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  • 1. Aboul-Ata, Aboul-Ata E.
    et al.
    Vitti, Antonella
    Nuzzaci, Maria
    El-Attar, Ahmad K.
    Piazzolla, Giuseppina
    Tortorella, Cosimo
    Harandi, Ali M.
    Olson, Olof
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Piazzolla, Pasquale
    Plant-Based Vaccines: Novel and Low-Cost Possible Route for Mediterranean Innovative Vaccination Strategies2014In: Advances in Virus Research / [ed] Maramorosch, K; Murphy, F A, Elsevier, 2014, Vol. 89, p. 1-37Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A plant bioreactor has enormous capability as a system that supports many biological activities, that is, production of plant bodies, virus-like particles (VLPs), and vaccines. Foreign gene expression is an efficient mechanism for getting protein vaccines against different human viral and nonviral diseases. Plants make it easy to deal with safe, inexpensive, and provide trouble-free storage. The broad spectrum of safe gene promoters is being used to avoid risk assessments. Engineered virus-based vectors have no side effect. The process can be manipulated as follows: (a) retrieve and select gene encoding, use an antigenic protein from GenBank and/or from a viral-genome sequence, (b) design and construct hybrid-virus vectors (viral vector with a gene of interest) eventually flanked by plant-specific genetic regulatory elements for constitutive expression for obtaining chimeric virus, (c) gene transformation and/or transfection, for transient expression, into a plant host model, that is, tobacco, to get protocols processed positively, and then moving into edible host plants, (d) confirmation of protein expression by bioassay, PCR-associated tests (RT-PCR), Northern and Western blotting analysis, and serological assay (ELISA), (e) expression for adjuvant recombinant protein seeking better antigenicity, (f) extraction and purification of expressed protein for identification and dosing, (g) antigenicity capability evaluated using parental or oral delivery in animal models (mice and/or rabbit immunization), and (h) growing of construct-treated edible crops in protective green houses. Some successful cases of heterologous gene-expressed protein, as edible vaccine, are being discussed, that is, hepatitis C virus (HCV). R9 mimotope, also named hypervariable region 1 (HVR1), was derived from the HVR1 of HCV. It was used as a potential neutralizing epitope of HCV. The mimotope was expressed using cucumber mosaic virus coat protein (CP), alfalfa mosaic virus CP P3/RNA3, and tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) CP tobacco mild green mosaic virus (TMGMV) CP as expression vectors into tobacco plants. Expressed recombinant protein has not only been confirmed as a therapeutic but also as a diagnostic tool. Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2), HSV-2 gD, and HSV-2 VP16 subunits were transfected into tobacco plants, using TMV CP TMGMV CP expression vectors.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Kristina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    "It's funny that we don't see the similarities when that's what we're aiming for": Visualizing and challenging teachers' stereotypes of gender and science2012In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 281-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study illuminates teachers’ conceptions of gender and science and possibilities to challenge these conceptions. Since 2005, a group of teachers (K-6) inSwedenhave met approximately once a month in two-hour seminars to discuss and develop their instruction in science and technology based on a gender perspective. The present data consist mainly of audio-recordings of the teacher seminars and video-recordings of science/technology activities with students. Analysis of the empirical data has been carried out in several stages and was inspired by thematic analysis, the theoretical framework of which is based on Hirdman’s and Beauvoir’s theories of gender. The results show that the teachers’ ideas about gender/equity and science exist on several levels, within which various conceptions are represented. On the one hand, “reasoning around similarity”, where teachers consider that both girls and boys should have the same prerequisites for working with science/technology. In contrast, stereotyped conceptions of girls and boys when the teachers evaluate their activities with students, where condescending attitudes toward girls are also observed. The girls’ ways of working with science/technology are not as highly valued as the boys’, and this outlook on children can ultimately have consequences for girls’ attitudes toward the subject. When teachers are allowed to read their own statements about the girls, they get “a glimpse of themselves”, and their condescending ideas about girls are made visible. In this way, the teachers can begin their active work toward change, which may lead to new outlooks on and attitudes toward students.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Kristina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Krönika: utbytta ord kan motverka fördomar2011In: Genus, ISSN 1403-8943, no 2, p. 25-25Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Andersson, Kristina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Lärare för förändring: att synliggöra och utmana föreställningar om naturvetenskap och genus2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The main focus in this thesis is teachers’ gender awareness related to scientific practice. The thesis is based on two different empirical studies: a longitudinal action research study together with a group of teachers (K-6) and a study during an in-service development course where experienced teachers applied gender theory on a real classroom situation, a case. 

     

    The studies show that working with gender is complicated and comprises of many aspects of human life. An important part of gender awareness is to be able to relate to these aspects. A question of vital importance is to challenge conceptions of gender in such a way that the conceptions will be verbalized and thereby visualized. Moreover, the studies show that feminist pedagogy and theory of science can lead to a new approach to teaching and learning in science. For teachers without any background in science, there are other competences than just subject matter knowledge that are vital for teaching. Feminist perspectives in professional development reinforce teachers’ pedagogical competences and their pedagogical content knowledge and thereby make these teachers feel they participate in the scientific practice and contribute in developing both the stuff of knowledge and its culture.

     

    The thesis also contributes to new methodological knowledge about action research. One of the results is that time is an important factor to take into consideration depending on what kind of change you want to receive. The researcher engaged in action research as an "outsider" has an important function in order to monitor the process and pay attention and use critical events to drive the change process forward.        

