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  • 51.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Wang, Weihong
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Stefan, Ioana
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Rapid innovators in emerging economies: An illustration of diversity in two Chinese firms2015In: Proceedings of the 22nd EurOMA Conference, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Wang, Weihong
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Stefan, Ioana
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Rapid NPD processes in Chinese CE firms2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 53.
    Berggren, Christian
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Karabag, Solmas Filiz
    Linköpings universitet.
    Wang, Weihong
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Stefan, Ioana
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Responses from established firms to rapid innovator challenges in emerging economies2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 54.
    Berggren, Christian
    et al.
    Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Bergek, Anna
    Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Söderlund, Jonas
    Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Sweden; Department of Leadership and Management, BI Norwegian School of Management, Norway.
    Exploring Knowledge Integration and Innovation2011In: Knowledge integration and innovation: Critical Challenges Facing International Technology-Based Firms / [ed] Christian Berggren, Anna Bergek, Lars Bengtsson, Michael Hobday, and Jonas Söderlund, Oxford: Oxford University Press , 2011, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This introduction relates the principal idea behind the book - that knowledge integration is a vital part of the dynamics of the innovation process to previous literature on knowledge integration, with its focus on companies' 'routine' activities. It presents the book's main empirical focus: internationally competing technology-based firms in, for example, the automotive, heavy electrical equipment, packaging machinery, telecom, tooling, and aerospace industries. It also introduces three major trends that affect conditions for innovation and knowledge integration: internationalization of R&D and production, transformation of markets, and changes in the character of developments in science and technology. In contrast to most definitions, the introduction emphasizes that knowledge integration is more than combining, sharing, or transferring different knowledge bases; it is also a process of creating new knowledge. The introduction concludes with an overview of the twelve chapters, describing how they provide an understanding of knowledge integration as a multilevel process.

  • 55.
    Berggren, Christian
    et al.
    Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Bergek, AnnaDepartment of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Sweden.Bengtsson, LarsUniversity of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.Söderlund, JonasDepartment of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Sweden; Department of Leadership and Management, BI Norwegian School of Management, Norway.Hobday, MichaelCentre for Research in Innovation Management (CENTRIM), University of Brighton, United Kingdom.
    Knowledge Integration and Innovation: Critical Challenges Facing International Technology-Based Firms2011Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technology-based firms continue to compete primarily on innovation, and are continuously required to present new solutions to an exacting market. As technological complexity and specialization intensifies, firms increasingly need to integrate and co-ordinate knowledge by means of project groups, diversified organizations, inter-organizational partnerships, and strategic alliances. Innovation processes have progressively become interdisciplinary, collaborative, inter-organizational, and international, and a firm's ability to synthesize knowledge across disciplines, organizations, and geographical locations has a major influence on its viability and success. This book demonstrates how knowledge integration is crucial in facilitating innovation within modern firms. This book provides original, detailed empirical studies of prerequisites, mechanisms, and outcomes of knowledge integration processes on several organizational levels, from key individuals, projects, and internal organizations, to collaboration between firms. It stresses the need to understand knowledge integration as a multi-level phenomenon, which requires a broad repertoire of organizational and technical means. It further clarifies the need for strong internal capabilities for exploiting external knowledge, reveals how costs of knowledge integration affect outcomes and strategic decisions, and discusses the managerial implications of fostering knowledge integration, providing practical guidance and support for managers of knowledge integration in high technology enterprises.

  • 56.
    Blanco-Portela, Norka
    et al.
    Department of Environmental Faculty of Engineering, Universidad EAN, Bogotá, Colombia.
    R-Pertierra, Luis
    Department of Biogeography and Global Change, National Museum of Natural Sciences, Madrid, Spain.
    Benayas, Javier
    Department of Ecology, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Sustainability Leaders’ Perceptions on the Drivers for and the Barriers to the Integration of Sustainability in Latin American Higher Education Institutions2018In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 8, article id 2954Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Higher education institutions (HEIs) have been steadily progressing towards the integrationof sustainable practices in their structures and operations. Several studies have reported the varietyof drivers of change and the barriers to change that universities have found in the integrationprocess. The present investigation is aimed at further characterizing and ranking the drivers for,and barriers of, sustainability integration in HEIs within their structures and operating functions.Open-ended expert opinion interviews of key sustainability leaders appointed at 45 HEIs from10 Latin-American countries were conducted in order to learn lessons from their diverse experiencesof the process. Additionally, a thematic workshop on HEI sustainability was organized to facilitatefurther discussions between 23 sustainability scholars and/or national coordinators of universitynetworks from 11 Latin American countries. As a result, 15 barriers were identified as hinderingthe institutionalization of sustainability in HEIs. This study also examined the relationship betweenthese reported barriers with 13 main drivers that were identified to be facilitating the integration ofsustainable practices within the organizational and academic structures at the universities. The strongcorrespondence between the several observed drivers for, and barriers to, change highlights theimportance of strategic planning that offers integrated actions. The findings of this paper can serveas a reference to assist HEIs in identifying drivers of, and barriers to, sustainability, so that the formercan be fostered and the latter addressed effectively. This can help identify and plan targeted actionsto make the transition towards sustainability in HEIs more natural and effective.

  • 57.
    Borg, Henrik
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för industriell ekonomi. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för industriell ekonomi.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för industriell ekonomi.
    An empirical examination of Bessant’s evolutionary model of continuous improvement behaviour2006In: Proceedings of the 7th CINet conference: Continuous Innovation and Sustainability – Defining the Road Ahead, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 58.
    Bredin, Karin
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Enberg, Cecilia
    Linköpings universitet.
    Niss, Camilla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Söderlund, Jonas
    Linköpings universitet.
    Knowledge Integration at Work: Individual Project Competence in Agile Projects2017In: Managing Knowledge Integration Across Boundaries / [ed] Fredrik Tell, Christian Berggren, Stefano Brusoni, Andrew Van de Ven, New York: Oxford University Press, 2017, p. 206-226Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 59.
    Bredin, Karin
    et al.
    Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling (IEI) / Företagsekonomi (FEK), Linköpings universitet.
    Niss, Camilla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Söderlund, Jonas
    Institutt for ledelse og organisasjon, BI Handelshøyskolen, Olso, Norge.
    Specialist med bredd eller flerbent generalist: Vad utmärker en kunskapsintegrerande projektmedlem?2015In: Kunskapsintegration och innovation i en internationaliserande ekonomi: Slutrapport från ett forskningsprogram / [ed] Hans Andersson och Christian Berggren, Stockholm: Makadam Förlag, 2015, 1, p. 72-83Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 60.
    Carlsson, Inga-Lill
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för industriell ekonomi. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Logistics capabilities important to small system suppliers2009Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 61.
    Carlsson, Inga-Lill
    University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för industriell ekonomi.
    Resources to form logistics capabilities - from the perspective of a small or medium-sized subcontractor2008In: Proceedings of the 7th International Meeting for Research in Logistics (IMRL 2008), Avignon, 24-26 September 2008, 2008, p. 51-62Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Carlsson, Inga-Lill
    University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för industriell ekonomi.
    Resources to Form Logistics Capabilities?: from the Perspective of a Small or Medium-Sized Subcontractor2008In: Supply Chain Forum: an International Journal, ISSN 1625-8312, E-ISSN 1624-6039, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 6-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One way for a small subcontractor to meet increasing global competition is to develop a system supplying ability, which implies more focus on logistical issues and a larger overall responsibility in the supply chain. Certain logistics capabilities have been identified as important to a small- or medium-sized subcontractor in order to cope with the system supplying role. Interviews have been carried out in a multiple case study with the purpose of identifying important resources for a smaller supplier with the ambition of forming logistics capabilities to support system supply. Resources within three different areas have been identified: organizational, competence base, and tools. Conclusions from a comparison among three companies, with different degrees of system supplying services, point out the importance of an organization with clear and distinct responsibilities and authorities. Competencies in logistics and enhanced understanding and use of IT support and communication systems are identified as areas to improve for the smaller companies.

