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  • 501.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Johansson, Elin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Sitting, standing and physical activity among male and female office workers of different age: behaviours examined using compositional data analysis2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Excessive sitting is an increasing concern in working life. Negative health effects may, to some extent, be mitigated by interrupting prolonged sitting by standing or more active behaviours, like walking. Alternations between these behaviours may also influence variation in neck-shoulder-arm exposures, and thus musculoskeletal disorder risks. This study examined time spent sitting, standing and active among office workers, and determined the extent to which these behaviours differed by gender and age.

    Methods. Ninety-nine workers at a Swedish government agency (50/49 men/women; mean(SD) age 47.1(9.0) years) wore a thigh accelerometer (Actigraph GT3X) for five working days. Data were processed to give the percentage of time spent sitting in short (<30 min) and long (≥30 min) bouts, in standing, and in more active behaviours. In adding up to 100%, such data are constrained and inherently dependent. This requires further examination to be performed using Compositional Data Analysis (CoDA). Thus, Isometric Log-transformed Ratios were constructed, describing sitting vs. non-sitting (sit/nonsit), short-bout vs. long-bout sitting (shortsit/longsit), and standing vs. active (stand/active). These ratios were examined for pairwise correlations, and for associations with gender and age.

    Results. On average, workers spent 28.9%, 42.2%, 21.6%, and 7.3% time in shortsit, longsit, standing, and active. Sit/nonsit correlated negatively with shortsit/longsit (r=–0.49) and stand/active (r=–0.64); shortsit/longsit correlated positively with stand/active (r=0.19). Gender showed small associations with all three ratios (partial-ƞ2=0.01-0.03; p=0.08-0.43). Stand/active increased with increasing age (partial-ƞ2=0.07; p=0.01), while sit/nonsit and shortsit/longsit were very weakly associated with age (partial-ƞ2=0.01 and 0.01; p=0.26 and 0.40).

    Conclusions. Workers spending more time sitting also spent a larger part of that time in long, uninterrupted sitting bouts. However, when not sitting, these workers were more physically active than workers who sat less. These behaviours differed little by gender and age, besides older workers being relatively less active during non-sitting periods.

  • 502.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Lewis, Charlotte
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Fysisk variation och belastningsbesvär i arbetet2016Report (Refereed)
  • 503.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Liv, Per
    Centre for Research and Development, Uppsala University / Region Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden.
    Influence of task proportion errors on the effectiveness of task-based job exposure modeling2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background.Job-based exposure estimation using the occupational mean (JBM) is associated with substantial error. Many studies have therefore estimated job exposures from workers’ tasks, i.e. task-based modeling (TBM), typically by combining individual workers’ task proportions (TP) in the job with a general task exposure matrix. Studies of postures and muscle activity have, however, shown that TBM may be ineffective; one possible reason being that TPs are not correct. The present simulation study investigated the influence of random and systematic TP error on TBM performance.

    Methods.We constructed two virtual two-task jobs with task exposure contrasts of 0.2 and 0.8. In both, TPs and task exposures mimicked likely occupational scenarios. We then simulated four cases of TP error: no error, random error, bias, and bias and random error. For each case, we varied the TP error size, and compared the absolute errors of TBM- and JBM-based job exposures for 10,000 virtual workers.

    Results.For the low-contrast job, TBM with error-free TPs was, on average, only 6% more efficient than JBM, and the probability of TBM leading to a more correct job exposure than JBM was 56%. TP errors had negligible effects on effectiveness. With error-free TPs in the high-contrast job, TPM was 75% more efficient than JBM, and led to more correct job exposures for 71% of all workers. TP errors decreased TBM performance, down to being 34% better than JBM when both random and systematic errors were “large”; 62% of all individuals being more correctly assessed by TBM.

    Discussion.For jobs with limited task exposure contrast, TBM was essentially equivalent to JBM, while TP errors had marginal impact. In high-contrast jobs, TBM was more effec-tive, but was also more sensitive to both random and systematic TP errors. This may feed further discussion of the cost-efficiency of TBM in occupational settings.

  • 504.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Liv, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Wahlström, Jens
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Cost-efficient measurement strategies for posture observations based on video recordings2013In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 609-617Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assessment of workingpostures by observation is a common practice in ergonomics. The present studyinvestigated whether monetary resources invested in a video-based posture observationstudy should preferably be spent in collecting many video recordings of thework and have them observed once by one observer, or in having multipleobservers rate postures repeatedly from fewer videos. The study addressed thisquestion from a practitioner’s perspective by focusing two plausible scenarios:documenting the mean exposure of one individual, and of a specific occupationalgroup. Using a data set of observed working postures among hairdressers, empiricalvalues of posture variability, observer variability, and costs for recordingand observing one video were entered into equations expressing the total costof data collection and the information (defined as 1/SD) provided by theresulting estimates of two variables: percentage time with the arm elevated<15 degrees and >90 degrees. Sixteen measurement strategies involving 1-4observers repeating their posture ratings 1-4 times were examined for budgetsup to €2000.  For both posture variablesand in both the individual and group scenario, the most cost-efficient strategyat any specific budget was to engage 3-4 observers and/or having observer(s)rate postures multiple times each. Between 17% and 34% less information wasproduced when using the commonly practiced approach of having one observer ratea number of video recordings one time each. We therefore recommend observationalposture assessment to be based on video recordings of work, since this allowsfor multiple observations; and to allocate monetary resources to repeated observationsrather than many video recordings.

  • 505.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Liv, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Wahlström, Jens
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Cost-efficient observation of working postures from video recordings – more videos, more observers or more views per observer?2012In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 41, no Suppl. 1, p. 2302-2306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In ergonomics, assessing the working postures of an individual by observation is a very common practice. The present study investigated whether monetary resources devoted to an observational study should preferably be invested in collecting many video recordings of the work, or in having several observers estimate postures from available videos multiple times. On the basis of a data set of observed working postures among hairdressers, necessary information in terms of posture variability, observer variability, and costs for recording and observing videos was entered into equations providing the total cost of data collection and the precision (informative value) of the resulting estimates of two variables: percentages time with the arm elevated 90 degrees. In all 160 data collection strategies, differing with respect to the number of video recordings and the number of repeated observations of each recording, were simulated and compared for cost and precision. For both posture variables, the most cost-efficient strategy for a given budget was to engage 4 observers to look at available video recordings, rather than to have one observer look at more recordings. Since the latter strategy is the more common in ergonomics practice, we recommend reconsidering standard practice in observational posture assessment.

  • 506.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Munch-Ulfsfält, Ulla
    Alviva AB, Göteborg.
    Nilsson, Birgitta
    BN Ergonomi.
    Thornblad, Helene
    Press Art AB.
    Ergonomi för ett gott arbete2007Book (Other academic)
  • 507.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Paquet, Victor
    Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, USA.
    The ability of limited exposure sampling to detect effects of interventions that reduce the occurrence of pronounced trunk inclination2010In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 295-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ergonomics interventions often focus on reducing exposure in those parts of the job with the highest exposure levels, while leaving other parts unattended. A successful intervention will thus change the form of the job exposure distribution. This disqualifies standard methods for assessing the ability of various exposure measurement strategies to correctly detect the intervention effect on mean job exposure. This study used a non-parametric simulation procedure to evaluate the relationship between the number of measurements collected during a self-paced manufacturing job undergoing ergonomics interventions of varying effectiveness and the probability of correctly determining whether and to which extent the interventions reduced the overall occurrence of trunk flexion. Sixteen video-recordings taken at random times on multiple days for each of 3 workers were used to estimate the time distribution of each worker's exposure to trunk flexion of at least 20°. Nine ergonomics intervention scenarios were simulated in which the upper 1/8, 1/4, and 1/2 of the exposure distribution was reduced by 10%, 30% and 50%. Ten exposure measurement strategies were explored, collecting from 1 to 10 pre- and post-intervention exposure samples. For each worker, intervention scenario and sampling strategy, data were bootstrapped from the measured (pre-intervention) and simulated (post-intervention) exposure distributions to develop empirical data of the estimated intervention effect. Results showed that for the one to three most effective intervention scenarios, depending on worker, one to four pre- and post-intervention exposure samples were sufficient to reach an 80% probability of detecting that the intervention did, indeed, have an effect. However, even for these effective scenarios, seven or more samples were needed to obtain a probability larger than 50% of estimating the magnitude of the intervention effect to within ±50% of its true size. For less effective interventions, limited exposure sampling led to low probabilities of detecting any intervention effect, let alone its correct size.

