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  • 1.
    Ahrné, Karin
    et al.
    SLU.
    Bengtsson, Bengt Åke
    Björklund, Jan-Olof
    Cederberg, Björn
    Eliasson, Claes
    Hydén, Nils
    Jonasson, Jan
    Lindeborg, Mats
    Lst Kalmar Län.
    Ohlsson, Anders
    Palmqvist, Göran
    Ryrholm, Nils
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Biology.
    Rödlista över fjärilar Lepidoptera2015In: Rödlistade arter i Sverige 2015 / [ed] Westling, Anna, Uppsala: ArtDatabanken SLU , 2015, p. 98-112Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Kristina
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Biology.
    Gullberg, Annica
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Biology.
    Hussénius, Anita
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Scantlebury, Kathryn
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware, USA.
    "We do science, we don't do gender!" Challenging science teaching education: Gender awareness in contructing knowledge of science and science teaching2015In: Feminist Pedagogy in Higher Education : Critical Theory and Practice / [ed] T. P. Light, J. Nicolas & R. Bondy, Waterloo, ON, Canada: Wilfrid Laurier University Press , 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Burman, Joseph
    et al.
    Department of Plant Protection Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp, Sweden; Ecology Research Group, Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury, Kent, United Kingdom .
    Westerberg, Lars
    IFM Biology, Conservation Ecology Group, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Ostrow, Suzanne
    IFM Biology, Conservation Ecology Group, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Ryrholm, Nils
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Biology.
    Bergman, Karl-Olof
    IFM Biology, Conservation Ecology Group, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Winde, Inis
    Department of Plant Protection Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp, Sweden; Department of Biology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden .
    Nyabuga, Franklin N.
    Department of Plant Protection Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp, Sweden; Department of Biology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden .
    Larsson, Mattias C.
    Department of Plant Protection Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp, Sweden.
    Milberg, Per
    IFM Biology, Conservation Ecology Group, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Revealing hidden species distribution with pheromones: the case of Synanthedonvespiformis (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) in Sweden2016In: Journal of Insect Conservation, ISSN 1366-638X, E-ISSN 1572-9753, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 11-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Synanthedonvespiformis L. (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) is considered a rare insect in Sweden, discovered in 1860, with only a few observations recorded until a sex pheromone attractant became available recently. This study details a national survey conducted using pheromones as a sampling method for this species. Through pheromone trapping we captured 439 specimens in Southern Sweden at 77 sites, almost tripling the number of previously reported records for this species. The results suggest that S. vespiformis is truly a rare species with a genuinely scattered distribution, but can be locally abundant. Habitat analyses were conducted in order to test the relationship between habitat quality and the number of individuals caught. In Sweden, S. vespiformis is thought to be associated with oak hosts, but our attempts to predict its occurrence by the abundance of oaks yielded no significant relationships. We therefore suggest that sampling bias and limited knowledge on distribution may have led to the assumption that this species is primarily reliant on oaks in the northern part of its range, whereas it may in fact be polyphagous, similar to S. vespiformis found as an agricultural pest in Central and Southern Europe. We conclude that pheromones can massively enhance sampling potential for this and other rare lepidopteran species. Large-scale pheromone-based surveys provide a snapshot of true presences and absences across a considerable part of a species national distribution range, and thus for the first time provide a viable means of systematically assessing changes in distribution over time with high spatiotemporal resolution.