     

  • 5.
    Andersson, Kristina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Vad har genus med naturvetenskap att göra?2013In: Den onaturliga naturen: Kunskapsmaterial om sexualitet och kön för lärare i naturkunskap och biologi på gymnasiet / [ed] Hans Olsson, Tommy Eriksson, RFSU , 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Andersson, Kristina
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Danielsson, Anna
    Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge.
    Gullberg, Annica
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Hussénius, Anita
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Chemistry.
    Acting for change: Challenging teachers through theatre, interventions and research2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Andersson, Kristina
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Danielsson, Anna
    Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och utbildningsstudier, Uppsala universitet.
    Gullberg, Annica
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Hussénius, Anita
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Chemistry.
    Chasing borderlands - pre-service teachers' meeting with different cultures in their education2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Andersson, Kristina
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology. Centre for Gender Research, Uppsala University.
    Gullberg, Annica
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology. Centre for Gender Research, Uppsala University.
    What is science in preschool and what do teachers have to know to empower children?2014In: Cultural Studies of Science Education, ISSN 1871-1502, E-ISSN 1871-1510, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 275-296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we problematize the purpose of teaching science in preschool and what competences preschool teachers need in order to conduct science activities in the classroom. The empirical data were collected through an action research project with five preschool and primary school teachers (K-6). In the first section we have used one situation, a floating-sinking experiment, as an illustration of how two different epistemological perspectives generate different foci on which kind of science teaching competences that are fruitful in preschool. In the first perspective, the central goal of science teaching is the development of the children’s conceptual understanding. With this perspective, we found that the science activities with the children were unsuccessful, because the children’s thoughts about concepts did not develop but even the situation enhanced a misconception concerning density. Moreover, the teacher was unsuccessful in supporting the children’s conceptual learning. The second perspective uses a feminist approach that scrutinizes science, where we investigate if the floating-sinking activity contributes to a feeling of participation in a scientific context for the children and if so how the teacher promotes this inclusion. This second perspective showed that the children’s scientific proficiency benefited from the situation; they had acquired a positive experience of the density concept that they could build upon which was reinforced by the teacher. The children discovered that they had power over their own learning by using an experimental approach. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that there are competences other than subject matter knowledge that are also important when preschool teachers engage children in scientific activities. Through process-oriented work with the teacher group, we identified four concrete skills: paying attention to and using children’s previous experiences; capturing unexpected things that happen at the moment they occur; asking questions that challenge the children and that stimulate further investigation; situated presence, that is, “remaining” in the situation and listening to the children and their explanations. We discuss possible ways to move preschool teachers away from their feelings of inadequacy and poor self-confidence in teaching science by reinforcing this kind of pedagogical content knowledge.

  • 9.
    Andersson, Kristina
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Gustafsson, Christina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Culture Studies, Religious Studies and Educational Sciences, Curriculum studies.
    Methodological dilemmas in action research2011In: Educational action research, ISSN 0965-0792, E-ISSN 1747-5074Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we want to call attention to and discuss two aspects of importance for work toward change regarding fundamental values through action research. The first aspect is time, and taking it into account according to “the action research spiral”. The second aspect concerns the importance of critical events for making progress and challenging preconceived notions. We also stress that researchers as “outsiders” have the opportunity to overview the process in a way that the other participants (insiders) do not. The empirical data is collected from an action research project on science and gender conducted inSweden with teachers from preschool and K-6. The collaboration was proceeded during 2005 to 2010, a total of 57 months.   

  • 10. Bengtsson, Bengt Å.
    et al.
    Björklund, Jan-Olov
    Cederberg, Björn
    ArtDatabanken.
    Eliasson, Claes
    Franzén, Markus
    Lunds Universitet.
    Hydén, Nils
    Lindeborg, Mats
    Palmqvist, Göran
    Ryrholm, Nils
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Söderström, Bo
    Artdatabanken.
    Fjärilar2010In: Rödlistade arter i Sverige 2010 / [ed] Ulf Gärdenfors, Uppsala: Artdatabanken i samarbete med Naturvårdsverket , 2010, 1, p. 361-392Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11. Bengtsson, Bengt Å.
    et al.
    Ryrholm, Nils
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Hur bevarar och övervakar man bäst Sveriges fjärilsfauna?2010In: Fauna och flora : populär tidskrift för biologi, ISSN 0014-8903, Vol. 105, no 1, p. 39-42Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Betzholtz, Per-Eric
    et al.
    School of Natural Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden .
    Pettersson, Lars B
    Department of Biology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden .
    Ryrholm, Nils
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Franzén, Markus
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Halle, Germany .
    With that diet, you will go far: trait-based analysis reveals a link between rapid range expansion and a nitrogen-favoured diet2013In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 280, no 1750, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent global change has had a substantial influence on the distribution of organisms, and many species are currently expanding their ranges. To evaluate the underlying processes, long-term data with good geographic resolution are essential. One important but generally overlooked data source is offered by the taxon-specific national catalogues of first provincial records that are kept in many countries. Here, we use such data to quantify trait-based influences on range expansion in Swedish butterflies and moths between 1973 and 2010. Of 282 species meeting pre-defined quality criteria, 170 expanded their northern range margin, with a mean expansion rate of 2.7 km per year. The analyses demonstrate that habitat and diet generalists, forest species and species active during warm conditions have expanded their ranges more rapidly than other species. Notably, range expansion in diet specialists was positively related to a nitrogen-favoured larval diet, an effect not found among oligo- or polyphagous species. In contrast to the general view, this shows that specialist species can undergo rapid range expansion. We suggest that increased areas of nitrogen-rich habitat, and increased availability of a nitrogen-favoured diet, are among the most important drivers of range expansions, potentially having far-reaching consequences for a wide variety of organisms.