  • 508.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Srinivasan, Divya
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Sample size and statistical performance in studies of sedentary behaviour – a novel approach based on compositional data analysis2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Sedentary behaviour studies often describe the extent of sitting by a time proportion; typically per cent time spent sitting. Proportions are examples of so-called “compositional data,” since they add up to a constrained sum (i.e. 100%). Compositional data differ from non-compositional data in aspects of essential importance to their analy-sis and interpretation, including how to address variability. Compositional data analysis (CDA) acts in a space of logarithmically transformed ratios of proportions, rather than on the proportions per se. We compared the statistical properties of confidence intervals (CI) of group mean values of sitting-time proportions obtained using standard procedures and CDA, exemplified by sample sizes required to obtain a specified precision.

    Methods. Sitting and non-sitting time proportions calculated from whole-day accelerom-eter recordings in 25 office workers were used as a heuristic example. Variability between subjects was assessed using standard statistics and CDA. In both cases, the size and shape of a 95% CI on the estimated mean sitting-time proportion of n subjects was assessed for different sizes of the mean and values of n.

    Results. While standard CIs at a specific n are independent of the mean value and sym-metric, CDA-derived CIs are asymmetric, except at a mean of 50%, and wider at “medium” than at “extreme” mean values. In the example, a 95% CI of ±5% around the mean was ob-tained using n=26 subjects according to standard procedures. However, using CDA, upper 95% CI limits of +5% were obtained with n=5 for a mean value of 90%, but required n=58 when the mean value was 60%. Similar-sized lower 95% CI limits of -5% were obtained with n=13 and n=63 at 90% and 60% means, respectively.

    Discussion. CDA-based estimates of sample sizes differed markedly from estimates based on standard statistics. Properties and implications of CDA in sedentary behaviour research deserve further consideration.

  • 509.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Sundberg, J
    Liv, Per
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Svendsen, S W
    A two-stage bootstrap procedure for examining the ability of exposure samples to determine whether a group mean exposure exceeds a threshold2007In: Sixth International Scientific Conference on Prevention of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders, 2007, p. 118-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 510.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Svendsen, S W
    Systematic and random errors in posture percentiles assessed from limited exposure samples2009In: Proceedings of the IEA 2009 conference, Beijing, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 511.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Södergren, Birgitta
    Uppsala universitet, företagsekonomiska institutionen.
    Organisatorisk mångfald – inspirerande innovation eller Babels torn?2009In: Inkluderande arbetsliv / [ed] Svend Erik Mathiassen, Eva Vingård, Stockholm: Fritze , 2009, p. 89-109Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den aktuella svenska politiken strävar efter att alla som vill och kan ta en plats i arbetslivet ska kunna få göra det. Det utanförskap som idag drabbar vitt skilda grupper ska åtgärdas, och arbetsmiljön ses som ett vitalt verktyg för att förverkliga ett inkluderande arbetsliv. På en organisationsnivå motsvarar idén om ett inkluderande arbetsliv begreppet organisatorisk mångfald, dvs. att organisationen rymmer personer med olika bakgrund, erfarenheter och kompetens. För att förstå villkoren för organisatorisk mångfald och bestämma rätt väg att nå dit, är det helt nödvändigt att skilja på anledningen till att en person inte släpps in i organisationen. Är orsaken negativa attityder men inga egentliga brister i arbetsförmåga, dvs. individens kapacitet att utföra sina arbetsuppgifter? Eller finns det faktiska brister i arbetsförmåga hos personen som kan åtgärdas antingen genom att hon ökar sin kapacitet eller genom att anpassa arbetet? Eller är personens arbetsförmåga permanent nedsatt? Dessa grader av utanförskap ställer organisationen inför olika utmaningar, och särskilt för gruppen med svårlösta brister i arbetsförmåga kommer många arbetsgivare att vara skeptiska till att investera i en anställning.

    Samtidigt finns det en växande acceptans för att socialt ansvarstagande ingår i företagens etiska skyldighet, och därmed finns det en drivkraft för att även se en anställning av exempelvis personer med psykisk funktionsnedsättning som en del i en etisk profilering. Ett stärkt varumärke genom ansvarstagande rekrytering är en potentiell framgångsfaktor vid organisatorisk mångfald. En annan framgångspotential, som är mera direkt knuten till produktivitet och lönsamhet, är att mångfald kan öka tillgången på erfarenheter och idéer i organisationen, och därmed dess kreativitet och motståndskraft. Mångfald kan även ge en bättre avspegling av olika kunders värderingar och förväntningar, dvs. att kunden känner igen sig bättre och organisationen förstår kundens behov bättre. Att förverkliga potentialen kräver medvetna insatser av organisationen som måste grundas på dess kultur. Slår insatsen fel kan strävan efter mångfald få motsatt effekt: sämre arbetsmiljö och förstärkt utanförskap för personer som inte anses passa i verksamheten.

  • 512.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental psychology.
    Ergonomics observation: development of efficient methods based on cognitive psychology2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    publicerat abstract
  • 513.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Trask, Catherine
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Cost-efficiency of adding another subject or another day to an exposure data set2010In: Premus 2010 (Seventh International Conference on Prevention of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders), 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 514.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Vingård, EvaArbets- och Miljömedicin, Uppsala universitet.
    God arbetsmiljö - en framgångsfaktor?2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 515.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Vingård, EvaArbets- och miljömedicin, Uppsala universitet.
    Inkluderande arbetsliv2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 516.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Wahlström, Jens
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Forsman, Mikael
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bias and imprecision in posture percentile variables estimated from short exposure samples2012In: BMC Medical Research Methodology, ISSN 1471-2288, E-ISSN 1471-2288, Vol. 12, p. 36-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Upper arm postures are believed to be an important risk determinant for musculoskeletal disorder development in the neck and shoulders. The 10th and 90th percentiles of the angular elevation distribution have been reported in many studies as measures of neutral and extreme postural exposures, and variation has been quantified by the 10th-90th percentile range. Further, the 50th percentile is commonly reported as a measure of "average" exposure. These four variables have been estimated using samples of observed or directly measured postures, typically using sampling durations between 5 and 120 min.

    Methods. The present study examined the statistical properties of estimated full-shift values of the 10th, 50th and 90th percentile and the 10th-90th percentile range of right upper arm elevation obtained from samples of seven different durations, ranging from 5 to 240 min. The sampling strategies were realized by simulation, using a parent data set of 73 full-shift, continuous inclinometer recordings among hairdressers. For each shift, sampling duration and exposure variable, the mean, standard deviation and sample dispersion limits (2.5% and 97.5%) of all possible sample estimates obtained at one minute intervals were calculated and compared to the true full-shift exposure value.

    Results. Estimates of the 10th percentile proved to be upward biased with limited sampling, and those of the 90th percentile and the percentile range, downward biased. The 50th percentile was also slightly upwards biased. For all variables, bias was more severe with shorter sampling durations, and it correlated significantly with the true full-shift value for the 10th and 90th percentiles and the percentile range. As expected, shorter samples led to decreased precision of the estimate; sample standard deviations correlated strongly with true full-shift exposure values.

    Conclusions. The documented risk of pronounced bias and low precision of percentile estimates obtained from short posture samples presents a concern in ergonomics research and practice, and suggests that alternative, unbiased exposure variables should be considered if data collection resources are restricted.

  • 517.
    Maznychenko, Andrey V.
    et al.
    Department of Movement Physiology, Bogomoletz Institute of Physiology, National Academy of Sciences, Kiev, Ukraine.
    Pilyavskii, Alexander I.
    Department of Movement Physiology, Bogomoletz Institute of Physiology, National Academy of Sciences, Kiev, Ukraine.
    Kostyukov, Alexander I.
    Department of Movement Physiology, Bogomoletz Institute of Physiology, National Academy of Sciences, Kiev, Ukraine.
    Lyskov, Eugene
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Vlasenko, Oleh V.
    Laboratory of Experimental Neurophysiology, Pirogov National Medical University, Vinnitsa, Ukraine.
    Maisky, Vladimir A.
    Department of Movement Physiology, Bogomoletz Institute of Physiology, National Academy of Sciences, Kiev, Ukraine.
    Coupling of c-fos expression in the spinal cord and amygdala induced by dorsal neck muscles fatigue2007In: Histochemistry and Cell Biology, ISSN 0948-6143, E-ISSN 1432-119X, Vol. 128, no 1, p. 85-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    c-fos gene expression in the cervical spinal cord and amygdala was examined in anaesthetized rats following muscle fatigue caused by intermittent high-rate (100 s(-1)) electrical stimulation of the dorsal neck muscles (m. trapezius and m. splenius). Fatigue-related increases in c-fos expression were observed on the stimulated muscle side in the cervical C2-C4 (layers 1, 3-5, 7 and 10) spinal segments, bilaterally in the lumbar L4-L6 (layer 1) segments and in contralateral central (Ce), medial (Me), and basomedial (BM) amygdaloid nuclei. A scarce number of staining cells were found within lateral and basolateral nuclei. The rostro-caudal extent of c-fos expression in the spinal cord supports functional coupling of the cervical and lumbar regions during the neck muscle fatigue development. The distinct c-fos expression in the Ce and Me amygdaloid nuclei suggests that they may contribute to mediating the neck muscle fatigue-related nociception, autonomic and behavioural responses.

