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  • 951.
    Öberg, Peter
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology.
    The demographic picture, trends and future development2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 952.
    Öberg, Peter
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Bildtgard, Torbjörn
    Stockholms universitet.
    Diversity of intimacy forms and their importance for well-being in later life2014In: The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013, E-ISSN 1758-5341, Vol. 54, no Suppl. 2, p. 195-195Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on different forms of intimacy in later life in late modern Sweden and their consequences for well-being. The results are based both on qualitative interviews with 28 Swedes (63–91 years), living in new relationships initiated after the age of 60 (marriage, cohabitation, LAT) or currently dating; and on a quantitative survey to 60–90 year old Swedes (n=1225; response rate 42%). The results show: A great diversity in relationship careers over the life course; a preference for LAT (70%) and cohabitation (26%) in new unions established 60+; strong support from adult children for parents’ new LAT (86%) and cohabitation (76%) relationships, but less support for marriage (50%); that new relationships are as important for life-satisfaction as long-lasting ones; after subjective health, a partner is the second most important explanation for life-satisfaction, more important than having children; LAT was the union form that added most to life-satisfaction for men while marriage was the only form that significantly added to the life-satisfaction of women. Results were the same for newly established relationships and older relationships. Results will be discussed in relation to the shift from marriage to divorce culture (Hackstaff), the transformation of intimacy (Giddens), potentials of the third age (Laslett), and gender socialization, but also in terms of how the results can be interpreted in a context of Swedish welfare-state supported individualism where a partner provides both autonomy in relation to adult children and social integration.

  • 953.
    Öberg, Peter
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Bildtgård, Torbjörn
    Stockholms universitet.
    Changing Union Forms Among Older People in Late Modern Sweden2015In: Aging Families/Changing Families, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on union form in cross-gender relationships in later life, against the background of the transformation of intimacy in late modernity. Results are based on a survey to 60–90 year old Swedes (n=1225; response rate 42%) and European census data. Sweden seems to be the only country where there are more divorced than widowed people in this age group. Almost 1/3 of Swedes, aged 60-90, categorized as “singles” by official Swedish census data on civil status, are in fact living as LATs or cohabitants. In new romantic relationships initiated 60+ the dominant union form is LAT (70%) followed by cohabitation (26%), while marriage is rare (4%). Less than 2 in 10 singles think that is important to be married – and among marrieds less than 8 in 10. Relationship history data shows that although half of the respondents have been married only once, one third (33%) have had 2+ cohabiting unions (marital/non-marital), half (46%) 2+ established relationships, and a majority (66%) 3+ sexual partners. The results indicate that the transformation of intimacy includes older Swedes. Discussion: Should we see older people as a vanguard in the exploration of late modern intimacy, rather than carriers of cultural lag?

  • 954.
    Öberg, Peter
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Bildtgård, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University.
    Diversity and Ageing – the meaning of new intimate relationships in later life2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 955.
    Öberg, Peter
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Sociology/Social work.
    Bildtgård, Torbjörn
    Social Work, Stockholm University.
    Diversity and ageing – the meaning of new intimate relationships in later life2012In: : Book of Abstracts, 2012, p. 423-423Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social gerontology and family sociology about intimacy in old age has almost exclusively focused on institutionalized life-long marriages and little research has focused on re-partnering and the forms and meaning of this diversity of new intimate relationships in later life. Framed by Giddens’ transformation of intimacy and Laslett’s theory of the third age, as well as changing social and demographical conditions, this paper will focus on how different forms of new intimate relationships are formative for the experi-ence of ageing.The strategical sampel was diversified according to differ-ent forms of new intimate relationships: dating singles, married, cohabiting and living apart together. Qualitative interviews was used with 28 Swedes, 63–91 years, who have established a new intimate heterosexual relation-ship after 60 or who are dating singles. The results showed the significance of new intimate relations for social integration and for the experience of old age as the “crown of life”. The meaning of new intimate relations in differ-ent intimacy forms are discussed in relation to everyday life in old age, the relational history and relational careers and future perspectives of informal support structures by the relation.

