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  • 51.
    Tenzer, Robert
    et al.
    University of Otago.
    Bagherbandi, Mohammad
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Urban and regional planning/GIS-institute.
    Cheinway, Hwang
    Chang, Emmy Tsui-Yu
    Moho Interface Modeling Beneath the Himalayas, Tibet and Central Siberia Using GOCO02S and DTM2006.02013In: Terrestrial, Atmospheric and Oceanic Science, ISSN 1017-0839, E-ISSN 2223-8964, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 581-590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We apply a newly developed method to estimate the Moho depths and density contrast beneath the Himalayas, Tibet and Central Siberia. This method utilizes the combined least-squares approach based on solving the inverse problem of isostasy and using the constraining information from the seismic global crustal model (CRUST2.0). The gravimetric forward modeling is applied to compute the isostatic gravity anomalies using the global geopotential model (GOCO02S) and the global topographic/bathymetric model (DTM2006.0). The estimated Moho depths vary between 60 - 70 km beneath most of the Himalayas and Tibet and reach the maxima of ~79 km. The Moho depth under Central Siberia is typically 50 - 60 km. The Moho density contrast computed relative to the CRUST2.0 lower crustal densities has the maxima of ~300 kg m-3 under Central Tibet. It substantially decreases to 150 - 250 kg m-3 under Himalayas and north Tibet. The estimated Moho density contrast under central Siberia is within 100 - 200 kg m-3.

  • 52.
    Tenzer, Robert
    et al.
    Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment and Geodesy, Wuhan University, Wuhan, China; he New Technologies for the Information Society, University of West Bohemia, Plzen, Czech Republic.
    Bagherbandi, Mohammad
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Land management, GIS. the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Chen, Wenjin
    University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy.
    Sjöberg, Lars E.
    the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Global Isostatic Gravity Maps From Satellite Missions and Their Applications in the Lithospheric Structure Studies2017In: IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing, ISSN 1939-1404, E-ISSN 2151-1535, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 549-561Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent satellite gravity missions provide information on the Earth’s gravity field with a global and homogenous coverage. These data have been utilized in geoscience studies to investigate the Earth’s inner structure. In this study, we use the global gravitational models to compute and compare various isostatic gravity data. In particular, we compile global maps of the isostatic gravity disturbances by applying the Airy-Heiskanen and Pratt-Hayford isostatic theories based on assuming a local compensation mechanism. We further apply the Vening Meinesz-Moritz isostatic (flexural) model based on a more realistic assumption of the regional compensation mechanism described for the Earth’s homogenous and variable crustal structure. The resulting isostatic gravity fields are used to analyze their spatial and spectral characteristics with respect to the global crustal geometry. Results reveal that each of the applied compensation model yields a distinctive spatial pattern of the isostatic gravity field with its own spectral characteristics. The Airy-Heiskanen isostatic gravity disturbances provide a very smooth gravity field with no correlation with the crustal geometry. The Pratt-Hayford isostatic gravity disturbances are spatially highly correlated with the topography on land, while the Vening-Meinesz Moritz isostatic gravity disturbances are correlated with the Moho geometry. The complete crust-stripped isostatic gravity disturbances reveal a gravitational signature of the mantle lithosphere. These general characteristics provide valuable information for selection of a particular isostatic scheme, which could be used for gravimetric interpretations, depending on a purpose of the study.

  • 53.
    Tenzer, Robert
    et al.
    University of Otago, National School of Surveying.
    Bagherbandi, Mohammad
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Urban and regional planning/GIS-institute.
    Gladkikh, Vladislav
    University of Otago, National School of Surveying.
    Signature of the upper mantle density structure in the refined gravity data2012In: Computational Geosciences, ISSN 1420-0597, E-ISSN 1573-1499, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 975-986Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 54.
    Tenzer, Robert
    et al.
    Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics, School of Geodesy and Geomatics, Wuhan University, Wuhan, China .
    Bagherbandi, Mohammad
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Land management, GIS. Royal Institute of Technolog (KTH), Division of Geodesy & Geoinformation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Lars E.
    Royal Institute of Technolog (KTH), Division of Geodesy & Geoinformation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Comparison of various isostatic marine gravity disturbances2015In: Journal of Earth System Science, ISSN 0253-4126, E-ISSN 0973-774X, Vol. 124, no 6, p. 1235-1245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present and compare four types of the isostatic gravity disturbances compiled at sea level over the world oceans and marginal seas. These isostatic gravity disturbances are computed by applying the Airy– Heiskanen (AH), Pratt–Hayford (PH) and Vening Meinesz–Moritz (VMM) isostatic models. In addition, we compute the complete crust-stripped (CCS) isostatic gravity disturbances which are defined based on a principle of minimizing their spatial correlation with the Moho geometry. We demonstrate that each applied compensation scheme yields a distinctive spatial pattern in the resulting isostatic marine gravity field. The AH isostatic gravity disturbances provide the smoothest gravity field (by means of their standard deviation). The AH and VMM isostatic gravity disturbances have very similar spatial patterns due to the fact that the same isostatic principle is applied in both these definitions expect for assuming a local (in the former) instead of a global (in the latter) compensation mechanism. The PH isostatic gravity disturbances are highly spatially correlated with the ocean-floor relief. The CCS isostatic gravity disturbances reveal a signature of the ocean-floor spreading characterized by an increasing density of the oceanic lithosphere with age. 

