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  • 8951.
    Öberg, Peter
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Bildtgård, Torbjörn
    Institutionen för socialt arbete, Socialhögskolan, Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Andersson, Lars
    Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier (ISV), NISAL, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sverige.
    Skyddar en parrelation på äldre dar mot ensamhet?2016In: Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift, ISSN 1104-1420, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 19-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to study the importance of intimate relationships as protection from loneliness in later life. We base ourselves on a survey to Swedes aged 60–90 (n=1 225) focusing on intimate relationships. The analysis considers neglected issues in ageing research on loneliness: the importance of union form, the importance of looking at relationship dissolution in terms of both widowhood and divorce, and the importance of new late life unions (a gains perspective). We use two theoretical perspectives: the discrepancy model (realities vs. ideals), and the protection hypothesis, where the partner is generally the first and most important source of support in everyday life. The results show that a partner protects against loneliness and that union form matters: marriage provides the best protection, followed by cohabitation and Living Apart Together (LAT). Feelings of loneliness decrease over time following a union dissolution – and, for men, more rapidly after separation than widowhood. The more the ideal union form differs from one’s actual union form, the more common are feelings of loneliness. Initiating a new relationship after a union dissolution protects against loneliness. The article discusses the importance of using union form instead of civil status as relationship indicators in studies of older people in late modern Sweden, and of including separation/divorce as indicators of union dissolution besides widowhood. It also stresses the importance of looking at later life not only from a loss – but also from a gains – perspective.

  • 8952.
    Öberg, Peter
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska instutionen.
    Pohjolainen, Pertti
    Age institute, Helsinki.
    Ruoppila, Isto
    Psykologiska institutionen, Jyväskylä universitet, FI.
    Experiencing ageing – Kokemuksellinen vanheneminen – Att uppleva åldrandet1994 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I boken Att uppleva åldrandet ges en mångsidig bild av aktuell social- och psykogerontologisk forskning. Kända forskare från USA, Skandinavien och Finland analyserar i olika artiklar centrala temata som: uppfattningen av ålderdomen genom historien, psykogerontologins historia och utveckling, kreativitet under livsloppet, attityder till åldrandet och livslörändrdingar, upplevelser av hälsa och sjukdom samt förhållandet och växelverkan mellan generationerna. Artiklarna förmedlar också ny kunskap om äldrebefolkningen i Finland. Boken riktar sig speciellt till olika yrkesgrupper som är intresserade av åldrandet, samt till studerande i social- och vårdvetenskap.

  • 8953.
    Öberg, Peter
    et al.
    Uppsala univeristet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Ruth, Jan-Erik
    Age institute, Helsinki FI.
    Alter und Altern in der Lebensge­schichte älterer Finnen1995In: Altwerden in einer alternden Gesellschaft:: Kontinuität und Krisen in biographischen Verläufen / [ed] Mader, W., Opladen: Leske & Budrich , 1995, p. 155-170Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8954.
    Öberg, Peter
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska instutionen.
    Ruth, Jan-Erik
    Age institute, Helsinki FI.
    Hyvä vanhuus – kaikesta huoli­mat­ta [En god ålderdom – trots allt]1994In: Muuttuva vanhuus [Ålderdom i förän­dring] / [ed] Uutela, A. & Ruth, J.-E., Helsinki: Gaudeamus , 1994, 1, p. 445-463Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8955.
    Öberg, Peter
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Ruth, Jan-Erik
    Age institute, Helsinki FI.
    Livsloppsformer och åldrande i Finland1993In: Livslöp blant gamle i Norden / [ed] Kari Waerness, Jan-Erik Ruth & Lars Tornstam, Oslo: Norsk gerontologisk institutt , 1993, p. 141-198Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8956.
    Öberg, Peter
    et al.
    Uppsala univeristet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Ruth, Jan-Erik
    Age institute, Helsinki FI.
    Old age as reflected in the life stories of elderly Finns1995In: Images of aging in Western so­cieties / [ed] Hummel, C. & Lalive d'Epinay, C.J., Geneva: Centre for Interdisciplinary Gerontolology, University of Geneva , 1995, 1, p. 121-140Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8957.
    Öberg, Peter
    et al.
    Centrum för forskning och utbildning i äldreomsorgen, Kuntokalio, Finland.
    Ruth, Jan-Erik
    Age institute, Helsinki FI.
    Rädsla och Otrygghet Bland Äldre1987In: Gerontologia, ISSN 0784-0039, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 55-62Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8958.
    Öberg, Peter
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Dept Sociol.
    Tornstam, Lars
    Sociologiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet.
    Attitudes towards embodied old age among Swedes2003In: The International Journal of Aging & Human Development, ISSN 0091-4150, E-ISSN 1541-3535, Vol. 56, no 2, p. 133-153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Messages in the consumer culture are often youth oriented, aiming at the prevention of the bodily decay associated with biological ageing. In gerontological discourses, this has been hypothesised to generate negative attitudes towards embodied ageing and old age. Studies about general attitudes towards old age show that younger respondents have more negative attitudes than do older respondents, and gerontological discourses also hypothesise a gendered ageism, with especially negative attitudes towards elderly women. The empirical study of embodied ageing among 1,250 Swedes aged 20-85 years contradicts these hypotheses. The results show rather positive attitudes towards embodied old age, especially among young and middle-aged respondents. Neither do the results unequivocally confirm the hypothesis of gendered ageism, which predicts considerably more negative attitudes towards old women than towards old men. One interpretation of the results is that, counter to many hypotheses, the consumer culture, with its new opportunities and roles for old people, may positively affect these attitudes.