  • 63.
    Carlsson, Inga-Lill
    et al.
    Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Developing system supplier capability by integrating knowledge with customers2019In: International Journal of Logistics Systems and Management, ISSN 1742-7967, E-ISSN 1742-7975, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 91-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As large corporations outsource parts of their manufacturing and services, many small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) suppliers are expected to deepen their capabilities and take on the role of system suppliers. The purpose of this paper is to analyse how knowledge integration with customers may help a SME develop system supplier capabilities. The study is based on a deep longitudinal case study of a SME manufacturer and focuses on continuous development capability as one of the core system supplier capabilities. The results show that knowledge integration (KI) with customers is an effective means to build system capability but that this is a stepwise process. The study identifies three levels of KI with customers: unidirectional knowledge transfer, mutual knowledge exchange and full-range knowledge integration. The analysis further indicates that each level of KI requires specific supplier capabilities.

  • 64.
    Carpenter, Angela
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. University of Leeds, School of Earth and Environment, Leeds, West Yorkshire, United Kingdom.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability Ltd., Cardiff, United Kingdom.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Astner, Linda
    Port Authority, Gävle Hamn AB/Port of Gävle AB, Fredriksskans, Gävle, Sweden.
    Securing a port's future through Circular Economy: Experiences from the Port of Gävle in contributing to sustainability2018In: Marine Pollution Bulletin, ISSN 0025-326X, E-ISSN 1879-3363, Vol. 128, p. 539-547Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ports are an important player in the world, due to their role in global production and distributions systems. Theyare major intermodal transport hubs, linking the sea to the land. For all ports, a key requirement for commercialand economic viability is to retain ships using them and to remain accessible to those ships. Ports need to findapproaches to help them remain open. They must ensure their continued economic viability. At the same time,they face increasing pressure to become more environmentally and socially conscious. This paper examines theapproach taken by the Port of Gävle, Sweden, which used contaminated dredged materials to create new landusing principles of Circular Economy. The paper demonstrates that using Circular Economy principles can be aviable way of securing a port's future and contributing to its sustainability, and that of the city/region where itoperates.

  • 65.
    Carpenter, Angela
    et al.
    School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, United Kingdom; Centre for Marine and Coastal Policy Research, Plymouth University, United Kingdom.
    Shellock, Rebecca
    Plymouth Marine Laboratory, United Kingdom; European Centre for Environment and Human Health, University of Exeter, Truro, United Kingdom.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Stephen, Fletcher
    UN Environment World Conservation Monitoring Centre, United Kingdom.
    Glegg, Gillian
    Centre for Marine and Coastal Policy Research, Plymouth University, United Kingdom.
    Public perceptions of management priorities for the English Channel region2018In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 97, p. 294-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The English Channel region is an area of high conservational importance, as well being a contributor to economic prosperity, social well-being and quality of life of the people living around it. There is a need to incorporate societal elements into marine and coastal governance, to improve management of the Channel ecosystem. Public Perception Research (PPR) is a relatively unexplored dimension of marine science, with limited research at the scale of the Channel region. Using an online survey, this study examined the public's use of, and funding priorities for, the Channel's marine and coastal environment. It revealed that there are variations in how the English and French coastlines are used. Environmental issues were generally viewed as being more important than economic ones. Country-level differences were observed for public uses of, and priorities for the Channel region. Cleaner water and beaches, and improved coastal flood defences, were more highly prioritised by English respondents, while offshore renewable energy and sustainability of businesses were more highly prioritised by French respondents. The paper contributes to the debate on the value of PPR by addressing evidence gaps in the English Channel region, and to PPR literature more broadly. It provides baseline data to inform future engagement strategies for the marine and coastal governance of the Channel region specifically. It also identifies how this type of research has implications for the wider marine and coastal environment, including contributing to Sustainable Development Goal 14 on conserving and sustainably using the oceans, seas, and marine resources.

  • 66.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    et al.
    Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Sweden; Department of Industrial Economics and Management, KTH, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Trade-offs in Make-Buy Decisions: Exploring Operating Realities of Knowledge Integration and Innovation2011In: Knowledge Integration and Innovation: critical challenges facing international technology-based firms / [ed] Christian Berggren, Anna Bergek, Lars Bengtsson, Michael Hobday, and Jonas Söderlund, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011, 1, p. 228-245Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores trade-offs particularly relevant for firms that compete on innovation, but which have outsourced manufacturing and therefore need to integrate knowledge by involving their new contract manufacturers in the innovation and development activities of outsourced parts. The empirical analysis is based on survey data from 127 manufacturing firms in Sweden. The analysis shows that trade-offs remain in make-buy decisions, especially between cost and flexibility, and cost and speed. When comparing different groups of firms, the results also show that knowledge integration in terms of collaboration between outsourcing firms and their suppliers reduces some trade-offs but intensifies others. The chapter concludes that technologybased firms that compete on innovation often have to involve their new suppliers in the innovation and development activities of outsourced parts. However, when doing so, they have to consider that they cannot 'have it all' as the existing management literature often claims.

  • 67.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    et al.
    Stockholm Business School, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lakemond, Nicolette
    Department of Management and Engeering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sustainable supply management as a purchasing capability: a power and dependence perspective2016In: International Journal of Operations & Production Management, ISSN 0144-3577, E-ISSN 1758-6593, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 2-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to use the relative power and total interdependence concepts as an intervening theoretical lens to explain why and how sustainable supply management (SSM) initiatives by manufacturing firms differ across the Kraljic matrix according to purchasing capability.

    Design/methodology/approach – Tested hypotheses by subjecting survey data from 338 manufacturers on buyer-supplier relationships in Europe and North America to regression analysis.

    Findings – Shows three situations where relative power and total interdependence determine the effectiveness of purchasing capabilities. First, sustainability programs impact supplier compliance in all Kraljic categories but bottleneck items. Second, there are significant trade-offs between lower cost and higher social and environmental supplier compliance for noncritical components. Third, strategic alignment of sustainability objectives between corporate and supply function levels only leads to improved financial performance for strategic components.

    Research limitations/implications – Further research could take power and dependence into account to explain when and how purchasing capabilities focussed on sustainability can be achieved.

    Practical implications – Shows how supply strategists could devise-tailored approaches for different purchasing categories with respect to power and dependence when pursuing economic, social and environmental objectives in combination – the triple bottom line – along their supply chains.

    Originality/value – Illustrates and provides a theoretical explanation for why SSM is a purchasing capability that must vary across purchasing categories defined by different situations of power and dependence.

  • 68.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden; KITE Research Group, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för industriell ekonomi. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. KITE Research Group, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för industriell ekonomi. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Åhlström, Pär
    Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Supplier selection or collaboration?: Determining factors of performance improvement when outsourcing manufacturing.2009In: Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management, ISSN 1478-4092, E-ISSN 1873-6505, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 143-153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An empirical study was designed to determine factors of performance improvement when outsourcing manufacturing. Findings from a survey of 136 manufacturing plants in Sweden show that most of them achieve their outsourcing motives, but not without trade-offs. Factors of performance improvements such as economies of scale or operations in low-cost countries can improve one performance dimension, such as product cost, yet negatively impact volume flexibility, speed or product innovation. The results show part characteristics and supplier operating capabilities are more important than supplier relationship strategies when outsourcing manufacturing, meaning that supplier selection trumps supplier collaboration in the make-or-buy decision.