  • 13.
    Ekblom, Jenny
    et al.
    Gävle kommun.
    Hjelm-Wigren, Eva
    Gävle kommun.
    Gullberg, Annica
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Andersson, Kristina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Allt har ställts på kant, men det är tusen gånger roligare - vad naturvetenskap kan vara i förskolan.2012In: Pedagogiska Magasinet, ISSN 1401-3320Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Gullberg, Annica
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Andersson, Kristina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Hussénius, Anita
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Chemistry.
    Danielsson, Anna
    Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och utbildningsstudier, Uppsala universitet.
    "Genus är att låta barnen vara dom de är" - hur barnsyn och genusmedvetenhet får ämnesdidaktiska konsekvenser.2012In: Utbildning och lärandeArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports from a study exploring how an increased knowledge about gender issues can affect pre-school student teachers’ reflections and actions concerning science and technology activities. We have analysed written assignments given to student enrolled in a teacher education programme as well as group discussions that were part of their science and technology courses. One assignment was focused on describing situations during their pre-school placements where the students themselves judged gender to be important. The analysis identifies a reoccurring argumentation among the students that draws on an idea that children need to ‘be who they are’, thus portraying them as having a stable core identity. In this paper we ask what it means to let the children ‘be who they are’ and what the consequences of this view for developing the pre-school according to the curriculum and the education act can be. In doing so, we discuss issues that respectively may promote and hinder pre-school teachers to develop strategies that challenges stereotypical gender patterns. Furthermore, we problematize what consequences this might have for science teaching.

  • 15.
    Hillström, Lars
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Enander, Angelica
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences.
    Stenberg, Sandra
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences.
    The use of games for learning about health and diet: a study in preschools in Sweden2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Hillström, Lars
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Pape Møller, Anders
    Laboratorie dÉcologie, Systématique et Evolution, CNRS UMR 8079, Université Paris-Sud, Batiment 362, F-91405 Orsay Cedex, France.
    The evolution of reversed sexual dimorphism in birds: a comparative study in charadriiformes2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Reversed size dimorphism is common in birds of prey, owls and in waders. Not much attention has been paid to the evolution of morphological characters such as wing morphology and variables related to flight agility. The aim of this study was to investigate if the morphological variables in shorebirds, related to flight performance, such as wing length, wing area, wing loading, and factors such as aspect ratio, are related to the display-flights performed by these different species of shorebirds. Data on morphological variables, e.g. body mass, wing length, wing area etc. was collected at the British Museum of Natural History, London, UK.

    Data on behavioral variables, e.g. duration of a display flight or height of display flight was extracted from the published literature. There was a significant difference in wing length dimorphism (t = 2.51, p= 0.0402), when comparing between species within the same genus that had higher versus lower level of flight performance. There was also a significant difference in wing area dimorphism (t = 2.84, p= 0.025), for higher versus lower level of flight performance. However, there was no such difference for weight dimorphism, nor for tarsus dimorphism, or for wing loading or aspect ratio, when comparing between species for higher versus lower level of flight performance. Further analyses will be presented and a suggestive explanation for the evolution of reversed sexual dimorphism will be discussed at the congress. The hypotheses for increased food- or incubation efficiency is with several arguments irrelevant to shorebirds (which will be discussed).

  • 17.
    Hillström, Lars
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Persson, Inga-Britt
    Gröna Kunskapshuset, Nedre Dalälvens Biosfärsområde.
    Creating Biosfärum- a gate to the Biosphere Reserve.2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Hillström, Lars
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Österdal, Henrik
    Norränge Skog & Natur AB, Norrängevägen 57, 820 10 ARBRÅ.
    Evolution of antlers in the moose Alces alces: a comparison of two different populations in Sweden2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish moose population has during the last 60 years been going through rather drastic changes in numbers. Recently there also seemed to have been a shift towards males with less and less developed antlers, which is an important problem for the moose population breeding. The aim with the present study was to study how antler size in the moose is related to age, body mass and population density. Information on the antler and body mass characters was obtained from 425 males that were shot during the annual moose hunting in October between the years 1999-2006. Age and body mass were the variables that explained most of the variation in antler size in this study. A residual of antler points over age, demonstrated a positive correlation between residuals and carcass, such that males with larger antlers for their age, was on average heavier than other males. There was also a significant negative correlation between population density and carcass. The high mortality rate of older males have lead to that few males reach an age where the horns are fully developed and the age distribution has moved to younger ages. As a consequence of this fact the males start to reproduce at younger ages. As the rutting behaviour is a very energy demanding activity, the younger male’s body growth will be constrained and there will be a large cost to come in rutting stage early. As the percentage of males and male age is having an impact on the reproduction of the population, this is an important problem which should be considered in order to give the right prerequisites for a more productive population of moose with big males that have well developed horns.

  • 19.
    Hultengren, Svante
    et al.
    Naturcentrum.
    Bohman, Petter
    Naturcentrum.
    Ryrholm, Nils
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Weibull, Henrik
    Naturcentrum.
    Inventeringar av kalkhällmarker i östra Dalsland2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Naturcentrum AB har på uppdrag av Länsstyrelsen i Västra Götaland genomfört inventeringar av naturvårdsintressanta arter på kalkhällmarker i östra Dalsland. Inventeringen har fokuserat på särskilt intressanta arter t ex rödlistade arter, sällsynta arter m m, inom grupperna fjärilar, bin, lavar, mossor och marksvampar. Dessutom har presenteras spridda observationer inom andra grupper, till exempel tvåvingar och trollsländor.

    De dalsländska kalkrika lerskifferhällmarkerna utgörs av någon mil breda, omvandlade berggrundsstråk i de mellersta och östra delarna av landskapet. Dessa kalkmarker skiljer sig från de geologiskt yngre och sedimentära kalkområdena som är typiska för till exempel Öland och Gotland. Förutsättningarna för floran och faunan i Dalslands kalkområden är unika genom det milda och fuktiga klimatet och att markke- min avviker något från de flesta andra kalkrika trakterna i Sverige. Dessa specifika förhållanden gynnar en lång rad sällsynta eller rödlistade arter.

    Fyra av de besökta områdena ligger på Ryrhalvön norr om Köpmannebro och den femte vid Ånimskogs kyrka. Samtliga delområden utgörs av västvända branter i direkt anslutning till sjöarna Ånimmen och Östebosjön. Miljöerna är generellt öppna och det västvända läget skapar ett varmt och solexponerat mikroklimat. I anslutning till de kala hällarna finns partier med tunna, kalkhaltiga jordlager och grusmarker. Graden av beskogning varierar både inom och mellan de olika delområdena.