  • 55.
    Tenzer, Robert
    et al.
    Wuhan University, China, Hubei, China.
    Bagherbandi, Mohammad
    Division of Geodesy and Satellite Positioning, KTH.
    Sjöberg, Lars
    Division of Geodesy and Satellite Positioning KTH.
    Novak, Pavel
    University of West Bohemia, Czech Republic, Plzeň, República Checa.
    Isostatic crustal thickness under the Tibetan Plateau and Himalayas from satellite gravity gradiometry data2015In: Earth Sciences Research Journal, ISSN 1794-6190, E-ISSN 2339-3459, Vol. 19, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global gravity and crustal models are used in this study to determine the regional Moho model. For this purpose, we solve the Vening Meinesz-Moritz's (VMM) inverse problem of isostasy defined in terms of the isostatic gravity gradient. The functional relation between the Moho depth and the second-order radial derivative of the VMM isostatic potential is formulated by means of the (linearized) Fredholm integral equation of the first kind. Methods for a spherical harmonic analysis and synthesis of the gravity field and crustal structure models are applied to evaluate the gravity gradient corrections and the respective corrected gravity gradient, taking into consideration major known density structures within the Earth's crust (while mantle heterogeneities are disregarded). The resulting gravity gradient is compensated isostatically based on applying the VMM scheme. The VMM inverse problem for finding the Moho depths is solved iteratively. The regularization is applied to stabilize the ill-posed solution. The global geopotential model GOCO-03s, the global topographic/bathymetric model DTM2006.0 and the global crustal model CRUST1.0 are used to generate the VMM isostatic gravity gradient with a spectral resolution complete to a spherical harmonic degree of 250. The VMM inverse scheme is used to determine the regional isostatic crustal thickness beneath the Tibetan Plateau and Himalayas (compiled on a 1x1 arc-deg grid). The differences between the isostatic and seismic Moho models are modeled and subsequently corrected for by applying the non-isostatic correction. Our results show that the regional gravity gradient inversion can model realistically the relative Moho geometry, while the solution contains a systematic bias. We explain this bias by more localized information on the Earth's inner structure in the gravity gradient field compared to the potential or gravity fields.

  • 56.
    Tenzer, Robert
    et al.
    University of Otago, National School of Surveying.
    Bagherbandi, Mohammad
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Urban and regional planning/GIS-institute.
    Vajda, Peter
    Geophysical Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences.
    Depth-dependent density change within the continental upper mantle2012In: Slovak Academy of Sciences. Geophysical Institute. Contributions to Geophysics and Geodesy, ISSN 1338-0540, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 57.
    Tenzer, Robert
    et al.
    Wuhan Univ, Peoples R China.
    Bagherbandi, Mohammad
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Urban and regional planning/GIS-institute. Royal Inst Technol KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vajda, Peter
    Slovak Acad Sci, Slovakia.
    Global model of the upper mantle lateral density structure based on combining seismic and isostatic models2013In: Geosciences Journal, ISSN 1598-7477, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 65-73Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 58.
    Tenzer, Robert
    et al.
    Department of Land Surveying and Geo-Informatics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, China.
    Chen, Wenjin
    Department of Geodesy and Geomatics, Wuhan University, Wuhan, China.
    Baranov, Alexey
    Schmidt Institute of Physics of the Earth, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russian Federation; Institute of Earthquake Prediction Theory and Mathematical Geophysics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Bagherbandi, Mohammad
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Land management, GIS. Division of Geodesy and Geoinformatics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gravity maps of Antarctic lithospheric structure from remote-sensing and seismic data2018In: Pure and Applied Geophysics, ISSN 0033-4553, E-ISSN 1420-9136, Vol. 175, no 6, p. 2181-2203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Remote-sensing data from altimetry and gravity satellite missions combined with seismic information have been used to investigate the Earth’s interior, particularly focusing on the lithospheric structure. In this study, we use the subglacial bedrock relief BEDMAP2, the global gravitational model GOCO05S, and the ETOPO1 topographic/bathymetric data, together with a newly developed (continental-scale) seismic crustal model for Antarctica to compile the free-air, Bouguer, and mantle gravity maps over this continent and surrounding oceanic areas. We then use these gravity maps to interpret the Antarctic crustal and uppermost mantle structure. We demonstrate that most of the gravity features seen in gravity maps could be explained by known lithospheric structures. The Bouguer gravity map reveals a contrast between the oceanic and continental crust which marks the extension of the Antarctic continental margins. The isostatic signature in this gravity map confirms deep and compact orogenic roots under the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains and more complex orogenic structures under Dronning Maud Land in East Antarctica. Whereas the Bouguer gravity map exhibits features which are closely spatially correlated with the crustal thickness, the mantle gravity map reveals mainly the gravitational signature of the uppermost mantle, which is superposed over a weaker (long-wavelength) signature of density heterogeneities distributed deeper in the mantle. In contrast to a relatively complex and segmented uppermost mantle structure of West Antarctica, the mantle gravity map confirmed a more uniform structure of the East Antarctic Craton. The most pronounced features in this gravity map are divergent tectonic margins along mid-oceanic ridges and continental rifts. Gravity lows at these locations indicate that a broad region of the West Antarctic Rift System continuously extends between the Atlantic–Indian and Pacific–Antarctic mid-oceanic ridges and it is possibly formed by two major fault segments. Gravity lows over the Transantarctic Mountains confirms their non-collisional origin. Additionally, more localized gravity lows closely coincide with known locations of hotspots and volcanic regions (Marie Byrd Land, Balleny Islands, Mt. Erebus). Gravity lows also suggest a possible hotspot under the South Orkney Islands. However, this finding has to be further verified.

