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  • 51.
    Rydback, Michelle
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Hyder, Akmal S.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Borg, Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Osarenkhoe, Aihie
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    The marketing process of medical tourism2015In: Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Sustainable Value Chain in a Dynamic Environment / [ed] D. Vrontis, Y. Weber, E. Tsoukatos, Marseille: EuroMed Press , 2015, p. 2720-2722Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Rönnow, Daniel
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Electronics.
    Shahbazali, M.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences.
    Baki, W.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences.
    Tripathy, Malay Ranjan
    Department of Electronics and Communication Engineering Amity School of Engineering and Technology, Amity University, Noida, India.
    Effect on Lefthandedness from SRR Rotational Disorder2015In: PIERS 2015 Prague: Progress in Electromagnetics Research Symposium : Proceedings, Cambridge, MA: The Electromagnetics Academy , 2015, p. 2372-2375Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The split ring resonator (SRR) is the key element to obtain left handedness at microwave frequencies. The orientation of the SRR relative to the electromagnetic field is decisive for achieving lefthandedness. We investigate by simulations how the lefthandedness is affected by rotational disorder of the SRRs in an array of 2 x 11 SRRs. Rotational disorder of the inner ring has a minor effect on the lefthandedness. Combined rotational disorder of inner and outer ring has a similar effect as rotational disorder of the outer ring only. Rotational disorder causes a shift in the frequency range of lefthandedness.

  • 53.
    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Lagerqvist, Linda
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Pousette, Sandra
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Keep calm and have a good night: nurses' strategies to promote inpatients' sleep in the hospital environment2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 356-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients in the hospital environment are suffering from disrupted sleep, which adversely affects their recovery process, health and well-being. The aim of this study was to explore nurses' experiences and their strategies to promote inpatients' sleep. An empirical qualitative design was applied. Eight nurses at a hospital in Sweden were purposefully selected to be included in semi-structured interviews. Burnard's method for inductively analysing interview transcripts was applied. The findings are presented in four categories: (i) prevention and planning as a sleep-promoting nursing strategy; (ii) adaptation of the environment as a sleep-promoting nursing strategy; (iii) use of drugs as a sleep-promoting nursing strategy; and (iv) caring conversation as a sleep-promoting nursing strategy. Using strategies to promote sleep is important as it affects the recovery of the patients. We argue for the use of simple strategies of sensory reduction as cost-effective sleep-promoting measures that also reduce the use of sedative drugs.

  • 54.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Sundström, Agneta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Industrial economics. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Holm, Tove
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management. Sykli Environmental School of Finland, Finland.
    Yao, Zhilei
    Learning about sustainability: what influences students’ self-perceived sustainability actions after undergraduate education?2016In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 8, no 6, article id 510Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Changing societies’ minds about sustainability requires knowledge about the situation, awareness of what needs to be done and actions to change today’s unsustainable behaviors. Universities are challenged to develop students’ ability to appreciate the complexities of sustainability and translate sustainability knowledge of education into systemic, anticipatory and critical thinking and actions. To meet this challenge, universities provide specific study programs and courses and integrate sustainability in education and activities. There is limited research on the results of such efforts from a student perspective. The study focused on an identical cohort of 108 undergraduate students who answered a survey about their self-perceived knowledge, awareness and actions before and after their studies in a Swedish university. All 108 students had sustainability integrated into their study programs; forty-eight also attended specific sustainability courses. The test model explains variations in students’ self-perceived sustainability actions at the end of their studies. There were differences already in students’ initial self-perceived knowledge between the groups. The students’ female gender, self-perceived initial actions, studying sustainability courses as well as the increase in self-perceived sustainability knowledge contribute significantly to the later sustainability actions. The results show student development, which can encourage those working with education for sustainable development in universities.

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  • 55.
    Sjöberg, Fredric
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Schönning, Emil
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science.
    Nurses' experiences of performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation in intensive care units: a qualitative study2015In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, no 17-18, p. 2522-2528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: To describe the nurses' experiences of performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation in intensive care units.

    Background: Research in the area of resuscitation is primarily concentrated on medical and biophysical aspects. The subjective experiences of those who perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation and their emotions are more seldom addressed. Design: Qualitative descriptive design.

    Methods: Qualitative semi-structured interviews were used (n = 8). Data were analysed with content analysis.

    Results: Three categories describe the experiences of nurses: training and precardiopulmonary resuscitation; chaos and order during cardiopulmonary resuscitation; and debriefing postcardiopulmonary resuscitation. The study results indicate that the health care staff find it necessary to practice cardiopulmonary resuscitation, as it provides them with a basic feeling of security when applying it in actual situations.

    Conclusion: We argue that postcardiopulmonary resuscitation debriefing must be viewed in the light of its eigenvalue with a specific focus on the staff's experiences and emotions, and not only on the intention of identifying errors.

    Relevance to clinical practice: Debriefing is of the utmost importance for the nurses. Clinical leaders may make use of the findings of this study to introduce debriefing forums as a possible standard clinical procedure. 