  • 8959.
    Öberg, Peter
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Tornstam, Lars
    Sociologiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet.
    Body images among men and women of different ages1999In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 629-644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The exterior territories, or surfaces, of the body have become symbols of the self in late modernity. People are increasingly overwhelmed with messages of youthful ideals: how to stay young or how to get old without signs of ageing. However, studies of the effects of these images on people’s own experiences as they grow older seem to be lacking. The present paper reports an empirical study which focuses on body image for men and women of different ages. Four hypotheses, derived from social gerontological theories, are developed and tested against data: the female beauty hypothesis, the double marginality hypothesis, the ageing mask hypothesis and the ageless self hypothesis. The survey, taken by 2,002 Swedes, reveals a response pattern with basically positive body images and, for women, increasingly positive with age. The results are, thus, in sharp contrast to the gerontophobic messages from consumer culture as well as to some gerontological theories

  • 8960.
    Öberg, Peter
    et al.
    Uppsala university, Department of Sociology.
    Tornstam, Lars
    Sociologiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet.
     Youthfulness and Fitness Identity Ideals for All Ages?2001In: Journal of Aging and Identity, ISSN 1087-3732, E-ISSN 1573-3491, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 15-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In consumer society the body, one focus for a youthful consumption, is a symbol of identity, the ‘true presentation’ of who one really is. We have witnessed new images for elderly people, especially the Young-Old. This descriptive study focuses on the importance of youthfulness and fitness in different among Swedes in different ages. The empirical study among 1.250 Swedes in the age 20-85 show youthfulness and fitness as uni-age phenomena. More than 7 out of 10 report lower ‘subjective ages’ (Feel-Age, Ideal-Age and Look-Age) than their chronological age. Fitness activities and slenderness ideals seem to be important independent of age group. This could, on one hand, be interpreted as a changing life course with new, more ‘positive’ images of old age. On the other hand it could be interpreted as a new, more subtle form of ageism.

  • 8961.
    Öborn, Helena
    et al.
    Division of Pediatrics, Department of Clinical Science, Technology and Intervention, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wettergren, Lena
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Herthelius, Maria
    Division of Pediatrics, Department of Clinical Science, Technology and Intervention, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Forinder, Ulla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Social Work, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Associations between lower urinary tract dysfunction and health-related quality of life in children with chronic kidney disease2016In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 105, no 8, p. 959-966Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim Little is known about the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of children with lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). We investigated LUTD and other possible predictors of impaired HRQoL in children with conservatively treated moderate to severe CKD or with a kidney transplant.

    Methods All 64 children with CKD or a kidney transplant treated at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden, between June 2011 and December 2012 were approached and 59 children aged 8-18 were enrolled in the study. Lower urinary tract function was evaluated with voiding history, frequency and volume chart, uroflowmetry and post void ultrasound measurements. Self-reported HRQoL was assessed with validated generic instruments.

    Results The HRQoL of the study cohort was as good as the general paediatric population, apart from the physical and psychological well-being dimensions, and was no different to children with other chronic conditions. Urinary incontinence, but not LUTD in general, was associated with impaired HRQoL, as was having a kidney transplant and being female in some dimensions.

    Conclusion LUTD was common in children with CKD or a kidney transplant but did not affect their general HRQoL. Predictors of impaired HRQoL included incontinence, having had a kidney transplant and being female.

  • 8962.
    Öhberg, Fredrik
    University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Biomechanical methods and error analysis related to chronic musculoskeletal pain2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Spinal pain is one of humanity’s most frequent complaints with high costs for the individual and society, and is commonly related to spinal disorders. There are many origins behind these disorders e.g., trauma, disc hernia or of other organic origins. However, for many of the disorders, the origin is not known. Thus, more knowledge is needed about how pain affects the neck and neural function in pain affected regions. The purpose of this dissertation was to improve the medical examination of patients suffering from chronic whiplash-associated disorders or other pain related neck-disorders.

