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  • 1.
    Andersson, Maria
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden .
    Eriksson, Ola
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    von Borgstede, Chris
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden .
    The Effects of Environmental Management Systems on Source Separation in the Work and Home Settings2012In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 4, no 6, p. 1292-1308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Measures that challenge the generation of waste are needed to address the global problem of the increasing volumes of waste that are generated in both private homes and workplaces. Source separation at the workplace is commonly implemented by environmental management systems (EMS). In the present study, the relationship between source separation at work and at home was investigated. A questionnaire that maps psychological and behavioural predictors of source separation was distributed to employees at different workplaces. The results show that respondents with awareness of EMS report higher levels of source separation at work, stronger environmental concern, personal and social norms, and perceive source separation to be less difficult. Furthermore, the results support the notion that after the adoption of EMS at the workplace, source separation at work spills over into source separation in the household. The potential implications for environmental management systems are discussed.

  • 2.
    Assefa, Getachew
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Ecology, School of Industrial Engineering and Management, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm.
    Glaumann, Mauritz
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering. Division of Environmental Strategies Research, Department of Urban Planning and Environment, School of Architecture and the Built Environment, Stockholm.
    Malmqvist, Tove
    Division of Environmental Strategies Research, Department of Urban Planning and Environment, School of Architecture and the Built Environment, Stockholm.
    Eriksson, Ola
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Quality versus impact: Comparing the environmental efficiency of building properties using the EcoEffect tool2010In: Building and Environment, ISSN 0360-1323, E-ISSN 1873-684X, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 1095-1103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are tools that are developed for the assessment of the environmental impact of buildings (e.g. ATHENA). Other tools dealing with the indoor and outdoor environmental quality of building properties (referred to as real estates in other literature) are also available (e.g. GBTool). A platform where both the aspects of quality and impact are presented in an integrated fashion are few. The aim of this contribution is to present how the performance of different building properties can be assessed and compared using the concept of environmental efficiency in a Swedish assessment tool called EcoEffect. It presents the quality dimension in the form of users' satisfaction covering indoor and outdoor performance features against the weighted environmental impact covering global and local impacts. The indoor and outdoor values are collected using questionnaires combined with inspection and some measurements. Life cycle methodology is behind the calculation of the weighted external environmental impact. A case study is presented to show the application of EcoEffect using a comparative assessment of Lindas and a Reference property. The results show that Lindas block is better in internal environment quality than the Reference property. It performs slightly worse than the Reference property in the external environmental impact due to emissions and waste from energy and material use. The approach of integrated presentation of quality and impact as in EcoEffect provides with the opportunity of uncovering issues problem shifting and sub-optimisation. This avoids undesirable situations where the indoor quality is improved through measures that result in higher external environmental impact. (C) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Eriksson, Ola
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Environmental technology assessment of natural gas compared to biogas2010In: Natural Gas / [ed] Potocnik, Primoz, Rijeka: INTECH, 2010, p. 127-146Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Eriksson, Ola
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Baky, A.
    Swedish Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Engineering (JTI), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Identification and testing of potential key parameters in system analysis of municipal solid waste management2010In: Resources, Conservation and Recycling, ISSN 0921-3449, E-ISSN 1879-0658, Vol. 54, no 12, p. 1095-1099Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) and life cycle costing (LCC) are well-established methods used for many years in many countries for system analysis of waste management. According to standard LCA procedure the assessment should include improvement analysis, in many cases this is performed by simple sensitivity analyses. An obstacle to perform more thorough sensitivity analyses is that it is hard to distinguish input data important to the results, i.e. key parameters. This paper further elaborates sensitivity analyses performed in an environmental system analysis fora hypothetical Swedish municipality. In this paper, the method to identify and test input data that can be categorised as potential key parameters is described. The method and the results from computer simulations of the identified parameters are presented, and some conclusions are drawn regarding the robustness of the results for environmental impact from municipal solid waste management. The major conclusion is that the results are robust. Changes in results, when changing the preconditions, are often small and the changes observed do not lead to new conclusions; i.e., a change of ranking order between treatment options.