  • 4.
    Carpio, Antonio J.
    et al.
    Instituto de Agricultura Sostenible (IAS, CSIC), Alameda del Obispo s/n, Córdoba, Spain ; Department of Zoology, University of Córdoba, C-1 Rabanales, Córdoba, Spain.
    Hillström, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Biology.
    Tortosa, Francisco S.
    Department of Zoology, University of Córdoba, C-1 Rabanales, Córdoba, Spain.
    Effects of wild boar predation on nests of wading birds in various Swedish habitats2016In: European Journal of Wildlife Research, ISSN 1612-4642, E-ISSN 1439-0574, Vol. 62, no 4, p. 423-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The wild boar has, over the past few decades, undergone an expansion in Europe, which may have negatively affected ground-nesting bird populations and particularly those of wading birds. The aim of this study was to evaluate predation on waders’ nests by wild boar in Sweden, where this species has been increasing since its reintroduction. This was done by placing artificial nests in seven different study areas. A comparison was then made of predation rates of the nests placed on control plots (areas in which no wild boar were present but other predators were) and plots containing different abundances of wild boar. Contrary to our expectations, the proportion of nests predated was significantly lower in those areas in which wild boar were present, with a predation rate of 54 %, whereas the predation rate was 87.5 % in the others. The wild boar was identified as the second most important nest predator in the plots in which it was present, accounting for 18 % of the predated nests. The main predator on both types of plots was the red fox, which was responsible for 28 and 38.5 % of the predated nests on plots with/without wild boar, respectively. Interestingly, predation by badgers occurred principally in areas in which the wild boar was absent (34.5 % of the predated nests), whereas only one nest was predated by this predator in areas containing wild boar. It is not, however, possible to state whether predation by badgers was lower because of the presence of wild boar or whether this was owing to the fact that badgers do not select those particular patches because of habitat features.

  • 5.
    Hadin, Åsa
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Ryrholm, Nils
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Biology.
    Energy recovery from horse manure - exploring energy actors’ experiencesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    European Union and Swedish national energy policy and energy objectives state an increased interest in transition of energy systems to more efficient use of energy, as well as increased use of renewable sources of energy. Horse manure is a potential resource available for renewable energy. Horse manure is sometimes considered a waste problem, resulting in research of possible energy recovery processes, such as combustion and anaerobic digestion. In this study 13 energy actors’ experiences of horse manure were explored by means of interviews and e-mail. Five related to combustion of horse manure and eight related to anaerobic digestion. The aim was to make a compilation of their knowledge and from the results identify how horse manure could be made more attractive as an energy resource. The challenges the actors face are mainly connected with horse manure being a heterogeneous material, primarily due to its bedding content (straw, wood bedding, etc.), and occasionally to other types of added waste. These unpredictable variations in the substrate as well as impurities like sand make it more difficult for plants to have standard procedures for processing horse manure. The view that bedding material needs to be specifically straw pellets and that all impurities should be kept out of the collected horse manure for anaerobic treatment was also expressed. Horse manure as part of co-combustion processes was perceived as a fuel with capacity to contribute to plant economy as it gives revenue from gate fees and could reduce costs for its NOx reducing capacity. Another view was that grate furnaces could possibly be more suitable than fluidized beds as incineration technology. However, problems with odour made two plants end their combustion trials. In farm-scale incineration horse manure required a lot of monitoring and co-combustion with pellets in order to maintain an effective process. When compiling all available information this study has a number of suggestions for how horse manure should be treated already at the production stage in order to be a more versatile resource in energy recovery processes. The recommendation is to keep horse manure dry (transports and incineration), avoid initiation of composting processes (AD and incineration), sort the waste = no added other waste (AD), and depending on intended AD-treatment process, use a specific bedding type. Most of these issues may be solved by supplier’s involvement in the supply chains for resource recovery, i.e. closing natural cycles of plant nutrients and energy recovery.

  • 6.
    Hussénius, Anita
    et al.
    Centre for Gender Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Scantlebury, Kathryn
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, USA.
    Andersson, Kristina
    Department of Education, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gullberg, Annica
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Biology.
    Interstitial Spaces: A Model for Transgressive Processes2016In: Illdisciplined Gender: Engaging Questions of Nature/Culture and Transgressive Encounters / [ed] Bull, J. & Fahlgren, M., Cham: Springer, 2016, p. 11-30Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter introduces the concepts of interstitial spaces and transgressive identities to examine the boundaries of gender and feminist studies, science, and education and discuss our research practices and positions. We use a metalogue as the vehicle for analyzing our autobiographies to provide examples when we have operated in interstitial spaces and engaged transgressive identities. Interstitial spaces exist between and within boundaries. These spaces are possible sites within a defined context (a discipline, a practice, a culture) that may be occupied by an actor/agent working as a “carrier” of different cultural practices, knowledge, and theories. A “carrier” can use the interstitial space to influence and challenge a “new” context and thus loosen up boundaries but can also by experiencing new cultures and developing new knowledge return to the “old” culture to integrate these new practices. Thus, interstitial spaces establish a context for transgressive identities to emerge so one can act in ways to transform and change the cultures of disciplines. We usetransgressive identities as a theoretical description and understanding of our research practices and positions.

