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  • 1.
    Albertzeth, Gustav
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Engineering, Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember, Surabaya, Indonesia.
    Pujawan, I. Nyoman
    Department of Industrial Engineering, Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember, Surabaya, Indonesia.
    Hilletofth, Per
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Tjahjono, Benny
    Centre for Business in Society, Coventry University, Coventry, United Kingdom.
    Mitigating transportation disruptions in a supply chain: a cost-effective strategy2019In: International Journal of Logistics, ISSN 1367-5567, E-ISSN 1469-848XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transportation disruptions can be damaging to a supply chain because goods may not arrive on time and this jeopardises the service level to the customers. While supply chain disruptions have gained significant attention from scholars, little has been done to explore these disruptions in the context of transportation. The study described in this paper aims to address disruptions occurring in the transportation of goods from a plant to a distribution centre. We modelled this real case to obtain insights on the effectiveness of different strategies to mitigate transportation disruptions. We evaluated four mitigation strategies and compared the outcomes in terms of service level and total costs: (1) the risk acceptance strategy, (2) the redundant stock strategy, (3) the flexible route strategy, and (4) the redundant-flexibility strategy. The results suggest that the best strategy differs depending on the budget that managers are willing to deploy to improve the service level. The simulation experiments and the use of the Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratio (ICER) would be instrumental in helping decision makers in selecting the best disruption mitigation strategies where the best option would likely be different under varying circumstances. 

  • 2.
    Alieva, Jamila
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Digital collaboration within the supply chain: new booster for hidden lean potential2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the hidden lean potential exposed by manufacturers’ usage of enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. The potential can be classified into three types: unlocked lean potential in a connected ERP system, unlocked lean potential in an un-connected ERP system, and the lean potential for further unlocking in companies that do not use ERP systems when collaborating with suppliers/customers. Empirical data is obtained from two cases of manufacturing companies in Sweden and one ERP system company. The findings indicate that hidden lean potential can be unlocked through digital collaboration within the supply chain.

  • 3.
    Almira, Memic
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Aida, Osmanovic
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Utformning av en ankomstkontroll: Möjligheter och utmaningar som en ankomstkontroll kan ge industriföretag2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Many companies strive to develop their arrival controls in an effective way as arrivals controls have proven to be significant for the companies. This is grounded in the fact that arrival controls improve the flow of production and minimize the risk for production errors since the controls enable an effective management of the company’s products and materials. Not establishing these controls consequently often leads to production default, stress and increased expenses. Nonetheless, many companies choose not to implement arrival controls because such implementations are accompanied by large costs. Furthermore, they require space, which smaller companies do not have.

    The purpose of this study is, through the analysis of previous literature and interaction with a local company, examine how efficient arrival controls can be structured. Additionally, this study aspires through, improvement proposals, to aid Munters AB in the construction of arrival controls.

    This is a qualitative case study conducted at Munters AB in Tobo. Empirical data was accumulated through semi-structured interviews, analytical observations and consistent visits to the company.

    Arrival controls are of significant importance for companies and the absence of such are undoubtly damaging for the company. This is evidential in the interviews, where both the quality director and the Lean coordinator were aware of the company’s shortcomings in this area. Further findings show that all workers in the production department experienced continuous defects in every day production and therefore hoped for an implementation of arrival controls. In conclusion the study found that Munters AB is in urgent need of arrival controls. However, in order for such an implementation to be as effective as possible, the company needs to utilize different methods, tools and system and crucial forward planning in production. 

  • 4. Arnemo, Ulf
    et al.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköpings universitet.
    Hansson, Stefan
    Holmberg, Gunnar
    Karabag, Solmaz Filiz
    Karlsson, Mats
    Larsson, Bengt
    Rencrantz, Daniel
    Sigfridsson, Erik
    Stefan, Ioana
    University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Wang, Wiehong
    Rapid innovators in emerging economies: Challenges and opportunities for Swedish firms2016Report (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Barath, Christian
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Amini, Nasrollah
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Produktinformationens inverkan på returer inom e-handel: Fallstudie på tre företag inom modebranschen2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Med e-handelns snabba expansion har även returerna ökat, returvolymen inom e-handel kan vara så hög som 50% (Dissanayake och Singh, 2007). Returer kostar inte bara pengar utan påverkar även miljön i form av bl.a. ökade transporter. De vanligaste returorsakerna inom modebranschen är storlek och passform vilket kan härledas till bristande produktinformation som t.ex. undermåliga storleksguider. Tidigare forskning om produktinformation har oftast berört vikten av produktinformation vid konsumentköp samt vilka egenskaper i produktinformationen som är viktiga. (Chiu et al, 2014; Manvai och Venkataram, 2005; Markopoulos, Arin och Ungar, 2016) Syftet med denna fallstudie är att undersöka hur produktinformationen påverkar antalet produktreturer hos e-handelsföretag i modebranschen. Studiens frågeställningar berör hur fallföretagen arbetar med produktinformation och om det har påverkat returvolymen samt fallföretagens hållbarhetsarbete. Studien är baserad på en kvalitativ metod och med hjälp av semistrukturerade intervjuer med tre fallföretag besvaras studiens syfte och frågeställningar. Fallföretagen i denna studie arbetar med försäljning inom modebranschen, två av dessa är stora företag och har både fysiska butiker och e-handel. Det tredje fallföretaget är ett mindre företag som enbart har e-handel. Studien visar att fallföretagen får samma gynnsamma effekt av arbetet med produktinformation även om drivkraften bakom arbetet är olika. Studien visar även att produktinformationen kan ses som en kanal för att effektivt förmedla hållbarhetsarbete till kunderna. Studien bidrar med bredare kunskap om produktinformation samt att studien kan ligga till grund för vidare forskning om produktinformationens inverkan på returer. Studien styrker även vissa delar av tidigare forskning inom returer i modebranschen.

  • 6.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. University of A Coruna, A Coruna, Spain.
    Discussing Approaches to Standard of Living2019In: Decent Work and Economic Growth: Encyclopedia of the UN Sustainable Development Goals / [ed] Walter Leal Filho, Anabela Marisa Azul, Luciana Brandli, Pinar Gökcin Özuyar, Tony Wall, Cham: Springer, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Carpenter, Angela
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability Ltd., Cardiff, UK.
    Examining Relations Between Public Participationand Public Expenditure: Opinions from English and French Users on Environmental Issues in the English Channel2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 8, article id 2230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Governments need to decide how to allocate their public expenditure, which is commonly misconstrued as simply targeting social issues. Most scientific literature highlights that the role of public spending is to enhance social welfare and fight poverty and inequality. Nonetheless, public expenditure also includes spending on environmental issues. This paper analyses relations between public participation, support for public expenditure, and pro-environmental behaviour (PEB) intentions in the English Channel region. An online public survey was developed to investigate public use of the English and French sides and the public's willingness to change their behaviour to better protect the Channel region. The survey was undertaken in the summer of 2014 and was answered by 2000 respondents. The Channel region public is willing to participate more in behaviour that involves direct changes or switches between buying/purchasing choices. In contrast, there is less willingness to engage in pro-environmental behaviour intentions that involve more active engagement activities. French respondents were slightly less inclined to change their consumer behaviour intentions, while women and older people were slightly more likely to do so. This research shows that pro-environmental behaviour could positively affect support for proposed public expenditure on environmental issues.