    Methods A new assessment tool for objective movement analysis was developed. In addition, basic aspects of proprioceptive information transmission, which can be of relevance for muscular tension and pain, are investigated by studying the coding of populations of different types of sensory afferents by using a new spike sorting method. Both experiments in animal models and humans were studied to accomplish the goals of this dissertation. Four cats where were studied in acute animal experiments. Mixed ensembles of afferents were recorded from L7-S1 dorsal root filaments when mechanical stimulating the innervated muscle. A real-time spike sorting method was developed to sort units in a multi-unit recording. The quantification of population coding was performed using a method based on principal component analysis. In the human studies, 3D neck movement data were collected from 59 subjects with whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) and 56 control subjects. Neck movement patterns were identified by processing movement data into parameters describing the rotation of the head for each subject. Classification of neck movement patterns was performed using a neural network using processed collected data as input. Finally, the effect of marker position error on the estimated rotation of the head was evaluated by computer simulations.

    Results Animal experiments showed that mixed ensembles of different types of afferents discriminated better between different muscle stimuli than ensembles of single types of these afferents. All kinds of ensembles showed an increase in discriminative ability with increased ensemble size. It is hypothesized that the main reason for the greater discriminative ability might be the variation in sensitivity tuning among the individual afferents of the mixed ensemble will be larger than that for ensembles of only one type of afferent. In the human studies, the neural networks had a predictivity of 0.89, a sensitivity of 0.90 and a specificity of 0.88 when discriminating between control and WAD subjects. Also, a systematic error along the radial axis of the rigid body added to a single marker had no affect on the estimated rotation of the head.

    Conclusion The developed spike sorting method, using neural networks, was suitable for sorting a multiunit recording into single units when performing neurophysiological experiments. Also, it was shown that neck movement analysis combined with a neural network could build the basis of a decision support system for classifying suspected WAD or other pain related neck-disorders.

  • 8963.
    Öhlund, Lennart S.
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Public health science. Aalesund University College, Aalesund, Norway .
    Grönbladh, Leif
    Uppsala University, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Letter to the Editor Regarding "Exiting Prostitution: An Integrated Model," by L. M. Baker, R. L. Dalla, & C. Williamson, Violence Against Women, 16, 579-6002012In: Violence against Women, ISSN 1077-8012, E-ISSN 1552-8448, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 371-372Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8964.
    Öhlund, Lennart S
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Education and Psychology, Ämnesavdelningen för folkhälsovetenskap.
    Grönbladh, Leif
    Uppsala universitet.
    Patterns of deviance career in the history of female methadone clients: an exploratory study2009In: International Journal of Social Welfare, ISSN 1369-6866, E-ISSN 1468-2397, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 95-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to describe the drug career of 71 severely opioid-dependent women who had a history of selling sex and were enrolled in methadone maintenance treatment. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews, from medical records and reports from social agencies and correctional institutions. The sequential pattern could be described in the following order: initiation of the first drug of abuse, opioid onset, initiation of selling sex, first non-methadone treatment episode, first sentence and, finally, methadone maintenance treatment. There were significant age differences and correlations between most of the events. The main correlation (r = 0.70) was the one between debut of opioid use and selling sex, which was confirmed in a stepwise multiple regression analysis. In addition, a history of running away from home advanced the age at which the women started selling sex for those with an onset of opioid use at an older age than the mean of 18.4 years.

  • 8965.
    Öhlund, Lennart S.
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Public health science.
    Gunne, Lars
    Uppsala universitet, Uppsala, Sweden.
    The treatment goal in maintenance treatment of heroin addiction ought to be more than retention2013In: Heroin Addiction and Related Clinical Problems, ISSN 1592-1638, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 53-56Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8966.
    Öhman, Peter
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet, Avdelningen för ekonomivetenskap och juridik.
    Svanberg, Jan
    Mittuniversitetet, Avdelningen för ekonomivetenskap och juridik.
    Påverkar en identifiering med klienterna revisorers oberoende?2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Olika hot mot revisorers oberoende har uppmärksammats i tidigare forskning. Ett av dessa hot har väckt CERs och i synnerhet Peter Öhmans och Jan Svanbergs intresse. Det är i vilken grad oberoendet påverkas av om revisorerna identifierar sig med sina klienter. Den genomförda studien visar att de revisorer som identifierar sig relativt mer med sina klienter har större sannolikhet att såväl acceptera klientföretagens redovisning som att begå kvalitetsförsämrande handlingar. Detta verkar inte kunna motverkas av om revisorerna identifierar sig med revisorsprofessionens kärnvärden. Forskningsresultaten har tidigare publicerats i den internationella tidskriftsartikeln “Auditors’ identification with their clients: Effects on audit quality” (Svanberg och Öhman, 2015).