  • 56.
    Sköld, Simon
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Larsson, Johan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Fagerström, Arne
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Business and Economic Studies, Business administration.
    Hållbarhetsanpassad förädlingsvärdesanalys för svenska börsföretag under åren 2014 och 20152016In: Balans : tidskrift för redovisning och revision, ISSN 0346-8208, Vol. -, no 4, p. 1-4Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 57.
    Svedin, Tommy
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Norrlander, Annelie
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Fläckman, Birgitta
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science.
    Levnadsvanor, upplevd stress och hälsa hos personal inom ambulansens och räddningstjänstens verksamheter2012In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 16-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are comparable as well as non comparable factors for personnel involved in ambulance and emergency services. The aim of this study was to describe and compare the ambulance and emergency personnel-rated health, physical activity, diet and work-related stress factors and some physiological measurements. The groups were recruited through convenience sampling. Questionnaire was used as data collection method. In addition, physiological measurements of all participants were measured at one occasion. Important relationships emerged regarding health status, perceived fatigue and workload of ambulance personnel. Emergency services of physical activity showed a major difference in relation to ambulance personnel. Job satisfaction was perceived as good in both occupational groups, however, experienced ambulance personnel more psychologically stress. Significant difference was seen between the groups regarding fatigue after a session. Obese and those with high waistlines was over-represented in the ambulance. There were more ambulance personnel staffs that were treated for hypertension and /or diabetes. Differences were found between the groups regarding hypertension, diabetes and physical activity. It was concluded, the lifestyle factors that can prevent the risk of cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome, are the ones, were not overweight, exercise regularly, had a good diet and experienced a good job satisfaction.

  • 58.
    Trygged, Sven
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Backlund, Åsa
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Elofsson, Stig
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Patterns of Poor Health among Junior and Senior High School Students in Sweden2017In: Health Behavior and Policy Review, E-ISSN 2326-4403, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 294-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: We examined how students’ self-perceived poor health is associated with social background, family, and school situation.

    Methods: Questionnaires distributed to 13,006 students in Sweden were examined using logistic regression analyses. The investigation focused on students reporting both poor self-rated health and subjective health complaints, referred to asself-perceived poor health.

    Results: Besides age and sex, we found associations between self-perceived poor health and family structure, relationship with parents, and school-related factors such as truancy, grades, and perceived school climate.

    Conclusions: Self-perceived poor health is related to both family and school related factors. Therefore, preventive health interventions need to include both school and family. Special attention should be given to truant students.

  • 59.
    Wermke, Wieland
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Education. Uppsala universitet.
    Pettersson, Daniel
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Education.
    Forsberg, Eva
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences, Education. Uppsala universitet.
    Approaching the space issue in Nordic curriculum theory: National reflections of globalization in social studies/citizenship textbook pictures in Sweden, England and Germany2015In: Nordic Journal of Studies in Educational Policy, ISSN 2002-0317, Vol. 1, no 1, article id 27011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on globalisation in Nordic curriculum theory by investigating the issue of space. It puts forward an increased interest in the practical levels of schooling and argues globalisation should be investigated not only as a policy phenomenon, but also as instructional matter in different contexts. It presents two perspectives of space, a container and a relational perspective. A distinction between the two perspectives contributes to an understanding of how the world is constructed at different levels of curriculum. The article tests its argument with an explorative social studies and citizenship textbook study in the national contexts of Sweden, England and Germany. It can be shown that all cases differ in their portrayals of globalisation and in the constructions of space related issues.

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  • 60.
    Zborowsky, Terri
    et al.
    Ellerbe Becket Inc, Healthcare Educ & Res, Minneapolis, USA.
    Bunker-Hellmich, Lou
    Ellerbe Becket Inc, Healthcare Educ & Res, Minneapolis, USA.
    Morelli, Agneta
    University of Gävle.
    O'Neill, Mike
    Knoll Inc, Workpl Res, East Greenville, USA.
    Centralized vs. Decentralized Nursing Stations: Effects on Nurses' Functional Use of Space and Work Environment2010In: Health Environments Research & Design Journal, ISSN 1937-5867, E-ISSN 2167-5112, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 19-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Evidence-based findings of the effects of nursing station design on nurses' work environment and work behavior are essential to improve conditions and increase retention among these fundamental members of the healthcare delivery team. The purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate how nursing station design (i.e., centralized and decentralized nursing station layouts) affected nurses' use of space, patient visibility, noise levels, and perceptions of the work environment. Background: Advances in information technology have enabled nurses to move away from traditional centralized paper-charting stations to smaller decentralized work stations and charting substations located closer to, or inside of, patient rooms. Improved understanding of the trade-offs presented by : centralized and decentralized nursing station design has the potential to provide useful information for future nursing station layouts. This information will be critical for understanding the nurse environment "fit." Methods: The study used an exploratory design with both qualitative and quantitative methods. Qualitative data regarding the effects of nursing station design on nurses' health and work environment were gathered by means of focus group interviews. Quantitative data-gathering techniques included, place- and person-centered space use observations, patient visibility assessments, sound level measurements, and an online questionnaire regarding perceptions of the work environment. Results: Nurses on all units were observed most frequently performing telephone, computer, and administrative duties. Time spent using telephones, computers, and performing other administrative duties was significantly higher in the centralized nursing stations. Consultations with medical staff and social interactions were significantly less frequent in decentralized nursing stations. There were no indications that either centralized or decentralized nursing station designs resulted in superior visibility. Sound levels measured in all nursing stations exceeded recommended levels during all shifts. No significant differences were identified in nurses' perceptions of work control-demand-support in centralized and decentralized nursing station designs. Conclusions: The "hybrid" nursing design model in which decentralized nursing stations are coupled with centralized meeting rooms for consultation between staff members may strike a balance between the increase in computer duties and the ongoing need for communication and consultation that addresses the conflicting demands of technology and direct patient care.

12 51 - 60 of 60
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