  • 5.
    Eriksson, Ola
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering. Profu i Göteborg AB, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Bisaillon, Mattias
    Multiple system modelling of waste management2011In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 31, no 12, p. 2620-2630Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to increased environmental awareness, planning and performance of waste management has become more and more complex. Therefore waste management has early been subject to different types of modelling. Another field with long experience of modelling and systems perspective is energy systems. The two modelling traditions have developed side by side, but so far there are very few attempts to combine them. Waste management systems can be linked together with energy systems through incineration plants. The models for waste management can be modelled on a quite detailed level whereas surrounding systems are modelled in a more simplistic way. This is a problem, as previous studies have shown that assumptions on the surrounding system often tend to be important for the conclusions. In this paper it is shown how two models, one for the district heating system (MARTES) and another one for the waste management system (ORWARE), can be linked together. The strengths and weaknesses with model linking are discussed when compared to simplistic assumptions on effects in the energy and waste management systems. It is concluded that the linking of models will provide a more complete, correct and credible picture of the consequences of different simultaneous changes in the systems. The linking procedure is easy to perform and also leads to activation of project partners. However, the simulation procedure is a bit more complicated and calls for the ability to run both models.

  • 6.
    Finnveden, Göran
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Built Environment, Department of Urban Planning and Environment, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Ekvall, Tomas
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Arushanyan, Yevgeniya
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Built Environment, Department of Urban Planning and Environment, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Bisaillon, Mattias
    Profu AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Greger
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Built Environment, Department of Urban Planning and Environment, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Gunnarsson Östling, Ulrika
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Built Environment, Department of Urban Planning and Environment, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Ljunggren Söderman, Maria
    Chalmers University of Technology, Environmental Systems Analysis Energy and Environment, Göteborg, Sweden .
    Sahlin, Jenny
    Profu AB, Mölndal, Sweden .
    Stenmarck, Åsa
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Sundberg, Johan
    Profu AB, Mölndal, Sweden .
    Sundqvist, Jan-Olov
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Built Environment, Department of Urban Planning and Environment, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Söderholm, Patrik
    Luleå University of Technology, Economics Unit, Luleå, Sweden .
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Built Environment, Department of Urban Planning and Environment, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Eriksson, Ola
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Forsfält, Tomas
    Konjunkturinstitutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Guath, Mona
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Built Environment, Department of Urban Planning and Environment, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Policy Instruments towards a Sustainable Waste Management2013In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 841-881Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to suggest and discuss policy instruments that could lead towards a more sustainable waste management. The paper is based on evaluations from a large scale multi-disciplinary Swedish research program. The evaluations focus on environmental and economic impacts as well as social acceptance. The focus is on the Swedish waste management system but the results should be relevant also for other countries. Through the assessments and lessons learned during the research program we conclude that several policy instruments can be effective and possible to implement. Particularly, we put forward the following policy instruments: "Information"; "Compulsory recycling of recyclable materials"; "Weight-based waste fee in combination with information and developed recycling systems"; "Mandatory labeling of products containing hazardous chemicals", "Advertisements on request only and other waste minimization measures"; and "Differentiated VAT and subsidies for some services". Compulsory recycling of recyclable materials is the policy instrument that has the largest potential for decreasing the environmental impacts with the configurations studied here. The effects of the other policy instruments studied may be more limited and they typically need to be implemented in combination in order to have more significant impacts. Furthermore, policy makers need to take into account market and international aspects when implementing new instruments. In the more long term perspective, the above set of policy instruments may also need to be complemented with more transformational policy instruments that can significantly decrease the generation of waste.

  • 7.
    Gentil, Emmanuel C.
    et al.
    Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark.
    Damgaard, Anders
    Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark.
    Hauschild, Michael
    DTU Management, Innovation and Sustainability Group, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark.
    Finnveden, Göran
    Environmental Strategies Research - fms, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Ola
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Thorneloe, Susan
    US EPA, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, United States.
    Kaplan, Pervin Ozge
    US EPA, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, United States.
    Barlaz, Morton
    Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, NC State University, Raleigh, United States.
    Muller, Olivier
    PricewaterhouseCoopers, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France.
    Matsui, Yasuhiro
    Graduate School of Environmental Science, Okayama University, Okayama, Japan.
    Ii, Ryota
    Pacific Consultants Co. Ltd., Tokyo, Japan.
    Christensen, Thomas H.
    Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark.
    Models for waste life cycle assessment: Review of technical assumptions2010In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 30, no 12, p. 2636-2648Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A number of waste life cycle assessment (LCA) models have been gradually developed since the early 1990s, in a number of countries, usually independently from each other. Large discrepancies in results have been observed among different waste LCA models, although it has also been shown that results from different LCA studies can be consistent. This paper is an attempt to identify, review and analyse methodologies and technical assumptions used in various parts of selected waste LCA models. Several criteria were identified, which could have significant impacts on the results, such as the functional unit, system boundaries, waste composition and energy modelling. The modelling assumptions of waste management processes, ranging from collection, transportation, intermediate facilities, recycling, thermal treatment, biological treatment, and landfilling, are obviously critical when comparing waste LCA models. This review infers that some of the differences in waste LCA models are inherent to the time they were developed. It is expected that models developed later, benefit from past modelling assumptions and knowledge and issues. Models developed in different countries furthermore rely on geographic specificities that have an impact on the results of waste LCA models. The review concludes that more effort should be employed to harmonise and validate non-geographic assumptions to strengthen waste LCA modelling.