    Inventeringarna genomfördes under några dagar under sommaren 2006 samt med en dags kompletterande lavinventering under februari 2008. Totalt på träffades 24 rödlistade arter fördelade enligt följande; sju fjärilsarter, två biarter, tre lavar, sex olika mossor och sex arter av svampar. Flera av dessa är ytterst sällsynta och har sin huvudsakliga utbredning i landet på dessa kalkrika lerskifferhällar. Vidare noterades ett 30-tal nya arter för landskapet Dalsland. Det största antalet nya fynd gjordes inom gruppen insekter vilket visar att kännedomen om landskapets insektsfauna är mycket bristfällig.

    Klot-tegellaven Psora globifera är klassad som starkt hotad (EN) och har huvuddelen av sina kända före- komster i kalkrika områden i Dalsland. Arten växer på lättvittrade, solexponerade, kalklerskifferhällar. I delområde 3 förekommer arten rikligt och i delområde 4 något mera sparsamt. Klotsporig skifferlav Sarcogyne distinguenda (VU) är en annan mycket sällsynt lav med få kända lokaler i landet av vilken den ena utgörs av delområde 5 (Carlsson 1998). Arten är knuten till klippor av kalklerskiffer. Det stora antalet arter gelélavar Collema spp. (sju stycken) är anmärkningsvärt även om ingen av arterna är rödlistade. Av mos-sorna bör särskilt nämnas hår-rosettmossa Riccia ciliata (VU), dvärgrosettmossa Riccia warnstorfii (VU) och trubbklockmossa Encalypta mutica (NT) vilka alla är mer eller mindre knutna till kalkhällar eller kalkrika jordar. Rosettmossorna växer rikligt i delområde 1 medan trubbklockmossan, som omfattas av habitatdi-rektivet inom Natura 2000, noterades i delområde 5. Brun fingersvamp Clavaria pullei (EN) noterades på gräsmarkerna i delområde 5. Arten verkar vara knuten till öppna och hävdade kalkrika marker. Bland in-sekterna utgör nyponsandbiet Andrena nitida (VU), fibblesandbiet A. fulvago (NT) och jungfrulinpraktmal Hypercallia citrinalis (NT) några av de mest anmärkningsvärda arterna. Nyponsandbiet som noterades i del-område 1 är mycket sällsynt och observerades senast 1949 i Dalsland.

    Inventeringarna som utförts är av stickprovskaraktär och det bedöms som sannolikt att fler värdefulla arter kan påträffas vid fördjupade inventeringar. Detta gäller både de behandlade delområdena och kalk-lerskiffermarker i allmänhet.

  • 20.
    Hussenius, Anita
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Chemistry. University of Gävle, Lärarutbildningsnämnden.
    Andersson, Kristina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology. University of Gävle, Lärarutbildningsnämnden.
    En plastisk sak som lär nytt hela livet2010In: Pedagogiska Magasinet, ISSN 1401-3320, no 2, p. 26-30Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Hussenius, Anita
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Chemistry.
    Andersson, Kristina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Danielsson, Anna
    University of Cambridge.
    Gullberg, Annica
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Salminen-Karlsson, Minna
    Centrum för genusvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    Scantlebury, Kathryn
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware.
    Hur lärare uppmärksammar genus i naturvetenskaplig undervisning2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Hussénius, Anita
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Chemistry.
    Andersson, Kristina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Danielsson, Anna
    Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge.
    Gullberg, Annica
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Salminen-Karlsson, Minna
    Centrum för Genusvetenskap, Uppsala universitet.
    Scantlebury, Kathryn
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware.
    Gender awareness in constructing knowledge of science and science teaching2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Hussénius, Anita
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Chemistry.
    Andersson, Kristina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Gullberg, Annica
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Integrerad undervisning om genus: på lärarprogrammets ämneskurser2012In: Genusvetenskapens pedagogik och didaktik / [ed] Anna Lundberg & Ann Werner, Göteborg: Nationella sekretariatet för genusforskning , 2012, p. 36-44Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Hussénius, Anita
    et al.
    Centre for Gender Research, Uppsala University.
    Andersson, Kristina
    Centre for Gender Research, Uppsala University.
    Gullberg, Annica
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Scantlebury, Kathryn
    University of Delaware.
    Ignoring Half the Sky: A Feminist Critique of Science Education’s Knowledge Society2013In: Science Education for Diversity: Theory and Practice / [ed] N. Mansour & R. Wegerif, Rotterdam: Springer Netherlands, 2013, p. 301-315Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A Chinese proverb observes that women “hold up half the sky”, yet often in science education we have ignored the knowledge generated by feminist researchers about how females engage and participate in science. Further, science education has often failed to consider the implications from feminist critiques of science on science education. This chapter will provide a feminist perspective on who generates knowledge in science education and what knowledge is acceptable as ‘scientific’ by the field. Second, we will discuss the culture of science education and discuss whether science educators value the knowledge produced by gender and feminist researchers. In particular, we will examine the integration (or lack thereof) of gender issues into the dominant areas in science education research, such as teachers’ pedagogical content knowledge, the development of students’ science knowledge through inquiry, the role of conceptual change, and teachers’ preparation and professional development programs. Third, we will provide examples of how gender theory and feminist perspectives in science education could generate new knowledge about gender and science education.