  • 8.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. University of Gävle.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Analysing the incorporation of Sustainable Development into European Higher Education Institutions’ curricula2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Cannava, Catharina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Managing the bi-directional flow of materials to increase customer satisfaction and reduce cost: A case study at Sandvik Mining and Rock Technology2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This thesis explores the bi-directional flows of material perceived by manufacturing firms in the supply chain and accordingly derive suggestions to properly manage these flows to increase customer satisfaction and reduce cost.

    Methods: A literature review was summarized in a conceptual framework. This framework was then illustrated in a case. In this case, 11 semi-structured interviews, 3 participant observations and 3 types of archival records were collected. Analysis and discussion of the preliminary conceptual framework compared to the case was the basis for the modified conceptual framework that was designed.

    Main findings: In general material flows downstream the supply chain, but because of quality issues, recycling or returns material need to flow upstream the supply chain. This thesis provides a holistic view of how to manage these flows with a modified conceptual framework.

    Academic contributions: Previously, almost no academic research has been conducted on decision variables when it comes to managing material flows upstream the supply chain. This thesis contributes to closing this gap by suggesting different actions to properly manage the bi-directional flow of material. Furthermore, previous research addressing how to manage material flows has been re-accessed and expanded.

    Managerial implications: By using the framework, practitioners can determine helpful activities to increase customer satisfaction and reduce cost. This means management gets directions of where to allocate their resources.

    Limitations: The perspective and evidence in this research are only collected from the manufacturer’s point of view, valuable insight from suppliers and customers may have been overlooked. The suggestions of how to manage the bi-directional flow of materials have not been tested and the outcome of these recommendations has not been compared to KPIs or other measurements.

  • 10.
    Carlsson, Inga-Lill
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Developing system supplier capability by integrating knowledge with customers2019In: International Journal of Logistics Systems and Management, ISSN 1742-7967, E-ISSN 1742-7975, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 91-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As large corporations outsource parts of their manufacturing and services, many small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) suppliers are expected to deepen their capabilities and take on the role of system suppliers. The purpose of this paper is to analyse how knowledge integration with customers may help a SME develop system supplier capabilities. The study is based on a deep longitudinal case study of a SME manufacturer and focuses on continuous development capability as one of the core system supplier capabilities. The results show that knowledge integration (KI) with customers is an effective means to build system capability but that this is a stepwise process. The study identifies three levels of KI with customers: unidirectional knowledge transfer, mutual knowledge exchange and full-range knowledge integration. The analysis further indicates that each level of KI requires specific supplier capabilities.

  • 11.
    Ceulemans, Kim
    et al.
    Toulouse Business School, France.
    Scarff Seatter, Carol
    University of British ColumbiaKelownaCanada.
    Molderez, Ingrid
    University of LeuvenBrusselsBelgium.
    Van Liedekerke, Luc
    University of Antwerp, Belgium; Center for Economics and Ethics, KU Leuven, Belgium.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability, Ltd., Cardiff, UK.
    Unfolding the complexities of the sustainability reporting process in higher education: a case study in the University of British Columbia2020In: International Business, Trade and Institutional Sustainability / [ed] Walter Leal Filho, Paulo R. Borges de Brito, Fernanda Frankenberger, Springer, 2020, p. 1043-1070Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability reporting is an important tool for the assessment and communication of sustainability performance in the corporate world; however, it is still in its early stages in higher education. Only a limited number of universities around the world have published sustainability reports, and there is still a lack of empirical evidence of how the sustainability reporting process is organized and how it contributes to sustainability integration in higher education. The aim of this paper is to provide in-depth insights into the complexities of the sustainability reporting process. A case study is presented on sustainability reporting in The University of British Columbia (UBC), Canada, covering the period of 2008–2014. The case consists of document analysis and interviews with the internal actors of the sustainability reporting process at UBC. In the study, it was found that even in an institution with a deliberate sustainability strategy and integration process, sustainability reporting is a complex undertaking. Some of the key elements adding complexity to the reporting process are the search for suitable lead authors and relevant content for the reports in consecutive reporting cycles; the different aims that reporting tries to achieve simultaneously for the sustainability integration process; and suitably addressing the different internal stakeholders that are involved in the reporting process in higher education. In order to reduce complexity in universities, assigning an internal hybrid actor to facilitate the reporting process could be helpful. Unfolding the key complexities arising when undertaking consecutive reporting cycles can help internal actors of other institutions to better design and implement the process of sustainability reporting and integration in their universities. © 2020, Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

  • 12.
    Dominic, Chris
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Johansson, Jennie
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Building network integration solutions for locally produced foods: new requirements on supply chain, logistics and packaging2017In: International Agriculture Innovation and Cross-border EC Conference (IAICEC), Chiang Mai, Thailand, 18-19th October 2017 / [ed] Dr. Tzong-Ru Lee, Chiang Mai, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One important ongoing development in the grocery foods industry is the increase growth of Locally Produced Foods. This emerging market that based on the pillars of sustainability, demands new logistics challenges that requires innovative supply chain models . These chains are designed through the application of digitalized media. The paper presents an on-going study in establishing Network Integration for Locally Produced foods in Mid-Sweden Region. The objective of this study is to present an approach to explore locally produced foods. A case study based on logistics activities, supply chain management, packaging is presented. The data used in the study are from micro-producers of food, customers from local restaurants , consumers and the public sector from Mid-Sweden Region. The results indicates that th e main aspects of Network Integration actively contributes to better performance for this industry in almost all items considered in the study. This approach is considered particularly innovative, hence there are scarcity of literature that deals jointly with packaging, logistics and Network Integration from an empirical standpoint.

  • 13.
    Dominic, Chris
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Olsmats, Carl
    Höskolan Dalarna.
    Four-dimensional concurrent engineering: an extended theoretical framework integrating packaging2019In: Four-dimensional concurrent engineering: an extended theoretical framework integrating packaging / [ed] Roland ten Klooster, IAPRI , 2019, p. 48-48Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper takes on the challenge to integrate packaging in a concept of four-dimensional concurrent engineering (4DCE). The purpose is to explore a conceptual model and empirically evaluate the specific performance of packaging in interrelation with product and processes in the Supply Chain (SC). The objectives are to better understand the concepts of packaging logistics and logistics management in the SC. The conceptual model 4DCE is developed based on the three-dimensional concurrent engineering theories.The tool Packaging Scorecard is applied to evaluate the concurrent performance of packaging throughout the SC. The packaging system involves many actors that are integrated into the 4DCE framework with focus on interaction of SC and logistics in relation to packaging and product, with the overall aim to operate as effectively and efficiently as possible. In order to explore the potential of the 4DCE framework, empirical verification and testing of the concept has been carried out. The process has been done through multiple in-depth, action-oriented case studies in three different industries on the Swedish market. The case studies covered holistic aspects on the packaging system.The concept 4DCE contributes to packaging logistics theory by providing a framework for assessment incorporating complex and dynamic interactions between product, packaging, logistics and SC. Furthermore, the holistic packaging development concept is ensured by increasing knowledge of the packaging system and how it interacts with actors and performs to fulfil requirements along the SC. The 4DCE provides valuable data for packaging development processes in the cases, however there is a need for broader studies in different industries.