  • 8967.
    Öhman, Peter
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Svanberg, Jan
    Mittuniversitetet; Högskolan Dalarna.
    Tidspress, etisk kultur och revisionskvalitet2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den tidspress som revisorer kan uppleva har visat sig vara en bidragande orsak till att vissa revisionsuppdrag brister i kvalitet. Denna studie, gjord av Peter Öhman och Jan Svanberg vid CER, visar att revisionsbyråernas etiska kulturer har större betydelse för revisionskvaliteten än vad tidspressen har. Forskningsresultaten har tidigare publicerats i den internationella tidskriftsartikeln “Auditors’ time pressure: Does ethical culture support audit quality?” (Svanberg och Öhman, 2013).

  • 8968.
    Öjlert, Walborg
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle-Sandviken.
    Lindblom, Bengt-Åke
    Högskolan i Gävle-Sandviken.
    Olika vägar för kulturutbudet till barn och ungdom i förskola, grundskola och fritidshem. Delrapport 2, Vilka typer av material förekommer i förskolan ?1981Report (Other academic)
  • 8969.
    Öman, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Mathematics, Natural and Computer Sciences, Ämnesavdelningen för datavetenskap.
    Jonsson, Torsten
    University of Gävle, Department of Mathematics, Natural and Computer Sciences, Ämnesavdelningen för datavetenskap.
    Om ett pedagogiskt arbete på en högskoleavdelning2004In: Kunskap och lärande i den högre utbildningen: lärarreflexioner från praktiken / [ed] Sara Dahlström och Göran Fransson, Gävle: Högskolan i Gävle , 2004, p. 39-52Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8970.
    Österlind, Eva
    University of Gävle, Department of Education and Psychology, Ämnesavdelningen för pedagogik. Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för utbildningsvetenskap med inriktning mot tekniska, estetiska och praktiska kunskapstraditioner.
    Acting out of habits - can Theatre of the Oppressed promote change?: Boal's theatre methods in relation to Bourdieu's concept of habitus2008In: Research in Drama Education, ISSN 1356-9783, E-ISSN 1470-112X, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 71-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Habits make everyday life manageable, but can also become obstacles and cause problems. The tendency to repeat old patterns of behavior is a common problem for individuals and for society as a whole. Unreflexive habitual actions constitute an important aspect of social reproduction. In this article, two questions are addressed: Why is change so hard to achieve? Can Theatre of the Oppressed be used to promote change? A close reading of the French sociologist Bourdieu in relation to Boal's theatre methods is undertaken to answer these questions. Bourdieu's concept of habitus serves to explain the persistence of status quo; structural aspects are embedded in how we think and act, and are also inscribed in the body. These unconscious aspects of habitus are interesting in relation to theatre, where the conscious use of body language, inner dialogue and action are central. Looking at Boal's theatre methods in the light of Bourdieu's concept of habitus, Theatre of the Oppressed clearly has the potential to make social structures, power relations and individual habitus visible and, at the same time, provide tools to facilitate change. It is one of the few methods that offers an integrated approach to work on individual, group and social levels, and involves both the body and the mind. If the methods are practiced according to the principles outlined by Boal, they can be used not only to become aware of, but also to expand, habitus. As participants describe effects on their attitudes and actions, do they make changes in their daily lives? Are there any long-term effects of Theatre of the Oppressed? The work of Boal and others is promising, but to answer those questions more evidence is needed.

  • 8971.
    Österlind, Eva
    University of Gävle, Department of Education and Psychology, Ämnesavdelningen för pedagogik.
    Drama Research in Scandinavia2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8972.
    Österlind, Eva
    University of Gävle, Department of Education and Psychology, Ämnesavdelningen för pedagogik. Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för utbildningsvetenskap med inriktning mot tekniska, estetiska och praktiska kunskapstraditioner.
    Drama Research in Sweden: Mapping the Field2008In: NJ (Drama Australia journal), ISSN 1445-2294, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 95-109Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A review of drama research in Sweden is presented, based on a descriptive analysis of Swedish doctoral dissertations. Bourdieu’s field-concept is used as a framework, and the results are discussed in relation to the perceived need for a research discipline in drama. How can Swedish drama research be described? Which theoretical perspectives and research methods are being used? The overview shows the academic disciplines that are hosting research of drama in education, and influences from their theoretical perspectives are briefly discussed. There is no autonomous field, but a domain of drama research which includes dissertations within the disciplines of Education and Literature. Conditions in Sweden are not as good compared to some other Nordic countries, where subject specific education and expert tutors are available at the research level. Is an autonomous research discipline unnecessary, or even impossible to achieve, taking into account the general tendencies towards inter- and cross-disciplines and ‘knowledge areas’ within higher education?