  • 518.
    Meinertz Dantoft, Thomas
    et al.
    Danish Research Centre for Chemical Sensitivities, Copenhagen University Hospital, Gentofte, Denmark; Department of Systems Biology, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark .
    Andersson, Linus
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Nordin, Steven
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Skovbjerg, Sine
    Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Capital Region, Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Chemical intolerance2015In: Current Rheumatology Reviews, ISSN 1573-3971, E-ISSN 1875-6360, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 167-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemical intolerance (CI) is a term used to describe a condition in which the sufferer experiences a complex array of recurrent unspecific symptoms attributed to low-level chemical exposure that most people regard as unproblematic. Severe CI constitutes the distinguishing feature of multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS). The symptoms reported by CI subjects are manifold, involving symptoms from multiple organs systems. In severe cases of CI, the condition can cause considerable life-style limitations with severe social, occupational and economic consequences. As no diagnostic tools for CI are available, the presence of the condition can only be established in accordance to criteria definitions. Numerous modes of action have been suggested to explain CI, with the most commonly discussed theories involving the immune system, central nervous system, olfactory and respiratory systems as well as altered metabolic capacity, behavioral conditioning and emotional regulation. However, in spite of more than 50 years of research, there is still a great deal of uncertainties regarding the event(s) and underlying mechanism(s) behind symptom elicitation. As a result, patients are often misdiagnosed or offered health care solutions with limited or no effect, and they experience being met with mistrust and doubt by health care professionals, the social care system and by friends and relatives. Evidence-based treatment options are currently unavailable, however, a person-centered care model based on a multidisciplinary treatment approach and individualized care plans have shown promising results. With this in mind, further research studies and health care solutions should be based on a multifactorial and interdisciplinary approach.

  • 519.
    Meinertz Dantoft, Thomas
    et al.
    Danish Research Centre for Chemical Sensitivities, Copenhagen University Hospital, Gentofte, Denmark; Center for Biological Sequence Analysis, Department of Systems Biology, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark.
    Skovbjerg, Sine
    Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Capital Region, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Andersson, Linus
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Claeson, Anna-Sara
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lind, Nina
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Nordin, Steven
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Brix, Susanne
    Center for Biological Sequence Analysis, Department of Systems Biology, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark.
    Inflammatory mediator profiling of n-butanol exposed upper airways in individuals with multiple chemical sensitivity2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 11, article id e0143534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS) is a chronic condition characterized by reports of recurrent symptoms in response to low level exposure to various chemical substances. Recent findings suggests that dysregulation of the immune system may play a role in MCS pathophysiology.

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine baseline and low dose n-butanol-induced upper airway inflammatory response profiles in MCS subjects versus healthy controls.

    METHOD: Eighteen participants with MCS and 18 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Epithelial lining fluid was collected from the nasal cavity at three time points: baseline, within 15 minutes after being exposed to 3.7 ppm n-butanol in an exposure chamber and four hours after exposure termination. A total of 19 cytokines and chemokines were quantified. Furthermore, at baseline and during the exposure session, participants rated the perceived intensity, valence and levels of symptoms and autonomic recordings were obtained.

    RESULTS: The physiological and psychophysical measurements during the n-butanol exposure session verified a specific response in MCS individuals only. However, MCS subjects and healthy controls displayed similar upper airway inflammatory mediator profiles (P>0.05) at baseline. Likewise, direct comparison of mediator levels in the MCS group and controls after n-butanol exposure revealed no significant group differences.

    CONCLUSION: We demonstrate no abnormal upper airway inflammatory mediator levels in MCS subjects before or after a symptom-eliciting exposure to low dose n-butanol, implying that upper airways of MCS subjects are functionally intact at the level of cytokine and chemokine production and secretory capacity. This suggests that previous findings of increased cytokine plasma levels in MCS are unlikely to be caused by systemic priming via excessive upper airway inflammatory processes.

  • 520. Mel'nichouk, Alexander P
    et al.
    Bulgakova, Natalia V
    Tal'nov, Arkadij N
    Hellström, Fredrik
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Windhorst, Uwe
    Kostyukov, Alexander I
    Movement-dependent positioning errors in human elbow joint movements2007In: Experimental Brain Research, ISSN 0014-4819, E-ISSN 1432-1106, Vol. 176, no 2, p. 237-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Healthy adult humans performed elbow movements in a horizontal plane under a small external extending torque (2.1-3.3 Nm). Test movements (TMs) consisted of slow ramp-and-hold flexions in the absence of visual feedback, with the target joint angle to be remembered from a preceding conditioning movement (CM). The CM was produced by matching two beams on the monitor screen: (1) command representing the target position (a straight line); and (2) a signal from the sensor of the elbow joint angle. Two kinds of CM were applied, which had the same target position (50 degrees in most experiments) but differed in initial positions: (1) fully extended joint (0 degrees, P1 CMs); (2) flexed joint (100 degrees, P2 CMs). In a group of 25 subjects, the target in TMs was usually overshot, with the position errors depending on the CMs: 2.7 +/- 0.6 degree (mean +/- SEM) for P1 CMs, and 10.9 +/- 0.7 degree (P < 0.001) for P2 CMs. Vibration of the elbow flexors substantially diminished the difference between the position errors, amounting to--0.31 +/- 0.5 degree and 2.33 +/- 0.6 degrees, respectively. It is suggested that the observed position errors resulted from after-effects in the activity of muscle spindles in agonist and antagonist muscles, but influence of differences in dynamic components of the afferent signals during oppositely directed approaches to the target cannot be excluded.

  • 521.
    Merkus, Suzanne
    et al.
    National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Lunde, Lars-Kristian
    National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo.
    Koch, Marcus
    National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo.
    Wærsted, Morten
    National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo.
    Forsman, Mikael
    Division of Ergonomics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Knardahl, Stein
    National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo.
    Veiersted, Kaj Bo
    National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo.
    Upper arm elevation, upper trapezius muscle activity, and neck and shoulder pain – a longitudinal study of construction and healthcare workers2020In: Pain, ISSN 0304-3959, E-ISSN 1872-6623Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 522.
    Mikaelsson, Lars-Åke
    et al.
    Department of Ecotechnology and Sustainable Building, Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    Larsson, Johan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Integrated planning for sustainable building production: an evolution over three decades2017In: Journal of Civil Engineering and Management, ISSN 1392-3730, E-ISSN 1822-3605, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 319-326Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reviews the authors'€™ work on Integrated Planning (IP) as a construction site management tool. IP integrates the different planning skills used by site managers, construction workers and craftspersons into an interactive group which manages a production planning process from the earliest stages to the end of a building project. The studies reviewed in this paper, performed over the last three decades, tested, longitudinally evaluated and refined the IP model for use in modern sustainable building sites. The refined model, Integrated Planning for Sustainable Building Production (SBP), includes the factors: leadership, health and safety, quality management and environmental management.

  • 523.
    Mixter, Susanna
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Alternations between physical and cognitive tasks in repetitive work – Effect of cognitive task difficulty on fatigue development in women2019In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 62, no 8, p. 1008-1022Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a context of job rotation, this study determined the extent to which the difficulty of a cognitive task (CT) interspersed between bouts of repetitive, low-intensity work (pipetting) influences recovery from fatigue. Fifteen participants performed three experimental sessions, each comprising 10 repeats of a 7 min + 3 min combination of pipetting and CT. The CT was easy, moderate or hard. Surface electromyography (EMG amplitude of the forearm extensor and trapezius muscles) and self-reports was used to assess fatigability. Perceived fatigue and trapezius EMG amplitude increased during sessions. CT difficulty influenced fatigue development only little, besides forearm extensor EMG increasing more in CT3 than in CT1 and CT2. During CT bouts, fatigability recovered, and to a similar extent irrespective of CT. Thus, CT difficulty influenced recovery of perceived as well as performance fatigability to a minor extent, and may not be a critical issue in job rotation comprising alternating physical and cognitive tasks.

  • 524.
    Mixter, Susanna
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Alternations between physical and mental tasks – a viable option for job rotation?2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    IEA_2018_abstract
  • 525.
    Mixter, Susanna
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bjärntoft, Sofie
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Alternations between physical and cognitive tasks – does temporal pattern and cognitive task difficulty influence fatigue development?2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Some evidence suggests that alternations between physical and cognitive work tasks may be a viable option for job rotation, since production can be maintained without excessive fatigue. Effects on fatigue and pain of the temporal distribution of physical and cognitive tasks are, however, uncertain. The aim of this study was to examine development of fatigue and pain during physical and cognitive work tasks of different difficulties, alternating in different temporal patterns.