  • 69.
    Domingues, Ana Rita
    et al.
    Department of Management, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy; CENSE, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Caparica, Portugal .
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability, Ltd., Cardiff, United Kingdom .
    Ceulemans, Kim
    University of Victoria, Gustavson School of Business, Centre for Social and Sustainable Innovation, Victoria, BC, Canada .
    Ramos, Tomás B.
    CENSE, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Caparica, Portugal .
    Sustainability reporting in public sector organisations: exploring the relation between the reporting process and organisational change management for sustainability2017In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 192, p. 292-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability Reporting has become a key element in different organisations. Although there have been a number of academic publications discussing the adoption of sustainability reports in the public sector, their numbers have been quite low when compared to those focussing on corporate reports. Additionally, there has been little research on the link between sustainability reporting in Public Sector Organisations (PSOs) and Organisational Change Management for Sustainability (OCMS). This paper focuses on the contribution of sustainability reporting to OCMS. A survey was sent to all PSOs that have published at least one sustainability report based on the GRI guidelines. The study provides a critical analysis of the relation between sustainability reporting and OCMS in PSOs, including the drivers for reporting, the impacts on organisation change management, and the role of stakeholders in the process. Despite still lagging in sustainability reporting journey, PSOs are starting to use sustainability reporting as a communication tool, and this could drive organisational changes for sustainability.

  • 70.
    Domingues, Ana Rita
    et al.
    University of Bologna, Italy; NOVA University of Lisbon, Portugal.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Ramos, Tomás B.
    NOVA University of Lisbon, Portugal; CENSE.
    Stakeholder-driven initiatives using sustainability indicators2018In: Routledge Handbook of Sustainability Indicators / [ed] Bell, Simon and Moore, Stephen, Abingdon: Routledge, 2018, p. 379-391Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 71.
    Dominic, Chris
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Olsmats, Carl
    Höskolan Dalarna.
    Four-dimensional concurrent engineering: an extended theoretical framework integrating packaging2019In: Four-dimensional concurrent engineering: an extended theoretical framework integrating packaging / [ed] Roland ten Klooster, IAPRI , 2019, p. 48-48Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper takes on the challenge to integrate packaging in a concept of four-dimensional concurrent engineering (4DCE). The purpose is to explore a conceptual model and empirically evaluate the specific performance of packaging in interrelation with product and processes in the Supply Chain (SC). The objectives are to better understand the concepts of packaging logistics and logistics management in the SC. The conceptual model 4DCE is developed based on the three-dimensional concurrent engineering theories.The tool Packaging Scorecard is applied to evaluate the concurrent performance of packaging throughout the SC. The packaging system involves many actors that are integrated into the 4DCE framework with focus on interaction of SC and logistics in relation to packaging and product, with the overall aim to operate as effectively and efficiently as possible. In order to explore the potential of the 4DCE framework, empirical verification and testing of the concept has been carried out. The process has been done through multiple in-depth, action-oriented case studies in three different industries on the Swedish market. The case studies covered holistic aspects on the packaging system.The concept 4DCE contributes to packaging logistics theory by providing a framework for assessment incorporating complex and dynamic interactions between product, packaging, logistics and SC. Furthermore, the holistic packaging development concept is ensured by increasing knowledge of the packaging system and how it interacts with actors and performs to fulfil requirements along the SC. The 4DCE provides valuable data for packaging development processes in the cases, however there is a need for broader studies in different industries.

  • 72.
    Engström, Gabriella
    et al.
    School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Eriksson, David
    School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sollander, Kristina
    School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Drivers and barriers of reshoring in the Swedish manufacturing industry2018In: World Review of Intermodal Transportation Research (WRITR), ISSN 1749-4729, E-ISSN 1749-4737, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 195-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to explore reshoring drivers and barriers in the Swedish manufacturing industry. The research is based on case research including five case companies from the Swedish manufacturing industry with experience of manufacturing reshoring. The empirical findings are compared to the existing literature to identify any potential gaps between the existing literature and the Swedish manufacturing context. The findings suggest that quality related issues, an increased degree of automation, and improved cost performance at the home base are the strongest reshoring drivers for Swedish manufacturing companies. The identified drivers and barriers are transferable and have the potential to be building blocks for researchers and practitioners to better understand the reshoring phenomena. The findings also show that further research should focus on reshoring drivers and barriers in relation to specific reshoring characteristics (e.g., ownership, scale of production being reshored, and position in the supply chain).

  • 73.
    Engström, Gabriella
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Eriksson, David
    Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sollander, Kristina
    Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Reshoring Drivers and Barriers in the Swedish Manufacturing Industry2018In: Journal of Global Operations and Strategic Sourcing, ISSN 2398-5364, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 174-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this study is to explore reshoring drivers and barriers from a Swedish manufacturing perspective.

    Design/methodology/approach

    This paper is a case study, including four Swedish manufacturing companies, with focus on drivers and barriers from the context of the Swedish manufacturing industry. A literature review of previously established drivers and barriers is used to map out the empirical findings and thereby identify potential gaps between the current body of literature and drivers and barriers from a Swedish manufacturing context.

    Findings

    The findings of the study suggest that quality issues continue to be one of the strongest reshoring drivers. Except for product quality, quality is also connected to host country’s infrastructure, communication and service. The supply chain perspective is a source of several drivers and is identified as a perspective often overlooked in offshoring decisions. Barriers related to firm specifics were more elaborately discussed by the companies, especially concerning calculation of location decision and the need to invest in resources, which allows for a higher level of capacity at the home country facility.

    Research limitations/implications

    The study develops a structured table of reshoring drivers and barriers which can serve as a base for future research. Future research on the calculation of location decisions is deemed as a crucial step to further understand reshoring and aid companies in the decision-making process.

    Practical implications

    The drivers and barriers identified in the study can give practitioners insight into reshoring from the perspective of the Swedish manufacturing industry and thus aid in future manufacturing location decisions. The table of drivers and barriers can also be important to understand how Sweden can strengthen its competitive advantage and motivate more companies to reshore manufacturing.

    Originality/value

    This is one of only few papers from the Nordic countries and also one of few case studies examining reshoring in manufacturing companies.

  • 74.
    Eriksson, David
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Svensson, Göran
    Oslo School of Management, Kristiania University College, Oslo, Norway.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Exploring opportunities for moral disengagement in codes of conduct from the textile industry2018In: World Review of Intermodal Transportation Research (WRITR), ISSN 1749-4729, E-ISSN 1749-4737, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 371-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this research is to assess how codes of conducts are outlined and formulated in relation to moral disengagement along the supply chain. The research is focused on the idea that supply chain structure may reduce the actors' sense of moral responsibility for the actions and impacts of the supply chain on workers and environment. The research has been conducted as a case study including Swedish firms in the textile industry. The research has used secondary data from codes of conducts. The findings show that codes of conduct do not cover all supply chain practices linked with moral disengagement. This does not cause immoral behaviour as such, but might cause moral disengagement. Supply chain research needs to focus on what should be included in codes of conduct and other ethical guidelines, so as to reduce the risk of immoral behaviour. In order to reduce the likelihood for moral disengagement, there are several supply chain practices that should be included in codes of conduct, such as power asymmetry, managerial support, and incentives.