  • 7. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Kellner, Eva
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Biology.
    (I) gapet mellan teori och praktik - utveckling av lärarkunskap i biologi2016In: Ämnesdidaktiska utmaningar - inom matematik, naturvetenskap och teknik / [ed] Mikael Björling, Gävle: Gävle University Press , 2016, 1, p. 47-60Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Kellner, Eva
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Biology.
    Attorps, Iiris
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Mathematics.
    Kollegialt lärande: aktionsforskning i biologi- och matematikundervisning2016In: Ämnesdidaktiska utmaningar - inom matematik, naturvetenskap och teknik / [ed] Mikael Björling, Gävle: Gävle University Press , 2016, 1, p. 61-74Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Kellner, Eva
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Biology.
    Attorps, Iiris
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Mathematics.
    Primary school teachers' concerns and needs in biology and mathematics teaching2015In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 282-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to provide insights into nine primary school teachers’ concerns and instructional needs in biology and mathematics, grades 1 to 6. By using Content Representation, combined with Learning Study in an action research project, teachers were encouraged to reflect on their conceptions, processes of instructing and pupil learning. From concerns articulated by teachers three instructional needs emerged: (i) to make subject progression, especially in biology, and pupil learning more visible, (ii) to develop mathematics teaching in order to change pupils’ views of the subject, and (iii) to develop teachers’ subject matter knowledge and teaching in an ongoing collaborative process.  The paper argues that in order to stimulate teacher professional development it is important to make teacher concerns and thereby needs explicit. They help teachers to identify and reflect on relations between teacher subject matter knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge and pupil learning.

  • 10.
    Lundin, Mikael
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Biology. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies, Umeå, Sweden; Harmångers Maskin and Marin AB .
    Calamnius, Linda
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Biology. Harmångers Maskin and Marin AB.
    Fjälling, Arne
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Drottningholm, Sweden.
    Size selection of whitefish (Coregonus maraena) in a pontoon trap equipped with an encircling square mesh selection panel2015In: Fisheries Research, ISSN 0165-7836, E-ISSN 1872-6763, Vol. 161, p. 330-335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many fishing methods result in significant catches of non-target species or individuals that are too small to be retained for economic values or within quota regulations. In the Baltic Sea trap fishery, the major problem is the bycatch of juvenile and non-marketable whitefish (Coregonus maraena) which constitutes a threat to the sustainability of the fishery and a time-consuming problem for the fishers. This study evaluates the effectiveness of a modified fish trap in reducing such bycatch. An encircling selection panel consisting of 50 × 50 mm square mesh netting was installed in a pontoon fish chamber of a salmon/whitefish trap. Comparative fishing was conducted against a control trap without selection panel in the inshore waters of the Bothnian Sea. Comparisons of catch compositions between the traps showed that there was a 72% reduction in juvenile whitefish catch in the experimental trap. The length at 50% retention (30.1 cm) corresponded well to the minimum market size (>30 cm) of whitefish that are desired for the local market. Fishers are advised to use a netting panel of 50 × 50 mm square mesh for their traps to reduce undersized whitefish. The results are important for the sustainability of whitefish stocks in the Baltic Sea.