    Methods

    Fifteen women performed alternating bouts of a physical task (phys) and a cognitive task (CT) for a total of 100 minutes. Four experimental conditions were tested in a repeated-measures design. Conditions 1 and 2 consisted of five long-cycle sequences (phys+CT, 14+6 minutes), and in conditions 3 and 4, 10 short-cycle sequences (7+3 minutes) were performed. Each temporal pattern was completed with an easy or a difficult CT. Muscle fatigue was assessed using surface electromyography (EMG) from the right trapezius, and perceived fatigue and pain in the right shoulder was assessed using CR-10 ratings. Effects of time and experimental condition on these outcomes were tested using ANOVA.

    Results

    Perceived fatigue and pain in right shoulder after pipetting work bouts increased in all four conditions (long-cycle, fatigue F=5.68, p<0.001, pain F=4.12, p=0.01; short-cycle, fatigue F=10.59, p<0.001, pain F=5.45, p<0.001). Trapezius EMG did not change significantly across work bouts (long-cycle, F=2.14, p=0.09; short-cycle, F=1.03, p=0.42). Irrespective of the temporal alternation pattern, neither EMG nor fatigue and pain were influenced by CT difficulty (CT main effect and CT×time interaction: EMG, all F≤2.5, p≥0.1; fatigue and pain, all F≤2.0, p≥0.7).

    Conclusions

    The temporal pattern of alternations between a repetitive physical task and a CT did not influence fatigue development, and the difficulty level of the CT did not significantly influence fatigue and pain, irrespective of the temporal alternation pattern.

  • 526.
    Mixter, Susanna
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Jahncke, Helena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Lindfors, Petra
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University.
    Does the difficulty of a memory task interspersed between bouts of repetitive work influence recovery?2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Controlled experiments suggest that active breaks with mental activity interspersed between physical work bouts can lead to more effective recovery from fatigue than passive rest. However, most of these studies investigated a highly stereotyped physical task until exhaustion. Research investigating the effects of mental breaks in tasks of higher occupational relevance is limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent to which a working memory task performed at three difficulty levels would enhance recovery of perceived fatigue after a repetitive physical work task.

    Methods. 12 women (mean age 26.4) performed 10 work cycles each comprising seven minutes of pipetting (to model repetitive work) followed by three minutes devoted to a working memory task. Three difficulty levels (MT1, MT2, MT3) of the memory task were tested on three different days in a randomized order across participants. During the last minute of pipetting and after the memory task, participants rated fatigue on the Borg CR-10 scale. Before, during and after each experiment, salivary a-amylase was measured.

    Results. Perceived fatigue in the right shoulder during the last minute of pipetting increased with time (p<0.001) but did not significantly differ between types of MT (p=0.314). Perceived fatigue in the right shoulder just after the memory task also increased with time (p<0.001), and in a pattern differing between MT types (time*MT: p=0.042), while MT type showed no significant main effect (p=0.169). Post-hoc tests showed that MT3 led to better recovery than MT1 (effect of MT: p=0.041; time*MT: p=0.025). Salivary a-amylase increased with time (p=0.001) but showed no significant effects of MT type (p=0.214).

    Discussion. Our results indicate that recovery of perceived fatigue after a repetitive task was better when performing a difficult — as compared to an easy — memory task. This effect was not accompanied by any differences in a-amylase response.

  • 527.
    Mixter, Susanna
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Lindfors, Petra
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dimberg, Kenth
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Science, Biology.
    Jahncke, Helena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Lyskov, Eugene
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Stress-related responses to alternations between repetitive physical work and cognitive tasks of different difficulties2019In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This experimental study aimed to determine the extent to which a repetitive physical task alternatingwith a cognitive task (CT) influences stress responses and whether the CT difficulty is important. Fifteen women performed three sessions of 10 consecutive work bouts, each including a seven-minutere petitive physical task and a three-minute CT at either of three difficulty levels. Stress-related responses were assessed using heart rate variability, blood pressure, salivary alpha-amylase, salivary cortisol, perceived stress and cognitive performance.The alternating work did not result in any marked increase in perceived stress or changes in stressresponses. CT difficulty did not influence stress responses (all p>0.05), apart from alpha-amylase which was higher during the easiest CT (F= 5.34, p= 0.02). Thus, introducing cognitive work bouts into repetitive physical work did not result in increased levels of stress, suggesting this approach to be viable in job rotation.

  • 528.
    Monnier, Andreas
    et al.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Physiotherapy, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Swedish Armed Forces, Regional Medical Service Mälardalen, Berga, Sweden.
    Djupsjöbacka, Mats
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Larsson, Helena
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Physiotherapy, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Swedish Armed Forces, Headquarters, Medical Services, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Norman, Kjell
    Swedish Armed Forces, 1st Marine Regiment, 2nd Amphibious Battalion, Berga, Sweden.
    Äng, Björn O.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Physiotherapy, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Centre for Clinical Research Dalarna, Falun, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Risk factors for back pain in marines; A prospective cohort study2016In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It is recognised that back pain (BP) is a debilitating medical problem in the soldier community, which limits operational readiness as well as work ability. As such, identification of risk factors is a necessity for effective preventive actions, but also regarded as important from a safety perspective. The aim of this prospective cohort study was therefore to identify risk factors for back pain and BP limiting work ability in active duty marines within a 6 and 12-month period. Methods: Demographic characteristics, health-related factors and occupational exposure information, as gathered from questionnaires, as well as clinical test of movement control among 137 Swedish marines were regressed with multivariable logistic regressions, and strength of associations was presented as odds ratio (OR) with 95 % confidence intervals (CI). BP within 6 and 12 months were used as primary outcomes, whereas BP limiting work ability within 6 and 12 months served as secondary outcomes. Results: Previous BP and tall body height (≥1.86 m) emerged as risk factors for back pain within 6 months (OR 2.99, 95 % CI 1.22-7.30; OR 2.81, 95 % CI 1.16- 6.84, respectively), and 12 months (OR 6.75, 95 % CI 2.30-19.80; 2.75, 95 % CI 1.21-6.29, respectively). Previous BP was also identified as risk factor for BP limiting work ability within 12 months (OR 6.64, 95 % CI 1.78-24.78), and tall body height emerged as a risk within both six (OR 4.30, 95 % CI 1.31-14.13) and 12 months (OR 4.55, 95 % CI 1.53-13.57) from baseline. Conclusions: Marines with a history of BP are at risk of further BP episodes, which, thus, emphasise the importance of early BP preventive actions. Tall body height also emerged as an important risk which may reflect that personal equipment and work tasks are not adapted for the tallest marines. While this should be considered when introducing new work equipment, further studies are warranted to clarify the underlying mechanism of this association.

  • 529.
    Monnier, Andreas
    et al.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Physiotherapy, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Stockholm ; Swedish Armed Forces, Regional Medical Service Mälardalen, Berga.
    Larsson, Helena
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Physiotherapy, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Stockholm ; Swedish Armed Forces, HR Centre, Stockholm.
    Djupsjöbacka, Mats
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Brodin, Lars-Åke
    Department of Medical Engineering, School of Technology and Health, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Huddinge.
    Äng, Björn O
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Physiotherapy, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Stockholm ; Centre for Clinical Research Dalarna, Falun ; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Musculoskeletal pain and limitations in work ability in Swedish marines: a cross-sectional survey of prevalence and associated factors2015In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 5, no 10, article id e007943Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To estimate the prevalence of self-rated musculoskeletal pain and pain limiting work ability in Swedish Armed Forces (SAF) marines, and to study factors potentially associated with pain limiting work ability for the most prevalent pain regions reported.

    Design Population-based, cross-sectional survey.

    Participants There were 272 SAF marines from the main marine battalion in Sweden included in the study.

    Outcomes Self-assessed musculoskeletal pain and pain limiting the marines' work ability within a 6-month period, as obtained from structured questionnaires. The association of individual, health and work-related factors with musculoskeletal pain limiting work ability was systematically regressed with multiple logistic models, estimating OR and 95% CI.

    Results Musculoskeletal pain and pain limiting work ability were most common in the back, at 46% and 20%, and lower extremities at 51% and 29%, respectively. Physical training ≤1 day/week (OR 5.3, 95% CI 1.7 to 16.8); body height ≤1.80 m (OR 5.0, 95% CI 1.6 to 15.1) and ≥1.86 m (OR 4.4, 95% CI 1.4 to 14.1); computer work 1/4 of the working day (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.0 to 10.0) and ≥1/2 (OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.1 to 10.1) of the working day were independently associated with back pain limiting work ability. None of the studied variables emerged significantly associated with such pain for the lower extremities.

    Conclusions Our findings show that musculoskeletal pain and resultant limitations in work ability are common in SAF marines. Low frequency of physical training emerged independently associated with back pain limiting work ability. This suggests that marines performing physical training 1 day per week or less are suitable candidates for further medical evaluation and secondary preventive actions. While also associated, body height and computer work need further exploration as underlying mechanisms for back pain limiting work ability. Further prospective studies are necessary to clarify the direction of causality.