  • 25.
    Hussénius, Anita
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Chemistry.
    Danielsson, Anna
    Department of Education, Uppsala University.
    Andersson, Kristina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Gullberg, Annica
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Scantlebury, Kathryn
    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Dealware.
    Challenging primary student teachers' conceptions of gender and science: The initial phases of a research and intervention project2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Huttunen, Piritta
    et al.
    Finnish Forest Research Institute, Muhos Research Unit, Muhos, Finland.
    Kärkkäinen, Katri
    Finnish Forest Research Institute, Muhos Research Unit, Muhos, Finland.
    Löe, Geir
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Rautio, Pasi
    Finnish Forest Research Institute, Rovaniemi, Finland.
    Ågren, Jon
    Department of Ecology and Evolution, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Leaf trichome production and responses to defoliation and drought in Arabidopsis lyrata (Brassicaceae)2010In: Annales Botanici Fennici, ISSN 0003-3847, E-ISSN 1797-2442, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 199-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leaf trichomes can protect plants against herbivory and drought, but can be costly to produce. Theory suggests that selection for reduced costs of resistance may result in the evolution of inducible defences. We quantified variation in tolerance to drought and defoliation, and tested the hypotheses that (a) tolerance is associated with cost, (b) leaf trichome production increases tolerance to drought, and (c) trichome production is increased in response to defoliation and drought stress in Arabidopsis lyrata (Brassicaceae). Eight maternal half-sib families were exposed to two watering regimes and four defoliation treatments in a factorial design. Tolerance to drought varied among families and was inversely related to leaf size, but was not related to trichome density. Family mean performance in the low-watering treatment tended to correlate negatively with that in the control treatment. Trichome production was not induced by defoliation or drought stress. The results suggest that there is genetic variation in tolerance to drought in the study population, that tolerance to drought is associated with a cost, and that trichome production does not increase tolerance to drought in A. lyrata.

  • 27.
    Ianiri, G.
    et al.
    Dipartimento di Agricoltura, Ambiente e Alimenti, Facoltà di Agraria, Università degli Studi del Molise, Campobasso, Italy, and Division of Cell Biology and Biophysics, School of Biological Sciences, University of Missouri-Kansas City, USA.
    Idnurm, A.
    Division of Cell Biology and Biophysics, School of Biological Sciences, University of Missouri-Kansas City, USA .
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology. Dipartimento di Agricoltura, Ambiente e Alimenti, Facoltà di Agraria, Università degli Studi del Molise, Campobasso, Italy.
    Durán-Patrón, R.
    Departamento de Química Orgánica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cádiz, Spain .
    Mannina, L.
    Dipartimento di Chimica e Tecnologie del Farmaco, Rome, Italy .
    Ferracane, R.
    Dipartimento di Scienza degli Alimenti, Università di Napoli “Federico II”, Italy .
    Ritieni, A.
    Dipartimento di Chimica Farmaceutica e Tossicologica, Università di Napoli “Federico II”, Italy .
    Castoria, R.
    Division of Cell Biology and Biophysics, School of Biological Sciences, University of Missouri-Kansas City, USA .
    Searching for Genes Responsible for Patulin Degradation in a Biocontrol Yeast Provides Insights into the Basis for Resistance to This Mycotoxin2013In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 0099-2240, E-ISSN 1098-5336, Vol. 79, no 9, p. 3101-3115Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Jahncke, Helena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Buildning science - applied psychology.
    Hygge, Staffan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Buildning science - applied psychology.
    Halin, Niklas
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Buildning science - applied psychology.
    Green, Anne Marie
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Buildning science - applied psychology.
    Dimberg, Kent
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    An experiment on noise and cognition in a simulated open-plan office2010In: 39th International Congress on Noise Control Engineering 2010, INTER-NOISE 2010, Lisbon, Portugal: Portuguese acoustical society , 2010, Vol. 4, p. 2827-2836Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to investigate cognitive, emotional, and physiological effects of two background noise conditions (high noise: 51 LAeq and low noise: 39 LAeq) during work in a simulated open-plan office, followed by four restoration conditions (river movie with sound, only river sound, silence, and office noise) after the work period. Students (N = 47) went through one practice session and two experimental sessions, one each with the low and high noise conditions. In each experimental session they worked for two hours with tasks involving basic working memory processes. We also took physiological measures of stress (cortisol and catecholamine) and self-reports of mood and fatigue. The results showed that the participants remembered fewer words, rated themselves as more tired and less motivated in high noise compared to low noise. The participants showed high levels of cortisol when they arrived to the experimental session and they had a significant (p <.001) decline in both noise conditions after two hours of work. An identical decline was shown in the norepinephrine levels (p < 0.001). The restoration phase also indicated that the sound conditions may promote different restorative experiences. To conclude, the present study showed that noise level can be of importance for working memory performance and subjective feelings of tiredness and motivation in an open-plan office and that varying sound conditions may promote different restorative experiences.

  • 29.
    Jahncke, Helena
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Buildning science - applied psychology.
    Hygge, Staffan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Buildning science - applied psychology.
    Halin, Niklas
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Buildning science - applied psychology.
    Green, Anne Marie
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Buildning science - applied psychology.
    Dimberg, Kenth
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Open-plan office noise: Cognitive performance and restoration2011In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 373-382Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Kellner, Eva
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Attorps, Iiris
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Mathematics.
    Kollegialt lärande om progression i biologi- och matematikundervisning2014In: Nämnaren : tidskrift för matematikundervisning, ISSN 0348-2723, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 3-8Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Kan man utveckla undervisningen i biologi och matematik samtidigt? Ett lärarlag samarbetade med två forskare för att undersöka och svara på frågan. De undervisningsområden som valdes ut handlar om ekosystem och övergången mellan aritmetik och algebra.