  • 8973.
    Österlind, Eva
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Culture Studies, Religious Studies and Educational Sciences, Educational drama. Stockholms universitet.
    Emotions – Aesthetics – Education2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Emotions are seen as a driving force in students’ learning, but students’ involvement can also be problematic. A subject matter that catches students’ attention can either lead to positive learning activities or lead to rejection if the subject matter is upsetting in a negative way. Here, this teaching dimension will be addressed in connection with Environmental Education.

    Three examples ­– a whole-class teaching event, an individual student’s learning process and an example of process drama – will be briefly presented in order to discuss how different instructional designs interact with students’ emotions. A conclusion is that emotionally-loaded subjects require an elaborated teaching strategy in order to develop deeper knowledge. When the teaching includes an aesthetic approach, like process drama, emotions are not seen as a problem but as an integrated, natural part of the whole.

  • 8974.
    Österlind, Eva
    University of Gävle, Department of Education and Psychology, Ämnesavdelningen för pedagogik.
    Evaluation of Theatre Projects for Social Change: When, How and Why?2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Theatre for Social Change (TfSC) is built on the audience’s active participation. TfSC is based on intentionality and a belief that the theatre form is powerful – the explicit purpose of TfSC is to promote change. Theatre  for Social Change projects often takes place outside the formal educational system. Projects based on external financial support often have to meet demands for evaluation, but is it possible to evaluate Drama and Theatre for Social Change in a way that is  meaningful for those who are involved and increases the body of knowledge?

    In this paper three projects of Theatre for Social Change in Sweden/EU, Serbia and Palestine are described, with focus on the evaluations. The examples are used to discuss the evaluator’s role(s) and position, when and how to evaluate, and the value of evaluations, primarily for project members and audiences but also for donors as well as for colleagues in the field of drama. As a result of the demands from external funders, substantial evaluation reports are written about drama/theatre projects around the world. Therefore it becomes important to develop and share ‘good practice’ in how to carry out credible evaluations that contribute to the development of drama and Theatre for Social Change.

  • 8975.
    Österlind, Eva
    University of Gävle, Department of Education and Psychology, Ämnesavdelningen för pedagogik.
    Forum Theatre: A way to promote active citizenship2008In: TmačaART Magazine, Vol. 10, no 39, p. 44-51Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Culture House Lätting is a local Swedish organization working with young persons who are unemployed or do part of their secondary education as apprentices in art work. One of the methods used by Lätting is Forum Theatre. Supported by the European Commission, Lätting created a project to increase active citizenship among young people from so called remote areas. Four workshops were held with participating youth organizations from four(five) countries and the process was carefully documented. A brief presentation of the project and its outcomes is followed by a discussion concerning evaluation.

  • 8976.
    Österlind, Eva
    University of Gävle, Department of Education and Psychology, Ämnesavdelningen för pedagogik.
    Is Forum Theatre a Way to Promote Active Citizenship – and how to answer that question?2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8977.
    Österlind, Eva
    University of Gävle, Department of Education and Psychology, Ämnesavdelningen för pedagogik.
    Vanans makt och hur man bryter den: Ett möte mellan Bourdieus teorier om varför det bestående består och Boals teater för förändring.2007In: Drama Boreale 2006: Aktuell forskning i drama og teater / [ed] B. Rasmussen, Trondheim: Tapir Akademisk Forlag , 2007, p. 65-73Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8978.
    Österlind, Eva
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Education and Psychology, Ämnesavdelningen för pedagogik.
    Josephson, Agneta
    Att bryta vanans makt: Ett möte mellan Bourdieu och Boal2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8979.
    Österlind, Eva
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Education and Psychology, Ämnesavdelningen för pedagogik.
    Sternudd-Groth, Mia-Marie
    Instructional Design and Student Learning – Is There a Connection?: Process Drama compared with Individual Instruction and Whole Class Teaching2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8980.
    Österlind, Eva
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Education and Psychology, Ämnesavdelningen för pedagogik.
    Sörling, Stig
    University of Gävle, Department of Business Administration and Economics, Ämnesavdelningen för företagsekonomi.
    Leadership in Work Organization based on Self-Management2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8981.
    Österlund, Catharina
    et al.
    University of Umeå, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology, Umeå, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Evelina
    University of Umeå, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hellström, Fredrik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Häger, Charlotte K.
    University of Umeå, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå, Sweden.
    Häggman-Henrikson, Birgitta
    University of Malmö, Faculty of Odontology, Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function, Malmö, Sweden.; Scandinavian Center for Orofacial Neurosciences (SCON), Malmö, Sweden.
    Jaw-Neck Movement Integration in 6-year old Children Differs from that of Adults2019In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, ISSN 0305-182X, E-ISSN 1365-2842Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A functional integration between the jaw and neck regions during purposive jaw movements is well described in adults, but there is a lack of knowledge of such integration during jaw function in children.; Objectives: To determine the movement integration between the jaw and neck during jaw motor tasks in 6-year-olds, whether there is a difference between children and adults.; Methods: Jaw and neck movements were recorded with an optoelectronic 3D system in 25 healthy 6-year-olds (12 girls, 13 boys) and 24 healthy adults (12 women, 12 men) during paced jaw opening-closing and self-paced gum chewing. Jaw and neck movement amplitudes, intra-individual variation in movement amplitude, ratio between neck-jaw movement amplitudes, and movement cycle time were analysed. Differences between children and adults were evaluated with Mann-Whitney U test for independent samples.; Results: Compared to adults, 6-year old children showed larger neck movement amplitudes (P=0.008) during chewing, higher intra-individual variability in amplitudes of jaw (P=0.008) and neck (P=0.001) movements, higher ratio between neck-jaw movement amplitudes for jaw opening-closing (P=0.026) and chewing (P=0.003), and longer jaw movement cycle time (P≤0.0001) during the jaw opening-closing task.; Conclusion: Despite integrated jaw-neck movements in 6-year old children, the movement pattern differs from that of adults and may be interpreted as an immature programming of jaw-neck motor behavior. The well-integrated movements observed in adults most likely develop over years, perhaps into adolescence, and needs further research including well controlled longitudinal studies to map this development in order to provide appropriate age-related clinical treatment for functional disorders. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.; This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 8982.
    Östlund, Ann-Sofi
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Uppsala universitet.
    Motivational Interviewing in Primary Care: Nurses' experiences and actual use of the method2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The overall aim of the present thesis was to describe and examine primary care nurses´ self-reports on training, use and performance as well as experiences and actual performance of MI.