  • 75.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Call-Off Production, Triggered by the Traditional Kanban Card or by Electronic Kanban: A Case Study at Ericsson2010In: POMS 21st Annual Conference, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyzes a concept for materials supply called call-off production, used by the telecom company Ericsson, where a case study was performed. Call-off orders are initiated from the production area and submitted through electronic data interchange (EDI) to an external supplier, a third-party logistics provider, skipping the traditional purchase ordering process. In call-off production Ericsson applies two forms of kanban for triggering the replenishment, namely the conventional kanban card and electronic kanban. For both variants, call-off production implies a short lead time, frequent deliveries, and the potential for controlling tied-up capital, using few resources, and providing a high level of delivery service. The study indicates that the conventional kanban card requires more handling than electronic kanban. On the other hand, electronic kanban could hide problems in the stock. To conduct the analysis, a theoretical framework and an analysis model were created as a foundation. Call-off production could be an uncomplicated and efficient method for manufacturing companies to manage some of the purchased products. This study’s intended contribution is to increase the knowledge of a supply model in practice.

  • 76.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för industriell ekonomi. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Mobile Inventory: An analysis of a materials supply model at Ericsson corporation2009In: Proceedings of the annual POMS conference, USA, May 2009, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study analyzes the telecom company Ericsson’s supply model, named Mobile Inventory by the author, focusing on the customer’s point of view. Mobile Inventory involves specially designed carts with electronic components required for production that circulate between a third-party logistics provider (3PLP) and Ericsson. The carts are transported by trucks and rolled out close to the assembly line at Ericsson, where they work as production storage sites. The inventory level inside the cart is kept at a certain maximum level, which covers the requirements until a new cart is delivered. The supply model works without a traditional purchase ordering process, operating instead as a variant of a periodic ordering system with fixed delivery days and where the 3PLP is responsible for the replenishment of the carts. The system runs to a large extent by itself. Mobile Inventory could be an uncomplicated supply model for manufacturing companies to manage some of their products like noncritical/standard and leverage parts, demanding only limited resources and providing a high level of customer service. This study intends to increase the knowledge of an alternative approach for materials supply that could be applied to manufacturing companies other than Ericsson.

  • 77.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Visual replenishment methods in the manufacturing industry and suggestion for a decision tool2013Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In almost all supply chains, materials need to be stored or buffered, implying that manufacturing companies need effective replenishment methods. However, this is challenging, since companies must balance inventory costs and customer service in complex and different situations. Therefore, it is important to choose replenishment methods carefully. One well-known and widespread method is Material Requirements Planning (MRP). But the method has problems, such as regarding volume flexibility. There are other methods, but the literature lacks case studies and detailed descriptions and analysis of them, especially for visually oriented methods. Therefore, it is important to explore different methods for materials supply.

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the application of visually oriented replenishment methods in manufacturing industry and further to design a tentative decision tool for selecting methods. The research aims to provide some answers to three key questions.

    The first research question concerns general factors that are important for evaluating how effective replenishment methods are. From the literature review, different factors emerged such as product characteristics (fit in the Kraljic matrix, volume issues, size, etc.); information, trust, and geographical proximity between supplier and customer; and different logistics goals (delivery service elements, tied-up capital, use of resources, inventory accuracy). It is also import to include the basic principles methods are related to. The factors were summarized in an analysis model, which is structured with three main areas (planning environment/conditions, basic principles, and effects). The model is used to analyze four case studies.

    The  second research  question focuses  on  the  characteristics for  visually orientedreplenishment methods. Examples of characteristics are: easy to understand and operate, offers uncomplicated flows, substantially applicable for noncritical and leverage parts with high yearly requirement and fairly even consumption, provides potential for  reduced  errors  in  stores/flows, potential for  providing high  delivery service and low levels of tied-up capital and resource utilization.

    The third research question focuses on what a tentative decision tool for selecting replenishment methods might look like, based on the factors that emerged from the other research questions and studies by others. In order to achieve an efficient materials supply, companies need to consider these factors when selecting replenishment methods. The decision tool consists of different steps, considering aspects of the planning environment/conditions in relation to the product and the supplier. The importance of the companies’ goals/motives for materials supply must also be assessed. The output from the decision tool is appropriate replenishment methods.

  • 78.
    Findler, Florian
    et al.
    Vienna University of Economics and Business, Vienna, Austria.
    Schönherr, Norma
    Vienna University of Economics and Business, Vienna, Austria.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Reider, Daniela
    Vienna University of Economics and Business, Vienna, Austria.
    Martinuzzi, André
    Vienna University of Economics and Business, Vienna, Austria.
    The impacts of higher education institutions on sustainable development: a review and conceptualization2019In: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, ISSN 1467-6370, E-ISSN 1758-6739, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 23-38Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    This paper aims to conceptualize impacts of higher education institutions (HEIs) on sustainable development (SD), complementing previous literature reviews by broadening the perspective from what HEIs do in pursuit of SD to how these activities impact society, the environment and the economy.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The paper provides a systematic literature review of peer-reviewed journal articles published between 2005 and 2017. Inductive content analysis was applied to identify major themes and impact areas addressed in the literature to develop a conceptual framework detailing the relationship between HEIs’ activities and their impacts on SD.

    Findings

    The paper identifies six impact areas where direct and indirect impacts of HEIs on SD may occur. The findings indicate a strong focus on case studies dealing with specific projects and a lack of studies analyzing impacts from a more holistic perspective.

    Practical implications

    This systematic literature review enables decision-makers in HEIs, researchers and educators to better understand how their activities may affect society, the environment and the economy, and it provides a solid foundation to tackle these impacts.

    Social implications

    The review highlights that HEIs have an inherent responsibility to make societies more sustainable. HEIs must embed SD into their systems while considering their impacts on society.

    Originality/value

    This paper provides a holistic conceptualization of HEIs’ impacts on SD. The conceptual framework can be useful for future research that attempts to analyze HEIs’ impacts on SD from a holistic perspective.

  • 79.
    Findler, Florian
    et al.
    Institute for Managing Sustainability, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business, Vienna, Austria.
    Schönherr, Norma
    Institute for Managing Sustainability, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business, Vienna, Austria.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Stacherl, Barbara
    Institute for Managing Sustainability, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business, Vienna, Austria.
    Assessing the Impacts of Higher Education Institutions on Sustainable Development: An Analysis of Tools and Indicators2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many higher education institutions (HEIs) have started to incorporate sustainable development (SD) into their system. A variety of sustainability assessment tools (SATs) have been developed to support HEIs to systematically measure, audit, benchmark, and communicate SD efforts. In recent years, stakeholders have increasingly asked HEIs to demonstrate their impacts on SD. These impacts are the direct and indirect effects an HEI has outside of its organizational boundaries on society, the natural environment, and the economy. This study analyzes to what extent SATs are capable of measuring the impacts that HEIs have on SD. A mixed-method approach, using descriptive statistics and an inductive content analysis, was used to examine 1134 indicators for sustainability assessment derived from 19 SATs explicitly designed for application by HEIs. The findings reveal that SATs largely neglect the impacts HEIs have outside their organizational boundaries. SATs primarily use proxy indicators based on internally available data to assess impacts and thus tend to focus on themes concerning the natural environment and the contribution to the local economy. Updating existing SATs and developing new ones may enable HEIs to fully realize their potential to contribute to SD. 