  • 31.
    Kellner, Eva
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Gullberg, Annica
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Attorps, Iiris
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Mathematics.
    Thorén, Ingvar
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Mathematics.
    Tärneberg, Roy
    Prospective teachers' initial conceptions about pupils difficulties in science and mathematics: a potential resource in teacher education2011In: International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, ISSN 1571-0068, E-ISSN 1573-1774, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 843-866Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A crucial issue for prospective teachers (PTs) in their education is to develop pedagogical content knowledge (PCK; i.e. how to make a topic comprehensible to pupils). However, research has shown that PTs may have tacit ideas about teaching that act as filters preventing consideration of unfamiliar and discrepant ideas. These ideas must be elicited and taken into consideration in order to be modified. Therefore, PTs’ explicit conceptions may constitute a valuable resource in teacher education. The aim of this study was to investigate PTs’ ideas about pupils’ difficulties, at a topic-specific level, upon beginning the teacher education programme. The “Lesson Preparation Method” was used in four case studies to elicit the conceptions of 32 PTs regarding pupils’ difficulties in four specific science and mathematics topics: plant growth, gases, equations and heat and temperature. In all four topic groups (n = 5 – 11), there was a variety of initial conceptions about pupils’ difficulties, which were categorised into two to five topic-specific categories. Although, initially, PTs may not have expressed any notions about pupils’ difficulties, conceptions were elicited by using the Lesson Preparation Method. Furthermore, we found that the initial ideas corresponded with earlier research on pupils’ difficulties, which could provide a potential resource when creating a scaffolding context in teacher education programmes where PCK development is stimulated.

  • 32.
    Lopez-Vaamonde, Carlos
    et al.
    University of Montpellier.
    Agassiz, David
    Augustin, Sylvie
    Ryrholm, Nils
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Lepidoptera2010In: Alien Terrestrial Arthropods of Europe. Pt 2. / [ed] Alain Roques, et al., Sofia: Pensoft Publishers , 2010, 1, p. 603-668Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We provide a comprehensive overview of those Lepidopteran invasions to Europe that result from increasing globalisation and also review expansion of species within Europe. A total of 97 non-native Lepidoptera species (about 1% of the known fauna), in 20 families and 11 superfamilies have established so far in Europe, of which 30 alone are Pyraloidea. In addition, 88 European species in 25 families have expanded their range within Europe and around 23% of these are of Mediterranean or Balkan origin, invading the north and west. Although a number of these alien species have been in Europe for hundreds of years, 74% have established during the 20th century and arrivals are accelerating, with an average of 1.9 alien Lepidoptera newly established per year between 2000–2007. For 78 aliens with a known area of origin, Asia has contributed 28.9%, Africa (including Macaronesian islands, Canaries, Madeira and Azores) 21.6%, North America 16.5%, Australasia 7.2% and the neotropics just 5.2%. The route for almost all aliens to Europe is via importation of plants or plant products. Most alien Lepidoptera established in Europe are also confined to man-made habitats, with 52.5% occuring in parks and gardens. We highlight four species in particular, Diaphania perspectalis, Cacyreus marshalli, Cameraria ohridella and Paysandisia archon, as the most important current economic threats.

  • 33.
    Lundin, Mikael
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology. Institutionen för vilt, fisk och miljö, Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    Size-selection of herring (Clupea harengus membras) in a sustainable fishery2012Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Lundin, Mikael
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Calamnius, Linda
    Harmångers Maskin & Marin AB, Industriområdet 2, 820 74 Stocka, Sweden.
    Hillstrom, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Lunneryd, Sven-Gunnar
    Department of Aquatic Resources, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Turistg. 5, SE-453 21 Lysekil, Sweden.
    Size selection of herring (Clupea harengus membras) in a pontoon trap equipped with a rigid grid2011In: Fisheries Research, ISSN 0165-7836, E-ISSN 1872-6763, Vol. 108, no 1, p. 81-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A sustainable fishery in the Baltic and Bothnian Seas requires the development and introduction of fishing gear which fishes selectively and at the same time excludes raiding seals. The purpose of this study was twofold: firstly to test and evaluate rigid grids as a method for retaining only larger herring in a pontoon trap, and secondly to analyze which factors were influencing the selection process. The results demonstrate that it is indeed possible to sort herring by size in a pontoon fish chamber. The efficiency of excluding undersized herring was at best 27%, using a selection grid covering just over 0.1% of the fish chamber wall. The factors which have most effect on the selection were the quantity of fish in the trap, the season of the year, the time of day and the presence of seals. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 35.
    Lundin, Mikael
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Ovegård, Mikael
    Department of Aquatic Resources, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skolg. 6, SE-742 42 Öregund, Sweden.
    Calamnius, Linda
    Harmångers Maskin & Marin AB, Industriområdet 2, 820 74 Stocka, Sweden.
    Hillström, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Lunneryd, Sven-Gunnar
    Department of Aquatic Resources, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Turistg. 5, SE-453 21 Lysekil, Sweden.
    Selection efficiency of encircling grids in a herring pontoon trap2011In: Fisheries Research, ISSN 0165-7836, E-ISSN 1872-6763, Vol. 111, no 1-2, p. 127-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High bycatches of undersized herring constitute a major problem in the Baltic Sea herring trap fishery. In an attempt to reduce these bycatches, this field study evaluates the efficiency of rigid selection grids encircling a herring pontoon trap. The results show that 54-72% of the undersized herring were removed from the catch. The introduction of such grids would therefore represent a significant step towards a more efficient and sustainable herring fishery in the Baltic Sea. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  • 36.
    Oksinska, M. P.
    et al.
    Department of Agricultural Microbiology, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Wroclaw, Poland.
    Pietr, S. J.
    Department of Agricultural Microbiology, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Wroclaw, Poland.
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Resistance to oxidation products of caffeic acid is important for efficient colonization of wheat seedlings by Pseudomonas proteolytica strain PSR1142013In: Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment. Applied Soil Ecology, ISSN 0929-1393, E-ISSN 1873-0272, Vol. 66, p. 71-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interrelationships between plants and rhizosphere bacteria are strongly dependent on the quality and quantity of root exudates. The ability to colonize roots is crucial for pseudomonads to function as biological control agents of root- and soil-borne pathogenic microbes. The multiplication of rhizosphere bacteria is restricted in the presence of simple phenolic compounds, which are components of the resistance mechanisms of plants to pathogens. Caffeic acid is a phenolic compound, which is commonly found in wheat tissues. It is prone to oxidation into o-quinones, which are toxic to microorganisms. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the ability of microorganisms to resist caffeic acid and its oxidation products could play a role in the early colonization of wheat seedlings. Among the fluorescent pseudomonads that we have studied, strain PSR114 is one of the most efficient colonizers of wheat seedlings during the first 48h after seed germination, and it is particularly resistant to products resulting from the spontaneous oxidation of caffeic acid. This strain was isolated from the rhizosphere of oilseed rape and identified as being closely related to Pseudomonas proteolytica through the analysis of 16S rRNA and rpoB gene sequences. At pH 7.0, this strain grew intensively in the presence of 1.50mgmL-1 of caffeic acid. Its multiplication was partially reduced in the presence of oxidized caffeic acid at concentrations above 0.21mgmL-1, and completely inhibited at concentrations above 0.38mgmL-1. A Tn5 transposon mutant of PSR114 had lower level of resistance to the oxidation products of caffeic acid, as well as reduced capacity to colonize wheat seedlings when compared to the wild type strain. This work demonstrates that resistance to oxidation products of caffeic acid can be important for successful bacterial colonization of wheat seedlings.