  • 14.
    Enesgård Forsell, Rasmus
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Berge Hedkvist, Kim
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Blockchain i försörjningskedjan för läkemedel: Ökad transparens och spårbarhet i kampen mot förfalskade och undermåliga läkemedel2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Falsified and substandard drugs are classified as a global problem and continue to increase as manufacturing becomes globalized and the complexity of distribution systems expands. The falsified and substandard drugs come with major health risks and socioeconomic consequences. The pharmaceutical supply chain is handled by several parties, making it harder to detect when falsified and substandard drugs end up in distribution. Since the rise of the cryptocurrency bitcoin, blockchain technology has been recognized for its transparency and security. Previous research describes blockchain as a decentralized database structure that preserves a chronological chain of blocks where each block contains a registered valid network activity verified by consensus of the participants in the network. The purpose of this study is to create a broader understanding of how blockchain can improve the transparency and traceability of the pharmaceutical supply chain in order to reduce the incidence of falsified and substandard drugs. The study is based on a qualitative method in the form of five semi-structured interviews with representatives from the pharmaceutical industry and two blockchain companies. In the study's discussion section, the literature study is set against the collected empirical material. Two tables also illustrate how the pharmaceutical industry is working with traceability and what effects blockchain can provide a supply chain. Finally, the study notes that regulations on the pharmaceutical industry primarily control which database structure is implemented on the supply chain. It is also stated that blockchain has characteristics that can improve transparency and traceability of a supply chain, but the technology is to some extent limited mainly by its large need for capacity

  • 15.
    Eriksson, Anton
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Försäljningsprocessens påverkan på lagerstryning2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Companies exist because there is a demand for their products and services. Companies need to logistically coordinate all their processes for them to grow and optimize their profits. Logistics is an area in constant development, where the old views become accepted and new ones become focus areas where the direction has gone from being cost-oriented to focusing on change processes, lead times and competitive means. This case study was performed towards a manufacturing company where the work was carried out with an affiliate company in Shanghai, China. The main company has its headquarter and production in Gävle, Sweden. The case study was limited towards the sales department and its impact on inventory control from a cost perspective. The study purpose was to examine how the sales processes affect the inventory control by going through the process from when the first contact being taken with the company to the final product arriving at customer. By mapping the entire process, one can find out the improvement areas and identify what causes long storage times for the company, how the company should work to minimize these times and how the company can work with processes for a more efficient operation. The problem of this study was that the chosen case company had a long storage time ranging from a few days to a few years, which caused high capital ties and costs for the warehouse operations. The empirical data was collected through interviews with employees who works closely with the processes that have been investigated in the study. The observation was conducted in Shanghai, China, where the case company has a warehouse. The observation and the interviews led to the results and empirical data describing how the company currently works with the sales processes and the basis for the problems that they are experiencing today. By comparing the theoretical theory and results, it turns out that the company’s view of how they work with the sales process is different from the reality. The study shows that deficiencies exist in the processes described by the interviews. One part of the problem was the lack of communication within the company. The departments focused on their own tasks and tried to perform good results without seeing the overall picture for the company. By improving the communication within the company, processes around improvements will be easier to implement. The result of the analysis in combination with literature theories led to that improvement measures could be distinguished. The company was recommended to review its processes, warehouses and packaging from a lean perspective in order to streamline and optimize its operations. This is done by constantly working on the communication and process work. For continued research, proposals are made for in-depth research within sales and its processes from a cost perspective. Sales are the part of companies that contribute to profitability, but it also needs to be studied about its impact on costs. The study's theoretical contribution suggests how a process that contributes with profitability also accounts for costs and how these can be improved through continuous process work.

  • 16.
    Findler, Florian
    et al.
    Vienna University of Economics and Business, Vienna, Austria.
    Schönherr, Norma
    Vienna University of Economics and Business, Vienna, Austria.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Reider, Daniela
    Vienna University of Economics and Business, Vienna, Austria.
    Martinuzzi, André
    Vienna University of Economics and Business, Vienna, Austria.
    The impacts of higher education institutions on sustainable development: a review and conceptualization2019In: International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, ISSN 1467-6370, E-ISSN 1758-6739, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 23-38Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    This paper aims to conceptualize impacts of higher education institutions (HEIs) on sustainable development (SD), complementing previous literature reviews by broadening the perspective from what HEIs do in pursuit of SD to how these activities impact society, the environment and the economy.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The paper provides a systematic literature review of peer-reviewed journal articles published between 2005 and 2017. Inductive content analysis was applied to identify major themes and impact areas addressed in the literature to develop a conceptual framework detailing the relationship between HEIs’ activities and their impacts on SD.

    Findings

    The paper identifies six impact areas where direct and indirect impacts of HEIs on SD may occur. The findings indicate a strong focus on case studies dealing with specific projects and a lack of studies analyzing impacts from a more holistic perspective.

    Practical implications

    This systematic literature review enables decision-makers in HEIs, researchers and educators to better understand how their activities may affect society, the environment and the economy, and it provides a solid foundation to tackle these impacts.

    Social implications

    The review highlights that HEIs have an inherent responsibility to make societies more sustainable. HEIs must embed SD into their systems while considering their impacts on society.

    Originality/value

    This paper provides a holistic conceptualization of HEIs’ impacts on SD. The conceptual framework can be useful for future research that attempts to analyze HEIs’ impacts on SD from a holistic perspective.

  • 17.
    Findler, Florian
    et al.
    Institute for Managing Sustainability, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business, Vienna, Austria.
    Schönherr, Norma
    Institute for Managing Sustainability, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business, Vienna, Austria.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Stacherl, Barbara
    Institute for Managing Sustainability, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business, Vienna, Austria.
    Assessing the Impacts of Higher Education Institutions on Sustainable Development: An Analysis of Tools and Indicators2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many higher education institutions (HEIs) have started to incorporate sustainable development (SD) into their system. A variety of sustainability assessment tools (SATs) have been developed to support HEIs to systematically measure, audit, benchmark, and communicate SD efforts. In recent years, stakeholders have increasingly asked HEIs to demonstrate their impacts on SD. These impacts are the direct and indirect effects an HEI has outside of its organizational boundaries on society, the natural environment, and the economy. This study analyzes to what extent SATs are capable of measuring the impacts that HEIs have on SD. A mixed-method approach, using descriptive statistics and an inductive content analysis, was used to examine 1134 indicators for sustainability assessment derived from 19 SATs explicitly designed for application by HEIs. The findings reveal that SATs largely neglect the impacts HEIs have outside their organizational boundaries. SATs primarily use proxy indicators based on internally available data to assess impacts and thus tend to focus on themes concerning the natural environment and the contribution to the local economy. Updating existing SATs and developing new ones may enable HEIs to fully realize their potential to contribute to SD. 