  • 8.
    Glaumann, Mauritz
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Environmental assessment of buildings and building materials2010In: Sustainable Construction: A life Cycle Approach in Engineering. International Training School, Malta 2010 / [ed] Braganca L et al, Malta: Faculty for the Built Environment, University of Malta , 2010, p. 99-150Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Glaumann, Mauritz
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Malmqvist, Tove
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and the Built Environment,, Division of Environmental Strategies Research, Department of Urban Studies, Environmental Strategies Research - fms.
    Wallhagen, Marita
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Selecting environmental assessment tool for buildings2011In: Proceedings of 6th World Sustainable Building Conference, SB11 Helsinki, October 18-22, 2011, Helsinki, 2011, Vol. 1, p. Abstract 162-163Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Hillman, Karl
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Governance of Innovation for Sustainable Transport: Biofuels in Sweden 1990-20102011Report (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Hillman, Karl
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Nilsson, Måns
    Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Rickne, Annika
    University of Gothenburg.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University.
    Fostering sustainable technologies: A framework for analysing the governance of innovation systems2011In: Science and Public Policy, ISSN 0302-3427, E-ISSN 1471-5430, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 403-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development and diffusion of technological innovations need governing in order to contribute to societal goals related to sustainability. Yet, there are few systematic studies mapping out what types of governance are deployed and how they influence the development and diffusion of sustainable technological innovations. This paper develops a framework for analysing the role of governance in innovation systems aimed towards sustainability. The framework is based on the literatures on governance, technological innovation systems and socio-technical transitions. We foresee empirical studies based on the framework that may serve as a needed input into governance processes. © Beech Tree Publishing 2011.

  • 12.
    Hillman, Karl
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Rickne, Annika
    University of Gothenburg.
    Balancing Variety Creation and Selection: Governing Biofuels in Sweden 1990-20102012In: Paving the Road to Sustainable Transport: Governance and innovation in low-carbon vehicles / [ed] Måns Nilsson, Karl Hillman, Annika Rickne, Thomas Magnusson, Routledge, 2012, 1, p. 235-259Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Hillman, Karl
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Suurs, Roald
    TNO.
    Hekkert, Marko
    Utrecht University.
    Sandén, Björn
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Cumulative causation in biofuels development: a critical comparison of the Netherlands and Sweden2011In: The Dynamics of Sustainable Innovation Journeys / [ed] Frank Geels, Marko Hekkert, Staffan Jacobsson, Abingdon: Routledge , 2011, 1, p. 73-92Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Iguchi, Masahiko
    et al.
    Tokyo Institute of Technology.
    Hillman, Karl
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    The Development of Fuel Economy Regulation for Passenger Cars in Japan2012In: Paving the Road to Sustainable Transport: Governance and innovation in low-carbon vehicles / [ed] Måns Nilsson, Karl Hillman, Annika Rickne, Thomas Magnusson, Routledge, 2012, 1, p. 57-74Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Kus, Hülya
    et al.
    stanbul Technical University , Faculty of Architecture, Turkey.
    Norberg, Peter
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Sjöström, Christer
    Building Science, KTH, Stockholm.
    Durability assessment of external renderings on AAC based on 10-year long-term monitoring data2013In: Third International Conference  on  Sustainable construction Materials and Technologies: Conference proceedings / [ed] Peter Claisse, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Long-term performance and durability of external walls made of rendered autoclaved aerated concrete was investigated within a research project, based on continuous monitoring of temperature and moisture in the materials employed in the weathering test conducted in Gavle, Sweden. The details of natural exposure test set-up and preliminary measurement and experiment results were published elsewhere. Among the external rendering systems applied on AAC wall panels, a variety of coatings including inorganic and organic coatings with and without hydrophobic agents were tested. Together with the surface and bulk temperatures and moisture contents of the tested materials, microclimate parameters were also continuously measured. In this paper, monitoring data collected during 10 years of natural exposure are examined, and some results, particularly on moisture performance of external rendering systems, are presented and briefly discussed. 