  • 37.
    Ryrholm, Nils
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Fjärilsfaunan på Koster2012In: Dokumentationer av landlevande fauna och flora i Kosterhavets nationalpark och angränsande naturreservat / [ed] Svante Hultengren, Stenungsund: Naturcentrum , 2012, p. 5-29Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Ryrholm, Nils
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Norges sommerfugle av Leif Aarvik et al2010In: Entomologisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0013-886X, Vol. 131, p. 54-Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Ryrholm, Nils
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    The Violet Copper at its northern distribution range2014In: Jewels in the mist: A biological synopsis on the endangered butterfly Lycaena helle / [ed] Habel, Jan C, Meyer, Marc & Schmitt Thomas, Sofia: Pensoft Publishers, 2014, p. 15-21Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Stefanescu, Constantí
    et al.
    Butterfly Monitoring Scheme, Museu de Granollers de Ciències Naturals, Granollers, Spain..
    Páramo, Ferran
    Butterfly Monitoring Scheme, Museu de Granollers de Ciències Naturals, Granollers, Spain..
    Åkesson, Susanne
    Dept of Animal Ecology, Lund Univ. Sweden.
    Alarcón, Marta
    Univ. Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain.
    Ávila, Anna
    Edifici C, Univ. Bellaterra, Spain.
    Brereton, Tom
    Butterfly Conservation, Manor Yard, East Lulworth, Wareham, Dorset, UK.
    Carnicer, Jofre
    Global Ecology Unit, Campus de Bellaterra, Spain.
    Cassar, Louis F.
    Division of Environmental Management and Planning, Univ. of Malta, Malta.
    Fox, Richard
    Butterfly Conservation, Manor Yard, East Lulworth, Wareham, Dorset, UK.
    Heliölä, Janne
    Finnish Environment Inst., Helsinki, Finland.
    Hill, Jane K.
    Dept of Biology, Univ. of York, UK.
    Hirneisen, Norbert
    science4you, von-Müllenark-Str. 19, Bonn, Germany.
    Kjellén, Nils
    Dept of Animal Ecology, Lund Univ. Sweden.
    Kühn, Elisabeth
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Halle, Germany.
    Kuussaari, Mikko
    Finnish Environment Inst., Helsinki, Finland.
    Leskinen, Matti
    Dept of Physics, Univ. of Helsinki, Finland.
    Liechti, Felix
    Swiss Ornithological Inst., Switzerland.
    Musche, Martin
    Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Halle, Germany.
    Regan, Eugenie C.
    National Biodiversity Data Centre, WIT West Campus, Waterford, Ireland.
    Reynolds, Don R.
    Plant and Invertebrate Ecology Dept, Hertfordshire, UK, and Natural Resources Inst., Univ. of Greenwich, Chatham, Kent.
    Roy, David B.
    Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Oxfordshire, UK.
    Ryrholm, Nils
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Schmaljohann, Heiko
    Inst. of Avian Research ‘Vogelwarte Helgoland’, Germany.
    Settele, Josef
    Dept of Community Ecology, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Halle, Germany, and BCE, Butterfly Conservation Europe, the Netherlands.
    Thomas, Chris D.
    Dept of Biology, Univ. of York, UK.
    van Swaay, Chris
    BCE, Butterfly Conservation Europe, the Netherlands, and De Vlinderstichting, Dutch Butterfly Conservation, the Netherlands.
    Chapman, Jason W.
    Plant and Invertebrate Ecology Dept, Hertfordshire, UK, and Environment and Sustainability Inst., Univ. of Exeter, UK.
    Multi-generational long-distance migration of insects: studying the painted lady butterfly in the Western Palaearctic2013In: Ecography, ISSN 0906-7590, E-ISSN 1600-0587, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 474-486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Long-range, seasonal migration is a widespread phenomenon among insects, allowing them to track and exploit abundant but ephemeral resources over vast geographical areas. However, the basic patterns of how species shift across multiple locations and seasons are unknown in most cases, even though migrant species comprise an important component of the temperate-zone biota. The painted lady butterfly Vanessa cardui is such an example; a cosmopolitan continuously-brooded species which migrates each year between Africa and Europe, sometimes in enormous numbers. The migration of 2009 was one of the most impressive recorded, and thousands of observations were collected through citizen science programmes and systematic entomological surveys, such as high altitude insect-monitoring radar and ground-based butterfly monitoring schemes. Here we use V. cardui as a model species to better understand insect migration in the Western Palaearctic, and we capitalise on the complementary data sources available for this iconic butterfly. The migratory cycle in this species involves six generations, encompassing a latitudinal shift of thousands of kilometres (up to 60 degrees of latitude). The cycle comprises an annual poleward advance of the populations in spring followed by an equatorward return movement in autumn, with returning individuals potentially flying thousands of kilometres. We show that many long-distance migrants take advantage of favourable winds, moving downwind at high elevation (from some tens of metres from the ground to altitudes over 1000 m), pointing at strong similarities in the flight strategies used by V. cardui and other migrant Lepidoptera. Our results reveal the highly successful strategy that has evolved in these insects, and provide a useful framework for a better understanding of long-distance seasonal migration in the temperate regions worldwide.