  • 18.
    Fobbe, Lea
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Carpenter, Angela
    Abid, Muhammad
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Sustainability assessment of seaports: Towards a comprehensive holistic framework2018In: 24th Annual ISDRS Conference, Actions for a Sustainable World. From Theory to Practice, Messina, 13 -15 June, 2018, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Gruvman, Joakim
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Andersson, Johan
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Produktionsrelaterad förändring för ett bättre logistiskt flöde med mänsklig hänsyn: En fallstudie på PEPAB Produktionspartner AB2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The business world is in constant change, which means that businesses must be able to adapt to these changes and constantly improve. The research field on how businesses should achieve a smart material supply is small, which emphasizes the importance of studying how a company can change its production layout to improve its internal logistics.

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to increase the understanding of the production layout's importance for the material supply and the human aspect in production-related change work.

    Method: The study has used an abductive, exploratory approach to answer the purpose and the research questions. This means that studies of theories were done in parallel with studies of the empirical material at the case company PEPAB Produktionspartner AB. Theories from the literature and the empirical data have been analyzed and discussed in order to draw conclusions.

    Findings: The results are a description of the current internal material flow of four representative components and a description of employees´ attitude to change. By mapping the material flow, logistics flow factors and human related factors have been discovered. 

    Theoretical contribution: When changing the production starting from the logistic factors waiting, unnecessary inventory, unnecessary manufacturing, defects, unnecessary transportations and improperly designed production layout a better logistical flow and better material supply can be achieved. Combining this with a well-planned preparatory work with related training can make a successful change. 

    Practical contribution: This study contributes practically with a new production layout that enables a better logistical flow. It also emphasizes the importance of a well-thought-out and wellplanned preparatory work to maintain the staff´s sense of participation.

  • 20.
    Halling, Bengt
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Division of Ergonomics, Royal Institute of Technology, KTH.
    Lyckström, Martin
    Scania CV AB, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Wijk, Katarina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Centre for Research and Development, Region Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden; Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden .
    Application of a sense of coherence-based leadership for productivity and health at Scania2019In: International Journal of Human Factors and Ergonomics, ISSN 2045-7804, E-ISSN 2045-7812, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 179-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose was to explore if sense of coherence (SOC) theory can be used in human factors ergonomics (HFE) practice as a leadership approach to decrease the rate of sick leave and rehabilitation cases and increase work attendance among assembly personnel without impeding productivity. Via three studies carried out at the Swedish truck manufacturer Scania, we investigated the company's key performance indicators and documented meetings with managers during the intervention. The results show that SOC can be used in HFE practice and that productivity, quality and attendance at work increased, while rehabilitation cases decreased. Our conclusion is that a health promotion approach among managers is essential in a lean organisation that aims to reduce waste in the company and optimise human capability and thereby productivity. SOC theory can support the creation of workplaces that are high performing and healthy, starting with concerns for the people creating the output.

  • 21.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Jonkoping Univ, Sch Engn, Dept Ind Engn & Management, POB 1026, SE-55111 Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Eriksson, David
    Jonkoping Univ, Sch Engn, Dept Ind Engn & Management, POB 1026, SE-55111 Jonkoping, Sweden..
    Tate, Wendy
    Univ Tennessee, Dept Supply Chain Management, Knoxville, TN USA..
    Kinkel, Steffen
    Karlsruhe Univ Appl Sci, ILIN, Moltkestr 30, D-76133 Karlsruhe, Germany..
    Right-shoring: Making resilient offshoring and reshoring decisions2019In: Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management, ISSN 1478-4092, E-ISSN 1873-6505, Vol. 25, no 3, article id 100540Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this special topic forum is to look at some current literature on the right-shoring debate. The papers that were selected for the special topic form use a range of qualitative and quantitative methodologies to answer specific research questions related to the right-shoring phenomenon. Each of the papers is summarized in this editorial to show the findings, implications and future research directions. The ideas from these manuscripts were used as a foundation to discuss the way in which research in this area should progress. What types of questions should we be asking as we seek to discover the best "shore"? What factors and variables should we consider in our future decisions? Are there differences across regions of the world? Research in this area has continued to progress, largely because of significant global economic, environmental and regulatory changes. The "shoring" decision appears to be an area where research is keeping up with, or potentially leading practice, but there is still more opportunity to advance decision making. The included papers address a number of factors related to specific geographies and factors related to the movement of manufacturing and products and services from one location to another.

  • 22.
    Hilletofth, Per
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. Department of Supply Chain and Operations Management, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sequeira, Movin
    Department of Supply Chain and Operations Management, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Adlemo, Anders
    Department of Computer Science and Informatics, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Three novel fuzzy logic concepts applied to reshoring decision-making2019In: Expert systems with applications, ISSN 0957-4174, E-ISSN 1873-6793, Vol. 126, p. 133-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the possibility of increasing the interpretability of fuzzy rules and reducing the complexity when designing fuzzy rules. To achieve this, three novel fuzzy logic concepts (i.e., relative linguistic labels, high-level rules and linguistic variable weights) were conceived and implemented in a fuzzy logic system for reshoring decision-making. The introduced concepts increase the interpretability of fuzzy rules and reduce the complexity when designing fuzzy rules while still providing accurate results. 

  • 23.
    Jafari, Samira
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Bakkar, Nour
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Kourkis, Marina
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Industri 4.0 i förhållande till hållbarhetsaspekterna:: Samt de utmaningar ett företag kan stöta på vid tillämpning av Industri 4.02019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 24.
    Jakobson, Fredrik
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Cristoferson, John
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Nyttan med digitala lösningar i tillverkande industrier2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The union of digital technologies and logistical functions through concepts such as Industry 4.0 could change how a lot of markets operate. This creates new requirements for manufacturing companies who wish to keep growing and to stay competitive. The purpose of this study was to look at implementation of modern digital technologies in an industrial manufacturing context. The authors of this study explored which motives exist for such an implementation and which problems that need to be considered. Furthermore, the authors examined how effectiveness can be measured after implementation from both a manufacturing perspective as well an internal transport perspective. Interviews were conducted with a manufacturing company in the process of implementing a digital warehouse management system as well as a consulting company that provided support to the project.

    The case company in the study was in the final phase of implementing a digital warehouse management system with a primary feature of tracking material and goods through the production. Prior to this warehouse management system, all planning and stock keeping were performed manually.