  • 956.
    Öberg, Peter
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Bildtgård, Torbjörn
    Stockholms universitet.
    Initiation and development of new intimate relationships in later life2016In: The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013, E-ISSN 1758-5341, Vol. 56, no Suppl. 3, p. 17-18, article id Suppl. 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to contemporary family theory late modern relationships are guided less be external norms and more by internal negotiation between relatively equal partners. The purpose of this paper is to study initiation and development of new intimate relationships in later life, with a focus on negotiation and change, based on relationship histories with older Swedes (n=28), who are currently in new late in life cross-gender relationships initiated 60+, or currently dating singles. The results show a paradox: relationship ideals often seem unchangeable in prospect, but actual relationship arrangements appear open and changeable, when described in retrospect. LATs recall having been determined not to initiate any new relationships, cohabitants to retain their own home, remarried informants never to marry again. The analysis focuses the negotiations leading to relationship change. We discuss and question prevailing implicit assumptions about older people’s relationships as non-negotiated and unchangeable.

  • 957.
    Öberg, Peter
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Bildtgård, Torbjörn
    Stockholms universitet.
    New Forms of Intimacy in Later Life in a Culture of Divorce2014In: 8th International Conference on Cultural Gerontology: Programme and Abstracts, 2014, p. 92-92Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies on intimacy in later life have mostly focused on institutionalized life-­‐long marriages, and the transition out of such marriages into widowhood. Based on theories about the shift from marriage to divorce culture (Hackstaff), the transformation of intimacy (Giddens) and potentials of the third age (Laslett), this paper focuses on forms of intimacy in later life in late modern Sweden. The results arebased partly on qualitative interviews, including relationship biographies, with 28 Swedes (63–91 years) living in new heterosexual relationships initiated after the age of 60 (marriage, cohabitation, LAT) and dating singles. And partly on a quantitative survey to 60–90 year old Swedes (n=1225). The results show: A great diversity in relationship careers; a preference of LAT and cohabitation (non-­‐visible in official statistics); the importance of intimate relationships for well-­‐being and that new relationships are as important for life-­‐satisfaction as long-­‐lasting ones; that intimate relationships are more important than children for well-­‐being. A central analytical finding was the importance of time as an organizing frame for new intimate relationships in later life: the paradox of having a lot of free time in the third age, but a restricted life time left. Results will be discussed in relation to the theorizing frames mentioned above, especially new practices for intimacy in a culture of divorce. Cohort replacement is only one explanation for changing practices and the period effect seems to be as important.

  • 958.
    Öberg, Peter
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Bildtgård, Torbjörn
    University of Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Partner-age in late life unions - ideals vs realities2016In: The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013, E-ISSN 1758-5341, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 732-732, article id Suppl. 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Age homo/heterogamy in romantic unions is given little attention in current gerontological research. Still partner age-differences are important for men’s and women’s relationship opportunities. This paper studies actual partner-age (age-difference) in cross-gendered unions, and ideal partner-age both for singles and respondents in unions. The study was carried out by a survey to 60–90 year old Swedes, currently either singles or in a cross-gender relationship (married, cohabiting, LAT) (n=1225). Unions follow a traditionally gendered age structure: 56% of men, but only 16% of women have a younger partner. This pattern is more pronounced: in first unions (p<.001) and unions initiated before 1970 (p<.01). For respondents in unions actual partner-age showed no significant correlation with union form or urbanity (modernity-hypothesis), and not with education or income (power-hypothesis). For respondents in unions Ideal Partner-Age correlates strongly (p<.001; R2=0,76) with actual partner-age (ideal slightly younger). Among single respondents, almost all (92%) single men and half of the single women (47%) prefer a younger partner (8,9 years younger on average for men; 2,2 for women). The proportion preferring a younger partner increases by age, leading to increasingly incompatible age ideals. Results will be discussed in relation to life-course theory; gender and power; the deinstitutionalization hypothesis.

  • 959.
    Öberg, Peter
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Bildtgård, Torbjörn
    Stockholms universitet.
    Sexual activity and norms among older Swedes: a life course perspective2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been argued that in late modernity sex has escaped its reproductive cage and people form pure relationships, based on mutual satisfaction. Ironically, although older people are per definition non-reproductive, they have often been neglected in studies on sexuality. In this paper we present results from 1) a qualitative interview study with a strategic sample of 28 63–91 year old Swedes currently dating or in a heterosexual relationship (married, cohabiting, LAT) initiated 60+ and 2) a quantitative survey including answers from 1225 60–90 year old Swedes. The interviews revealed a clear normative change, from a cultural context that condemned extra-marital sex in young adulthood to a context which encourages sexual relationships but not marriage in later life. All had experienced the sexual liberation of the 1960s, and today, these liberal attitudes seem to encompass later life. Today, an active sex-life was regarded as important for a good relationship and sexual attraction was seen as a precondition for new relationships. Many informants had interpreted sexual decline in former relationships as “natural” and age-related, but re-discovered sexuality with their new partner. In the survey, a majority (93 %) had had their sexual debut before marriage (despite the restrictive norms). Half or the respondents have had ≥ 4 more sexual partners, and one in five ≥ 10. Sexual activity correlated negatively with relationship length. It has often been argued in gerontology that sexual values and practices will become more liberal in the future by cohort replacement. Our data indicates that “the future might already be here”.