    Method: One qualitative and three quantitative studies were conducted among primary care nurses. A study-specific questionnaire was sent to 980 primary care nurses and 673 (69%) responded (Study I). Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 MI trained primary care nurses (Study II). MI sessions between 12 (Study III) respective 23 (Study IV) primary care nurses and patients (total 32 respective 50 sessions) were audio-recorded. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis, Motivational Interviewing Integrity Code, Motivational Interviewing Sequential Code for Observing Process Exchanges and statistical analysis.

    Results: The findings showed that primary care nurses reported and experienced lack of training in MI and lack of prerequisites for using MI (Study I-II), while training, knowledge, prerequisites and time were associated with use of MI. They also reported and experienced that MI facilitated their work with patients (Study I-II) as well as elicited their own ability to motivate and be empathetic (Study II). About half of the primary care nurses reported that they used MI (Study I), and none of the nurses (Study III) achieved the approved skill levels in MI in their recorded sessions. They overestimated their performance on six of eight aspects of MI (Study III). The most frequently used nurse talk in the recorded sessions was neutral, which is not consistent with MI. Questions and reflections directed toward change were most likely to be followed by change talk among patients (Study IV).

    Conclusions: Self-reported knowledge about MI and personal as well as workplace prerequisites for using it were associated with self-reported use of MI. Participating nurses´ experienced that MI requires openness, practice, support, feedback and willingness. The participating primary care nurses did not achieve approved levels of MI skills in their recorded MI sessions. Patients´ change talk is more likely to occur after open questions, complex reflections as well as after questions and reflections directed toward change.

  • 8983.
    Östlund, Ann-Sofi
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala universitet.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala universitet.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala universitet.
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala universitet.
    Primary care nurses' performance in motivational interviewing: a quantitative descriptive study2015In: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 89-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Motivational interviewing is a collaborative conversational style intended to strengthen motivation to change. It has been shown to be effective in addressing many different lifestyle problems as well as in chronic disease management, and many disease prevention guidelines promote use of motivational interviewing. The aim of the present study was twofold: to assess to what extent the primary care nurses in the study perform motivational interviewing according to the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity Code and to investigate how the participating primary care nurses rated their own performance in motivational interviewing.

    Method: The study was based on twelve primary care nurses’ audio-recorded motivational interviewing sessions with patients (total 32 sessions). After each session, the nurses completed a questionnaire regarding their experience of their own performance in motivational interviewing. The audio-recorded sessions were analyzed using Motivational Interviewing Integrity Code 3.1.1.

    Results: None of the nurses achieved beginning proficiency in all parts of any motivational interviewing sessions and two nurses did not achieve beginning proficiency in any parts or sessions. Making more complex than simple reflections was the specific verbal behavior/summary score that most nurses achieved. Beginning proficiency/competency in “percent open questions” was the summary score that fewest achieved.