  • 16.
    Malmqvist, Tove
    et al.
    Royal Inst Technol KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Glaumann, Mauritz
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering. Royal Inst Technol KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    Royal Inst Technol KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Carlson, Per-Olof
    ACC Glasradgivare AB, Nacka, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Martin
    IVL Swedish Environm Res Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Johnny
    Ramboll Consultants, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Winzell, Helene
    Helene Wintzell AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Finnveden, Göran
    Royal Inst Technol KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindholm, Torbjörn
    Chalmers, Environm & Energy Dept, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Malmström, Tor-Göran
    Royal Inst Technol KTH, Dept Bldg Technol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    A Swedish environmental rating tool for buildings2011In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 1893-1899Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2003, a joint effort between the Swedish government, a number of companies in the building and construction sectors, some municipalities, insurance companies and banks set a target that by 2009, all new buildings and 30% of existing Swedish buildings should be rated using a voluntary environmental rating tool. In a major research programme finished in 2008, a tool was developed to be used in this context. The tool covers three assessment areas: Energy, Indoor environment and Material & Chemicals. These areas are split into 11 aspects with one or a few indicators. Rating criteria are specified for each indicator, stipulating requirements for a rating Gold, Silver, Bronze and Rated. Indicator results can then be aggregated to aspect, area and a single raring for building level for enhanced result communication. The tool builds on previous experiences regarding environmental building rating tools and therefore includes some special characteristics which aim to tackle some of the criticism directed towards the first generation of such tools. At the time of writing, the first buildings have received official ratings and an independent stakeholder group is promoting broader implementation of the tool. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 17.
    Malmqvist, Tove
    et al.
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and the Built Environment,, Division of Environmental Strategies Research, Department of Urban Studies, Environmental Strategies Research - fms.
    Keski-Seppälä, Lars
    Sollentuna municipality.
    Glaumann, Mauritz
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Integrating municipal climate targets with planning strategies at building level in a life cycle perspective2011In: Proceedings of 6th World Sustainable Building Conference, SB11 Helsinki, October 18-22, 2011, Helsinki, 2011, Vol. 1, p. Abstract 158-159Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Mazzucchelli, Enrico
    et al.
    Politecnico di Milano.
    Wallhagen, Marita
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering. KTH, Avdelningen Miljöstrategisk analys - fms.
    Nearly Zero Energy Building: Design Strategies and BEATs Influence on Architectural Design2013In: 39th IAHS (The International Association for Housing Science), Milan Italy 2013: Changing Needs, Adaptive Buildings, Smart Cities (Volume 1) / [ed] Oktay Ural, Emilio Pizzi, Sergio Croce, Milan: PoliScript , 2013, p. 155-162Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Nilsson, Måns
    et al.
    Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Hillman, Karl
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University.
    How do we govern sustainable innovations? Mapping patterns of governance for biofuels and hybrid-electric vehicle technologies2012In: Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions, ISSN 2210-4224, Vol. 3, p. 50-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines patterns of governance aimed at sustainable technological innovation in the transport sector. It makes an overall assessment of governance emerging in the fields of biofuel and hybrid-electric vehicle (HEV) technologies, and makes a classification of its characteristics. It examines the role of different actors and levels of governance as well as preferred mechanisms and targets of governance. The assessment reveals that there are rather differential patterns of governance influencing the two fields. For instance, international-level and market-based governance are much more prevalent in biofuels, whereas industry-led and cognitive governance play comparatively stronger roles in HEV. These patterns can be understood in light of both the different institutional and actor characteristics of the two technologies, and their positions in relation to socio-technical regimes.

  • 20.
    Nilsson, Måns
    et al.
    Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Hillman, KarlUniversity of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.Rickne, AnnikaUniversity of Gothenburg.Magnusson, ThomasLinköping University.
    Paving the Road to Sustainable Transport: Governance and innovation in low-carbon vehicles2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book is about how societies around the world can accelerate innovation in sustainable transport. It examines the relationship between policy change and the development of technological innovations in low carbon vehicle technologies, including biofuels, hybrid-electric vehicles, electric vehicles and fuel cells. Examining this relationship across countries and regions that are leaders in vehicle manufacturing and innovation, such as the European Union, Germany, Sweden, China, Japan, Korea and USA, the books aims to learn lessons about policy and innovation performance.