  • 960.
    Öberg, Peter
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Bildtgård, Torbjörn
    Social Work, Stockholm University.
    The impact of new intimate relationships in later life on life satisfaction2013In: The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013, E-ISSN 1758-5341, Vol. 53, no Suppl. 1, p. 61-61Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 961.
    Öberg, Peter
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Bildtgård, Torbjörn
    Social Work, Stockholm University.
    The impact of new intimate relationships in later life on social and filial relationships.2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 962.
    Öberg, Peter
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Bildtgård, Torbjörn
    Stockholms universitet.
    The importance of intimate relationships for well-being in later life2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies on intimacy in later life have mostly focused on institutionalized life-long marriages, and the transition out of such marriages into widowhood. Based on theories about the shift from marriage to divorce culture (Hackstaff), the transformation of intimacy (Giddens) and potentials of the third age (Laslett), this paper focuses on forms of intimacy in later life in late modern Sweden. The results are based partly on qualitative interviews, including relationship biographies, with 28 Swedes (63–91 years) living in new relationships initiated after the age of 60 (marriage, cohabitation, LAT) and dating singles. And partly on a quantitative survey to 60–90 year old Swedes (n=1225). The results show: A great diversity in relationship careers; a preference of LAT and cohabitation (non-visible in official statistics); the importance of intimate relationships for well-being and that new relationships are as important for life-satisfaction as long-lasting ones; that intimate relationships are more important than children for well-being. A central analytical finding was the importance of time as an organizing frame for new intimate relationships in later life: the paradox of having a lot of free time in the third age, but a restricted life time left. Results will be discussed in relation to the theorizing frames mentioned above, especially new practices for intimacy in a culture of divorce. Cohort replacement is only one explanation for changing practices and attitudes to new intimate relationships in later life and the period effect seems to be as important.

  • 963.
    Öberg, Peter
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Bildtgård, Torbjörn
    Stockholms universitet.
    Time as a structuring condition for new intimate relationships in later life: A qualitative study of elderly Swedes2013In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 17, no Suppl. 1, p. 109-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Social gerontology about intimacy in old age has almost exclusively focused on institutionalized life-long marriages. However, mobility in and out of intimate relationships has become more common in late modern societies also in later life. In this paper the research questions are: What characterizes the formation of new intimate relationships in later life? Are there any specific, more or less universal, conditions that separate them from relationships in earlier life phases?

    Method: Qualitative interviews were used with a strategical sample of 28 6-?91 year old Swedes, who have established a new intimate heterosexual relationship after the age of 60 or who are dating.

    Results: The results showed time as constituting a central structuring condition for new intimate relationships in later life. In the results three aspects of time: Available free time, Lived time and Remaining time ? which all have a constituting and formative power on new late in life relationships are discussed in relation to theories of late modernity and the Third Age and in relation to changing demographical conditions.

    Conclusion: The concluding discussion will be about the time theoretical frame as a model for understanding experiences of ageing.

  • 964.
    Öberg, Peter
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work.
    Bildtgård, Torbjörn
    Institutionen för socialt arbete, Socialhögskolan, Stockholms universitet, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Andersson, Lars
    Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier (ISV), NISAL, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sverige.
    Skyddar en parrelation på äldre dar mot ensamhet?2016In: Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift, ISSN 1104-1420, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 19-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to study the importance of intimate relationships as protection from loneliness in later life. We base ourselves on a survey to Swedes aged 60–90 (n=1 225) focusing on intimate relationships. The analysis considers neglected issues in ageing research on loneliness: the importance of union form, the importance of looking at relationship dissolution in terms of both widowhood and divorce, and the importance of new late life unions (a gains perspective). We use two theoretical perspectives: the discrepancy model (realities vs. ideals), and the protection hypothesis, where the partner is generally the first and most important source of support in everyday life. The results show that a partner protects against loneliness and that union form matters: marriage provides the best protection, followed by cohabitation and Living Apart Together (LAT). Feelings of loneliness decrease over time following a union dissolution – and, for men, more rapidly after separation than widowhood. The more the ideal union form differs from one’s actual union form, the more common are feelings of loneliness. Initiating a new relationship after a union dissolution protects against loneliness. The article discusses the importance of using union form instead of civil status as relationship indicators in studies of older people in late modern Sweden, and of including separation/divorce as indicators of union dissolution besides widowhood. It also stresses the importance of looking at later life not only from a loss – but also from a gains – perspective.