    The authors proposed 14 different motives for manufacturing companies to implement a digital system and eight important factors to be considered when implementing a system such as the one the case company did. The authors also proposed Key Performance Indicators for measuring effectiveness and efficiency of manufacturing operations and forklift drivers, respectively, when a digital system is applied.

  • 25.
    Jazairy, Amer
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Analysing the institutional pressures on shippers and logistics service providers to implement green supply chain management practices2019In: International Journal of Logistics, ISSN 1367-5567, E-ISSN 1469-848XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper applies institutional theory to analyse the institutional pressures (regulatory, market, competitive) experienced by two actors within supply chains: shippers (i.e. logistics buyers) and logistics service providers (LSPs). Both actors are subject to institutional pressures to adopt green supply chain management practices, which could drive shippers to purchase green logistics services from LSPs, and LSPs to provide them. Also, the two actors are influenced by various factors that moderate the level of pressures on them and the responses they undertake. This study examines these pressures and moderators in detail to analyse how they influence green logistics purchasing/providing decisions. Empirical data were obtained from eight individual cases of three shippers and five LSPs. Accordingly, we compare these pressures and moderators based on the actors’ different roles in the supply chain. The findings aim to contribute to advancing the theory through (i) incorporating the roles of the moderating factors and (ii) providing further applications within specific shipper-LSP contexts. Further, this paper aims to assist managers within shipper and LSP organisations by demonstrating how their firm and market characteristics moderate the pressures exerted on them to buy or provide green logistics services, while providing insights on issues influencing their responsiveness.

  • 26.
    Jazairy, Amer
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Assessing the gaps between shippers and logistics service providers on green logistics practices along the logistics purchasing process2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To assess the gaps between the engagements of shippers (logistics buyers) and logistics service providers (LSPs) in different green logistics practices along the key phases of the logistics purchasing process: request for proposal, negotiations, contracting and execution.

    Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on a large scale survey of shippers and LSPs in Sweden. 331 companies (169 shippers; 162 LSPs) have responded. Data were analysed using independent sample T- tests and paired sample T-tests.

    Findings: While our findings conform with previous studies asserting that LSPs engage more extensively in green logistics practices than shippers do, we show that such situation is not uniformly applicable to all practices nor all purchasing phases; three patterns emerged that depict the gapsbetween the actors’ engagements along the process: (i) steady and wide gap, (ii) steady and narrow gap, and (iii) emergent gap – each gap is associated with distinct practices.

    Research limitations/implications: Contributing to the green logistics purchasing literature by creating three types of distinctions: (i) between shippers and LSPs, (ii) between different green logistics practices, and (iii) between different logistics purchasing phases. The survey covered actors in Sweden only, future studies could replicate the analysis in other countries.

    Practical implications: Insights are offered for managers within shipper/LSP firms to help them in spotting the green practices that are least focused upon by their partners, thus enabling them to modify their purchasing/marketing strategies accordingly.

    Social implications: Potentially contributing in reducing the carbon footprint of the logistics industry.

    Original/value: The three types of distinctions is a novel outset within the contract logistics and green supply chain management bodies of literature.

  • 27.
    Jazairy, Amer
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Do relationships matter? Linking the advancement of shipper-logistics service provider relationships with green logistics implementation2019In: Proceedings of the 26th EurOMA conference, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The contract logistics literature implicitly suggests that establishing advanced relationships between shippers (logistics buyers) and logistics service providers (LSPs) plays a role in facilitating green logistics practices. We systematically test this claim through surveying 335 companies (170 shippers; 165 LSPs) in Sweden. Using factor- and multiple regression analyses, we confirm that implementing green logistics practices is influenced by advanced relationships settings, but not all practices adhere to this. Also, a distinction is made on whether relationship advancement is expressed by the contract design or the degree of integration between the partners; the former better explains the implementation of the practices.

  • 28.
    Jonuzi, Taulant
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Sager, Josefin
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Effektivare materialflöden med människan i centrum: En fallstudie inom BillerudKorsnäs godsmottagning2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With the development of society, organizations are increasingly working to streamline their businesses to maintain and strengthen their position on the market. This can be carried out in several different ways, since businesses are individual and require special needs to develop longterm sustainability. The purpose of this case study is to emphasize how material flows within industrial goods reception can be streamlined based on human aspects. To answer the purpose, data was collected through interviews, observations and literature studies. Six interviews have been conducted at BillerudKorsnäs, with observations taking place continuously during the study. This is to create a reality perception with different approaches to increase the credibility of the study. The results were analyzed and discussed with the help of literature reviews. The literature studies consist of collected scientific articles, course literature, web pages and other credible sources. The results are based on a study of internal material flow in the central repository at BillerudKorsnäs in Gävle. As discovered, the material flow consists of mainly manual labor that lead to unnecessary time-consuming disturbances. A contributing factor to improve and streamline the material flow has been built on identifying health-promoting measures. Therefore, industrial goods reception can be made more efficient with the help of digital aids concerning to human aspects.

  • 29.
    Kaltenbrunner, Monica
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science.
    Lean maturity and quality in primary care2019In: Journal of Health Organisation & Management, ISSN 1477-7266, E-ISSN 1758-7247, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 141-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to 1) describe Lean maturity in primary care using a questionnaire based on Liker’s description of Lean, complemented with observations, and 2) determine the extent to which Lean maturity is associated with quality of care measured as staff-rated satisfaction with care and adherence to national guidelines. High Lean maturity indicates adoption of all Lean principles throughout the organization and by all staff.

    Design/methodology/approach - Data were collected using a survey based on Liker’s four principles, divided into 16 items (n = 298 staff in 45 units). Complementary observations (n = 28 staff) were carried out at four units.

    Findings - Lean maturity varied both between and within units. The highest Lean maturity was found for ‘adhering to routines’ and the lowest for ‘having a change agent at the unit’. Lean maturity was positively associated with satisfaction with care and with adherence to national guidelines to improve healthcare quality. 

    Practical implications - Quality of primary care may benefit from increasing Lean maturity. When implementing Lean, managers could benefit from measuring and adopting Lean maturity repeatedly, addressing all Liker’s principles and using the results as guidance for further development.

    Originality/value - This is one of the first studies to evaluate Lean maturity in primary care, addressing all Liker’s principles from the perspective of quality of care. The results suggest that repeated actions based on evaluations of Lean maturity may help to improve quality of care.

  • 30.
    Kaltenbrunner Nykvist, Monica
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Mathiassen, Svend Erik
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Occupational Health Science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
    Högberg, Hans
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science.
    Engström, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science.
    Staff perception of Lean, care-giving, thriving and exhaustion: a longitudinal study in primary care2019In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 652Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Lean is commonly adopted in healthcare to increase quality of care and efficiency. Few studies of Lean involve staff-related outcomes, and few have a longitudinal design. Thus, the aim was to examine the extent to which changes over time in Lean maturity are associated with changes over time in care-giving, thriving and exhaustion, as perceived by staff, with a particular emphasis on the extent to which job demands and job resources, as perceived by staff, have a moderated mediation effect.