    Conclusion: Primary care nurses did not achieve beginning proficiency/competency in all aspects of motivational interviewing in their recorded sessions with patients, where lifestyle change was discussed. This indicates a need for improvement and thus additional training, feedback and supervision in clinical practice with motivational interviewing.

  • 8984.
    Östlund, Ann-Sofi
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala universitet.
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala universitet.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    District nurses' and registered nurses' training in and use of motivational interviewing in primary care settings2014In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 23, no 15-16, p. 2284-2294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    To examine to what extent district nurses and registered nurses have training in motivational interviewing, to what extent they use it and what prerequisites they have for using it; to compare district nurses and registered nurses, as well as to compare users and nonusers of motivational interviewing; and to examine possible relationships between use of motivational interviewing and the variables training, supervision and feedback in motivational interviewing and prerequisites for use.

    Background

    Motivational interviewing is an effective method for motivating patients to change their lifestyle, used increasingly in primary care.

    Design

    A cross-sectional survey study.

    Methods

    A study-specific questionnaire was sent to all district nurses and registered nurses (n = 980) in primary care in three counties in Sweden, from September 2011–January 2012; 673 (69%) responded. Differences between groups as well as relationships between study variables were tested.

    Results

    According to self-reports, 59% of the respondents had training in motivational interviewing and 57% used it. Approximately 15% of those who reported using it had no specific training in the method. More district nurses than registered nurses had training in motivational interviewing and used it. The following factors were independently associated with the use of motivational interviewing: training in and knowledge of motivational interviewing, conditions for using it, time and absence of ‘other’ obstacles.

    Conclusions

    Having knowledge in motivational interviewing and personal as well as workplace prerequisites for using it may promote increased use of motivational interviewing.

    Relevance to clinical practice

    Having the prerequisites for using motivational interviewing at the workplace is of significance to the use of motivational interviewing. In the context of primary care, district nurses seem to have better prerequisites than registered nurses for using motivational interviewing.

  • 8985.
    Östlund, Ann-Sofi
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Helena
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, MIC Lab, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Primary care nurses' communication and its influence on patient talk during motivational interviewing2016In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 11, p. 2844-2856Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To describe what verbal behaviors/kinds of talk occur during recorded motivational interviewing sessions between nurses in primary care and their patients. The aim was also to examine what kinds of nurse talk predict patient change talk, neutral talk and/or sustain talk.

    Background

    Motivational interviewing is a collaborative conversational style. It has been shown to be effective, in addressing health behaviors such as diet, exercise, weight loss and chronic disease management. In Sweden, it is one of the approaches to disease prevention conversations with patients recommended in the National Guidelines for Disease Prevention. Research on the mechanisms underlying motivational interviewing is growing, but research on motivational interviewing and disease prevention has also been called for.

    Design

    A descriptive and predictive design was used.

    Methods

    Data were collected during 2011-2014. Fifty audio-recorded motivational interviewing sessions between 23 primary care nurses and 50 patients were analyzed using Motivational Interviewing Sequential Code for Observing Process Exchanges. The frequency of specific kinds of talk and sequential analysis (to predict patient talk from nurse talk) were computed using the software Generalized Sequential Querier 5.

    Findings

    The primary care nurses and patients used neutral talk most frequently. Open and negative questions, complex and positive reflections were significantly more likely to be followed by change talk and motivational interviewing-inconsistent talk, positive questions and negative reflections by sustain talk.

    Conclusions

    To increase patients’ change talk, primary care nurses need to use more open questions, complex reflections as well as questions and reflections directed toward change.

  • 8986.
    Östlund, Ann-Sofi
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap.
    Wadensten, Barbro
    Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap.
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap.
    Häggström, Elisabeth
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap.
    Motivational interviewing: Experiences of primary care nurses trained in the method2015In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 111-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Motivational interviewing is a person-centered counseling style used to promote behavioral change regarding a wide variety of lifestyle problems. Use of motivational interview is growing worldwide and among many different healthcare professions, including primary care nursing. The study aim was to describe motivational interview trained nurses' experiences of motivational interviewing in primary care settings. The study had a qualitative descriptive design. It was carried out in Swedish primary care settings in two county council districts, with 20 primary care nurses trained in motivational interviewing. Half of them used the method in their work, half did not. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were used. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The nurses experienced that openness to the approach and an encouraging working climate are required to overcome internal resistance and to increase use of motivational interviewing. They also experienced mutual benefit: motivational interviewing elicits and develops abilities in both nurses and patients. For the nurses using it, motivational interviewing is perceived to facilitate work with patients in need of lifestyle change. Lack of training/education, support, interest and appropriate work tasks/patients are reasons for not using motivational interviewing.