  • 965.
    Öborn, Helena
    et al.
    Division of Pediatrics, Department of Clinical Science, Technology and Intervention, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wettergren, Lena
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Herthelius, Maria
    Division of Pediatrics, Department of Clinical Science, Technology and Intervention, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Forinder, Ulla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Social work. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Social Work, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Associations between lower urinary tract dysfunction and health-related quality of life in children with chronic kidney disease2016In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 105, no 8, p. 959-966Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim Little is known about the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of children with lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). We investigated LUTD and other possible predictors of impaired HRQoL in children with conservatively treated moderate to severe CKD or with a kidney transplant.

    Methods All 64 children with CKD or a kidney transplant treated at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden, between June 2011 and December 2012 were approached and 59 children aged 8-18 were enrolled in the study. Lower urinary tract function was evaluated with voiding history, frequency and volume chart, uroflowmetry and post void ultrasound measurements. Self-reported HRQoL was assessed with validated generic instruments.

    Results The HRQoL of the study cohort was as good as the general paediatric population, apart from the physical and psychological well-being dimensions, and was no different to children with other chronic conditions. Urinary incontinence, but not LUTD in general, was associated with impaired HRQoL, as was having a kidney transplant and being female in some dimensions.

    Conclusion LUTD was common in children with CKD or a kidney transplant but did not affect their general HRQoL. Predictors of impaired HRQoL included incontinence, having had a kidney transplant and being female.

  • 966.
    Öhnell, Ulrika
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology.
    Martinsson, Ingela
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology.
    Allt går att reparera förutom döden: en studie om tillitens betydelse mellan behandlare och klient2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is a qualitative study with the intent to examine how a number of clients and counselors describe their experiences and impressions of the importance of high-level trust vs. low-level trust relationships between the client and the counselor. We have separately interviewed two clients and one counselor from an addiction treatment center (HVB-home). We found several similarities in the clients´ stories. Both had, for example, experienced weak attachment during their childhood and their addictions were about ridding anxiety. Both clients have had prior experiences of low-level trust relationship with counselor which has led to a negative impact on their treatment. The counselor we interviewed believed that a client’s earlier attachment experiences can influence whether or not a new relationship between a client and a counselor will be successful. That which we have found most interesting in the interviews is that all three interviewees agree that a high-level trust relationship between the client and the counselor is of high importance for the outcome of the treatment.

  • 967.
    Österman Menander, Charlotta
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology.
    Jakobsson, Katarina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology.
    Dilemman i väntrummet: En etnografisk studie om interaktioner och dilemman i socialtjänstens väntrum2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    “Waiting room dilemmas- an ethnographical study of interactions and dilemmas in social welfare waiting rooms” 

    The social services activity is a balance between service and control. Uniting these parts is a challenge, and this study’s main intention is about how various social offices relates to this in their work with peoples waiting room experiences. The purpose of the study is by observations and interviews, to investigate what exists in a place like a public authority waiting room. Questions like what kind of interactions will take place and which dilemmas might occur are asked. The result shows that different approaches in how social workers do call clients up occur, the accessibility or lack of accessibility to computers, telephone and copying machine, clarifies the power imbalance that exists in governmental work. The result also shows that some waiting room interactions may be experienced as enforced and that the social services law is hard to maintain.

  • 968.
    Östlund, Sara
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology.
    Andersson, Carina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology.
    ”Såna som mig får inte du tag på”: -Vilka faktorer är viktiga för att personer med intellektuell funktionsnedsättning ska erhålla en anställning på den öppna arbetsmarknaden?2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to examine important factors during support for people with intellectual disability to obtain employment. Five professionals who are supporting people with intellectual disabilities in the process towards work and four individuals that have received employment support have been interviewed. An empowerment perspective and inductive thematic method has been used to analyze the material. The results showed the importance to adjust support and evaluation individually. Client inclusive support, the work with motivation and advocating for people with disability are all important factors. To support development of skills and self awareness, to accustom society to people with disability and contribute to positive expectations are also central aspects. The conclusion has shown that empowerment-based support is a successful way of helping people with intellectual disability to receive employment. Also when needed, be able to offer continued support when employment has been established to help people retain employment.

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