    Method

    A longitudinal study with a correlational design was used. In total, 260 staff at 46 primary care units responded to a web survey in 2015 and 2016. All variables in the study were measured using staff ratings. Ratings of Lean maturity reflect participants’ judgements regarding the entire unit; ratings of care-giving, thriving, exhaustion and job demands and resources reflect participants’ judgements regarding their own situation.

    Results

    First, over time, increased Lean maturity was associated with increased staff satisfaction with their care-giving and increased thriving, mediated by increased job resources. Second, over time, increased Lean maturity was associated with decreased staff exhaustion, mediated by decreased job demands. No evidence was found showing that job demands and job resources had a moderated mediation effect.

    Conclusion

    The results indicate that primary care staff may benefit from working in organizations characterized by high levels of Lean maturity and that caregiving may also be improved as perceived by staff.

  • 31.
    Karlsson, Madelene
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Hagevall, Sandra
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Effektiviserad lagerhantering av reservdelar för minskad kapitalbindning2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Spare parts are, for many companies, a complex product to logistically handle. This is in part due to the varying characteristics and sporadic demand patterns of spare parts. Obstacles can often arise when companies utilize the same approach to their spare parts stock as they do with their general warehouse manufacturing inventory. By using the same approach, companies risk neglecting the widespread variation of the spare parts. With the help of established routines, a clear set of guidelines and factors, the chances of a successful handling of spare parts inventory is increased.

    The study is a qualitative case study with the purpose of identifying specific factors and to make recommendations of models for companies to take into account when evaluating and storing spare parts. Through unstructured/semi-structured interviews conducted with four case company employees, information was gathered which was used to assist in identifying these specific factors and models for companies. A theoretical frame of reference was produced through analyzing research articles and was compared to the compiled empirical data in an analysis.

    The departments within the case study based their work on single factor which were considered important for each specific department, without inter-departmental communication. The factors that were identified in the study include service, competitive advantage, tied up capital, size capacity, complexity, sales frequency and material. Four of these were considered to be a priority for the case company. The study showed that different models for spare parts management and outsourcing could be implemented in the case company. By integrating the different models for spare parts management and outsourcing, combined with communication, a new model has been proposed for handling the spare parts storage.

  • 32.
    Kriebel, Matilda
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Wolgsjö, Emma
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Proaktiv ändringshantering i uppstart av byggprojekt: En fallstudie om hur projektledare kan förebygga kostnader för tillägg i mindre byggprojekt2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A project can be defined as a temporary work that is within the scope of time and budget in terms of achieving a project goal. Due to the fact that construction projects are unique and usually very complex, project management therefore requires a working method that is adapted to the prerequisites of the project. The project manager's responsibility to follow up on the budget and ensure that resources such as working hours and consulting services are distributed correctly, is becoming increasingly challenging as the change paradox shows that flexibility decreases and costs for changes increase as the project progresses. Exceeding the project budget in construction projects has today become a global phenomenon and involves several negative social effects. Scientific studies show that the increased costs can be derived from deviations such as additions and changes during the construction project. On the other hand, there are perceived gaps in the literature for which factors affect the extent of these and thus became the study's area of ​​investigation. Based on the scientific gap, the study aims to analyze the startup process in smaller construction projects with regard to identifying the factors that have an impact on additions, but also to review how project managers can proactively manage these factors in order to reduce the risk of increased deviations. To answer the research questions and purpose, a qualitative case study has been applied to a global consulting company in the construction industry, where semi-structured interviews were conducted with five project managers at the company.

     

    The result of the study shows that project managers do not take preventive measures or work to prevent deviations in the startup process. Based on a thematic analysis of the results, factors with an impact on deviations have been identified in three areas; systematics, communication and experience and competence. The study has shown that increased costs for additions and changes can be deduced from different approaches to project management and misleading information, inadequate requirement specification that leaves room for own interpretation, unspecified communication channels, conflicts, lack of competence and abrupt completions of the project. In order to achieve a more proactive startup process in order to prevent increased costs for additions and changes, project managers should ensure a clear requirement specification by discussing important issues and decisions, requirements and expectations with support from templates and checklists. To avoid misunderstandings and conflicts, a communication plan can be established. Finally, the choice of project model should be established and routines for final reporting should be introduced to create a learning organisation that increases the project managers' self-insight and competence regarding increased costs for additions and project changes. The theoretical contribution of the study is the identified factors within three areas as well as suggestions for how project managers can facilitate the management of additions in the startup process of construction projects.

  • 33.
    Krstic, Nikola
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Eriksson, Fanny
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Modell för bestämning av tillverkningskostnad med utgångspunkt från materialflöden i produktion: En fallstudie på Alderholmens mekaniska2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Inledning: Marknadstillväxten har gått framåt senaste åren och företag bör hitta konkurrensfördelar för att fortsätta vara lönsamma. Priser bör anpassas efter marknaden och vetskap om tillverkningskostnad blir viktigt för tillverkande företag. För att beräkna tillverkningskostnad för produkter kan självkostnadskalkylering och totalkostnadsmodellen användas. Ett materialflöde i en produktion består av processer som innefattar hantering, förflyttning och lagring av material. Studien har inte funnit någon tidigare forskning eller modell som förklarar relationen mellan materialflöden och tillverkningskostnad på en detaljerad nivå vilket motiverar studien.

    Syfte: Syftet med arbetet var att utforma och utvärdera en modell för bestämning av tillverkningskostnad med utgångspunkt från materialflöden i produktion med avseende på lagring, transport och tillverkningsoperationer. Metoder: En abduktiv ansats har använts för att besvara syftet och frågeställningar där teori och empiri har inhämtats parallellt under arbetets gång. I studien har teori och empiri lagt grund för kostnadsfaktorer som påverkar tillverkningskostnaden.

    Utformning av modell för bestämning av tillverkningskostnad: I studien har teoretiska och empiriska undersökningar utförts för att redogöra för olika kostnadsfaktorer som påverkar tillverkningskostnaden. Modellen använder tre aktiviteter för att kategorisera identifierade kostnadsfaktorer i ett materialflöde: operation, lagring och transport.

    Tillämpning och utvärdering av modell: Modellen tillämpades på fallföretaget Alderholmens mekaniska. Efter tillämpningen utvärderades modellen där styrkor och utvecklingsmöjligheter presenterades. Slutsats: Studiens bidrag är en modell för beräkning av tillverkningskostnad med utgångspunkt från materialflödet i produktionen. Modellen presenterar vilka faktorer som påverkar tillverkningskostnaden. Kapitlet avslutas med rekommendationer till framtida studier för att utöka kunskapen inom ämnet.