  • 530.
    Monnier, Andreas
    et al.
    Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden; Swedish Armed Forces, Military Academy Karlberg, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, Helena
    Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Swedish Armed Forces, Headquarters, Medical Services, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nero, Håkan
    Department of Orthopedics, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Djupsjöbacka, Mats
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Äng, Björn O.
    Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden; Center for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Falun, Sweden.
    A longitudinal observational study of back pain incidence, risk factors and occupational physical activity in Swedish marine trainees2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 5, article id e025150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the occurrence of low back pain (LBP) and LBP that limits work ability, to identify their potential early risks and to quantify occupational physical activity in Swedish Armed Forces (SwAF) marines during their basic 4 month marine training course.

    DESIGN: Prospective observational cohort study with weekly follow-ups.

    PARTICIPANTS: Fifty-three SwAF marines entering the training course.

    OUTCOMES: Incident of LBP and its related effect on work-ability and associated early risks. Occupational physical activity, as monitored using accelerometers and self-reports.

    RESULTS: During the training course, 68% of the marines experienced at least one episode of LBP. This yielded a LBP and LBP limiting work ability incidence rate of 13.5 (95% CI 10.4 to 17.8) and 6.3 (95% CI 4.2 to 10.0) episodes per 1000 person-days, respectively. Previous back pain and shorter body height (≤1.80 m) emerged as independent risks for LBP (HR 2.5, 95% CI 1.4 to 4.3; HR 2.0, 95% CI 1.2 to 3.3, respectively), as well as for LBP that limited work ability (HR 3.6, 95% CI 1.4 to 8.9; HR 4.5, 95% CI 2.0 to 10.0, respectively). Furthermore, managing fewer than four pull-ups emerged as a risk for LBP (HR 1.9, 95% CI 1.2 to 3.0), while physical training of fewer than three sessions per week emerged as a risk for LBP that limited work ability (HR 3.0, 95% CI 1.2 to 7.4). More than 80% of the work time measured was spent performing low levels of ambulation, however, combat equipment (≥17.5 kg) was carried for more than half of the work time.

    CONCLUSIONS: Incidents of LBP are common in SwAF marines' early careers. The link between LBP and previous pain as well as low levels of exercise highlights the need for preventive actions early on in a marine's career. The role of body height on LBP needs further investigation, including its relationship with body-worn equipment, before it can effectively contribute to LBP prevention.

  • 531. Morrison, Janet
    et al.
    Lindberg, Per
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    When no one has time: measuring the impact of computerization on health care workers2008In: AAOHN journal, ISSN 0891-0162, Vol. 56, no 9, p. 373-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technological change is a constant in today's workplace, especially the modern health care workplace. The introduction of electronic health records changes workloads, job demands, interactions with other health care professionals, and work roles-all elements that have previously been noted to increase work stress and impact health. Despite the significant changes that accompany computerization, it is seldom studied as a source of stress. Also, the health effects of computerization within health care have not been extensively studied. This article summarizes the potential environmental impact of computerization on workers, with special reference to health care workers, and suggests ways occupational health nurses can monitor the health consequences of new technology and intervene in case of adverse health impact. In many health care organizations, high work pressure and staff shortages make it impractical, and perhaps impossible, to use standard in-depth research methods to investigate this issue. Therefore, several less obtrusive methods that can be triangulated are suggested as an alternative.

  • 532.
    Nakata, Minori
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Belastningsskadecentrum.
    Ahlgren, Christina
    From, Carin
    Lindberg, Per
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Solving tangled cases of work-related musculoskeletal disorders by international scientific cooperation.2005In: NEW SOLUTIONS: A Journal of Environmental and Occupational Health Policy, ISSN 1048-2911, E-ISSN 1541-3772, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 343-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSDs) have become a serious worldwide problem. At the same time a number of workers experience a problem in getting their WRMSDs acknowledged. As an attempt to solve these problems, Japanese school lunch cooks' working conditions were discussed at international scientific meetings and a detailed inspection was done at a Japanese school kitchen by Swedish researchers. It revealed that both national and international researchers' opinions coincided. Statements of medical views were written for several tangled cases in Japan and Sweden referring to both the national and international literature. As a result, these tangled cases were acknowledged officially as WRMSDs. New arbitrators and mediators of WRMSDs are required who can understand and communicate between the world of medical and labor sciences and also between the world of science and daily work life.

  • 533.
    Neumann, W. P.
    et al.
    National Institute for Working Life, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Design Sciences, Lund Technical University, Lund, Sweden; Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada.
    Winkel, J.
    National Institute for Working Life, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Medbo, L.
    Department of Transport and Logisitics, Chalmers Technical University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Magneberg, R.
    National Institute for Working Life, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Production system design elements influencing productivity and ergonomics: a case study of parallel and serial flow strategies2006In: International Journal of Operations & Production Management, ISSN 0144-3577, E-ISSN 1758-6593, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 904-923Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: A strategic change from parallel-cell based assembly (OLD) to serial-line assembly (NEW) was investigated in a Swedish company with special reference to how production system design elements affect both productivity and ergonomics.

    Methods: Multiple methods, including records and video analysis, questionnaires, interviews, biomechanical modelling, and flow simulation were applied.

    Findings: The NEW system, unlike the OLD, showed the emergence of system and balance losses as well as vulnerability to disturbances and difficulty handling all product variants. Nevertheless the NEW system as realised partially overcame productivity barriers in the operation and management of the OLD system. The NEW system had impaired ergonomics due to decreased physical variation and increased repetitiveness with cycle times that were 6% of previous thus increasing repetitiveness, and significantly reduced perceived influence over work. Workstations’ uneven exposure to physical tasks such as nut running created a potential problem for workload management. The adoption of teamwork in the NEW system contributed to significantly increased co-worker support – an ergonomic benefit.

    Implications: Design decisions made early in the development process affect both ergonomics and productivity in the resulting system. While the time pattern of 3 physical loading appeared to be controlled by flow and work organisation elements, the amplitude of loading was determined more by workstation layout. Psychosocial conditions appear to be affected by a combination of system elements including layout, flow, and work organisation elements.

    Practical Implications: Strategic use of parallelisation elements in assembly, perhaps in hybrid forms from configurations observed here, appears to be a viable design option for improved performance by reducing the fragility and ergonomic problems of assembly lines.

    Value: The interacting design elements examined here pose potential ‘levers’ of control by which productivity and ergonomics could be jointly optimised for improved total system performance.

  • 534.
    Neumann, W. Patrick
    et al.
    Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada.
    Winkel, Jörgen
    Department of Sociology and Work Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Management Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark.
    Palmerud, Gunnar
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Forsman, Mikael
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Innovation and employee injury risk in automotive disassembly operations2018In: International Journal of Production Research, ISSN 0020-7543, E-ISSN 1366-588X, Vol. 56, no 9, p. 3188-3203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineering innovations in car disassembly systems are studied for affects on system operators’ risk of repetitive strain injury (RSI). Objective instrumented measures of injury risk factors with synchronized video-based task analyses were used to examine changes in operators’ RSI risk during two cases of engineering innovation: 1) a shift in industrial model from traditional extracting saleable parts to line-based full material recovery, and 2) the prospective effects of a simulated “Lean” inspired process improvement in the line system.

    Both cases of innovation showed significantly increased movement speeds and reduced muscular recovery opportunities, implying increased RSI risk. This case study reveals a mechanism by which innovation may increase RSI risks for operators. Managers responsible for engineering innovation should ensure their teams have the tools and mandate necessary to control injury hazards as part of the development and design process. These cases suggest how failure to manage RSI hazards in the innovation process may allow increases of injury risks that can compromise operational performance. This “innovation pitfall” has implications for operator health and organizational sustainability. Alternative pathways are discussed.

  • 535.
    Neupane, Subas
    et al.
    Unit of Health Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
    Karstad, Kristina
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Hallman, David
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Rugulies, Reiner
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Holtermann, Andreas
    National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Objectively measured versus self-reported occupational physical activity and multisite musculoskeletal pain: A prospective follow-up study at 20 nursing homes in Denmark2020In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 93, p. 381-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    To explore the prospective association of objectively measured and self-reported occupational physical activity (OPA) with multisite musculoskeletal pain (MSP) among Danish eldercare workers.

    Methods

    The study population consisted of eldercare workers in 20 Danish nursing homes (N = 553, response rate 59%, 525 female). Baseline data were collected in 2013–2014 and the 1-year follow-up was completed in 2016. At baseline, we measured objective OPA by a thigh-worn ActiGraph GT3X + accelerometer during work and self-reported OPA by a questionnaire survey. Information on musculoskeletal pain during the past four weeks in seven different body sites was reported by a structured questionnaire at baseline (n = 389) and by SMS and telephone interview during follow-up (n = 284). MSP was defined as having pain in two or more body sites. Using log-binomial models we calculated risk ratios (RRs) with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to estimate the association between objectively measured and self-reported OPA and MSP.