  • 21.
    Nilsson, Måns
    et al.
    Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Rickne, Annika
    University of Gothenburg.
    Hillman, Karl
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Magnusson, Thomas
    Linköping University.
    The Road Ahead: Conclusions and Governance Implications2012In: Paving the Road to Sustainable Transport: Governance and innovation in low-carbon vehicles / [ed] Måns Nilsson, Karl Hillman, Annika Rickne, Thomas Magnusson, New York: Routledge, 2012, 1, p. 277-289Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Rossi, Barbara
    et al.
    MS2F, ArGEnCo Department, University of Liège, Belgium .
    Marique, Anne-Francoise
    LEMA, ArGEnCo Department, University of Liège, Belgium .
    Glaumann, Mauritz
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Reiter, Sigrid
    LEMA, ArGEnCo Department, University of Liège, Belgium .
    Life-cycle assessment of residential buildings in three different European locations, basic tool2012In: Building and Environment, ISSN 0360-1323, E-ISSN 1873-684X, Vol. 51, p. 395-401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper deals with the development of a tool used for the life cycle assessment of residential buildings located in three different European towns: Brussels (Belgium), Coimbra (Portugal) and Lulea (Sweden). The basic tool focuses on the structure and the materials of the buildings and permits the evaluation of the Embodied energy, Embodied carbon and yearly energy consumption. For that purpose, a different set of original data is taken into account for each location, in which the monthly temperatures, energy mix, heating and cooling systems are defined. The energy consumption, being for heating space or water, for cooling or for lighting is transformed into CO2 emissions to deduce the Operational carbon as well. The influence of the energy mix can therefore be assessed in the basic tool. As a matter of fact, the heating and cooling systems habitually used in the three countries are also of great importance. The District Heating system, is, for instance, incorporated in the basic tool. The presence of solar water heater or photovoltaic panels is also strongly influencing the operational carbon. After a short literature review on building LCA and the description of the basic tool, the software Pleiades + Comfie combined with Equer is used to achieve the complete LCA for one building using two different load bearing frames. The results of the calculations for Brussels climate are verified against these software results. The dependence of the results to parameters such as climate, energy mix and habits is then discussed in the companion paper.

  • 23.
    Sandén, Björn
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Hillman, Karl
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    A framework for analysis of multi-mode interaction among technologies with examples from the history of alternative transport fuels in Sweden2011In: Research Policy, ISSN 0048-7333, E-ISSN 1873-7625, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 403-414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between technologies is a salient feature of the literature on technical change and terms like ’dominant design’ and ’technology lock-in’ are part of the standard vocabulary and put competition among technologies in focus. The aim of this paper is to provide an account of the wide range of interaction modes beyond competition that is prevalent in transition processes and to develop a conceptual framework to facilitate more detailed and nuanced descriptions of technology interaction. Besides competition, we identify five other basic modes of interaction: symbiosis, neutralism, parasitism, commensalism and amensalism. Further, we describe interaction as overlapping value chains. Defining a technology as a socio-technical system extending in material, organisational and conceptual dimensions allows for an even more detailed description of interaction. The conceptual framework is tested on and illustrated by a case study of interaction among alternative transport fuels in Sweden 1974-2004. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 24.
    Twumasi Afriyie, Ebenezer
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Buildning science - material science.
    Norberg, Peter
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Sjöström, Christer
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Buildning science - material science.
    Forslund, Mikael
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Buildning science - material science.
    Preparation and characterization of double metal-silica sorbent for gas filtration2013In: Adsorption, ISSN 0929-5607, E-ISSN 1572-8757, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 49-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the preparation of a porous (Mg, Ca) silicate structure, which could be employed as sorbent filter media. The sorbents have been prepared using sodium silicate precipitated with various ratios of magnesium and calcium salts. The sorbents obtained were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and nitrogen physisorption isotherm. Further, the applicability and performance of the sorbent impregnate with potassium hydroxide for removal of sulphur dioxide (SO2) has been demonstrated. From the isotherms, specific surface area, pore diameter and volume of pores were estimated. Results show that the chemical composition and textural properties of the resultant sorbents were highly dependent on Mg/Ca molar ratio. It was found that sorbents made with 68 mol% Mg and 32 mol% Ca (PSS-MgCa-68/32); and 75 mol% Mg and 25 mol% Ca (PSS-MgCa-75/25) exhibited even higher specific surface area and pore volume than the sorbents containing a single metal. The Mg/Ca-silica sorbents obtained contains interconnected bimodal porosity with large portions being mesopores of varied sizes. The pore size distribution (PSD) results further indicate that PSS-MgCa-68/32 sorbent exhibits wide PSD of interconnected pores in the size range of 1 to 32 nm while PSS-MgCa-50/50 and PSS-MgCa-75/25 exhibits narrow PSD of 1 to 5 nm. Using SO2 as model contaminate gas, it was shown that the dynamic adsorption performance of the PSS-MgCa-sorbents impregnated with 8 wt% KOH exhibits SO2 uptake, with impregnated PSS-MgCa-68/32 showing better performance. This shows that the materials prepared can be used as adsorbent for gas filtration.