  • 34.
    Ljungblom, Emma
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Rydeblad, Emelie
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management.
    Motivationsfaktorer för medarbetare inom tillverkande industri2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Industries aim to have a high performance to get a high profitability. A high performance comes from the employees' work performance every day. This work performance for industry employees comes largely from the motivation they feel for the work. In this study, work motivation for employees in industry has been examined through a questionnaire study together with interviews with selected persons from the management. The conclusion for this study is that employees' work motivation in industry´s is strongly linked to how the management manages and acts within the organization. The management influences the employees' motivation by controlling how the organization is structured, which reward systems are to be used and how the corporate culture is structured. If employees in industry´s experience high motivation for their work, the work performance will increase along with increased work motivation. The result of this study shows how corporate culture together with other motivation factors can motivate employees to increase work performance in the manufacturing industry. This study has also resulted in a self-developed model that can be used by companies to increase work motivation and thereby the work performance of the company.

  • 35.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Analysing the use of tools, initiatives, and approaches topromote sustainability in corporations2019In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interest in sustainability from the corporate sector is evidenced by over 13,000 companiesin 160 countries that have signed the United Nations Global Compact. In thiscontext, a number of tools, initiatives, and approaches (TIAs), e.g., circular economy,corporate social responsibility, eco-efficiency, life cycle assessment, and sustainabilityreporting have been developed by and for corporations to engage and promote sustainabilitywithin their systems. Each of the TIAs has advantages when addressingsustainability issues and the company system's elements, but it has disadvantages indealing with their complexities and interactions. Relying only on one TIA results in alimited contribution to sustainability, whereas using too many TIAs wastes resourcesand energy. The Corporate and Industrial Voluntary Initiatives for Sustainability(CIVIS) has been proposed to better combine the TIAs. A survey was developed toinvestigate the use of 24 TIAs. The survey was sent to a database of 5,299 organisations(of which 3,603 were companies), from which 202 responses were obtained.The responses were analysed using ratio analysis, principal component analysis, andcluster analysis. The responses show that some TIAs are well known and providegood results when used, for example, corporate social responsibility, corporate sustainability,and Global Reporting Initiative reports. The analyses show a number ofgroups of the TIAs that can help to better combine them. The paper updates theCIVIS framework in order to provide clearer guidance on how to combine the TIAs. Acombination of between four and six initiatives appears to be most effective way topromote sustainability. The TIAs can help to promote sustainability in corporations,but they need to be combined correctly in order to address holistically the fourdimensions of sustainability, the system elements, and stakeholders, while avoidingduplication of tasks and wasting resources.

  • 36.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Assessing sustainability in higher education institutions2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bridging aims and delivery of higher education for sustainable development: Using pedagogical approaches to fulfil competences2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Chemical Engineering and Sustainability: the need for holistic education and practice2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Impulsores de la sostenibilidad corporativa [Corporate sustainability drivers]2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Organisational sustainability2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability, Ltd, Cardiff, UK.
    Sustainable business models: providing a more holistic perspective2018In: Business Strategy and the Environment, ISSN 0964-4733, E-ISSN 1099-0836, Vol. 27, no 8, p. 1159-1166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corporate sustainability has recently been challenging traditional business models that have been based on value proposition, creation and capture. There has been a steady increase in publications using the term “sustainable business models”; however, there have been few that have theoretically defined or characterized the term, and in most cases, they just apply the term. Seven peer‐reviewed papers were selected that aimed to define and explain sustainable business models and that have been widely cited. The papers were analyzed by assessing the elements and activities covered using the corporate sustainability framework, and by comparing them against four approaches to explain organizations. The paper proposes a definition and framework for more sustainable business models aimed at integrating organizational approaches, the company system, stakeholders, change and sustainability dimensions, thus providing a more holistic and systemic approach to discourses on sustainable business models.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-04-10 00:01
  • 42.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability Ltd, Cardiff, UK.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Analysing the factors affecting the incorporation of sustainable development into European Higher Education Institutions' curricula2019In: Sustainable Development, ISSN 0968-0802, E-ISSN 1099-1719, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 965-975Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been an increase in sustainable development (SD) integration into Higher Education Institutions' (HEIs) curricula. Several tools have been developed to assess SD in HEIs; however, only a few have focussed on curricula assessment, such as the “Sustainability Tool for Assessing UNiversities' Curricula Holistically.” Curricula assessment can provide an overview on how courses and programmes incorporate SD. This paper analyses the factors affecting the incorporation of SD in curricula using a survey sent to a database of 4,099 European contacts, with a response rate of 9.85%. The responses were analysed using descriptive statistics, t test, ANOVA, and correlations. The analyses showed that (a) teaching in European courses covers many issues of sustainability in a fairly good balance, with the exception of social issues that are the least addressed; (b) there are correlations between the economic, environmental, social, and cross‐cutting themes; (c) females tend to teach SD in a more balanced way than men; (d) the HEIs types have no influence on how SD is being taught, but the education level has; and (e) some countries, in the case of this research, Italy and Spain, may show more interest, yet the average results tended to be lower than those others, in this research, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the Netherlands. Curricula assessment provides a diagnostic of SD incorporation and the factors that affect it. This can help educators improve their courses and provide students with better SD skills and insights

  • 43.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability, Cardiff, UK.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Analysing the incorporation of sustainable development into European Higher Education Institution's curricula2019In: Engineering Education towards Sustainability: Approaches for Institutionalization and Teaching Implementation: Second Internacional Conference on Engineering Education for the 21st Century – ICEE21C 2019 / [ed] Guraya, T., Cabedo, L., Bilbao: Universidad del País Vasco / Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea , 2019, p. 51-56Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Corporate Sustainability Initiatives: Their use and results2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Corporate leaders and employees have been increasingly recognising their role in contributing to sustainability. In this context, different voluntary tools, approaches, and initiatives have been developed by and for corporations to engage with sustainability. Each initiative has advantages with respect to scope and focus for the sustainability dimensions and the company system’s elements, but it has certain disadvantages when it comes to dealing with the complexity and broadness of sustainability. Relying on one initiative can result in a limited and narrow contribution to sustainability and curtail coverage of the company’s system and using too many tools wastes resources and energy due to duplication in tasks. The paper provides an analysis of the use of twenty-four of the most widely used initiatives (e.g. life cycle assessment, eco-design, cleaner production, corporate social responsibility, and sustainability reporting) by companies. A survey was developed for investigating the importance of how sustainability has been embedded in organisations. Most of the questions were on a five-point scale (extremely important to not at all important or completely agree to completely disagree) and rankings. The survey was applied using the online survey tool Qualtrics (2018). The survey was sent to a database of 5,299 contacts from different organisations (of which 3603 were companies) obtained from the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) database, and personal contacts. Of the responses 215 were from companies, but only 189 provided useable responses for the tools and approaches used, of which 27 were from Sweden.The tools most widely used were Corporate Social Responsibility, Corporate Sustainability, and GRI reports (in the top quintile) by all companies, and Corporate Sustainability, Corporate Social Responsibility, Eco-efficiency, and Socially/Sustainable Responsible Investment by Swedish companies. The tools least used (in the lowest quintile) were Factor X, The Natural Step, SA8000, and ISO 26000 by all companies, and Factor X, SA8000, Industrial ecology, ISO 26000, EMAS, AA1000, and The Natural Step by Swedish companies. For all the companies, 5.6 tools in average provided good results, 6.5 some results, 2.5 no perceived results, and 0.1 negative results. There are some initiatives that are well known and provide results (some and good) when used, such as corporate social responsibility, corporate sustainability, GRI reports, and eco-efficiency). There are some initiatives that are not known/not used (e.g. Factor X, The Natural Step, SA8000, and ISO26000). The most widely know initiatives focus mainly on management and strategy, and assessment and reporting with a broad sustainability perspective. In general, the four more widely known initiatives have a good ratio of results versus no results. The cluster and analysis and PCA groups can serve as guides to decide which initiatives to combine in order to address the company system and sustainability dimensions. A combination between four to six initiatives should provide the most efficient way to address sustainability. There have been many initiatives proposed to contribute to sustainability by and for corporations. To better achieve this, the initiatives need to be combined efficiently in a holistic way to address the company and sustainability dimensions.