  • 41.
    Van Swaay, Cris
    et al.
    Butterfly Conservation Europe (BCE), Wageningen, The Netherlands; De Vlinderstichting, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Collins, Susan
    Butterfly Conservation Europe (BCE), Wageningen, The Netherlands .
    Dusej, Goran
    Swiss Butterfly Conservation, Switzerland .
    Maes, Dirk
    Butterfly Conservation Europe (BCE), Wageningen, The Netherlands; Research Institute for Nature and Forest (INBO), Brussels, Belgium.
    Munguira, Miguel
    Butterfly Conservation Europe (BCE), Wageningen, The Netherlands; Departamento de Biología, Edificio de Biología, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain .
    Rakosy, Laslo
    Department of Taxonomy and Ecology, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania .
    Ryrholm, Nils
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Šašić, Martina
    Butterfly Conservation Europe (BCE), Wageningen, The Netherlands; Croatian Natural History Museum, Zagreb, Croatia .
    Settele, Joseph
    Butterfly Conservation Europe (BCE), Wageningen, The Netherlands, and UFZ, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, UFZ, Department of Community Ecology, Halle, Germany.
    Thomas, Jeremy
    Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Wallingford, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom .
    Verovnik, Rudy
    Butterfly Conservation Europe (BCE), Wageningen, The Netherlands; University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, Ljubljana, Slovenia .
    Verstrael, Theo
    Butterfly Conservation Europe (BCE), Wageningen, The Netherlands; De Vlinderstichting, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Warren, Martin
    Butterfly Conservation Europe (BCE), Wageninge, The Netherlands; Butterfly Conservation, Manor Yard, East Lulworth, Wareham, Dorset, United Kingdom.
    Wiemers, Martin
    Butterfly Conservation Europe (BCE), Wageningen, The Netherlands; Department of Tropical Ecology and Animal Biodiversity, University of Vienna, Wien, Austria .
    Wynhoff, Irma
    Butterfly Conservation Europe (BCE), Wageningen, The Netherlands; De Vlinderstichting, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Dos and Don’ts for butterflies of the Habitats Directive of the European Union2012In: Nature Conservation, ISSN 1314-6947, E-ISSN 1314-3301, Vol. 1, p. 73-153Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Twenty-nine butterfly species are listed on the Annexes of the Habitats Directive. To assist everyone who wants or needs to take action for one of these species, we compiled an overview of the habitat requirements and ecology of each species, as well as information on their conservation status in Europe. This was taken from the recent Red List and their main biogeographical regions (taken from the first reporting on Article 17 of the Directive). Most important are the Dos and Don`ts, which summarize in a few bullet points what to do and what to avoid in order to protect and conserve these butterflies and their habitats.

  • 42.
    Van Sway, Chris
    et al.
    Vlinderstichting.
    Collins, Susan
    Butterfly conservation.
    Dusej, Goran
    Maes, Dirk
    University of Leuven.
    Munguira, Miguel
    University of Madrid.
    Rakozy, Laszlo
    University of Cluj.
    Ryrholm, Nils
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology.
    Sasic, Martina
    Settele, Josef
    Thomas, Jeremy
    Verovnik, Rudi
    Verstrael, Theo
    Warren, Martin
    Wiemers, Martin
    Wynhoff, Irma
    Do´s and don´ts for butterflies of the habitat directive2010Report (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Wright, Sandra A. I.
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Biology. Università degli Studi del Molise, Campobasso, Italy.
    de Felice, D.V.
    Università degli Studi del Molise, Campobasso, Italy.
    Ianiri, G.
    Università degli Studi del Molise, Campobasso, Italy.
    Pinedo-Rivilla, C.
    Università degli Studi del Molise, Campobasso, Italy.
    De Curtis, F.
    Università degli Studi del Molise, Campobasso, Italy.
    Castoria, R.
    Università degli Studi del Molise, Campobasso, Italy.
    Two rapid assays for screening of patulin biodegradation2014In: International Journal of Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 1735-1472, E-ISSN 1735-2630, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 1387-1398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mycotoxin patulin is produced by the blue mould pathogen Penicillium expansum in rotting apples during postharvest storage. Patulin is toxic to a wide range of organisms, including humans, animals, fungi and bacteria. Wash water from apple packing and processing houses often harbours patulin and fungal spores, which can contaminate the environment. Ubiquitous epiphytic yeasts, such as Rhodosporidium kratochvilovae strain LS11 which is a biocontrol agent of P. expansum in apples, have the capacity to resist the toxicity of patulin and to biodegrade it. Two non-toxic products are formed. One is desoxypatulinic acid. The aim of the work was to develop rapid, high-throughput bioassays for monitoring patulin degradation in multiple samples. Escherichia coli was highly sensitive to patulin, but insensitive to desoxypatulinic acid. This was utilized to develop a detection test for patulin, replacing time-consuming thin layer chromatography or high-performance liquid chromatography. Two assays for patulin degradation were developed, one in liquid medium and the other in semi-solid medium. Both assays allow the contemporary screening of a large number of samples. The liquid medium assay utilizes 96-well microtiter plates and was optimized for using a minimum of patulin. The semi-solid medium assay has the added advantage of slowing down the biodegradation, which allows the study and isolation of transient degradation products. The two assays are complementary and have several areas of utilization, from screening a bank of microorganisms for biodegradation ability to the study of biodegradation pathways.

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