  • 25.
    Twumasi Afriyie, Ebenezer
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Buildning science - material science.
    Norberg, Peter
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Sjöström, Christer
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Buildning science - material science.
    Forslund, Mikael
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Buildning science - material science.
    Textural and hydrogen sulphide adsorption behaviour of double metal-silca modified with potassium permanganate2013In: Journal of porous materials, ISSN 1380-2224, E-ISSN 1573-4854, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 447-455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new MgCa–silica material with bimodal pore size is impregnated with KMnO4 for dynamic adsorption of H2S. The MgCa–silica was synthesized using sodium silicate and calcium and magnesium salts as precipitating agents. The KMnO4 impregnation onto MgCa–silica was obtained through either direct addition into MgCa–silica wet coagulum or doping of dried MgCa–silica pellets into KMnO4 solution. These chemisorbents were characterized by nitrogen physisorption, spectrophotometer, microscopy and dynamic H2S adsorption test setup similar to ASHRAE standard I45.I. The results show that impregnation route and KMnO4 wt% cause a reduction of surface area and total pore volume. The decrease in pore volume was slightly more in chemisorbents obtained via post doping compared to direct impregnation. Regardless of pore volume reduction the pore size range, 1–32 nm, was as in the parent MgCa–silica with micro and meso-pore diameter centered at 1.4 and 5.4 nm respectively. Thus obtained chemisorbents have their pore entrances neither blocked nor shifted. The MgCa–silica/KMnO4 chemisorbents exhibits good H2S uptake performance. The chemisorbent with 11.4 wt% KMnO4 and obtained via direct impregnation possesses the highest uptake capacity. The lowest capacity was observed for chemisorbent with 8 wt% KMnO4 and made by direct impregnation. The variations in uptake capacity are likely due to impregnation route, the KMnO4 content and its location in the pore system. The results suggest that the MgCa–silica/KMnO4chemisorbents can remove H2S from indoor air at room temperature.

  • 26.
    Wallhagen, Marita
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Environmental Assessment of Buildings and the influence on architectural design2010Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This licentiate thesis examines environmental assessment tools for buildings. This is done by investigating, analysing, comparing and testing how different environmental assessment tools measure the environmental performance of buildings and examining the consequences this may have on architectural design.

    The study begins by analysing three environmental assessment tools: LEED, CSH and EcoEffect. These tools are then tested on a case study building (an eight-storey residential building) to analyse differences regarding assessment results, improvement proposals and potential impacts on architectural design.

    One of the environmental impacts assessed in the three tools, namely Climate Change caused by gases having Global Warming Potential (GWP), is then analysed in greater detail from a life cycle perspective by measuring CO2-equivalents (CO2-eq). A basic calculation tool (referred to as the ENSLIC tool), based on life cycle assessment methodology, is used to assess a case study building (a four-storey office building in Gävle). The impact of the building on CO2-eq emissions is calculated and the impact of a number of suggested building improvements and changes of energy sources is analysed. 

    The studies show the complexity of assessment tools and different ways to make comparisons. Both similarities and differences between the tools are apparent, regarding hierarchical structure and also on each hierarchical level, from categories to issues and parameters. It is also shown that the choice of environmental assessment tool may have an influence on the architectural design of buildings.

    The difficulty with assessing complex buildings is apparent even when only one environmental issue is assessed with the LCA-based ENSLIC tool. Many aspects influence the assessment result. These include energy use, choice of materials and choice of energy sources.