    Results

    We found statistically significant positive associations between self-reported OPA (RR for high OPA 1.24, 95% CI 1.05–1.46) and MSP while there was no significant association found between objective OPA and MSP.

    Conclusion

    Our study indicates that self-reported, but not objectively measured OPA is positively associated with MSP. This finding highlights the need for better understanding, use, and interpretation of self-reported and objectively measured OPA in the study of MSP.

  • 536.
    Nilsson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Innventia AB.
    Pousette, Sandra
    Innventia AB.
    Forsman, Mikael
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bernmark, Eva
    Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Can producers of packaging contribute to improving the handling of packages for women working in the food industry?2011In: 25th IAPRI Symposium, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extensive manual handling is a risk factor for work-related musculoskeletal disorders in the lower back and neck-shoulder regions (World Health Organization 2003). In the Swedish food industry, manual handling occurs mainly in production and in packing. The type and structure of packages is a probable determinant of the working conditions. In this research and development project, we investigated whether packages can be redesigned so that workloads during manual handling are reduced.

    The project included the following steps, implemented at three selected production lines different food industry companies:

    - Collection of production data and a description of all manual activities devoted to the handling of packages.

    - Direct measurements of working postures and muscle activity of the upper body, together with ratings of physical load using questionnaires.

    - Collection of general productivity data.

    - Group discussions with workers concerning the packaging characteristics supporting or obstructing easy handling; followed by suggestions for improvements.

    - Interviewing the next step in the value chain, e.g. bakers and shop replenishers, regarding suggestions for improvements to the selected packages.

    - Discussions with packaging producers regarding improvements to the selected packages.

    - Feed-back of results to the participating companies.

    The existing production systems and the manual handling activities observed there were compared to simulated production using prototypes of new packages. Measured and rated ergonomic exposures showed that workload was lower for the prototypes. In one company (N=9), muscular activity decreased by 10.1%  (p<0.05). In the second company (N=4) postures were less inclined during work, and  muscular activity declined by 43.6% . In the third company (N=8), wrist velocity decreased by 7% (p<0.05). In the two latter companies, the number of handling operations included in the packaging operations was greatly reduced with the prototype package. None of the new prototype solutions had negative effects on productivity.

    From these cases, we conclude that workloads during manual handling of packages can be reduced by modifying packages per se. We believe that considerations to the ergonomics effects of a particular package should be included in the planning, design and specifications of that package throughout its value chain.

  • 537.
    Nordhall, Ola
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Knez, Igor
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Psychology.
    Motivation and Justice at Work: The Role of Emotion and Cognition Components of Personal and Collective Work Identity2018In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 8, article id 2307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of personal and collective work identity (including emotion and cognition components), in predicting work motivation (operationalized as work self-determined motivation) and organizational justice (operationalized as organizational pay justice). Digitized questionnaires were distributed bye-mail to 2905 members, teachers, of a Swedish trade union. A total of 768 individuals answered the questionnaire and by that participated in this study. Personal-compared to collective work identity was shown to positively associate with self-determined motivation accounted for by the emotion component of personal work identity. Collective compared to personal work identity was reported to positively associate with organizational pay justice accounted for by the cognition component of collective work identity. All this suggests that both work-related motivation and organizational justice might be, to some extent, accounted for by the psychological mechanisms of work identity and that, as predicted, different types of work identity, play different significant roles in predicting motivation and justice at work. More precisely, the emotion component of work identity was more pronounced in personal work-bonding relationships, and the cognitive component, of work identity in contrast, was more pronounced in collective work-bonding relationships.

  • 538.
    Nordhall, Ola
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Knez, Igor
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Psychology.
    Saboonchi, Fredrik
    Department of Medicine and Public Health, Swedish Red Cross University College, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Predicting general mental health and exhaustion: the role of emotion and cognition components of personal and collective work-identity.2018In: Heliyon, ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 4, no 8, article id e00735Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate relationships between emotion and cognition components of personal and collective work-identity and self-reported general mental health and exhaustion, in Swedish teachers (N = 768). In line with our predictions, we showed that the emotion component of personal work-identity and the cognition component of collective work-identity associated positively with general mental health and negatively with exhaustion. The reverse result was found, however, for the cognition component of personal work-identity and emotion component of collective work-identity. In general, all this indicates that person-work bonding might, to some degree, account for general mental health and exhaustion in employees. In particular, the findings suggest that general mental health and exhaustion may vary symmetrically across the: (1) Type of person-work bonding (personal vs. collective work-identity); and (2) Type of psychological component (emotion vs. cognition) involved in personal- and collective work-identity.

  • 539.
    Nordhall, Ola
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Knez, Igor
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Psychology.
    Saboonchi, Fredrik
    Department of Medicine and Public Health, Swedish Red Cross University College.
    Teachers´personal work-identity predicts emotional exhaustion and work motivation: amediating role of job demands and resources2018In: FALF KONFERENS 2018: Arbetet – problem eller potential för en hållbar livsmiljö?, Gävle: Gävle University Press , 2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Teachers´ psychological job demands (large class sizes, low social support, and expectations to care for pupils, parents and colleagues) are positively related to their emotional exhaustion. Teachers´ psychological job resources (autonomy, mastery of skills, and experiences of their work as incentive and interesting) are positively related to work motivation and engagement, which can be defined as the positive antipode of emotional exhaustion. In addition, job demands and resources may, in general terms, explain the relationships between the employee and different work motivation- and mental illness outcomes.

    Furthermore, teachers´ personal work-identity comprises cognitive- (coherence, correspondence, mental time, reflection, agency) and emotional- (attachment, belongingness, closeness) components, differently associated with various work-related outcomes. Our previous results show that the cognitive component positively relates to emotional exhaustion, and the emotional one positively relates to self-determined work motivation. These relationships have up to date not been theoretically and practically related to organizational/job characteristic factors, such as, job demands and resources.

     

    Aims

    Firstly, we investigated if a positive relationship between teachers´ cognitive personal work-identity and emotional exhaustion was mediated by psychological job demands. Secondly, we checked for if a positive relationship between teachers´ emotional personal work-identity and self-determined work motivation was mediated by psychological job resources.

    Methods

    768 members, representing eleven different local teachers´ trade unions, working in the south and middle part of Sweden replied to a digitized questionnaire measuring cognitive- and emotional components of personal work identity, job demands (prosocial extra-role performances) and resources (educational inspirations), emotional exhaustion and self-determined work motivation. Two mediation analyzes were performed by PROCESS macro for SPSS (version 2.16.3), model 4.

     

    Results

    A positive relationship between teachers´ cognitive personal work- identity and emotional exhaustion was mediated by psychological job demands: completely standardized indirect effects: β= .04, 95% CI [.0180, .0650].

    Also, a positive relationship between teachers´ emotional personal work- identity and self-determined work motivation was positively mediated by psychological job resources: completely standardized indirect effect: β= .09, 95% CI [.0569, .1178].

    This suggests that, when teachers think (cognitive component of work-identity) more of their work, they will be more emotionally exhausted, but when they feel (emotional component of work-identity) more of their work they will be more motivated to work. Psychological job demands and resources may however and to some extent explain these relationships, respectively.

  • 540.
    Nordin, Steven
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Aldrin, Lina
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Claeson, Anna-Sara
    Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Andersson, Linus
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Effects of negative affectivity and odor valence on chemosensory and symptom perception and perceived ability to focus on a cognitive task2017In: Perception, ISSN 0301-0066, E-ISSN 1468-4233, Vol. 46, no 3-4, p. 431-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to gain understanding for the impact of negative affectivity (NA) and odor valanceon perceptual aspects during low-level odorous exposure. Fifty-five young adults who were eitherrelatively low or high in NA (anxiety, depression, and somatization) were randomized forexposure to either limonene (pleasant odor) or pyridine (unpleasant odor). In an exposurechamber, they took part in baseline, blank and stable exposure sessions, during which theyrated odor intensity, impact on ability to focus on an imagined cognitive task, and intensity ofsymptoms. The results showed higher ratings of negative impact on ability to focus duringexposure to the unpleasant odor compared with the pleasant odor, and an association betweenNA and symptom intensity, with 18% of the variance in symptom intensity explainedby somatization. The association between NA and symptom intensity was found to be drivenby the factor sex. These results imply (a) that prior findings of odorous exposure that interferenegatively with work performance may be due to impact of an unpleasant odor on ability to focuson cognitive tasks and (b) that there are associations between NA, sex, and symptoms that maypartly be referred to attentiveness to and interpretation of bodily sensations.