  • 80.
    Fobbe, Lea
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Carpenter, Angela
    Abid, Muhammad
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Sustainability assessment of seaports: Towards a comprehensive holistic framework2018In: 24th Annual ISDRS Conference, Actions for a Sustainable World. From Theory to Practice, Messina, 13 -15 June, 2018, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 81.
    Haartman, Robin von
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    The Challenge of being both Cost Efficient and Responsive: Analysing the Supply Chain Design of Ericsson, the Telecom Equipment Maker2010In: Proceedings of APMS 2010 - International Conference on Advances in Production Management Systems, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Literature suggests that supply chains should be designed based on the characteristics of products, including their technological maturity and the predictability of demand. The advantages of doing so are indisputable, but may be more difficult to achieve in practice. The aim of this paper is to, based on a single case study, analyse how a leading technology-based company solves the problems of conflicting supply chain demands. The company sells multiple products with varying degrees of technical maturity and predictability of demand. The study finds that technological maturity is driving a change towards a more efficient supply chain. The efficient supply chain is, however, not suitable for all products. The case company's solution is a dual-speed supply chain: a responsive one when demand is uncertain and an efficient one for standard products with predictable demand. The paper concludes that the supply chain will by necessity be a compromise as well as segmented based on the characteristics of the company's many products.

  • 82.
    Halling, Bengt
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
     Lean:  en fråga om tvåfald eller enfald2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Sammanfattning

    Biltillverkaren Toyota anses vara ett av världens effektivaste företag och beskrivs som en framgångssaga.Toyotas framgångar har lett till att många företag och organisationer inom olika branscher försökt lära av Toyota och deras sätt att bedriva sin verksamhet med syfte att nå liknande framgångar som Toyota way gett Toyota. Detta har vanligtvis skett under begreppet Lean. Lean som begrepp myntades och spreds av forskare i USA. Undersökningar av resultatet av de Lean införanden som gjorts i olika företag och organisationer visar att mycket få lyckas.

     Syfte

    Reflektera över motsättningar och överensstämmelser av olika beskrivningar av Toyota Way och Lean, samt 2. reflektera över varför få lyckas med Lean.

    Resultat

    en viktig faktor bakom den höga andelen misslyckade Lean införanden är att Toyota way är ett tvåfaldigt system medan Lean, som införs med syfte att nå framgångar liknande de Toyota uppnått, oftast införs som ett enfaldigt system. För att fungera behöver Lean samma tvåfaldighet som Toyota way annars uppnås bara något som kan benämnas ”bluff Lean”.

    Diskussion

    Är lösningen på nuvarande problem med den låga andelen framgångsrika Lean införanden att lära om och då från primärkällan Toyota.

    Finns det behov att skapa svenska Leanbegrepp?

    Är många Leankonsulter ett hot mot framgångsrikt införande av Lean?

    Vad lärs ut om Lean på svenska lärosäten, den tvåfaldiga eller den enfaldiga ”Lean modellen”?

    Är erfarenheterna från TWI och insikten från The European Productivity Agency’s Report of the Rome Conference 1958, om att överordnat allt annat är produktivitet en fråga om inställning, glömda i västvärlden?

  • 83.
    Halling, Bengt
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Lean Implementation: the significance of people and dualism2013Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean, with its origins at the Toyota Motor Company, is a concept that is known to increase effectiveness in manufacturing. The Lean concept is now argued to be relevant not only in manufacturing but in service and health-care delivery as well. The reported results of Lean implementation efforts are divided. There are reports that most of the Lean implementation efforts are not reaching the goal; on the other hand, there are reports of promising results. The divided results from Lean implementation efforts show how important it is to research and identify factors that are barriers to successful implementation of Lean. This thesis aims to contribute knowledge about barriers to Lean implementation by collecting empirical findings from manufacturing and health care and structuring the perceived barriers and difficulties to Lean implementation. My first study aimed to compare similarities and divergences in barriers to Lean described by key informants in manufacturing and health care. The data was collected via semi-structured interviews. Findings showed that the perceived difficulties and barriers are much the same in manufacturing and health care. The second study was a case study at a manufacturing firm, researching how the views on Lean of the managers implementing Lean influence its implementation. Data was collected via semi-structured interviews with 20 individuals and covered all hierarchical management levels in the company. Findings showed that managers' views on Lean influence the implementation but also that learning during the implementation process can alter managers' views of Lean. The third study aimed to research how management of Lean is described in the literature. This was done through a literature review. The findings showed that Lean management is a matter of dualism, consisting of two complementary systems of action, management and leadership, which are related to the two basic principles of Lean, continuous improvement and respect for the people.

  • 84.
    Halling, Bengt
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Ergonomi, KTH.
    Bergman, Mikael
    Fagersta Stainless.
    Herdin, Gunnar
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Presentation av Human Lean Center2018In: FALF KONFERENS 2018 Arbetet – problem eller potential för en hållbar livsmiljö?   10-12 juni 2018 Gävle: Program och abstracts / [ed] Per Lindberg, Gävle: Gävle University Press , 2018, p. 145-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Inledning

    Human Lean började som ett samarbete mellan Bengt Halling och några produktionslinor hos Scania för att se om hälsoteorin Känsla av sammanhang (Kasam) kunde hjälpa cheferna vid dessa arbetsplatser att öka hälsoläget bland medarbetarna med bibehållande av den positiva utveckling av produktiviteten som företaget uppvisat. Lärdomar från samarbetet låg som grund för etablerandet av Human Lean Center (HLC) vid högskolan i Gävle. Human Lean kan beskrivas som ett koncept som kombinerar Kasam och Lean filosofi och där människan ses som central för produktivitet och kvalitet.

    Syfte

    Syfte med etablerande av HLC är att erbjuda organisationer en utbildning som kombinerar hälsoteori och Lean filosofi för långsiktigt uthållig och konkurrenskraftig verksamhet. HLC nyttjas numera även vid olika studentutbildningar.

    Metod

    Metod vid utbildningen vid HLC bygger på att kombinera teori och praktik. Teorin handlar om hälsoteori och hälsofrämjande kombinerat med beskrivning av Lean konceptets historiska framväxt och Lean filosofi. Den praktiska delen av utbildningen handlar om att montera trampbilar längs en taktad produktionslina med hjälp av Lean metoder och verktyg utgående från att människan är central för produktion, att hälsa är en resurs med påverkan på människans förmåga och det innebär att arbetsplatser bör utformas så att de stödjer tillgången till människors förmåga att göra sitt bästa varje dag på jobbet. Att skapa arbetsplatser som stöder människor genom ett hälsofrämjande perspektiv behöver en strategi på daglig basis i human Lean sker detta genom komb-inationen Kasam och Lean filosofi. Med det menas att arbetsmiljön runt människor skall utformas med syftet skapa en känsla av att deras arbetssituation upplevs som meningsfull, begriplig och hanterbar.

    Resultat

    Resultat från de arbetsplatser där Human Lean konceptet prövats visar på positiva effekter på såväl hälsa som produktivitet och kvalitet. Fagersta stainless avdelning för dragen tråd var ett av de första att genomgå utbildning vid HLC. Mikael Bergman från Fagersta finns på plats vid presentationen för att berätta om hur utbildningen uppfattats av personal och företaget.

    Slutsatser

    Slutsatser utifrån erfarenheter från utvecklingen av Human Lean konceptet och Human Lean Centers verksamhet är att Human Lean konceptet genom kombinationen hälsoteori och Lean filosofi samt teori och praktisk träning kan ge positiva effekter på verksam-heters produktivitet och kvalitet samtidigt som hälsonivån bland medarbetare höjs i form av minskad sjukskrivning och minskat behov av rehabilitering.