    The complexity and difficulty in linking buildings to environmental impact create a need for interactive tools measuring environmental performance, which can be useful as decision support in the early design phase.

  • 27.
    Wallhagen, Marita
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Glaumann, Mauritz
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Design consequences of differences in building assessment tools: a case study2011In: Building Research & Information, ISSN 0961-3218, E-ISSN 1466-4321, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 16-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental assessment tools for buildings are emerging rapidly in many countries. Do different assessment tools influence the design process and also guide ‘green’ building projects in different directions? Three assessment tools, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for New Construction (LEED-NC), Code for Sustainable Homes (CSH) and EcoEffect, were tested in a case study project in Sweden: a new multi-storey residential building called Grönskär. The content and results of the three assessment tools were compared in general, while issues in the three core common categories of Energy, Indoor Environment and Materials & Waste were compared in more detail. The assessment results for the case study building varied with the three tools, and the design strategies and tactics to improve the overall rating of the building project differed for each tool. This confirms that the tools can influence sustainable building in different directions and illustrates insufficient consensus between assessment tools in terms of issues, criteria and weighting. The divergent results highlight the need for an appropriate structure of assessment tools that are both environmentally relevant and practically useful.

  • 28.
    Wallhagen, Marita
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering. KTH, MIljöstrategisk Analys - fms.
    Glaumann, Mauritz
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and the Built Environment,, Division of Environmental Strategies Research, Department of Urban Studies, Environmental Strategies Research - fms.
    Eriksson, Ola
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Westerberg, Ulla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Building engineering.
    Framework for Detailed Comparison of Building Environmental Assessment Tools2013In: Buildings, ISSN 2075-5309, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 39-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding how Building Environmental Assessments Tools (BEATs) measure and define “environmental” building is of great interest to many stakeholders, but it is difficult to understand how BEATs relate to each other, as well as to make detailed and systematic tool comparisons. A framework for comparing BEATs is presented in the following which facilitates an understanding and comparison of similarities and differences in terms of structure, content, aggregation, and scope. The framework was tested by comparing three distinctly different assessment tools; LEED-NC v3, Code for Sustainable Homes (CSH), and EcoEffect. Illustrations of the hierarchical structure of the tools gave a clear overview of their structural differences. When using the framework, the analysis showed that all three tools treat issues related to the main assessment categories: Energy and Pollution, Indoor Environment, and Materials and Waste. However, the environmental issues addressed, and the parameters defining the object of study, differ and, subsequently, so do rating, results, categories, issues, input data, aggregation methodology, and weighting. This means that BEATs measure “environmental” building differently and push “environmental” design in different directions. Therefore, tool comparisons are important, and the framework can be used to make these comparisons in a more detailed and systematic way.

  • 29.
    Wallhagen, Marita
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Glaumann, Mauritz
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
    Malmqvist, Tove
    Royal Institute of Technology, Division of Environmental Strategies Research, Department of Urban Studies, School of Architecture and the Built Environment, Stockholm.
    Basic building life cycle calculations to decrease contribution to climate change: Case study on an office building in Sweden  2011In: Building and Environment, ISSN 0360-1323, E-ISSN 1873-684X, Vol. 46, no 10, p. 1863-1871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined whether simplified life cycle-based calculations of climate change contributions can provide better decision support for building design. Contributions to climate change from a newly built office building in Gävle, Sweden, were studied from a life cycle perspective as a basis for improvements. A basic climate and energy calculation tool for buildings developed in the European project ENSLIC was used. The study also examined the relative impacts from building material production and building operation, as well as the relative importance of the impact contributions from these two life cycle stages at various conditions.

    The ENSLIC tool calculates operational energy use and contributions to climate change of a number of optional improvement measures. Twelve relevant improvement measures were tested. The most important measures proved to be changing to CO2 free electricity, changing construction slabs from concrete to wood, using windows with better U-values, insulating the building better and installing low-energy lighting and white goods. Introduction of these measures was estimated to reduce the total contribution to climate change by nearly 50% compared with the original building and the operational energy use by nearly 20% (from 100 to 81 kWh/m2 yr). Almost every building is unique and situated in a specific context. Making simple analyses of different construction options showed to be useful and gave some unexpected results which were difficult to foresee from a general design experience. This process acts as an introduction to life cycle thinking and highlights the consequence of different material choices.

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