  • 45.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Francisco J.
    ITESM, Mexico.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Teaching Sustainability in European Higher Education Institutions: Assessing the Connections between Competences and Pedagogical Approaches2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been considerable progress in the incorporation of SD into the curricula of Higher Education Institutions (HEIs), where European HEIs have been leaders. This has included research on competences for sustainable development, and how to deliver such competences through pedagogical approaches; however, there has been limited research on the connection between how courses are delivered (pedagogical approaches) and how they may affect sustainability competences. A survey was developed to investigate sustainability being taught, sustainability competences delivered, and pedagogical approaches used in European Higher Education Institutions. The survey was sent to a database of more than 4,000 contacts of teachers and professors in Europe from which 390 complete responses (9.80%) were obtained. The social dimension of sustainability was the least addressed at 18%, while the other dimensions (economic, environmental, and cross-cutting) were addressed almost equally at between 27% and 28%. A correlation analysis was done between a) the Contribution to sustainability, b) Strength of competences, and c) Strength of pedagogical approaches, which show a stronger correlation between Strength of competences to Contribution and Strength of pedagogical approaches to Strength of competences than between the Strength of pedagogical approaches and Contribution was lower. A correlation analysis was then carried out between the sustainability STAUNCH® dimensions (economic, environmental, social, and cross-cutting themes) and the competences. The analysis showed that the correlations are stronger in the cross-cutting themes, followed by the social, the environmental, and the economic ones. Finally, a correlation analysis was carried out between the competences and the pedagogical approaches. The results obtained were between 0.0426 and 0.5555. A comparison of the survey results and the theoretical framework (see Lozano et al., 2017) was carried out to detect the differences. Three pedagogical approaches deliver the most competences (Eco-justice and community, Project and/or problem-based learning, and Community service learning). The updated framework shows that there is a general perception that the pedagogical approaches may deliver the sustainability competences, with some particular exceptions, such as Case studies, Supply chain/Life cycle analysis, and Lecturing. The updated framework provides a more precise perspective on how sustainability competences can be better delivered in class, and how to better deliver the ‘Full Monty’ of sustainability competences.

  • 46.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Barreiro-Gen, Maria
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. University of Gävle.
    Lozano, Francisco J.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Teaching Sustainability in European Higher Education Institutions: Assessing the Connections between Competences and Pedagogical Approaches2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability Ltd., Cardiff, UK.
    Barreiro-Gen, María
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Lozano, Francisco J.
    Escuela de Ingeniería y Ciencias, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Campus Toluca, San Antonio Buenavista, Toluca de Lerdo, Mexico.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Teaching Sustainability in European Higher Education Institutions: Assessing the Connections between Competences and Pedagogical Approaches2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 6, article id 1602Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been considerable progress in the incorporation of sustainable development (SD) into higher education institutions’ curricula. This has included research on competences for SD and pedagogical approaches used; however, there has been limited research on the connection between how pedagogical approaches are used and how they may develop sustainability competences. A survey was developed, based on the ‘connecting sustainable development pedagogical approaches to competences’ framework, to investigate sustainability being taught, sustainability competences developed, and pedagogical approaches used in European higher education institutions. The survey was sent to a database of more than 4000 contacts from which 390 complete responses (9.80%) were obtained. The results show that the social dimension was the least addressed at 18% of responses, while the economic, environmental, and cross-cutting dimensions were addressed almost equally. The correlation analyses showed a relation between the contribution to sustainability and the strength of competences, and between the strength of competences and the strength of pedagogical approaches. The results from the survey helped to update the theoretical framework, which provides a more precise perspective on how sustainability competences can be better developed in class, and how to better develop all the sustainability competences

  • 48.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. Organisational Sustainability Ltd., Cardiff, UK.
    Fobbe, Lea
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Carpenter, Angela
    University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
    Sammalisto, Kaisu
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Analysing sustainability changes in seaports: experiences from the Gävle Port Authority2019In: Sustainable Development, ISSN 0968-0802, E-ISSN 1099-1719, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 409-418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ports are under increasing pressure to become more sustainable. Although some ports have been including sustainability into their operations, this has been mainly done from economic and environmental perspectives and technological or policy‐related approaches, while there has been little research on organisational change management for sustainability. This paper analyses organisational change efforts for sustainability at the Port of Gävle, Sweden. Twenty‐three face‐to‐face interviews were conducted with various stakeholders. The findings show that there were differences in perception of sustainability; but similarities in the drivers for and the barriers to sustainability (with some key differences between the internal and external stakeholders). This research shows that, in their journey towards becoming more sustainable, ports have to take a holistic approach encompassing the four dimensions of sustainability (economic, environmental, social, and time); their stakeholders (internal and external); and legislative, technological, financial, cultural/social, voluntary initiatives, and organisational change management approaches.

  • 49.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Muñoz Torres, Maria Jesus
    University of Jaume I, Castellón de la Plana, Spain.
    Typologies of Sustainable Business2019In: Decent Work and Economic Growth / [ed] Walter Leal Filho, Anabela Marisa Azul, Luciana Brandli, Pinar Gökcin Özuyar, Tony Wall, Cham: Springer, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Lozano, Rodrigo
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Petterssén, Sigrid
    Jonsäll, Anette
    Niss, Camilla
    University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Management, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Management. University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production.
    Bergstrôm, Bjôrn
    Moving to a quintuple helixapproach in SPP: Collaboration and LCC forlighting procurements2019In: Cost and EU Public Procurement Law: Life-cycle costing for sustainability / [ed] Marta Andhov, Roberto Caranta, Anja Wiesbrock, Oxon: Routledge, 2019Chapter in book (Other academic)
12 1 - 50 of 66
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