  • 85.
    Halling, Bengt
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Ergonomi, KTH .
    Bergman, Mikael
    Fagersta Stainless.
    Wijk, Katarina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Intervention för ökad produktivitet och minskad sjukskrivning vid ett svenskt stålföretag2018In: FALF KONFERENS 2018 Arbetet – problem eller potential för en hållbar livsmiljö?   10-12 juni 2018 Gävle: Program och abstracts / [ed] Lindberg, Per, Gävle: Gävle University Press , 2018, p. 49-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund

    Vid Fagersta stainless produktionsenhet för dragen tråd vidareförädlas rostfri valsad tråd till dragen tråd som sedan kan användas för tillverkning av olika produkter. Vid produk-tionsenhet för dragen tråd hade de under en längre tid haft lönsamhetsproblem och hög sjukfrånvaro och företagets ledning ansåg att något måste göras för att ändra detta. En ny produktionschef och tre produktionsledare anställdes med uppdraget att vända den negativa situationen. Beslut togs om en intervention som påbörjades år 2015.

    Interventionen

    Samtlig personal vid produktionsenheten (n=46, inkluderande en produktionschef, tre produktions-ledare samt operatörer) genomgick utbildning under våren 2015 vid Human Lean Center, Högskolan i Gävle. Utbildningen bestod av en teoretisk och en praktisk del. Utbildningens teoretiska del handlade om hälsa och hälsofrämjande samt Lean filosofi. Utbildningens praktiska del innebar att montera trampbilar vid taktad monteringslina med hjälp av Lean metoder och ett hälsofrämjande perspektiv utgående från att arbete skall vara meningsfullt, begripligt och hanterbart. Kunskapen från utbildningen omsattes sedan vid Fagersta stainless produktionsenhet för dragen tråd genom att fyra förändringar gen-omfördes. 1. Skapa möjlighet för arbetsledarna att tillbringa tid på produktionsgolvet för att stödja produktionspersonalen. 2. Introduktion av ”whiteboardmöten” för information vid början av alla skift. 3. Byggandet av gemensam lunchplats. 4. Standardiserat arbets-sätt vid avvikelser.

    Metod

    Resultatet av interventionen mättes av Fagersta stainless med företagets system för upp-följning av produktivitet mätt i producerat ton stål per arbetare och sjukskrivningar mätta i procent av förlorad arbetstid i förhållande till möjlig arbetstid. Mätningar gjordes för år 2014, året före interventionen och för åren 2015-2017.

    Resultat

    Resultatet efter interventionen visar att Produktivitet per arbetare ökade för åren 2015-2017. År 2014 som var året före interventionen var produktiviteten per arbetare 158,3 ton. År 2015 ökade den med 24,9%, 2016 ökade produktiviteten per arbetare med 3,6% och för 2017 var ökningen 11,4%. Under samma tid åren 2015-2017 som produktiviteten ökade så minskade sjukskrivningar. 2014 året före interventionen uppgick sjukskriv-ningarna till 15% av total möjlig tid för arbete (100%). År 2015 sjönk sjukskrivningarna till 7% och 2016 sjönk de till 3% för att 2017 sjunka ytterligare till 2,5%.

    Slutsats

    Genom att kombinera hälsofrämjande teorier och Lean filosofi som delar i en utbildning med teoretiska och praktiska moment kan en kunskapsgrund läggas för en kontext-anpassad intervention som kan resultera i ökad produktivitet per arbetare samtidigt som sjukskrivningar kan minska. Verksamheter som vill öka produktivitet och samtidigt minska sjukskrivningar bör överväga att kombinera Lean filosofi med hälsofrämjande teori som strategi.

  • 86.
    Halling, Bengt
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Renström, Jonas
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Swedish Royal Institute of Technology.
    From Fantasy to Reality: Learning From Seven Years of Lean Implementation2013In: Journal of US-China Public Administration, ISSN 1548-6591, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 368-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to address the question of how manager’s views on Lean in terms of “toolbox Lean” or“Lean thinking” impact their view of the implementation process. This paper is based on a case study at a globallyestablished Swedish manufacturing company. Findings show that managers’ definitions of Lean have evolved froma “toolbox” view toward more of a “Lean thinking” view during the implementation process, due to the learningtaking place in the organization during the implementation. As the understanding of Lean develops, new andunforeseen deviations or needs may be identified. This in turn affects the managers’ views on the implementationprocess and perceived needs in regard to Lean development. The study also shows that fragmented development ofan organization, such as production units developing individually without support from middle management orhuman resources (HR) may impede Lean development efforts. Lean implementation and development requiresystem wide change in order to be sustainable, which primarily concerns the management system and managementapproach but also all support functions within an organization. The use of external consultants in selected parts ofan organization, thereby by-passing management levels and support functions may generate conflicting prioritiesand tension within an organization. The paper contributes to a deeper understanding regarding the learning processrelated to Lean implementations and to the aspects of people development and leadership required for sustainableLean development.

  • 87.
    Halling, Bengt
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Renström, Jonas
    Lean and the implementation process: managers perspective on change2011In: Det nya arbetslivet, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction and aims: Research has shown that view on Lean production differs both between researchers and practitioners and that there is no uniform definition of the concept (Emiliani 2006; Pettersen 2009). Furthermore, the perspective on Lean production as toolbox or philosophy, sometimes expressed as Lean thinking, influences the Lean implementation. Implementation of Lean can be seen as a project or an initiation of an ongoing developmental process where learning is taking place (Rother 2010). The purpose of this paper is to survey managers´s wiew of lean in terms of “toolbox Lean” or Lean thinking and their view of the implementation process in terms of a project with a time limit or as an initiation of an ongoing developmental process. The intention is to increase understanding about the relationship betweenhow Lean production is defined and implemented.

    Method: This paper is based on a case study at a Swedish manufacturing company aiming tobecome a company working with a business system based on Lean principles. The study has a multilevel, vertical, perspective covering five hierarchical management levels in the organization, from president of the company to first line managers at the shop floor. Data was collected through individual semi structured interviews with 14 managers at different organizational levels.

    Findings and reflection: The view on Lean has, according to managers, evolved at all management levels within the organization during the implementation. From a starting point were Lean was perceived as a set of tools by most, it has, as the managers increased their knowledge evolved into a view that is more complex and also includes behavioral and cultural issues. This would indicate that even if the starting point of an implementation of Lean is Lean tool focused it may over time come to include issues of management protocol addressing cultural development, coaching and communication as learning regarding the organizational needs take place. The interviews showed that managers on different hierarchical levels of the organization believed there to be differences in view regarding Lean within the organization. We however found the view on Lean to be quite similar at all management levels, described as a customer focused; standardized way of working that is continuously improved by keeping a process focus. The impression of there being differences in view regarding Lean is most likely caused by a lack of dialogue between organizational levels within the organization. Varying competence levels regarding Lean and thereby varying ways of working within the organization may create a lack of support between production and support functions. Health and health promotion are seen as important factors at the production unit that was studied.

    Research limitations: Organizational size and only partial coverage of the organization may limit the results validity to the parts of the organization that was researched and to larger organizations.

    Value: This paper provides insights regarding the learning process connected to a Lean implementation and that alterations of perspectives and needs may take place during such a process.

    Keywords: Lean production; Lean management; Lean implementation

    Paper type: Case study

  • 88.
    Halling, Bengt
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. KTH.
    Renström, Jonas
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. KTH .
    Lean leadership: a matter of dualism2014In: International Journal of Human Resources Development and Management, ISSN 1465-6612, E-ISSN 1741-5160, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 242-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On the basis of previous literature, this study takes a snowball approach to identify people influential on the topics through their writings. The aim was to conceptualise leadership and management in regard to lean, thus increasing understanding of the roles of leadership and management in lean development. The findings showed that leadership and management are two different but complementary action systems, similar to the duality of Toyota's two foundational principles: respect for people and continuous improvement. Differentiating between leadership and management is important in order to meet organisational needs during a lean implementation; each has complementary functions. Practical implications include the need to further train managers in leadership and to work within organisational culture to influence on–the–job behaviour. This lack of leadership competence may be one reason companies tend to address lean as a toolbox rather than an enterprise–wide system that covers all its operations and entails cultural and behaviour standards.