  • 59. Tenzer, Robert
    et al.
    Chen, Wenjin
    Tsoulis, Dimitrios
    Bagherbandi, Mohammad
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Land management, GIS. Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden .
    Sjöberg, Lars E.
    Novák, Pavel
    Jin, Shuanggen
    Analysis of the Refined CRUST1.0 Crustal Model and its Gravity Field2015In: Surveys in geophysics, ISSN 0169-3298, E-ISSN 1573-0956, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 139-165Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global crustal model CRUST1.0 (refined using additional global datasets of the solid topography, polar ice sheets and geoid) is used in this study to estimate the average densities of major crustal structures. We further use this refined model to compile the gravity field quantities generated by the Earth's crustal structures and to investigate their spatial and spectral characteristics and their correlation with the crustal geometry in context of the gravimetric Moho determination. The analysis shows that the average crustal density is 2,830 kg/m3, while it decreases to 2,490 kg/m3 when including the seawater. The average density of the oceanic crust (without the seawater) is 2,860 kg/m3, and the average continental crustal density (including the continental shelves) is 2,790 kg/m3. The correlation analysis reveals that the gravity field corrected for major known anomalous crustal density structures has a maximum (absolute) correlation with the Moho geometry. The Moho signature in these gravity data is seen mainly at the long-to-medium wavelengths. At higher frequencies, the Moho signature is weakening due to a noise in gravity data, which is mainly attributed to crustal model uncertainties. The Moho determination thus requires a combination of gravity and seismic data. In global studies, gravimetric methods can help improving seismic results, because (1) large parts of the world are not yet sufficiently covered by seismic surveys and (2) global gravity models have a relatively high accuracy and resolution. In regional and local studies, the gravimetric Moho determination requires either a detailed crustal density model or seismic data (for a combined gravity and seismic data inversion). We also demonstrate that the Earth's long-wavelength gravity spectrum comprises not only the gravitational signal of deep mantle heterogeneities (including the core-mantle boundary zone), but also shallow crustal structures. Consequently, the application of spectral filtering in the gravimetric Moho determination will remove not only the gravitational signal of (unknown) mantle heterogeneities, but also the Moho signature at the long-wavelength gravity spectrum. 