  • 8987.
    Östlund, Ulrika
    et al.
    Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Wennman-Larsen, Agneta
    Persson, Carina
    Gustavsson, Petter
    Wengström, Yvonne
    Mental health in significant others of patients dying from lung cancer2010In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 29-37Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8988.
    Östman, Anders
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för samhällsbyggnad.
    Assessment of End-User Needs: Project report2006Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8989.
    Östman, Anders
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för samhällsbyggnad. University of Gävle, GIS-institutet.
    BEGIN midterm project report2007Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8990.
    Östman, Anders
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Urban and regional planning/GIS-institute.
    Examples of training modules in Gävle, Berlin and Dublin2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8991.
    Östman, Anders
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för samhällsbyggnad.
    GI-INDEED – Professional Training in GIS based on Distance Learning2006In: The first GISAU conference, 2006, p. 10-13Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8992.
    Östman, Anders
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för samhällsbyggnad.
    GI-INDEED project midterm report2006Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8993.
    Östman, Anders
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Urban and regional planning/GIS-institute.
    Introduction of the VESTA GIS project2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8994.
    Östman, Anders
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Urban and regional planning/GIS-institute.
    Network for testing GI services2010In: Proceedings from Symposium GIS Ostrava 2010, 2010, p. 6 s.-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8995.
    Östman, Anders
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för samhällsbyggnad. University of Gävle, GIS-institutet.
    Process Analysis: Project report A2.1-D12007Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8996.
    Östman, Anders
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för samhällsbyggnad.
    Skyddade områden: ett viktigt tema i INSPIRE2005In: Nordisk Geomatik, ISSN 1653-2376, no 4, p. 16-18Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8997.
    Östman, Anders
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Urban and regional planning/GIS-institute.
    Verktyg för dataharmonisering baserade på öppen källkod2010In: Kartdagarna 2010 i Jönköping, 14-16 April, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8998.
    Östman, Anders
    et al.
    University of Gävle, GIS-institutet. University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för samhällsbyggnad.
    Abugessaisa, Imad
    Tanzilli, Solgerd
    He, Xin
    University of Gävle, GIS-institutet.
    El-Mekawy, Mohamed
    GeoTest: a Testing Environment for Swedish Geodata2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    GeoTest is a project initiated by Future Position X (a GIS cluster organization in Gävle, Sweden), the National Land Survey of Sweden (NLS) and the University of Gävle. The project aims to test Swedish geodata and make sure they comply with the INSPIRE specifications in Annex I–III. The purpose of this paper is to present the development of and experiences from GeoTest in developing the required infrastructure for testing Swedish geodata.

    Due to the high demand for geodata in modern society, and anticipated requirements by INSPIRE, the issue of testing a national SDI is very important. An adequate testing environment is required. In this context, two aspects are discussed:

    1. Technical requirements for GeoTest.

    2. Organizational and coordination aspects.

    The technical requirements for GeoTest are to provide an environment to test current specifications in the context of INSPIRE Annex I. The methodology is crucial to govern the testing process. The developed methodology mainly relates to the transformation testing of the themes specified in Annex I–III. The objective of the tests is to ensure that the specifications are balanced in terms of costs and that they contribute to address user needs. At this stage, GeoTest focuses on transformation testing. The aim is to test that the transformations from local schemas to INSPIRE schemas are technically feasible.

    The methodology is based on four stages; the main strategy used in this testing was the ETL (extract-transform-load) approach. The testing process started with a preliminary desk study, with the objective to collect basic information about the themes and identify the availability and sources of schemas. The extraction process helped to identify the costly procedures when generating GML data that conform to the source schemas; in this stage we encountered some problems in the extraction process, as the data are loosely coupled to the source schema. The transformation procedures of the GML data from the extraction process to the INSPIRE GML schema performed in three sub-stages, mainly related to schema mapping, matching and transformation.

    The testing process was coordinated with NLS, via one contact person per theme. The extraction for the sample data was based on random selection of 5% of the sheet index. The paper presents the results of testing five themes addresses, cadastral parcels, geographical names, hydrography, and transport networks. The result shows that in total, 13 INSPIRE schemas has been investigated. Of these, data may be delivered for 10 schemas.

  • 8999.
    Östman, Anders
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management, Urban and regional planning/GIS-institute.
    Bjerkman, Jan
    Future Position X.
    Regional GI Cluster in Support to the SDI Development2010In: International Conference SDI 2010 – Skopje, September 15-17 2010, 2010, p. 209-216Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9000.
    Östman, Anders
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för samhällsbyggnad. University of Gävle, GIS-institutet.
    Palmér, Owe
    Stridsman, Folke
    Training and Education for Spatial Data Infrastructures2007In: Proceedings of the IPY GeoNorth 2007 Conference, Yellowknife, Canada, August 21-24 2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
177178179180181 8951 - 9000 of 9009
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