetsliv, Karlstad: Karlstad Universitet , 2012, p. 19-19Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The management and prioritization of the work environment is crucial to the achievement of any potential benefits resulting from a good work environment. Managers from successful, micro- or small-sized companies responded to a questionnaire in which they rated the prioritization of seven work environment areas and to what extent they perceived that a relationship exists between a good work environment and corporate success. The results showed that Communication & Interaction was perceived as the highest prioritized area and that the mangers perceived a relationship between a good work environment and corporate success.

  • 397.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Wijk, Katarina
    Samhällsmedicin Gävleborg, Landstinget i Gävleborg.
    Manager perceptions of work environment prioritization and its relation to success2012In: Proceedings NES2012: Ergonomics for sustainability and growth / [ed] Ann-Beth Antonsson, Göran M Hägg, Stockholm, Sweden: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Technology and Health, Division of Ergonomics , 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The management and prioritization of the work environment is crucial to the achievement of any potential benefits resulting from a good work environment. Managers from successful, micro- or small-sized companies responded to a questionnaire in which they rated the prioritization of seven work environment areas, ranked six company interests, and rated to what extent they perceived that a relationship exists between a good work environment and corporate success. The results showed that Communication & Interaction was perceived as the highest prioritized area, that Profitability was the highest ranked company interest, and that the mangers perceived a relationship between a good work environment and corporate success.

  • 398.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Wijk, Katarina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bänziger, Tanja
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    A description of work environment management in succesful companies2011In: Wellbeing and Innovations Through Ergonomics: Proceedings of NES2011, September 18-21, 2011, Oulu, Finland / [ed] Juha Lindfors, Merja Savolainen & Seppo Väyrynen, Nordic Ergonomics Society , 2011, p. 460-465Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A good work environment can support companies' competitiveness, but many managers mostly associate ergonomics with occupational health and safety. In the process of managing the work environment and creating a good working environment, company managers have a central role. This article investigated managers' own descriptions of the work environment management (WEM). The study group consisted of successful companies (n=142) in a county of Sweden. The managers' descriptions were categorised into nine categories. The most frequently described category was “PhysicalFactors at work”, followed by “Manuals and Standardisation”, and “EmployeeInvolvement and Interaction”.

  • 399. Kazmierczak, K
    et al.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Neumann, P
    Winkel, J
    Observer reliability of industrial activity analysis based on video recordings2006In: International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, ISSN 0169-8141, E-ISSN 1872-8219, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 275-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to assess the agreement between observers analyzing activity patterns during truck engine assembly work based on video recordings. Two observers observed the recordings of nine workers, on the average 2.2 hours long, assigning activities to four activity categories. For each activity category data were obtained on the mean duration of uninterrupted sequences of activities and their relative time proportion in the job. This data was analyzed with 2-way crossed ANOVA algorithms to derive the components of variance attributed to disagreement between observers, to differences between filmed subjects, and to residual “unexplained” variance. The latter was interpreted as an estimate of within-observer variability and possible interactions between subject and observer. While the observers disagreed about the overall time proportions for the four activity categories by no more than 3.7% of time, their second-to-second classification disagreed for 13% of the total analysis time. The between-observer variance was small as compared to within-observer variance and the variance between subjects performing the same job. Simulations based on the variance components showed that a group mean of the proportion of direct work could be determined with a standard deviation within 5% of the mean by having two observers analyzing one two-hour video recording once, each.

    Relevance to industry

    The results of this study may support decision making when designing a reliable video based analysis of industrial work. Thus, the study helps production engineers, ergonomics practitioners and researchers allocate resources between data collection and data analysis, based on their preferences for precision and power of a particular study.

  • 400.
    Kelson, Denean M.
    et al.
    Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, USA.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Srinivasan, Divya
    Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, USA.
    Trapezius muscle activity variation during computer work performed by individuals with and without shoulder-neck pain2019In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 81, article id 102908Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed at determining the extent to which individuals with neck-shoulder pain and non-symptomatic individuals differ in muscle activation patterns, when performing computer work, as quantified by exposure variation analysis (EVA). As a secondary aim, we also aimed to quantify the day-to-day reliability of EVA variables describing trapezius muscle activation in a non-symptomatic control group. Thirteen touch-typing computer users (pain: n=5, non-symptomatic: n=8) completed three pre-selected computer tasks in the laboratory.

    Upper trapezius muscle activity was recorded using electromyography and analyzed using EVA with five amplitude and five duration categories. Individuals with neck-shoulder pain spent less time at low amplitudes and exhibited longer uninterrupted periods of muscle activation compared to their non-symptomatic counterparts. Thus, non-symptomatic workers tended to switch between exposure levels more often than individuals with pain. For a majority of EVA variables, ICCs ranged from 0.6 to 0.9, and between-days coefficients of variation were between 0.4 and 2.2.

567891011 351 - 400 of 815
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