  • 11.
    Lundin, Mikael
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Biology. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies, Umeå, Sweden and Harmångers Maskin and Marin AB.
    Calamnius, Linda
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Biology. Harmångers Maskin and Marin AB.
    Lunneryd, Sven-Gunnar
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Aquatic Resources, Lysekil.
    Magnhagen, Carin
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies, Umeå, Sweden.
    The efficiency of selection grids in perch pontoon traps2015In: Fisheries Research, ISSN 0165-7836, E-ISSN 1872-6763, Vol. 162, p. 58-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In commercial fishing, minimizing the bycatch of undersized fish or non-target species is highly beneficial, to avoid unnecessary fish mortality and to save time for the fishers. Two pontoon traps developed for perch fishing were equipped with size selection grids, and the efficiency with which under-sized fish could escape was tested. Average size of perch, roach, and whitefish was larger in traps with selection grids compared to in control traps without grids. Selection efficiencies using these comparisons were 82–86% for perch, 33% for whitefish and 100% for roach. The selection grids were filmed with an underwater video camera over the daily cycle, to estimate timing, and total number of exits from the traps. Selection efficiencies, calculated by extrapolating number of escapes observed to the total time of trap submergence, were 94–100% for perch and 100% for roach. The discrepancy in the selection efficiency estimates for perch probably depends on an uncertainty in the extrapolation, because of the variation in escape rate across time periods. Perch and roach differed in time of day for escapes. For perch most escapees was seen in the evening, and for roach most fish escaped at night, probably reflecting the general activity cycles of the two species. Over a fishing season, several thousands of fish would be able to escape from each trap, and an increase in the use of size selection grids could potentially be an efficient tool for fish population management.

  • 12.
    Van Tri, Mai
    et al.
    Southern Horticultural Research Institute, My Tho, Tien Giang, Vietnam.
    Van Hoa, Nguyen
    Southern Horticultural Research Institute, My Tho, Tien Giang, Vietnam.
    Minh Chau, Nguyen
    Southern Horticultural Research Institute, My Tho, Tien Giang, Vietnam.
    Pane, Antonella
    Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Catania, Catania, Italy.
    Faedda, Roberto
    Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Catania, Catania, Italy.
    De Patrizio, Alessandro
    Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Catania, Catania, Italy.
    Schena, Leonardo
    Department of Agraria, University Mediterranea of Reggio Calabria, Località Feo di Vito, Reggio Calabria, Italy.
    Olsson, Christer H. B.
    Department of Biological & Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Biology.
    Ramstedt, Mauritz
    Department of Forest Mycology and Plant Pathology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Cacciola, Santa Olga
    Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Catania, Catania, Italy.
    Decline of jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus) incited by Phytophthora palmivora in Vietnam2015In: Phytopathologia Mediterranea, ISSN ISSN 0031-9465, EISSN 1593-2095, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 275-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new disease of jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam.) was observed in the south- eastern region of South Vietnam. Symptoms included root rot, cankers and gummosis of trunks, chlorosis, wilt, blight of leaves, defoliation, fruit brown rot, and tree death. The disease was found in 10% of surveyed farms with an incidence varying from 2% to nearly 60% of the trees. A Phytophthora species, identified as P. palmivora (Butler) Butler, using the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of the rDNA as a barcode gene and morphological and cultural features, was consistently isolated from symptomatic roots, fruits, trunk cankers and leaves. Koch’s postulates were fulfilled using pathogenicity tests on seedlings, leaves and detached fruits of jackfruit. To our knowledge, this is the first report of P. palmivora on jackfruit in Vietnam.

  • 13.
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Biology. University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Patulin in food2015In: Current Opinion in Food Science, ISSN 2214-7993, E-ISSN 2214-8000, Vol. 5, p. 105-109Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patulin is produced by species of Penicillium, Aspergillus and Byssochlamys. It is a mycotoxin that primarily contaminates pome fruit products, but is being reported from other fruit and foods, for example shellfish and cheese. New findings reveal that patulin binds to the bases of DNA, in addition to its well-established ability to conjugate sulfhydryl groups. Novel cellular targets are also being uncovered. In the EU, patulin levels in apple products are now mostly below specified limits. Biocontrol agents either prevent infection by mycotoxigenic fungi or lower patulin levels. More knowledge about critical control points, the role of patulin in plant disease, and the environmental cues that stimulate patulin production will enable the tailoring of effective, future control measures.

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