  • 89.
    Halling, Bengt
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Renström, Jonas
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    LEAN och Ledarskap2012In:  , 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Research has shown that leadership is an important factor when implementing and developing a TPS (Toyota Production System) inspired Lean way of working in organizations. In spite of it´s stated importance, leadership is indicated as a weak area and a problem in many organizations striving to develop as Lean enterprises. To successfully implement and develop a sustainable Lean way of working it becomes essential to understand what kind of leadership a Lean organization requires. There is a stated gap in Lean literature regarding management and difficulties in implementation are indicated to often occur due to overlooked but crucial differences in approach in management.

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe leadership from a Lean perspective and identify possible key factors regarding leadership for a developing Lean organization.

    Method: This paper is based on a literature study.

    Results: Leadership within a Lean organization can be said to be characterized by a deep knowledge regarding the operation processes in order to be able to mentor, coach, and develop employees in line with company standards, goals and vision. It is indicated that a leaders primary responsibility is to support in the development of subordinates by taking active part in problem solving and by role modeling. To develop people in a way means to continuously challenge them, this challenge being a way to assure continuous improvement. With a long term perspective and the principle of “respect for people” in mind this means balancing the challenge to avoid overburdening (muri). Two aspects are of importance here; deep knowledge regarding company processes, standards and protocol and a close working relationship with subordinates in order to be able to continously coach, mentor, and take active part in problem solving.

    Discussion: Leadership and the role of management in Lean implementation and development will, if continuous improvement and not just implementation of tools is aspired, be to support structures and behaviors needed for problem solving and organizational learning. Toyota is by several sources described as a learning organization and Lean systems based on Toyota will thus require a leadership and a management system that meet the requirements of a learning organization. This type of leadership appears to be similar to what Bass (1999) describes as transformational and transactional leadership where inspiration & idealized influence, intellectual stimulation, and individualized consideration are key factors as well as goal setting, contracting, structure and standards.

    Value: This paper provides insights regarding possible key factors concerning leadership in regard to Lean implementation and development as well as the importance and purpose of leadership in a lean organization.

  • 90.
    Halling, Bengt
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wijk, Katarina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Department of Public Health Medicine, County Council of Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden; County Council of Gävleborg, Sweden; Faculty of Educational Science, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Experienced Barriers to Lean in Swedish Manufacturing and Health Care2013In: International Journal of Lean Thinking, ISSN 2146-0337, Vol. 4, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A B S T R A C T  

    Purpose: The purpose is to compare similarities and divergences in how the concepts of Lean and barriers to Lean are described by key informants at a production unit in a large manufacturing company and two emergency health care units in Sweden.

    Design/methodology/approach: Data was collected via semi-structured interviews and analyzed with the constant comparative method (CCM) and Porras and Robertson’s

    (1992) change model.

    Findings: In both organizations, the view of Lean changed from a toolbox to a human behavior view. Eight barriers were experienced in both organizations. Three barriers

    were unique to manufacturing or to health care, respectively. Nine barriers were elements of social factors;five were elements of organizing arrangements.

    Research limitations/implications: Only people practically involved and responsible for the implementation at the two organizations participated in the study.

    Practical implications: Persons responsible for implementing Lean should consider organizational arrangements and social factors in order to limit barriers to

    successful implementation.

    Originality/value: Most research on Lean has been about successful Lean implementations. This study focuses on how Lean is viewed and what barriers personnel in

    manufacturing and health care have experienced. In comparing the barriers to Lean experienced in the two groups, common, archetypical, and unique barriers for manufacturing and health care can be identified, thus contributing to knowledge about barriers to Lean implementation.

  • 91.
    HANIF, MUHAMMAD SAQIB
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management.
    RASTAN, MOHAMMAD REZA
    University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Service Innovation in Third Party Logistics: A case Study of Green Cargo Logistics AB2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    For a very long time, Innovation has been viewed as technological phenomenon representing technological advancement in product or process features. A lot of research can be found in literature representing product innovation management supported by empirical studies, however, prospect of service innovation management has been largely ignored. Especially there is very limited research on service development process in third party logistics companies.

    This research aims to bring a holistic view of innovation management in third party logistics (3PL) companies so that a better understanding can be developed and it can be examined if existing innovation models are valid for 3PL companies.

    To achieve the objectives of this thesis, relevant literature has been reviewed extensively so that conductors of this research can get benefit of existing knowledge in the field and a duplication of research can be avoided. This research work is based on qualitative case study and Green Cargo Logistics AB (which is one of well established third part logistics (3PL) companies) was selected in order to find answers to research questions, which were resulted from the research gaps, found in existing literature. Findings from the case company are discussed in connection with theory and an analysis is made to reach on following conclusion.

    Conclusions: An innovative 3PL company has better ability to stay competitive and increase its market share through a better ability to serve it with new better services. Along with technological advancement, spotted opportunity for business growth, threat from competition and customer demand, environmental concerns have also been recognized as driving force for innovations in 3PL. This thesis also shows that a small independent unit (group of people) can play role of innovative organization to prosper creativity by improving interactions with external and internal linkages. This research illustrates that contrary to existing literature (which says there should be one single strategy for innovation management process), a flexible and adaptive strategy can be equally or more effective. For balancing risks and rewards while selecting development projects, consideration of return on investment (ROI) is found to be the most important decision criterion. For implementing the selected innovative idea, a small-scale test should be conducted in order to avoid risks associated with development projects.

  • 92.
    Hellberg, Roland
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Intelligent Mail, an international revolution?2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The postal sector, the largest distribution network in the world, facing a decreasing letter volume due to both deregulation of the market and to substitution from electronic formats. One effect of the deregulation is that new operators are established and take market shares. The electronic media in form of e-mail and webpage’s, has taken a large part of the letter market. One way to meet this keener competition is to make distribution of mail more valuable and cost-effective for both the sender and the receiver by adding new options to the mail. In most countries there is only one operator who has the right to act as universal service provider in the meaning of UPU (Universal Post Union), called designated postal operator (DPO). Many of these DPO are developing a concept called Intelligent Mail to defense theirs market share.

     

    The purpose of this paper is to give a broad picture of intelligent mail as a concept and also to what extent this new concept will be able to use in international letter distribution within the postal sector.

     

    The data is mainly collected from different main operators through interviews and compared with written information.

     

    There are mainly to findings. The first is that the content and meaning of Intelligent Mail differ a lot from operator to operator. The second finding is that systems needed to support options in the concept are not universal within the postal sector and therefore very hard to use in an international context.

     

    The contribution of this paper is to give a deeper understanding of the Intelligent Mail concept and why this concept not is useful for international distribution within the postal industry today.

  • 93.
    Hellberg, Roland
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Successful design of warehouse layout for an extremely volatile market founded major increased market share2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to give a successful example of how and why a change in warehouse design, where different picking methods are combined and supported by an intelligent warehouse management system to meet a very huge variation in volume with very short delivery time, have founded a major increasing in the market share from 22 to 50 %.

    This research was done as a longitudinal study from 1993 to 2010, where one company was followed on daily base 1993-2000 and for the last 10 years followed on yearly base.