  • 541.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    A description of the safety culture at a large steel manufacturing company2012In: Ergonomics for sustainability and growth: Nordic Ergonomics Society (NES), Saltsjöbaden, Sweden, 19-22 august 2012, Nordic Ergonomics Society, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: At the moment, in Sweden, there is a noticeable upswing of interest for workplace safety culture among companies. These are companies with dangerous work environments but that have already come a long way in improving their workplace safety and ergonomics standards by following the national legislations, using regular and systematic audits of the workplaces, and using modern equipment and technology for safety. This study was conducted in collaboration with a large steel manufacturing company in Sweden which employs about 1000 people. The company aims to improve the safety culture within the organization, not in order to get future payback in monetary terms, but actually to strive towards their company social responsibility (CSR) goal: that nobody should have to get injured on the job. The present study is an initial exploration of the company to provide the basic understanding of the work environment setting where the company implements change. Research is still needed to better understand different safety cultures.

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate what the safety culture and risk-taking is like at the company, according to employees. 

    Methods: The study had a qualitative and descriptive study design. Ten focus group interviews were conducted for data collection, consisting of about 6–8 employees each. The participants were employees from production. The interviews lasted 75 min and were digitally recorded and thereafter verbatim transcribed. Descriptive data was also collected from all participants by allowing them to fill out a short questionnaire. The participants were recruited from the company’s five main mills to get a representative sample, and it was randomized which shift teams that were asked to participate. Three discussion themes were used during the sessions: 1. What do you think of the safety at your workplace? 2. How is safety performed at your workplace? 3. What can become better with the safety at your workplace? During the interviews, emphasis was put on follow-up questions and asking the participants to explain more and to use own examples. The focus group sessions were conducted by a doctoral student, supported by an assistant taking additional notes.

    Results: The results are right now being analyzed, but will be presented at the conference as an oral presentation. One preliminary result is that an important incitement for the employees to risk their safety, for example by not using the appropriate tools, is to quickly get the production running again if a stop occurs.

  • 542.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Different ways of defining and measuring company size when studying its effects on OHS: A literature study2014In: 11th International Symposium on Human Factors in Organisational Design and Management, Nordic Ergonomics Society , 2014, p. 587-593Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective and method: Company size is a proxy for other variables affecting occupational health and safety (OHS) performance. The aim of this literature study was twofold: to give an overview on how it empirically has been shown that smaller and larger companies differ from one another in terms of OHS, and to present how earlier studies have defined company size when studying its mediating effects on OHS. A search strategy with search terms was used in the major databases, as well as inspecting the reference list of appropriate studies recovered. A total of 29 articles were included.

    Findings: Examining what empirically has been shown on company size differences in terms of OHS resulted in ten different themes. For example that the OHS standard improves as company size increases, that there is an inverse relationship between company size and injury frequency, and that the rate of absenteeism is lower in small companies. The examined studies were similar, in that they found differences attributed to company size. They differed, however, in the ways they defined company size as a variable in analysis. To define company size as number of employees was the most commonly used approach (27 out of 29 studies). One study used number of man-labor years as definition. One study used the contractors’ annual volume of business in dollars as definition. The scale of measure that was most commonly used as variable for measuring company size was ordinal scale data (23 out of 29 studies). Three studies used ratio scale data. Three studies did not specify scale of measurement.

    Conclusion: It is important to carefully consider what definition and scale of measure to use for the sake of studying the mediating effects of company size on OHS. Some of the less commonly used alternatives could be relevant.

  • 543.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    En beskrivning av säkerhetskulturen vid ett stort stålindustriföretag2012In: Makt, myter och motstridigheter - Utmaningar i dagens arbetsliv: Forum för arbetslivsforskning (FALF), Karlstad, 11-13 juni 2012, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Introduktion: Bland svenska företag finns det för tillfället ett ökat intresse för den egna arbetsplatsens säkerhetskultur. Dessa företag har farliga arbetsmiljöer men har också kommit långt med att förbättra arbetssäkerhet och ergonomisk standard genom att följa de nationella föreskrifterna och arbetsmiljölagen. Dessa företag tillämpar systematiskt arbetsmiljöarbete med skyddsronder och använder modern utrustning och teknologi för säkerhet. Föreliggande studie genomfördes i samarbete med ett stort svenskt stålindustriföretag med cirka 1000 anställda på den berörda orten. Företaget har som mål att förbättra säkerhetskulturen inom organisationen, inte för att få igen satsningen monetärt, utan för att sträva mot det företagsetiska målet: att ingen skall behöva bli skadad på arbetet. Föreliggande studie är en första utforskning av företaget i syfte att skapa grundläggande kunskap om den arbetsmiljökontext som företaget implementerar förändring i. Det behövs även ytterligare forskning för att bättre förstå olika säkerhetskulturer.  

    Forskningsfråga: Vad finns det för säkerhetskultur och risktagande på företaget, enligt de anställdas erfarenheter och uppfattningar?

    Metod: Studien hade en kvalitativ och beskrivande studiedesign. Datainsamlingen bestod av tio fokusgruppintervjuer med cirka 6–8 anställda per grupp och deltagarna var anställda från produktionen. Intervjuerna hade en längd av 75 minuter och spelades in digitalt med en diktafon och transkriberades därefter ordagrant. Därutöver samlades bakgrundsdata in om deltagarna genom att de fyllde i ett kort frågeformulär. Deltagarna rekryterades från samtliga av företagets fem huvudavdelningar för att få ett representativt urval, och det slumpades fram vilka skiftlag som tillfrågades att delta. Tre diskussionsteman användes under intervjuerna: 1. Vad tycker ni om säkerheten här? 2. Hur gör ni med säkerheten här? 3. Vad kan bli bättre med säkerheten här? Under intervjuerna lades betoningen på följdfrågor där deltagarna ombads att utveckla sina svar och använda egna exempel. Fokusgruppintervjuerna leddes av en doktorand, och stöddes av en assistent som tog kompletterande anteckningar.

    Resultat: Datamaterialet analyseras just nu, men resultaten kommer att presenteras på konferensen. Ett preliminärt resultat är att ett viktigt incitament för anställda att riskera sin egen säkerhet, till exempel genom att inte använda de avsedda verktygen, är att snabbt få igång produktionen igen om ett stopp inträffar.

  • 544.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Socialmedicin..
    Förutsättningar och möjligheter för företag att prioritera och bedriva arbetsmiljö- och säkerhetsarbete2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Många företag saknar idag ett fungerande systematiskt arbetsmiljöarbete (SAM) som uppfyller lagens krav fullt ut. Istället tycks andra dagliga aktiviteter ha högre prioritet. Detta är en presentation av ett avhandlingsarbete, vars övergripande syfte var att undersöka förutsättningar och möjligheter för tillverkande företag att prioritera och arbeta med säkerheten och arbetsmiljön; med särskilt fokus på yrkesroller, företagsstorlek, säkerhetskultur och finansiella nyckeltal. Fyra delstudier (I–IV) ingår i denna avhandling, vilka är baserade på tre datainsamlingar. En enkät som mätte arbetsmiljöprioritering besvarades av 249 representanter vid 142 tillverkande företag (I & II). Fokusgruppintervjuer genomfördes med 66 arbetare på ett stort ståltillverkningsföretag, där deras erfarenheter och uppfattningar om säkerhet och risker i arbetet diskuterades (III). En enkät som mätte SAM, säkerhetskultur och arbetsmiljöprioritering besvarades av 280 representanter vid 197 tillverkande företag (IV). Information om företagens finansiella nyckeltal hämtades från ett kreditupplysningsföretag. De viktigaste resultaten från de fyra delstudierna kan bland annat sammanfattas med att lönsamheten uppfattades vara det mest prioriterade intresset vid företagen (I), och att avvägningar mellan produktivitet och säkerhet ansågs vara ett hinder för att kunna arbeta på ett säkert sätt (III). Chefer uppfattade generellt att arbetsmiljön prioriterades mer på företagen än vad skyddsombuden gjorde (I & IV). Uppfattningar om arbetsmiljöprioritering skiljde sig dock inte åt beroende på företagsstorlek (II & IV). Ansvaret för säkerheten på arbetet ansågs främst vila hos den enskilda individen, och risktagande betraktades komma ur en kombination av individuella faktorer och yttre omständigheter i arbetsmiljön (III). Att vara ett större företag, ha positiv säkerhetskultur och hög kreditvärdighet visade sig ha samband med att också ha ett bättre utvecklat SAM (IV). På motsvarande sätt, att vara ett mindre företag, ha negativ säkerhetskultur och låg kreditvärdighet befanns ha samband med att också ha ett sämre utvecklat SAM.

  • 545.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Socialmedicin.
    Prerequisites and Possibilities for Manufacturing Companies to Prioritize and Manage Occupational Health and Safety2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Legislation demands that health and safety of humans at work must be secured. Today, far from every company has a functioning systematic management of occupational health and safety (OHS) in place to fulfill its legal obligations. Instead, other day-to-day tasks appear to have greater priority.