  • 60.
    Tenzer, Robert
    et al.
    The Department of Land Surveying and Geo-Informatics, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong.
    Foroughi, Ismael
    Department of Geodesy and Geomatics, University of New Brunswick, Canada.
    Sjöberg, Lars E.
    Division of Geodesy and Satellite Positioning, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bagherbandi, Mohammad
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Land management, GIS. Division of Geodesy and Satellite Positioning, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hirt, Christian
    Institute for Astronomical and Physical Geodesy and Institute for Advanced Study, Munich, Germany.
    Pitoňák, Martin
    New Technologies for the Information Society (NTIS), Faculty of Applied Sciences, University of West Bohemia, 301, Czech Republic.
    Definition of Physical Height Systems for Telluric Planets and Moons2018In: Surveys in geophysics, ISSN 0169-3298, E-ISSN 1573-0956, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 313-335Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In planetary sciences, the geodetic (geometric) heights defined with respect to the reference surface (the sphere or the ellipsoid) or with respect to the center of the planet/moon are typically used for mapping topographic surface, compilation of global topographic models, detailed mapping of potential landing sites, and other space science and engineering purposes. Nevertheless, certain applications, such as studies of gravity-driven mass movements, require the physical heights to be defined with respect to the equipotential surface. Taking the analogy with terrestrial height systems, the realization of height systems for telluric planets and moons could be done by means of defining the orthometric and geoidal heights. In this case, however, the definition of the orthometric heights in principle differs. Whereas the terrestrial geoid is described as an equipotential surface that best approximates the mean sea level, such a definition for planets/moons is irrelevant in the absence of (liquid) global oceans. A more natural choice for planets and moons is to adopt the geoidal equipotential surface that closely approximates the geometric reference surface (the sphere or the ellipsoid). In this study, we address these aspects by proposing a more accurate approach for defining the orthometric heights for telluric planets and moons from available topographic and gravity models, while adopting the average crustal density in the absence of reliable crustal density models. In particular, we discuss a proper treatment of topographic masses in the context of gravimetric geoid determination. In numerical studies, we investigate differences between the geodetic and orthometric heights, represented by the geoidal heights, on Mercury, Venus, Mars, and Moon. Our results reveal that these differences are significant. The geoidal heights on Mercury vary from − 132 to 166 m. On Venus, the geoidal heights are between − 51 and 137 m with maxima on this planet at Atla Regio and Beta Regio. The largest geoid undulations between − 747 and 1685 m were found on Mars, with the extreme positive geoidal heights under Olympus Mons in Tharsis region. Large variations in the geoidal geometry are also confirmed on the Moon, with the geoidal heights ranging from − 298 to 461 m. For comparison, the terrestrial geoid undulations are mostly within ± 100 m. We also demonstrate that a commonly used method for computing the geoidal heights that disregards the differences between the gravity field outside and inside topographic masses yields relatively large errors. According to our estimates, these errors are − 0.3/+ 3.4 m for Mercury, 0.0/+ 13.3 m for Venus, − 1.4/+ 125.6 m for Mars, and − 5.6/+ 45.2 m for the Moon.

  • 61.
    Tenzer, Robert
    et al.
    Hong Kong Polytechnic University.
    Foroughi, Ismael
    University of New Brunswick, Canada.
    Sjöberg, Lars E.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences. KTH.
    Bagherbandi, Mohammad
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Computer and Geospatial Sciences, Geospatial Sciences.
    Hirt, Christian
    TU Munich, Germany.
    Pitoňák, Martin
    University of West Bohemia, Czech Republic.
    Theoretical and practical aspects of defining the heights for planets and moons2018Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    In planetary sciences, the geodetic (geometric) heights defined with respect to the reference surface (the sphere or the ellipsoid) or with respect to the center of the planet/moon are typically used for mapping topographic surface, compilation of global topographic models, detailed mapping of potential landing sites, and other space science and engineering purposes. Nevertheless, certain applications, such as studies of gravity-driven mass movements, require the physical heights to be defined with respect to the equipotential surface. Taking the analogy with terrestrial height systems, the realization of height systems for telluric planets and moons could be done by means of defining the orthometric and geoidal heights. In this case, however, the definition of the orthometric heights in principle differs. Whereas the terrestrial geoid is described as an equipotential surface that best approximates the mean sea level, such a definition for planets/moons is irrelevant in the absence of (liquid) global oceans. A more natural choice for planets and moons is to adopt the geoidal equipotential surface that closely approximates the geometric reference surface (the sphere or the ellipsoid). In this study, we address these aspects by proposing a more accurate approach for defining the orthometric heights for telluric planets and moons from available topographic and gravity models, while adopting the average crustal density in the absence of reliable crustal density models. In particular, we discuss a proper treatment of topographic masses in the context of gravimetric geoid determination. In numerical studies, we investigate differences between the geodetic and orthometric heights, represented by the geoidal heights, on Mercury, Venus, Mars, and Moon. Our results reveal that these differences are significant. The geoidal heights on Mercury vary from − 132 to 166 m. On Venus, the geoidal heights are between − 51 and 137 m with maxima on this planet at Atla Regio and Beta Regio. The largest geoid undulations between − 747 and 1685 m were found on Mars, with the extreme positive geoidal heights under Olympus Mons in Tharsis region. Large variations in the geoidal geometry are also confirmed on the Moon, with the geoidal heights ranging from − 298 to 461 m. For comparison, the terrestrial geoid undulations are mostly within ± 100 m. We also demonstrate that a commonly used method for computing the geoidal heights that disregards the differences between the gravity field outside and inside topographic masses yields relatively large errors. According to our estimates, these errors are − 0.3/+ 3.4 m for Mercury, 0.0/+ 13.3 m for Venus, − 1.4/+ 125.6 m for Mars, and − 5.6/+ 45.2 m for the Moon.

12 51 - 61 of 61
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