    At the end of the study (2010) the company distributed over 13,000,000 items (books) covering 35,000 titles. The order size varies from 1 to over 5000. In addition, the company distributes over 2,600,000 items for book clubs and online shopping, as well as providing a wide range of additional services in the form of special packaging solutions, mechanical packing, mailing information, etc. The delivery time must be within 15 min in some cases but normally order taken before 17:00 are dispatched the next day. The must books are not wrapped.

    There are mainly to findings. The first finding is the importance to really understand the variation in volume over time and to design the warehouse and processes after this. Many similar companies have tried to meet the marked demand with warehouse automation, but this case show the importance to avoid automation to keep maximum flexibility to be able to meet extreme volume variation with very short delivery times.

    The second finding is that the intelligence in meaning of supporting IT-systems both must handling different market demands and support different order fulfillment processes. To meet the customer’s different requirements with short delivery times and huge variation in volume the successful order fulfillment process includes lot of different picking methods.

    A deep and long time study of a “best practice” case of a third party logistic providers that have designed the warehouse in order to meet an extremely volatile market.

  • 94.
    Hellberg, Roland
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Successful redesigned warehouse operations in order to meet an extremely volatile market2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A study of a third party logistic provider that has continuously redesigned theirs warehouse operations in order to meet an extremely volatile market with very short delivery times and large order size fluctuation. This research was done as a longitudinal study from 1993 to 2010, where the company was followed on daily base 1993-2000 and for the last 10 years on yearly base.

     

    The paper explain how an unique combination of many different picking methods, flexible layout and an intelligent warehouse management system, have founded a major increase of the providers market share from 22 to 50 %.

     

    Many similar companies have tried to meet the marked demand with warehouse automation, this case show the importance to avoid automation to keep maximum flexibility to be able to meet extreme volume variation with very short delivery times. Instead investments are turned into intelligence of the IT-system which support different fulfillment processes.

     

  • 95.
    Holm, Tove
    et al.
    Sykli Environmental School of Finland, Finland.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Caeiro, Sandra
    Universidade Aberta and CENSE from Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal.
    Rieckmann, Marco
    University of Vechta, Germany.
    Dlouhá, Jana
    Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Wright, Tarah
    Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
    Ceulemans, Kim
    University of Victoria, Gustavson Business School, Centre for Social and Sustainable Innovation, Victoria, BC, Canada.
    Benayas, Javier
    Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    ournal of Cleaner Production, The Netherlands; Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Utrecht University, The Netherlands.
    Developing sustainability into a golden thread throughout all levels of education2016In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 117, p. 1-3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 96.
    Holm, Tove
    et al.
    Sykli Environmental School of Finland, Finland; Department of Biology, University of Turku, Finland; Novia University of Applied Sciences, Finland .
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Grindsted, Thomas S.
    Department of Environmental, Social and Spatial Change, Roskilde University, Denmark.
    Vuorisalo, Timo
    Department of Biology, University of Turku, Finland.
    Process framework for identifying sustainability aspects in university curricula and integrating education for sustainable development2015In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 106, p. 164-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability aspects in higher education must be enhanced with more concrete actions. Universities are globally required to have quality assurance to secure and improve teaching and learning, and they use management systems to this aim. Integrating education for sustainable development and management systems are alike in that they are based on continuous improvement and systematic thinking; for both processes all stakeholders need to be involved. Although quality assurance is compulsory for higher education, education for sustainable development has barely been examined or integrated in this context.This article examines how voluntary integration of education for sustainable development into management systems at universities could facilitate a scheme to overcome the challenges to integrating education for sustainable development that were identified in previous research. For this, a process framework for integrating education for sustainable development with management systems was developed in a network of 11 universities in the Nordic countries. The framework included planning, assessment, monitoring, and implementation of education for sustainable development. It was piloted and applied to identify relevant sustainability aspects in different disciplines, examples of which are provided in the article. The framework can be applied to visualize the implementation of education for sustainable development. 

  • 97.
    Holm, Tove
    et al.
    University of Turku, Department of Biology.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Grinsted, Thomas S
    Riskilde University.
    Vuorisalo, Timo
    University ofTurku.
    Process model for integrating ESD and identifying sustainability aspects in universities’ curricula2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At the Rio + 20 UN Conference on Sustainable Development in 2012 it was decided that education for sustainable development (ESD) will be promoted more actively beyond the UN Decade of ESD (2005-2014). Integrating ESD into the management system could be a way to ensure that it will be integrated throughout the university system because quality assurance is compulsory, which ESD is not. A process model for enhancing ESD with management systems was developed and compared with drivers and barriers for enhancing ESD and for implementing management systems, and piloted. The process includes planning, assessment, monitoring and implementation of ESD, by which sustainability aspects have been identified. Examples of relevant sustainability aspects in different disciplines in Norden are provided. It was found that sustainability aspects could be identified for many fields, which indicates that the process model could be used as a tool in universities’ management systems, for enhancing ESD.

  • 98.
    Holm, Tove
    et al.
    University of Turku, Department of Biology.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Vuorisalo, Timo
    University of Turku, Department of Biology.
    Education for sustainable development and management systems in higher education in Finland and China:  a comparative study2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 99.
    Holm, Tove
    et al.
    University of Turku, Department of Biology; Novia University of Applied Sciences.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Vuorisalo, Timo
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Education for sustainable development and quality assurance in universities in China and the Nordic countries: a comparative study2015In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 107, p. 529-537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global goal for education for sustainable development (ESD) is to integrate it at all levels of education. For ensuring it the change has to be put in practice, by transforming universities. The Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden) strive to be among the regions that lead the way in enhancing ESD, and want to increase cooperation with China. It is therefore interesting to compare the region with China. We compared ESD and quality assurance between these areas at both policy and implementation levels. The former was based on literature, and the latter was studied with specific surveys in academia in both regions; in two provinces in China and in the Nordic countries. We investigated the possibilities to improve ESD in these regions by benefiting from quality assurance requirements. We found that both regions enhance ESD. The rather similar quality assurance requirements do not include ESD. In China, the respondents viewed quality assurance as sustainable development.

  • 100.
    Holm, Tove
    et al.
    University of Turku, Department of Biology.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Vuorisalo, Timo
    University of Turku.
    Grindsted, Thomas S
    University of Roskilde.
    A Model for Enhancing Education for Sustainable Development with Management Systems: Experiences from the Nordic Countries2012In: Sustainable Development at Universities: New Horizons / [ed] Leal Filho, Walter, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2012, 1, p. 261-272Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enhancing education for sustainable development, ESD, in higher education is a global challenge. Most countries have national quality assurance demands for higher education that could benefit ESD. This innovative way to develop ESD has not been investigated before. The authors studied how different higher education institutions enhance ESD, in particular with quality, environmental and integrated management systems. The research was done as an exploratory comparative study. The results in earlier research about curriculum development for ESD from the last years were studied. Based on the results a model of a process for enhancing ESD, which can be used in the management systems, was developed. 27 higher education institutions from the Nordic countries answered a survey and eleven institutions wrote reports of how they are enhancing ESD. The results from the research, survey and institutions were presented at a seminar, where the model was further developed. The authors found that in none of the Nordic countries indicators for SD are included in the quality assurance models of higher education, even though there are demands for enhancing ESD. The majority of the replies stated that the institutions have a clear connection between ESD and quality assurance and it is implemented differently in many parts of the management systems. The findings from the survey and the pilot institutions are restricted to faculty involved in enhancing ESD in higher education the Nordic countries. The findings can be used by the responsible for developing ESD and/or management systems in different higher education institutions.

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