    The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate prerequisites and possibilities for manufacturing companies to prioritize and manage OHS, with focus on professional roles, company size, safety culture, and financial performance.

    Four papers (I–IV) are included in this thesis, based on three data collections. A questionnaire measuring the priority accorded to work environment was completed by 249 representatives of 142 manufacturing companies (I & II). Focus group interviews were conducted with 66 workers at a large steel-manufacturing company, discussing their experiences and perceptions of safety and risks at work (III). A questionnaire measuring OHS management practices, safety culture, and priority given to work environment was completed by 280 representatives of 197 manufacturing companies (IV). Information regarding the companies’ financial performance was retrieved from a credit bureau database.

    The main findings of the four papers demonstrated that profitability was considered as the most prioritized interest in the companies (I), and that trade-offs between productivity and safety is an obstacle to working safely (III). Managers generally perceived their companies to prioritize work environment factors more than the safety delegates did (I & IV). Perceptions of work environment priority did, however, not differ depending on company size (II & IV). Responsibility for safety was perceived to rest on the individual to the largest extent, and risk-taking was believed to originate from a combination of individual factors and external circumstances in the work environment (III). Larger company size, positive safety culture, and low risk in creditworthiness were found to be associated with better OHS management practices in companies (IV). Correspondingly, smaller company size, negative safety culture, and high risk in creditworthiness were found to be associated with worse OHS management practices.

    In summary, structural, social, and financial aspects seem to be important in companies’ possibilities for prioritizing and managing OHS. Recommendations for industry and future research are discussed.

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  • 546.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Presentation av ett avhandlingsprojekt: Implementering av säkerhetskultur på ett stålindustriföretag2011In: Det nya arbetslivet: Forum för arbetslivsforskning (FALF), Luleå, 15-17 juni 2011, 2011, p. 1-9Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Introduktion: Risk för arbetsskada och olycksfall är höga inom industrisektorn och metallarbetare hör till de yrkesgrupper som löper en högre risk för arbetsskador än genomsnittet, där risken är fyrdubbelt högre att drabbas än genomsnittet (AFA, 2006). Metallindustrin är en sektor som AFA försäkring bedömer vara i ett fortsatt behov av riktade och skadeförebyggande insatser mot verksamheten (AFA, 2006). I dagsläget är forskningsområdet om implementering av en hälsosammare och säkrare arbetsplats ett område i behov av att prioriteras (Källestål et al, 2004). Vi samarbetar med ett stålindustriföretag, vilket kommer att implementera en säkrare arbetsmiljö för sina anställda, genom olika riktade insatser: utbildning; filmvisning och diskussionsgrupper; affischering; användandet av förebilder och feedback m.m. i verksamheten, vilka samtliga avser att stärka säkerhetskulturen på företaget – och därigenom nå anställdas och chefers säkerhetsbeteende med huvudbudskapet: om att personligt risktagande inne på de relativt farliga arbetsavsnitten i verken aldrig förväntas, eller tolereras för den delen. Forskningsområdet kring säkerhetskultur och säkerhetsklimat beskrivs ingående i en aktuell litteraturöversikt (Törner, 2010). Företaget är en Europaledande koncern för tillverkning av specialstålprodukter, och har sammanlagt ca 1000 anställda på den ort vi samarbetar med. Preliminär forskningsdelstudie: Hur ser säkerhetskulturen ut på företaget? Datainsamlingsmetod: Fokusgruppintervjuer.

  • 547.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    What is safety culture and risk-taking like at a large steel manufacturing company?2012In: Work: Proceedings for the 18th Triennial International Ergonomics Association's (IEA) Congress, 2012, Vol. 41 suppl. 1, no Suppl. 1, p. 5831-5832Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Focus group interviews were conducted at a large steel manufacturing company with 1000 employees, in order to answer the research question: what is the safety culture and risk-taking like at the company, according to employees? Ten focus groups were used for data collection consisting of 6-8 employees each. The participants were operators from production. The interviews lasted 75 min and were digitally recorded and thereafter verbatim transcribed. Descriptive data was also collected from all participants by allowing them to fill out a short questionnaire. The results of this study will be presented at the conference as a poster presentation.

  • 548.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Wiitavaara, Birgitta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Högberg, Hans
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Westerling, Ragnar
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    A cross-sectional study of factors influencing occupational health and safety management practices in companies2017In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 95, p. 92-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Companies need to ensure a functioning occupational health and safety management (OHSM) system to protect human health and safety during work, but generally there are differences in how successful they are in this endeavor. Earlier research has indicated that factors like company size, safety culture, and different measures of financial performance may be related to the quality of OHSM practices in companies. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether these factors are associated with OHSM practices in companies. A postal questionnaire was used to collect data from a sample of Swedish manufacturing companies, and complementary data regarding the companies were retrieved from a credit bureau database. The statistical analysis was performed with ordinal regression analysis using generalized estimating equations. Different predictor variables were modeled with OHSM practices as the outcome variable, in order to calculate p-values and to estimate odds ratios. Company size, safety culture, and creditworthiness were found to be associated with better, as well as worse, OHSM practices in companies (depending on directionality). Practical implications for industry and future research are discussed.

  • 549.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Socialmedicin..
    Wiitavaara, Birgitta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Högberg, Hans
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Westerling, Ragnar
    Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    To measure OHS management practices in manufacturing companies2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Manufacturing companies are bound to manage many different processes in their day-to-day operations. A systematic management of occupational health and safety (OHS) factors is necessary in order to comply with OHS legislation. Work environmental risks should be assessed and controlled, and if not controlled immediately, an action plan should be established and followed up on later. A successful OHS management should reduce hazards in the workplace and protect worker health and safety. But how can we accurately measure how well companies actually comply with OHS legislation? Earlier measures exist, but they often assess the perceptions of the respondent rather than the circumstance of the company. The aim of this study was to develop and utilize a way to measure OHS management practices, by using a self-report-questionnaire distributed to companies.   

    Methods: A questionnaire was developed in several steps. OHS legislation and earlier studies were read in order to identify different relevant indicators for OHS management compliance. These indicators were then compiled, sorted, and narrowed down in order to produce a manageable and relevant list of 13 indicators. A criterion for relevant indicators was that they together should provide appropriate information on whether a company has come far, or not so far, in arranging a systematic OHS management. A yes–no question was formulated for each of the indicators. Three examples of indicators were: whether the company has written routines stating how the OHS management should be carried out or not, whether written risk assessments have been conducted during the last 12 months or not, and whether the company has routines in place for reporting incidents that occur (near-misses and accidents) or not. The indicators and questions were chosen and formulated in order to measure as much of an objective circumstance at the companies as possible. The rationale is that, either the companies have an arrangement for these indicators, or they do not. Questionnaires were sent to a sample of manufacturing companies (n=238) in central Sweden, for one manager and one safety delegate per company to answer.

    Results and discussion: Taken together, the 13 indicators formed an OHS management practices index. A yes-answer for each indicator was counted as 1 and no as 0, and the scores were summed together. Other measures were also collected for this study: companies’ safety culture, overall work environment priority, company profitability, and company size. The OHS management practices index will undergo psychometric testing for validity and reliability, such as test-retest and Cronbach’s alpha test statistic. The development process and usability of the OHS management practices measure will be presented in more detail at the conference. We believe that this novel measure of OHS management practices, as employed in this study, can be of interest for future research within the field of OHS. This approach provides a relatively straightforward way to measure companies’ OHS management practice using questionnaire items.

  • 550.
    Nordlöf, Hasse
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Wiitavaara, Birgitta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Winblad, Ulrika
    Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    Wijk, Katarina
    Samhällsmedicin, Landstinget Gävleborg. Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och utbildningsstudier, Uppsala universitet.
    Westerling, Ragnar
    Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    A description of reasons for risk-taking at a large steel manufacturing company2013In: Ergonomics for equality: Nordic Ergonomics Society (NES), Reykjavík, Iceland, 11-14 august 2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Risk-taking in an industrial work environment is a serious matter since it involves the risk for bodily injuries and in worst case death. The aim of this study was to investigate reasons for risk-taking at a large steel manufacturing company in Sweden which employs about 1000 people.

    Methods: Ten focus group interviews were conducted, each consisting of about 6–8 workers. The situation of safety at work was discussed in a semi-structured manner, letting the employees themselves explain the reasons behind risk-taking. The interviews were analyzed with qualitative content analysis.

    Results: Reasons for risk-taking were formed into the following six aspects: 1.Being new-at-work. 2.Being tired. 3.Being nonchalant to the safety risks. 4.Working on routine and being “blind-to-flaws”. 5.Too little staff to do the job. 6.To stress, hurry, and work faster in order to save time. Conclusion: One’s state-of-the-day and external work environment circumstances affects risk-taking.

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